Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 83
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Blum, K. M.
    et al.
    Gallampois, C.
    Andersson, P. L.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Renman, Agnieszka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Haglund, P.
    Comprehensive assessment of organic contaminant removal from on-site sewage treatment facility effluent by char-fortified filter beds2019In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 361, p. 111-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To remove organic contaminants from wastewater using cost-efficient and currently existing methods, our study investigated char-fortified filter beds for on-site sewage treatment facilities (OSSFs) in a long-term field setting. OSSFs are commonly used in rural and semi-urban areas worldwide to treat wastewater when municipal wastewater treatment is not economically feasible. First, we screened for organic contaminants with gas chromatography and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry-based targeted and untargeted analysis and then we developed quantitative structure-property relationship models to search for key molecular features responsible for the removal of organic contaminants. We identified 74 compounds (24 confirmed by reference standards) including plasticizers, UV stabilizers, fragrances, pesticides, surfactant and polymer impurities, pharmaceuticals and their metabolites, and many biogenic compounds. Sand filters that are used as a secondary step after the septic tank in OSSFs could remove hydrophobic contaminants. The addition of biochar significantly increased the removal of these and a few hydrophilic compounds (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, α = 0.05). Besides hydrophobicity-driven sorption, biodegradation was suggested to be the most important removal pathway in this long-term field application. However, further improvements are necessary to remove very hydrophilic contaminants as they were not removed with sand and biochar-fortified sand.

  • 2. Blum, Kristin M.
    et al.
    Andersson, Patrik L.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Ahrens, Lutz
    Gros, Meritxell
    Wiberg, Karin
    Haglund, Peter
    Non-target screening and prioritization of potentially persistent, bioaccumulating and toxic domestic wastewater contaminants and their removal in on-site and large-scale sewage treatment plants2017In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 575, p. 265-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On-site sewage treatment facilities (OSSFs), which are used to reduce nutrient emissions in rural areas, were screened for anthropogenic compounds with two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCxGC-MS). The detected compounds were prioritized based on their persistence, bioaccumulation, ecotoxicity, removal efficiency, and concentrations. This comprehensive prioritization strategy, which was used for the first time on OSSF samples, ranked galaxolide, a-tocopheryl acetate, octocrylene, 2,4,7,9-tetramethyl-5-decyn-4,7-diol, several chlorinated organophosphorus flame retardants and linear alkyl benzenes as the most relevant compounds being emitted from OSSFs. Twenty-six target analytes were then selected for further removal efficiency analysis, including compounds from the priority list along with substances from the same chemical classes, and a few reference compounds. We found significantly better removal of two polar contaminants 2,4,7,9-tetramethyl-5-decyn-4,7-diol (p = 0.0003) and tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (p = 0.005) in soil beds, a common type of OSSF in Sweden, compared with conventional sewage treatment plants. We also report median removal efficiencies in OSSFs for compounds not studied in this context before, viz. a-tocopheryl acetate (96%), benzophenone (83%), 2-(methylthio)benzothiazole (64%), 2,4,7,9-tetramethyl-5-decyn-4,7-diol (33%), and a range of organophosphorus flame retardants (19% to 98%). The environmental load of the top prioritized compounds in soil bed effluents were in the thousands of nanogram per liter range, viz. 2,4,7,9-tetramethyl-5-decyn-4,7-diol (3000 ng L-1), galaxolide (1400 ng L-1), octocrylene (1200 ng L-1), and alpha-tocopheryl acetate (660 ng L-1).

  • 3. Brogowski, Zygmunt
    et al.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Characterization of opoka as a basis for its use in wastewater treatment2004In: Polish Journal of Environmental Studies, ISSN 1230-1485, E-ISSN 2083-5906, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 15-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Opoka, as a silica-calcite sedimentary rock, occurs in south-eastern Europe and Russia. Stratigraphical studies down to 8 in depth were performed in Belzec, Poland, where samples were taken for further analyses. Vertical layers represented a heavy-weight opoka consisting of relatively more CaCO3 than the horizontal layers of lightweight opoka dominated by SiO2. Opoka had a mean bulk density of 1.34 g/cm(3), a porosity of 44.5 % and a specific surface area of 64 m(2)/g. Opoka, especially after heated to over 900degreesC can be used as reactive filter media for phosphorus removal. Maximum sorption capacity was 119.6 g PO4-P/ kg. Element analysis of the rock did not reveal any anomaly from that expected, and it was concluded that its element content does not devaluate opoka as a sorbent used in ecological wastewater treatment.

  • 4.
    Cucarella, Victor
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Mazurek, Ryszard
    Zaleski, Tomasz
    Kopec, Michal
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Effect of Polonite used for phosphorus removal from wastewater on soil properties and fertility of a mountain meadow2009In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 157, no 7, p. 2147-2152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reactive filter materials used for phosphorus (P) removal from wastewater can be disposed of as soil amendments after treatment, thus recycling P and other macro- and micro-nutrients to plants. In addition, materials with a high pH and Ca content, such as Polonite, are potential soil conditioners which, can be particularly beneficial for acid soils. Polonite previously used for on-site wastewater treatment was applied as a soil amendment to a mountain meadow. The amendment significantly increased soil pH and decreased the hydrolytic acidity, thus reducing Al toxicity risks. The effects were comparable to those of liming. No difference in yield and P uptake by meadow plants was observed. The uptake of metals was lower for amended soils, especially the uptake of Mn. Using Polonite after wastewater treatment as a soil amendment is thus a viable disposal alternative that can replace liming, when necessary, being capable of recycling P and other nutrients to meadow plants.

  • 5.
    Cucarella, Victor
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Phosphorus sorption capacity of filter materials used for on-site wastewater treatment determined in batch experiments – a comparative study2009In: Journal of Environmental Quality, ISSN 0047-2425, E-ISSN 1537-2537, Vol. 38, p. 381-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing numbers of filter materials have been proposed as suitable media for P removal in on-site wastewater treatment systems. The phosphorus sorption capacity (PSC) of the material can be estimated in batch experiments and is commonly used as the criterion for material selection. However, there is no standard procedure and batch experimental parameters are arbitrarily established, thus leading to difficulties in comparing the results. The main parameters affecting the batch adsorption system are the form and amount of material, material-to-solution ratio, nature, pH and initial concentration of P solution, contact time, agitation, and temperature. This paper critically reviews a number of relevant studies that used batch experiments to estimate the PSC of different filter materials. The nature and form [if the materials vary significantly and there is broad variation in the batch experimental parameters set in the selected studies. Analysis of the data from selected studies showed a relationship between particle size or pH of the material and its PSC. The initial P concentration of the solution and the material-to-solution ratio in the batch system were found to be correlated with the estimated PSC suggesting that batch parameters have a great influence on the results. Based on the analysis of the selected studies, the difficulties Of using batch experiments are outlined, recommendations for batch experiment procedure ate suggested and a classification system for filter materials according to their PSC. and particle size is presented.

  • 6.
    Cucarella, Victor
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Renman, Agnieszka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Phosphorus sorption properties of soils amended with recycled wastewater filter substrates2009In: Geoderma, ISSN 0016-7061, E-ISSN 1872-6259Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Cucarella, Victor
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Zaleski, T.
    Mazurek, R.
    Recycling of calcium-silicate material after wastewater filtration to agriculture -Soil condition impact2012In: Ecological Chemistry and Engineering S, ISSN 1898-6196, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 373-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reactive filter materials aimed at phosphorus (P) recovery is a novel method for on-site wastewater treatment. Once the bed filter is no longer effective, the sorbent must be replaced and can then be recycled as a soil amendment to agriculture. This study investigated the short-term effects of such amendments in a field with a wheat crop in order to evaluate the risks and/or potential benefits of this disposal option. The developed product Polonite (manufactured from Opoka) was used as a model filter sorbent in the field trial. Rates corresponding to approximately 6 and 8 tons per hectare were applied. In the short-term, this amending did not affect soil physical and sorption properties. The rate of Polonite used here, as P source for wheat was irrelevant in this kind of soil. The usefulness of this disposal option of exhausted filter material is discussed.

  • 8.
    Cucarella, Victor
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Zaleski, Tomasz
    Department of Soil Science and Soil Protection, Agricultural University of Cracow.
    Mazurek, Ryszard
    Department of Soil Science and Soil Protection, Agricultural University of Cracow.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Effect of reactive substrates used for phosphorus removal from wastewater on the feritlity of acid soils2008In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 99, no 10, p. 4308-4314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reactive substrates used in filter systems can reduce phosphorus (P) pollution and, once saturated with P, may be recycled in agriculture. These substrates are usually calcium carbonate derivates with high pH values, which may be particularly beneficial for acid soils. Three reactive substrates (Filtra P, Polonite and wollastonite) saturated with P were used as amendments to an acid soil in a pot experiment. Substrate amendments tended to improve ryegrass yield and P uptake compared with control and potassium phosphate treatments. Polonite produced the highest yield/amendment ratio, while Polonite and Filtra P significantly increased the concentrations of P and Ca in the ryegrass. Addition of all three substrates increased the pH, AL-extractable P and cation exchange capacity of soils during the experiment. These substrates can therefore be applied to acid soils in order to recycle P and improve soil properties.

  • 9.
    Cucarella, Victor
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Zaleski, Tomasz
    Department of Soil Science and Soil Protection, Agricultural University of Krakow.
    Mazurek, Ryszard
    Department of Soil Science and Soil Protection, Agricultural University of Krakow.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Fertilizer potential of calcium-rich substrates used for phosphorus removal from wastewater2007In: Polish Journal of Environmental Studies, ISSN 1230-1485, E-ISSN 2083-5906, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 817-822Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphorus (P) in wastewater is an important source of pollution, but properly managed, it can become a resource. Reactive filter media with a high affinity for P are promising in reducing P from effluents allowing nutrient recycling. In this study, three calcium-rich substrates (Filtra P, Polonite, wollastonite) with ability to remove P from wastewater have been saturated with P and tested as potential fertilizers in a pot experiment. Polonite had a relatively higher P content than Filtra P and wollastonite after saturation. All three materials tended to improve the yield of barley compared with the control treatment. Polonite induced the highest yield per unit of amendment from all three materials due to its higher P content, which could be shown in a higher ammonium lactate (AL)-extractable P in soil after harvesting. The application of the substrates slightly increased soil pH and decreased the hydrolytic acidity.

  • 10.
    Cucarella, Victor
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Zaleski, Tomasz
    Mazurek, Ryszard
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Recycling Polonite used for on-site wastewater treatment as a soil amendment to a wheat cropping field2009Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Earon, Robert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Olofsson, Bo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Initial Effects of a New Highway Section on Soil and Groundwater2012In: Water, Air and Soil Pollution, ISSN 0049-6979, E-ISSN 1573-2932, Vol. 223, no 8, p. 5413-5432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The environmental impacts of 16 different contaminants originating from the E18 Highway (17,510 annual average daily traffic) were studied over the initial months of the highway's operational life. Investigative methods used included electrical resistivity surveying, water chemistry analyses, soil analyses, distribution modeling, and transportation modeling of contaminants. The study conclusively showed a year-round infiltration due to melting of the snowpack from road salt, and a strong preferential, anthropogenic pathway due to increased hydraulic conductivities of road construction materials relative to in situ soils. The resistivity surveys produced values well below the expected values for the highway materials, indicating increased ionic content within the unsaturated zone. Time lapse resistivity modeling showed a clear downwards spreading of contamination from the roadway to subsurface distances greater than 5 m. Elevated concentrations of nearly every studied contaminant relative to baseline values were observed, with many metal concentrations within the snow pack averaging values in excess of the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency's groundwater limitations. Distribution modeling demonstrated a potential offset of peak values from the road surface due to plowing and splash transport processes, and indicated different distribution behavior during winter months than during summer months. One-dimensional transport modeling demonstrated the importance of adsorption and other retentive factors to the migration of contaminants to groundwater and provided an estimate for potential long-term contaminant concentrations.

  • 12.
    Eveborn, David
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering. JTI - Swedish Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Engineering, Sweden .
    Gustafsson, Jon Petter
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering. Department of Soil and Environment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Elmefors, Elin
    JTI,Swedish Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Engineering.
    Yu, Lin
    Center for Environmental and Climate Research (CEC), Lund University.
    Eriksson, Ann-Kristin
    Department of Soil and Environment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Ljung, Emelie
    JTI,Swedish Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Engineering.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Phosphorus in soil treatment systems: accumulation and mobility2014In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 64, p. 42-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In several western countries, septic tanks with subsequent soil treatment systems (STS) are a common treatment technique for domestic wastewater in rural areas. However the suitability of STS (especially relatively close to surface waters) can be questioned since the discharge of phosphorus (P) from such effluents is not well known. In this study, six STS in Sweden (11 to 28 years old) were investigated by means of batch and column experiments on samples taken from the unsaturated subsoil beneath the distribution pipes. At all sites the wastewater had clearly influenced the soil. This was observed through decreased pH, increased amounts of oxalate extractable metals and altered P sorption properties. The amount of accumulated P in the STS (defined as the amount of total P in the STS samples minus the amount of total P in unused soil samples) were found to be between 0.32 and 0.87 kg m-3, which in most cases was just a small fraction of the estimated P load (< 30%). Column studies revealed that remarkably high P concentrations (up to 6 mg L-1) were leached from the material when deionized water was applied. However, the response to deionized water varied between the sites. The affinity for P in the soils was well correlated to the amount of oxalate-extractable aluminium (as evidenced by a strong relationship between oxalate-extractable Al and oxalate-extractable P) and generally soils with high content of oxalate extractable Al was also less vulnerable to P leakage.

  • 13. Gros, M.
    et al.
    Blum, K. M.
    Jernstedt, H.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Rodríguez-Mozaz, S.
    Haglund, P.
    Andersson, P. L.
    Wiberg, K.
    Ahrens, L.
    Screening and prioritization of micropollutants in wastewaters from on-site sewage treatment facilities2017In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, Vol. 328, p. 37-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A comprehensive screening of micropollutants was performed in wastewaters from on-site sewage treatment facilities (OSSFs) and urban wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Sweden. A suspect screening approach, using high resolution mass spectrometry, was developed and used in combination with target analysis. With this strategy, a total number of 79 micropollutants were successfully identified, which belong to the groups of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), pesticides, phosphorus-containing flame retardants (PFRs) and pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). Results from this screening indicate that concentrations of micropollutants are similar in influents and effluents of OSSFs and WWTPs, respectively. Removal efficiencies of micropollutants were assessed in the OSSFs and compared with those observed in WWTPs. In general, removal of PFASs and PFRs was higher in package treatment OSSFs, which are based on biological treatments, while removal of PPCPs was more efficient in soil bed OSSFs. A novel comprehensive prioritization strategy was then developed to identify OSSF specific chemicals of environmental relevance. The strategy was based on the compound concentrations in the wastewater, removal efficiency, frequency of detection in OSSFs and on in silico based data for toxicity, persistency and bioaccumulation potential.

  • 14.
    Gustafsson, Jon Petter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Renman, Agnieszka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Poll, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Phosphate removal by mineral-based sorbents used in filters for small-scale wastewater treatment2008In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 42, no 1-2, p. 189-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mineral-based sorbents Filtra P, Polonite (R), natural wollastonite and water-cooled blast furnace slag (WCBFS) were studied in terms of their PO4 removal performance. Results from a long-term column experiment showed that both Filtra P and Polonite (R) removed > 95% of PO4 from the applied synthetic solution, and that the used filter materials had accumulated several (1.9-19) g kg(-1) P. Phosphorus was removed also by natural wollastonite and WCBFS, but these materials were less efficient. Batch experiments on the used materials showed that the solubility PO4 was considerably larger than the one expected for crystalline Ca phosphates such as hydroxyapatite, and results from investigations with attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) on the Filtra P material showed that the formed P phase was not crystalline. These evidence suggest that a soluble amorphous tricalcium phosphate (ATCP) was formed in the mineral-based sorbents; the apparent solubility constant on dissolution was estimated to log K-s = -27.94 ( 0.31) at 21 degrees C. However, since only up to 18% of the accumulated PO4 was readily dissolved in the experiments, it cannot be excluded that part of the phosphorus had crystallized to slightly less soluble phases. In conclusion, Filtra P and Polonite are two promising mineral-based sorbents for phosphorus removal, and at least part of the accumulated phosphorus is present in a soluble form, readily available to plants.

  • 15. Hallberg, M.
    et al.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Byman, L.
    Svenstam, G.
    Norling, M.
    Treatment of tunnel wash water and implications for its disposal2014In: Water Science and Technology, ISSN 0273-1223, E-ISSN 1996-9732, Vol. 69, no 10, p. 2029-2035Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of road tunnels in urban areas creates water pollution problems, since the tunnels must be frequently cleaned for traffic safety reasons. The washing generates extensive volumes of highly polluted water, for example, more than fivefold higher concentrations of suspended solids compared to highway runoff. The pollutants in the wash water have an affinity for particulate material, so sedimentation should be a viable treatment option. In this study, 12 in situ sedimentation trials were carried out on tunnel wash water, with and without addition of chemical flocculent. Initial suspended solids concentration ranged from 804 to 9,690 mg/L. With sedimentation times of less than 24 hours and use of a chemical flocculent, it was possible to reach low concentrations of suspended solids (< 15 mg/L), PAH (< 0.1 mu g/L), As (< 1.0 mu g/L), Cd (< 0.05 mu g/L), Hg (< 0.02 g/L), Fe (< 200 mu g/L), Ni (< 8 mu g/L), Pb (< 0.5 mu g/L), Zn (< 60 mu g/L) and Cr (< 8 mu g/L). Acute Microtox (R) toxicity, mainly attributed to detergents used for the tunnel wash, decreased significantly at low suspended solids concentrations after sedimentation using a flocculent. The tunnel wash water did not inhibit nitrification. The treated water should be suitable for discharge into recipient waters or a wastewater treatment plant.

  • 16.
    Hallberg, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Reman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Treatment of road runoff with sedimentation: estimation of total suspended solids removal and the effect of seasonal conditionsManuscript (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Hallberg, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Assessment of solid matter removal by sedimentation in highway runoffManuscript (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Hallberg, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Assessment of suspended solids concentration in highway runoff and its treatment implication2006In: Environmental technology, ISSN 0959-3330, E-ISSN 1479-487X, Vol. 27, no 9, p. 945-950Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is understood that the major pollution from storm water is related to the content of particulate matter. One treatment practice is based on the first flush, i.e. detention of the initial part of the runoff that is considered to contain the highest concentrations of pollutants, This study has evaluated the concentration of total suspended solids in 30 consecutive runoff events during the winter season for an area of 6.7 hectares. A six-lane highway (E4) that has an annual average daily traffic load of 120,000 dominates the area and road de-icing salt (NaCl) and studded tires were in regular use during the studied period. The effluent standard for wastewater of 60 mg TSS per litre applied in EU was used to assess the treatment requirement of storm water. In only two of the events the event mean concentration was below 60 mg V. In four runoff events a partial event mean concentration below 60 mg l(-1) was found, in 26 %, 12 %, 11 %, and 2 % respectively of the runoff volume. This would suggest that a capture of the initial part of the runoff for subsequent treatment is less applicable in this type of urban watershed.

  • 19.
    Hallberg, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Reactive filters for removal of dissolved metals in highway runoff2007In: Highway And Urban Environment / [ed] Morrison, GM; Rauch, S, 2007, Vol. 12, p. 465-474Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A pilot-scale system consisting of presedimentation and a saturated down-flow reactive bed filter was used for cleaning highway runoff. Blast furnace slag (BFS) and Polonite were selected as filter materials. A total suspended solids (TSSs) removal of over 99% was achieved. High removal performance was observed for dissolved Mn, Ni, Co, and Cu. In contrast Al was released after filtration. Metals were retained in the upper layer of the bed filters while a desorption was suggested to take place in the downward layers. This was probably attributed to the elevated salt levels during winter and the intermittent operation.

  • 20.
    Hallberg, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Removal of heavy metals from road runoff by filtration in granular slag columnsManuscript (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Hallberg, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Seasonal generation and characteristics of sediment in a stormwater pondManuscript (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Hallberg, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Suspended solids concentration in highway runoff during summer conditions2008In: Polish Journal of Environmental Studies, ISSN 1230-1485, E-ISSN 2083-5906, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 237-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One treatment practice for storm water is detention of the initial part of the runoff that is considered to contain the highest concentration of pollutants. This study has evaluated the concentration of total suspended solids (TSS) in 44 consecutive runoff events from a highway watershed. The effluent TSS standard for wastewater of 60 mg/l applied in the EU was used to assess the required treatment. In 35 of the runoff events the TSS partial event mean concentration exceeded 60 mg/l for the duration of the runoff event. Thus, a partial capture of the runoff volume should not be used as a treatment option in similar conditions that prevailed in this study.

  • 23.
    Hallberg, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Treatment of polluted road run-off water: Problems and possibilities2004In: Annals of Warsaw Agricultural University / Land Reclamation, ISSN 0208-5771, no 35, p. 55-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The legal aspects for conventional water production and treatment are clearly defined and not ambiguous. This is not the case for handling and treatment of run-off water. In the EU directive 1991/271/EEC run-off water is defined as sewage water. The EU Water Directive refers to 1991/271/EEC and points to run-off water as a pollutant source for ground water. Elevated levels of pollutant can be found in run-off water from catchment areas with dense traffic loads. Depending on road maintenance, use of studded tires, type of pavement, traffic flow, velocity, type of vehicle, residential and industrial areas, tunnels the degree of mobility of the pollutants will vary in the ambient air and the run-off water. An aspect that only to some extent has been elaborated on is the influence of pavement types and its wear with regard to the mobility of the pollutants. A treatment technique commonly used in many countries is storm water ponds. The pollutant removal efficiency varies for different ponds, due to different specific pond areas, i.e. pond area in relation to catchment area. Ponds act as sedimentation basins, collecting particles and bounded pollutants. However, the solute transport of e.g. heavy metals should be trapped by other means. For that purpose a filtration unit has been developed and tested in Sweden.

  • 24.
    Hallberg, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Lundbom, T
    Vägverket.
    Seasonal variations of ten metals in highway runoff and their partition between dissolved and particulate matter2007In: Water, Air and Soil Pollution, ISSN 0049-6979, E-ISSN 1573-2932, Vol. 181, no 1-4, p. 183-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge of differentiation of pollutants in urban runoff between dissolved and particulate matter is of great concern for a successful design of a water treatment process. Seasonal variations in pollutant load are of equal importance. Ten metals (Al, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn), as dissolved and particulate bound, was studied in the runoff from a major urban highway during a winter season and its following summer. Studded tyres and winter salting were expected to have an impact on the runoff water quality. The dissolved part of Al, Cd, Co, Cr, Mn and Ni was significantly higher in winter in comparison with summer (p < 0.01). For Fe, however, the dissolved part was lower during winter. No significant difference was found for Cu, Pb and Zn between the two seasons. The mass concentration (mg kg(-1)) for all metals was significantly higher over the summer except for Al and Co, which showed a higher mass concentration during the winter. The concentration of selected metals vs. total suspended solids (TSS) showed a linear relationship (r(2)> 0.95) during winter runoff events except for Cd. A good correlation (r (2)> 0.90) was also found for the summer period for Al, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn. It is suggested that the metal pollutant load during winter could be assessed indirectly by measurement of TSS.

  • 25.
    Hamisi, Rajabu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering. SEED-KTH.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering. SEED-KTH.
    Brokking Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering. SEED-KTH.
    Thunvik, Roger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering. SEED-KTH.
    A new modelling approach for phosphorus mobility and retention processes in the Oxundaån catchment, SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Eutrophication is the most significant threat towater quality in the entire Baltic Sea region. Its causes are nutrientover-enrichment from diffuse and point sources. Thematic strategies forsustainable mitigation of phosphorus loss from sewage drainage systems andrunoffs from arable land require a holistic approach to identify the criticalpolluting sources and implement relevant policy for adaptive water qualitymanagement. The use of constructed wetlands constitutes one such strategy thatcan mitigate phosphorus loss. However, insufficient understanding about phosphorusmobility and retention in catchments significantly hinders efforts to identifysuitable sites for constructed wetlands and implement alternative, adaptive andeffective management actions. This study aims to evaluate the long-termphosphorus mobility and retention in the Oxudaån catchment in Sweden, andthereby propose suitable sites to localize constructed wetlands. The Soil andWater Assessment watershed model was applied to map and quantify the phosphorusloading from diffuse and point sources under the scenarios of land usemanagement practices. Simulation results have demonstrated the positivecorrelation between the phosphorus concentration with the surface runoffs andnegative correlation with the pH. Overall, Oxundaån catchment indicates a decreasingtrend of phosphorus loading in the Verkaån and Oxundaån riverine of around 2.1% and 1.3 % per year, respectively. The present study suggests the suitablesites for localizing constructed wetlands in the south-west and north-east ofOxundaån lake based on the factor of low slope topography and soilpermeability. The simulation results from the SWAT model offer evidence thatcan guide the localization and choice of management interventions to achieve asustainable mitigation of phosphorus loss. This study concludes that, while singlemanagement actions can help solve the problem of eutrophication, a moreeffective and sustainable mitigation of eutrophication will require the integrationof multiple adaptive land use management approaches.

  • 26.
    Hamisi, Rajabu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering. SEED-KTH.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering. SEED-KTH.
    Brokking Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering. SEED-KTH.
    Thunvik, Roger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering. SEED-KTH.
    Welin, Anders
    SWECO International AB, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larm, Thomas
    Modelling phosphorus recovery by reactive adsorbent in a vertical subsurface flow constructed wetlandManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphorus removal efficiencies by four low - costsreactive adsorbent media were evaluated in the long - time period using thethree - dimensional model of the vertical subsurface flow constructed wetlandsin the COMSOL Multiphysics® software. Evaluations were made for Polonite,Filtralite P, Sorbulite and Wollastonite adsorbent media with the aims ofpredicting their long - term sorption capacity and describing the phenomena ofsorption mechanisms when applied in the vertical subsurface flow constructedwetlands for wastewater purification. The 3D model of the vertical flowconstructed wetlands were dimensioned to Swedish EPA guidelines for small scalewastewater treatment, and calibrated at saturated media using the breakthroughdata derived from the column experiments of similar adsorbent mediaapplication, and the local sensitivity analysis were performed for waterquality and hydraulic loading parameters. It was observed that the breakthroughcurves developed by model were significantly correlated to the experimentaldata. The overall findings showed that Polonite® could be the potentialreactive adsorbent for phosphorus removal in the VF-CWs application, and itsremoval efficiency was discovered to last for 5 years. The large variation ofmedia sorption capacities discovered to be affected more by factor of pH andhydraulic loading rates than the particle size. High degree of predictionaccuracy which is demonstrated by this model suggest that the proposed model isa useful tool for predicting pollutants removal in various reactive porousmedia.

  • 27.
    Hamisi, Rajabu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering. SEED-KTH.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering. SEED-KTH.
    Herrmann, Inga
    Department of Civil, Environmental and Natural Resources Engineering.
    Thunvik, Roger
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering. SEED-KTH.
    Reactive transport modelling of long-term phosphorus dynamic in the compact constructed   wetland using COMSOL MultiphysicsIn: Ecological Engineering JournalArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A three-dimensional reactive transport model (RETRAP-3D) was developed by this study in the COMSOL Multiphysics®software to evaluate the long-term sorption capacity and mechanisms of dissolved reactive phosphorus removal in reactive adsorbent. The model coupledphysics interfaces for water flow, transport of reactive species, reaction kinetics for chemical compositions and biofilm development. Simulations were conducted for Polonite®, Filtralite P®, and Blast Furnace Slag mediaat fully saturated media, equilibrium miscible solution and isothermal heat transfer conditions. The model was validated using column experimental data ofsimilar media for application in constructed filter beds. The general modelling results showed good agreement with the measured breakthrough data. The most significant DIP retention capacity (P < 0.02) and longest residence time(1250 days) has been found for Polonite® and the most insignificant DIP retention for blast furnace slag (P > 0.54). The DIP removal was significantly correlated to factors of pH change, media characteristics, hydraulic dosage and retention times. These results demonstrate the reliability of the model as aflexible tool to predict the long-term performance of filter media and better understand processes within the system under various operational, weather and wastewater conditions.

  • 28.
    Hylander, Lars D.
    et al.
    Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University.
    Kietlinska, Agnieszka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Simán, Gyula
    Division of Plant Nutrition, Department of Soil Science, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Phosphorus retention in filter materials for wastewater treatment and its subsequent suitability for plant production2006In: Bioresource Technology, ISSN 0960-8524, E-ISSN 1873-2976, Vol. 97, no 7, p. 914-921Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Constructed sand filter beds are advantageous for the treatment of wastewater in areas with a low population density. Phosphorus-sorbing materials with additional beneficial characteristics may be used instead of sand. This study aimed at determining and comparing phosphorus (P) retention capacities of amorphous and crystalline blast furnace slags, limestone, opoka, Polonite (R) and sand, for filtering domestic wastewater through columns over a period of 67 weeks. The P-enriched filter materials were subsequently tested for their fertilizer effectiveness in a pot experiment where barley was cultivated. Polonite (R), i.e. calcinated bedrock opoka, was most effective in removing P. This Occurred at a relatively high hydraulic conductivity that reduced the risk of clogging. Barley grown in two types of slag, with a grain size of 0.25-4, mm. was most effective in dry matter production followed by Polonite (R). Fine-grained slags and Polonite (R) were suggested its most suited of the investigated materials to recycle P back to agriculture.

  • 29.
    Karczmarczyk, Agnieszka
    et al.
    Warsaw University of Life Sciences-SGGW.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Phosphorus Accumulation Pattern in a Subsurface Constructed Wetland Treating Residential Wastewater2011In: Water, ISSN 2073-4441, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 146-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland was investigated after eight years of residential wastewater discharge (150 person equivalents). Twenty core samples distributed over the entire wetland were taken from the soil matrix. The distribution pattern of phosphorus (P) accumulation in the substrate of the wetland was determined using kriging technique and P sorption was related to the content of aluminum (Al), calcium (Ca) and iron (Fe). The correlations found between Al, Ca and Fe content and P accumulation in the bed substrate were weak: R2 = 0.09, R2 = 0.21 and R2 = 0.28, respectively. Great heterogeneity was observed in the distribution of Ca, P and organic matter in the superficial and deeper layers of the bed. Hydraulic problems associated with wastewater discharge and conductivity of the bed substrate were suggested to have negative effects on the wetland performance.

  • 30.
    Kholoma, Ezekiel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Renman, Agnieszka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Filter media-packed bed reactor fortification with biochar to enhance wastewater treatmentManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Contamination of water bodies with inappropriately released, poorly treated wastewater from rural establishments is a challenge world-wide. Rural communities in developed countries are now required to comply with statutory discharge limits, but less costly alternative technologies by which to comply are scarce. However, it is possible that retrofitting on-site facilities with specialist treatment units could provide a feasible solution. This study tested the effectiveness of retrofitting sand (Sa)- and gas-concrete (GC)-packed down-flow reactors with biochar (BC) in removing turbidity, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), phosphate (PO43-) and total phosphorus (TP) from wastewater. The reactors were each intermittently loaded with 0.063 L/d for 399 days. In general, all reactors achieved <3 NTU effluent turbidity (99% efficiency). The GC reactors were best at removing incoming PO43- (6.1 mg/L) and DOC (25.3 mg/L), trapping >95% and >60%, respectively. Compared with a reference Sa reactor (PO43- removal 35%; DOC removal 52%), the fortified sand (Sa-BC) filter removed significantly more PO43- (>45% removal, p=0.022) and DOC (>58% removal, p=0.034). In regression analysis, 53%, 81% and 85% of PO43- sorption variation in Sa, BC and Sa-BC filters, respectively, was explained by variations in reactor effluent pH. Similarly, a strong linear correlation was found between PO43- sorption efficiency and the pH of fortified (GC-BC, r > 0.7) and reference (r = 0.6) GC filters, suggesting chemisorption mechanisms. Therefore, if only sand is readily available for treating septic tank effluent, fortifying it with biochar could be a possible measure to improve its efficacy.

  • 31.
    Kholoma, Ezekiel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    A review of the potential of reactive filter media in fortifying on-site wastewater treatment systems - Lessons from full-scale wastewater treatment systems ManuscriptManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Wastewater with high concentrations of nutrients, pathogens and many micro-pollutants is usually satisfactorily treated by application of technologies which employ chemical processes. However, due to the absence of these processes in most small-scale wastewater treatment (SWT) systems, pollutants often escape treatment and ultimately end up in water bodies, hence the persistence of eutrophication and waterborne diseases experienced in many parts of world. Due to the recent introduction of requirements for SWT systems to comply with national discharge standards, alternative effective technologies are needed. Among the wide spectrum of supposedly effective alternative technologies which have been developed to-date, some can be incorporated to extend treatment chains of ineffective SWT facilities, e.g. package treatment plants and wetlands, while others are designed to enhance processes in some treatment steps, e.g. bioreactors for pre-treatment. However, due to the high costs, complexity and scarcity of many of these advanced technologies, reactive filter (RF) media are seemingly preferred. Much current knowledge about the potential of RF media is based on batch and column experimental findings. Therefore, various aspects of RF media relating to performance in full-scale plants are generally unknown. To our knowledge, no previous study has outlined the importance of key parameters distinguishing the performance of different RF media in full-scale plants or suggested the use of versatile media. This study therefore acquired and compiled data on RF media previously tested in full-scale plants, to compare and highlight parameters relating to their potential in treating wastewater of different strengths.

  • 32.
    Kholoma, Ezekiel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Renman, Agnieszka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Phosphorus removal from wastewater by field-scale fortified filter beds during a one-year study2016In: Environmental technology, ISSN 0959-3330, E-ISSN 1479-487X, Vol. 37, no 23, p. 2953-2963Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to low availability of alternative technologies, rural communities are unable to comply with national wastewater discharge limits. This study tested the effectiveness of filter bed fortification with biochar on phosphorus removal. Water-tight down-flow beds of sand and gas concrete, constructed alongside a reference sand bed (all 0.8 m deep and 0.75 m2 surface area), were topped with a 0.2 m biochar layer. Pre-treated domestic wastewater with mean concentrations of 6.4 mg/L PO3-4 and 142.6 NTU, was infiltrated at 4 cm/d hydraulic loading rate. Ultimately, the biochar-sand was relatively outstanding in turbidity reduction, achieving < 5 NTU. The biochargas concrete exhibited superior performance in PO3-4 removal, trapping 32.3 g (40.2%), compared with 20.5 g (25.6%) and 15.5 g (19.3%) by biochar-sand and reference bed respectively. However, statistical analysis revealed a weak correlation between pH and biochargas concrete removal efficiency (r2= 0.2). The relationship was stronger for biochar-sand PO3-4 (r2 = 0.5) than reference (r2 = 0.4) bed. Paired samples t-tests showed that incorporating biochar into the sand bed significantly (p =.04) improved its PO3-4 removal efficiency. In conclusion, sand bed fortification with biochar could be an important measure for improving P removal and wastewater clarification efficiency.

  • 33.
    Kholoma, Ezekiel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Zhang, Wen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Renman, Agnieszka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering.
    Leachability and plant availability of phosphorus in post-sorption wastewater filters fortified with biocharManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sand and gravel are widely applied in field filter systems for small-scale wastewater treatment. However, alternative filter materials are needed to achieve better treatment performance in removing contaminants and trapping plant nutrients for recycling to agriculture. This study assessed the plant availability and leachability of phosphorus (P) trapped in sand (Sa), biochar (BC) and gas concrete (GC, Sorbulite®) media used previously for phosphorus (P) removal in laboratory-scale packed bed reactors (PBR) and field-scale constructed filter beds (CFB). Phosphorus extraction and leaching were assessed in batch and leaching experiments using distilled water and ammonium lactate (AL) solution with a 1:20 solid:extractant ratio. The results revealed that both Sa (11.2 mgkg-1) and BC-fortified Sa (20.5 mgkg-1) leached P to percolating water, while P was less likely to leach from GC systems. Extraction with AL showed that the P retained in GC was plant-available and that the GC materials could release 65-90 mgkg-1 of the bound P mass. These findings highlight the need to evaluate the risk of nutrient leaching from filter media used in small-scale wastewater treatment systems with groundwater and surface water as final recipients. For greater sustainability, the P weakly bound in media such as sand and biochar and strongly bound in media such as gas concrete should be recovered by recycling the spent material to agriculture. However, this would require treatment system re-design to make recycling of filter material technically possible.

  • 34.
    Kietlinska, Agnieszka
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    An evaluation of reactive filter media for treating landfill leachate2005In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 61, no 7, p. 933-940Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     A laboratory bench-scale column study was conducted to evaluate permeable reactive filter materials as a new method for removal of heavy metals and inorganic nitrogen from landfill leachate. Mixtures of sand and peat, blast-furnace slag (BFS) and peat, and Polonite (R) and peat were tested by loading columns with leachate collected from a pond at Tvetaverket Landfill, Sweden. Sand, peat and Polonite (R) represent natural materials. BFS is a by-product from steel-works. The metal treatment efficiencies of the media were assessed and Polonite (R) was found to perform best, where Mn, Fe, Zn and Cu concentrations were removed by 99%, 93%, 86% and 67%, respectively. This material was also able to reduce inorganic N by 18%. The BFS showed good removal efficiency for Cu (66%), Zn (62%), Ni (19%) and Mo (16%). The sand-peat mixture did not demonstrate a promising removal capacity for any of the elements studied with the exception of Cu (25%). The removal of different elements was suggested to be a combination of several factors, i.e. precipitation, ion exchange and adsorption. Prior to full-scale application of reactive filters at a landfill site, matrix selection, filter design and operational procedures must be developed.

  • 35.
    Kietlinska, Agnieszka
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Jannes, S.
    Tham, G.
    Nitrogen removal from landfill leachate using a compact constructed wetland and the effect of chemical pretreatment2005In: Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering, ISSN 1093-4529, E-ISSN 1532-4117, Vol. 40, no 07-jun, p. 1493-1506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Onsite treatment of leachate was implemented at the Tveta Landfill, adjacent to the city of Sodertalje, Sweden. The system consists of leachate collection in a pond, precipitation of metals with chemicals, a constructed wetland, and forest irrigation. This article describes the constructed wetland and its effectiveness at removing ammonia in the system. Pulsed-discharge hydrology and wetland ecology formed the basis for the development of a compact constructed wetland (CCW). The system presented here has most design similarities with vertical sub-surface flow wetlands, though this system is run in batch mode. Chemically purified leachate and untreated leachate were applied to separate sections of the CCW using a filling and emptying schedule. A leachate treatment cycle of about 14 days duration was used, involving a 7 day submerged phase followed by a 7 day drained period. The removal efficiency varied between 40 and 75% on a mass basis. A maximum mass removal rate of up to 5.1 g m(-1) d(-1) was achieved in wetlands receiving leachate after chemical pretreatment. In wetlands receiving non-treated leachate a net release of up to 18 g m(-2) N occurred in the form of nitrate. This indicated a considerable nitrification but limited denitrification in those systems. It was unclear whether the chemical treatment enhanced the nitrogen removal efficiency because of lower toxicity and/or content of fewer competing cations, or other mechanisms. Mechanisms responsible for the NH4-N removal in the CCW system have to be further investigated.

  • 36. Malavipathirana, S
    et al.
    Wimalasiri, S
    Priyantha, N
    Wickramasooriya, S
    Welagedara, A
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering.
    Value Addition to Waste Material Supported by Removal of Available Phosphate from Simulated Brackish Water—A Low Cost Approach2013In: Journal of Geoscience and Environment Protection, ISSN 2327-4344, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 7-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphorus is one of the major nutrients that have been identified as a limited resource that would end up earlier than predicted at the rate of current consumption. Therefore, attempts to recover phosphorus from waste and its subsequent use are a concern of current researchers. Nevertheless, recovery of nutrients from wastewater is cumbersome because nutrients such as phosphates () and nitrates () prefer to remain in aqueous phase rather than being adsorbed on solid matrixes. Investigation of adsorption of available - P from simulated brackish water, on granulated solid waste material, prepared by crushed autoclaved aerated concrete (CAAC), and subsequent use of the material as phosphate fertilizer would be the focus of this research. Treatment of nutrient-rich brackish water is important because such water is discharged in huge volume at the time of harvesting of shrimp aquaculture ponds. Experiments conducted in simulated brackish water confirmed non-linear adsorption association with changing distribution coefficient (KD) which attributed the maximum removal of about 98% - P from 100 mgdm-3solution at its value of 40. The non-linear adsorption supported by both the Langumuir and the Freundlich isotherm models simultaneously satisfied monolayer adsorption and multilayer adsorption depicted by the regression coefficients of greater than .99 by the linearized forms of the isotherm models. Moreover, promising phosphate uptakes characteristics are exhibited by the adsorbent at the process of repetitive adsorption which resulted in 12 g/kg uptake of phosphate at 81% efficiency. The adsorbent seems to be used as a slow-released phosphorus fertilizer at the end of its life as an adsorbent.

  • 37.
    Marobhe, Nancy
    et al.
    University College of Lands and Architectural Studies (UCLAS), Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Jacks, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    The study of water supply and traditional water purification knowledge in selected rural villages in Tanzania2007In: Indigenous knowledge systems and sustainable development: Relevance for Africa / [ed] Emmanuel K Boon, Luc Hens, Delhi: Kamla Raj Enterprises , 2007, p. 111-120Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Marobhe, Nancy
    et al.
    University College of Lands and Architectural Studies (UCLAS), Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Jackson, Msafiri
    University College of Lands and Architectural Studies (UCLAS), Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Investigation on the performance of local plant materials for coagulation of turbid river water2007In: Journal of the Institution of Engineers Tanzania, ISSN 0856-0196, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 50-62Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Marobhe, Nancy
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Jackson, Msafiri
    Mgana, Shabaan
    Purification of water from small man-made reservoirs by coagulation using purified proteins from Vigna and Parkinsonia seeds2008In: Separation and Purification Technology, ISSN 1383-5866, E-ISSN 1873-3794Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 40. McConville, Jennifer
    et al.
    Kain, Jaan-Henrik
    Kvarnström, Elisabeth
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Bridging sanitation engineering and planning: theory and practice in Burkina Faso2011In: Journal of Water Sanitation and Hygiene for Development, ISSN 2043-9083, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 205-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The global challenge of providing sanitation services to the un-served underlines a need to change the way in which sanitation planning and service provision is approached. This paper offers a framework for categorizing sanitation projects planning processes based on planning steps and procedural planning theory to help engineers and sanitation planners gain a deeper understanding of the dynamics of these processes. The analysis identifies and discusses trends in both guidelines and actual sanitation programs. The results show that contemporary sanitation planning guidelines and field projects utilize patchwork processes of different planning modes, although the step of designing options is dominated by an expert-driven, rational-comprehensive approach. The use of planning theory can help engineers to ask critical questions about the objectives of the planning process and to develop context-appropriate planning processes that will make a difference for improving sanitation service provision.

  • 41.
    Mkumbo, Stalin
    et al.
    ARDHI University, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Mwegoha, W
    ARDHI University, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630), Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.
    Assessment of the phytoremediation potential for Pb, Zn and Cu of indigenous plants growing in a gold mining area in Tanzania2012In: International Journal of Ecology and Environmental Sciences, ISSN 0377-015X, E-ISSN 2320-5199, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 2425-2434Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phytoremediation of soil has attracted much attention in recent years due to its multiple advantages such as maintaining the biological activity and physical structure of soils, being potentially inexpensive and visually unobtrusive, and providing the possibility of biorecovery of metals. Identification of native species for phytoremediation is a key to the success of the method. This study sought to identify plant species with potential for phytoremediation of soils polluted with lead (Pb), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu). Soil and plants were collected and analysed for total metal concentration. Soil metal content range (mg kg-1) was 29.64-3457 for Pb, 37.53-6544.2 for Zn and 30.7-3625 for Cu. Of 19 plant species analysed, Sporobolus sp. proved to be a hyperaccumulator of Cu, Launea cornuta (Oliv & Hiern) O. Jeffrey, Tagetes minuta (L.) and Blotiella glabra (Bory) Tryon showed high potential for phytoextraction of Cu, and Dioscorea spp. (yam) and Stylochaeton natalensis Schott showed high potential for phytostabilisation of Cu. No hyperaccumulators of Pb and Zn were identified in the area, but Tephrosia candida and Tagetes minuta (L.) were identified as potential plants for phytoextraction of Pb and Conyza bonariensis (L.) Cronquist, Launea cornuta (Oliv & Hiern) O. Jeffrey, Tagetes minuta L.), Blotiella glabra (Bory) Tryon, Pteridium aquilinum (L.) Kulm and Polygonum setogulum A. Rich as potential plants for phytoextraction of Zn. Sphaeranthus africanus (L.) and Pteridium aquilinum (L.) Kulm showed potential for phytostabilisation of Pb and Stylochaeton natalensis Schott for phytostabilisation of Zn.

  • 42.
    Nilsson, Charlotte
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Lakshmanan, Ramnath
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Kuttuva Rajarao, Gunaratna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Industrial Biotechnology.
    Efficacy of reactive mineral-based sorbents for phosphate, bacteria, nitrogen and TOC removal - Column experiment in recirculation batch mode2013In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 47, no 14, p. 5165-5175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two mineral-based materials (Polonite and Sorbulite) intended for filter wells in on-site wastewater treatment were compared in terms of removal of phosphate (PO4-P), total inorganic nitrogen (TIN), total organic carbon (TOC) and faecal indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli and Enterococci). Using an innovative, recirculating system, septic tank effluent was pumped at a hydraulic loading rate of 3000 L m(2) d(-1) into triplicate bench-scale columns of each material over a 90-day period. The results showed that Polonite performed better with respect to removal of PO4-P, retaining on average 80% compared with 75% in Sorbulite. This difference was attributed to higher CaO content in Polonite and its faster dissolution. Polonite also performed better in terms of removal of bacteria because of its higher pH value. The total average reduction in E. coli was 60% in Polonite and 45% in Sorbulite, while for Enterococci the corresponding value was 56% in Polonite and 34% in Sorbulite. Sorbulite removed TIN more effectively, with a removal rate of 23%, while Polonite removed 11% of TIN, as well as TOC. Organic matter (measured as TOC) was accumulated in the filter materials but was also released periodically. The results showed that Sorbulite could meet the demand in removing phosphate and nitrogen with reduced microbial release from the wastewater treatment process.

  • 43.
    Nilsson, Charlotte
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Johansson Westholm, Lena
    Renman, Agnieszka
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Drizo, Aleksandra
    Effect of organic load on phosphorus and bacteria removal from wastewater using alkaline filter materials2013In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 47, no 16, p. 6289-6297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The organic matter released from septic tanks can disturb the subsequent step in on-site wastewater treatment such as the innovative filters for phosphorus removal. This study investigated the effect of organic load on phosphorus (P) and bacteria removal by reactive filter materials under real-life treatment conditions. Two long-term column experiments were conducted at very short hydraulic residence times (average similar to 5.5 h), using wastewater with high (mean similar to 120 mg L-1) and low (mean similar to 20 mg L-1) BOD7 values. Two alkaline filter materials, the calcium-silicate material Polonite and blast furnace slag (BFS), were tested for the removal capacity of total P, total organic carbon (TOC) and Enterococci. Both experiments showed that Polonite removed P significantly ( p < 0.01) better than BFS. An increase in P removal efficiency of 29.3% was observed for the Polonite filter at the lower concentration of BOD7 ( p < 0.05). Polonite was also better than BFS with regard to removal of TOC, but there were no significant differences between the two filter materials with regard to removal of Enterococci. The reduction in Enterococci was greater in the experiment using wastewater with high BOD7, an effect attributable to the higher concentration of bacteria in that wastewater. Overall, the results demonstrate the importance of extensive pre-treatment of wastewater to achieve good phosphorus removal in reactive bed filters and prolonged filter life.

  • 44.
    Olofsson, Bo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Karlberg, L
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Olsson, Susanna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Naturresurskunskap för samhällsbyggande: Kurskompendium för Samhällsbyggnadsprocessen2006Other (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Renman, Agnieszka
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Hylander, Lars D.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Transformation and removal of nitrogen in reactive bed filter materials designed for on-site wastewater treatment2008In: Ecological Engineering: The Journal of Ecotechnology, ISSN 0925-8574, E-ISSN 1872-6992, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 207-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) should be removed and recycled from wastewater in order to reduce the nutrient load to recipient waters, avoid contamination of groundwater and conserve resources. Nitrogen removal and transformation were studied in domestic wastewater percolating in unsaturated conditions through 0.5 m long columns containing potential filter materials. Six materials (three types of slag, limestone, opoka, Polonite(R) and sand) were compared at a design loading rate of 85 L m(-2) d(-1) during 67 weeks. All materials transformed ammonium efficiently to nitrate (>98%). Apparent removal of inorganic N was shown only by the coarsest slag and by Polonite(R), possibly due to losses through volatilisation. All other filter materials leached nitrate at the column effluent. Total N content was highest in the surface layer of the column material, with decreasing values with depth. In contrast, carbon

  • 46.
    Renman, Agnieszka
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Long-term phosphate removal by the calcium-silicate material Polonite in wastewater filtration systems2010In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 79, no 6, p. 659-664Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mineral-based filter material Polonite was tested for its PO4 removal capacity in column and full-scale systems using synthetic and domestic wastewater. Three long-term experiments (67, 68 and 92 wk), operated under different hydrological conditions, were compared. The best PO4 removal capacity (97%) was observed in an intermittent saturated column fed with a synthetic solution (530 L m(-2) d(-1)) without organic matter during 68 wk. An unsaturated column system using municipal wastewater (76.7 L m(-2) d(-1)) showed no tendency for PO4 breakthrough and effluent PO4 concentration was still low (0.2 mg L-1) after 67 wk. For a compact bed filter containing 560 kg of Polonite and fed with 70 m(3) of wastewater from a single house, the average PO4 removal was 89% after 92 wk of operation. The column experiments revealed that a design volume of 1-2 kg of material of a particle size of 2-5 mm was required amount for treating 1 m(3) of wastewater in on-site systems operating at target 90% P mass removal. Poor pre-treatment of the wastewater was suggested to reduce the phosphate removal capacity of Polonite in the bed filter trial, where 8 kg were required per m(3). To measure pH of the treated effluent water proved not to be a simple tool for determining when the filter material is exhausted and should be replaced. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 47.
    Renman, Agnieszka
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Phosphorus removal by Polonite from wastewater: Column experiments and a compact bed filter trialManuscript (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Renman, Agnieszka
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Engineering Geology and Geophysics.
    Gustafsson, Jon Petter
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Hylander, Lars D.
    Metal removal by bed filter materials used in domestic wastewater treatment2009In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 166, no 2-3, p. 734-739Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bed filters using reactive materials are an emerging technology for on-site wastewater treatment. Used materials, which are enriched with phosphorus, can be used as a fertiliser or soil amendment. However the materials can also be enriched with metals from the wastewater. Six materials (opoka, sand, Polonite (R), limestone, two types of blast furnace slag) exposed to long-term wastewater loading in columns and in a compact filter well filled with Polonite were investigated for metal removal and accumulation. Wastewater applied to the columns had low heavy metal concentrations in the order Zn > Cu > Mn > Ni > Cr. All columns were able to remove 53%-83% of Zn except those filled with sand. Polonite demonstrated a high removal capacity of Mn (>98%), while only the slag materials were able to remove Ni. All materials showed increased Cu, Cr(III). Mn. Pb and Zn content after filtration. Speciation calculations showed that high concentrations of dissolved organic matter might have prevented efficient metal removal, particularly in the case of Cu. The low content of toxic heavy metals in the studied filter materials studied would probably not restrict their use as a fertiliser or soil amendment.

  • 49.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Comparison of three urban catchments in Uppsala - patterns of stormwater runoff2001In: Annals of Warsaw Agricultural University, ISSN 0208-5771, no 31, p. 87-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A high resolution data acquisition technique was used to monitor stormwater runoff and losses of matter from three urban catchments in the city of Uppsala, Sweden. The landuse of the catchment areas were dominated by industry (1), apartment houses (2), and single houses with gardens (3), respectively. Battery supported data loggers with sensitive probes were used for registration outflow, temperature and electric conductivity every fifth minute during one year. The monitoring approach in this study clearly indicated the dynamics and the quality of urban stormwater. During one meas­urement period the precipitation was 125 mm while the runoffs from area 1-3 were 1016 mm, 267 mm and 60 mm, respectively. The much hig­her runoff from the industrial area indicated that wastewater was discharged to the stormwater se­wer system. The high conductivity (407 mS/m) and temperature (19.5°C) of the water throughout the year were also clear evidence for this sugge­stion.

  • 50.
    Renman, Gunno
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Landfill leachate treatment for metal removal by filtration through reactive substrates - column experiment2004In: Annals of Warsaw Agricultural University - SGGW, Land Reclamation, ISSN 0208-5771, no 35, p. 89-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ten columns made of PVC tubes with an internal diameter of 9.8 cm were filled with substrate to a height of 50 cm. Two types of leachate water from a landfill in Sö­dertälje, Sweden, were pumped to the columns with a load of 528 L/m2/day during four months. Five columns filled with different substrates received leachate from the ash deposit at the landfill. The remaining five columns received a mixed leachate from the whole landfill area. Both unsaturated and saturated conditions were used for pairs of columns with identical sub­strate. The metal sorption capacity was investi­gated. Columns filled with Polonite® (product from opoka) showed best overall performance. Highest average removal efficiency was obtained by fine-grained Polonite mixed with peat where Co, Cr, Cu, Zn and Mn were removed by 10, 12, 31, 45 and 99%, respectively. High removal efficiencies for all metals can only be obtained with multi-substrate filters, having metal specific sorption capacities.

12 1 - 50 of 83
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf