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  • 1.
    Bälter, Olle
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Riese, Emma
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Viberg, Olga
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Effective Feedback for Faster Learning2019In: KTH SoTL 2019, Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose The Open Learning Initiative (OLI) at Carnegie Mellon University and Stanford University showed already in 2008 (Lovett, Meyer & Thille) that by using the OLI methodology, teaching and learning time could be reduced with 50% with maintained results. One key in this methodology is to use online questions with answer-depending feedback. In this workshop we will work with you to formulate OLIinspired questions for your course. Work done/work in progress We have previously worked with online quizzes in several forms (Bälter, Enström & Klingenberg, 2013) and analyzed learning data from OLI courses (Bälter, Zimmaro & Thille, 2018). The online learning material where the questions and feedback is embedded is in campus courses used in flipped classroom settings. In 2017 we ran a pilot of preparatory course in programming based on a Stanford course with OLI methodology in the OpenEdX environment. During the fall semester 2018 questions with answer-depending feedback was added to the course material in an online introductory programming course given in Canvas at KTH. Results/observations/lessons learned While a full implementation of the entire OLI methodology requires infrastructure that is not in place at KTH yet (event handler, analytic engine), the actual learning for the students takes place in the interaction with the questions and their feedback and this part can already be implemented in Canvas at KTH. Take-home message Well-formulated questions with forward focused feedback can dramatically speed up both teaching and 1 2 1 1 2 Page 25 KTH SoTL 2019 (A-K) learning. This workshop brings that speed to your course with practical exercises based on your own course.

  • 2. Genlott, Annika Agélii
    et al.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Viberg, Olga
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Disseminating digital innovation in school – leading second-order educational change2019In: Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, ISSN 1360-2357, E-ISSN 1573-7608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using digital technology effectively in schools requires profound changes in traditional teaching and learning activities. Pedagogical innovations often start small-scale and developing good ideas into shared practice across schools is challenging in many ways, especially if the innovation requires second-order change, i.e. challenges to fundamental beliefs about teaching and learning. This study investigates how a validated pedagogical method requiring integrated Information and Communication Technology (ICT) use and second-order change can be disseminated and sustained over time. We surveyed 92 primary school teachers who at different times over a 5-year period participated in a training course designed to implement an innovative technology-supported teaching method, Write To Learn, across an entire city. We found that organized teacher development programs can drive second-order change, but this requires considerable, active, and sustained effort from leaders at both school and district level. Additional factors include immediate and extended social systems and handling diversity among teachers. The results are useful for both practitioners and researchers since they contribute to a deeper understanding of the opportunities and challenges involved in disseminating effective ICT-based methods that requires profound changes of thinking about teaching and learning to guide the transformation of teaching practice.

  • 3.
    Kukulska-Hulme, Agnes
    et al.
    The Open University (UK). The Institute of Educational Technology.
    Viberg, Olga
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Mobile collaborative language learning: State of the Art2018In: British Journal of Educational Technology, ISSN 0007-1013, E-ISSN 1467-8535, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 207-218Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a review of mobile collaborative language learning studies published in 2012–16 with the aim to improve understanding of how mobile technologies have been used to support collaborative learning among second and foreign language students. We identify affordances, general pedagogical approaches, second- and foreign-language pedagogical approaches, second language acquisition (SLA) principles and affective designs. The results indicate that affordances such as flexible use, continuity of use, timely feedback, personalisation, socialisation, self-evaluation, active participation, peer coaching, sources of inspiration outdoors and cultural authenticity have been emphasised. These affordances were found to be particularly suited to promote social constructivism, which is often sustained by game-based, task based and seamless learning. In terms of second and foreign language pedagogical approaches, the combination of individualised and collaborative learning prevails, along with task based, situated and communicative language learning, and raising orthographic awareness. Among SLA principles, negotiation of meaning and opportunities for feedback are highlighted. Affective aspects include increases in motivation, engagement and enjoyment, mutual encouragement, reduction in nervousness and embarrassment, and a few negative reports of risk of distraction, safety concerns, feelings of uncertainty and technical problems. The reviewed studies present a convincing case for the benefits of collaboration in mobile language learning.

  • 4. Nouri, Jalal
    et al.
    Ebner, Martin
    Ifenthaler, Dirk
    Saqr, Mohammed
    Malmberg, Joana
    Khalil, Mohammad
    Bruun, Jesper
    Viberg, Olga
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Conde González, M
    Papamitsiou, Z
    Berthelsen, O
    Efforts in Europe for Data-Driven Improvement of Education: A Review of Learning Analytics Research in Six Countries2019In: International Journal of Learning Analytics and Artificial Intelligence for Education, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 8-27Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Svela, Alexander
    et al.
    Nouri, Jalal
    Viberg, Olga
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Zhang, Lechen
    A Systematic Review of Tablet Technology in Mathematics Education2019In: International Journal of Interactive Mobile Technologies, E-ISSN 1865-7923, Vol. 13, no 8, p. 139-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2019, the mobile learning body of knowledge is extensive and much is known about the technology impacts and affordances of mobile devices in educational settings. A particular focus has now shifted toward specific tech- nologies in specific subjects. Mathematics is one such subject and tablets are one such technology that is gaining attention. This systematic review represent- ing the latest generation of tablet technology within the tablet-mediated learning in mathematics body of knowledge sought to derive evidence that supported questions into (a) what math sub-disciplines were covered, (b) what technology (application/hardware) was utilized, and (c) what pedagogical approaches were deployed in educational settings. This included analysis of the (d) advantages and (e) disadvantages present in those elements. Thirty-nine relevant articles were collected from various academic technology and educational databases. The results demonstrate that tablets are being predominantly deployed in vari- ous sub-disciplines such as Arithmetic, Computation, and Geometry with the iPad as the dominant choice for tablet hardware/applications. Pedagogical ap- proaches lean heavily on game-based learning, environment interaction, and special needs support. Technological advantages include increased collabora- tion and mathematics engagement enabled by tablet mobility and a high poten- tial for customization of solutions. Developers, teachers, and researchers need to be informed of potential challenges in designing content for tablet technology deployments in mathematics.

  • 6.
    Viberg, Olga
    Örebro University, Örebro University School of Business. Dalarna university.
    Antecedents to Design of Software for Learning: Self-Regulation and StructurationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Viberg, Olga
    Handelshögskolan, Örebro University, Informatik.
    Design and use of mobile technology in distance language education: Matching learning practices with technologies-in-practice2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on the adaptation of formal education to people’s technology- use patterns, their technology-in-practice, where the ubiquitous use of mobile technologies is central. The research question is: How can language learning practices occuring in informal learning environments be effectively integrated with formal education through the use of mobile technology? The study investigates the technical, pedagogical, social and cultural challenges involved in a design science approach.

    The thesis consists of four studies. The first study systematises MALL (mobile-assisted language learning) research. The second investigates Swedish and Chinese students’ attitudes towards the use of mobile technology in education. The third examines students’ use of technology in an online language course, with a specific focus on their learning practices in informal learning contexts and their understanding of how this use guides their learning. Based on the findings, a specifically designed MALL application was built and used in two courses. Study four analyses the app use in terms of students’ perceived level of self-regulation and structuration.

    The studies show that technology itself plays a very important role in reshaping peoples’ attitudes and that new learning methods are coconstructed in a sociotechnical system. Technology’s influence on student practices is equally strong across borders. Students’ established technologies-in-practice guide the ways they approach learning. Hence, designing effective online distance education involves three interrelated elements: technology, information, and social arrangements. This thesis contributes to mobile learning research by offering empirically and theoretically grounded insights that shift the focus from technology design to design of information systems.

  • 8.
    Viberg, Olga
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Andersson, Annika
    The Role of Self-Regulation and Structuration in Mobile Learning2019In: International Journal of Mobile and Blended Learning, ISSN 1941-8647, E-ISSN 1941-8655, Vol. 11, no 4, article id 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The roles of self-regulation and structuration in mobile learning are poorly understood. This study therefore examines these aspects in relation to the design and use of mobile technology in an online language learning setting. The online self-regulated learning (SRL) instrument was adopted to measure students' perceived level of self-regulation. Structuration Theory was applied as the theoretical lens for understanding students' technology-mediated learning practices. The results show that several factors defining learners' level of self-regulation were correlated with their mode of structuration. The analysis indicates that students' SRL characteristics are correlated with their structures regarding their technologies-in-practice and their practical assumptions about effectiveness in learning. An implication for practice is that students' SRL dimensions need to be taken into account when designing educational software for mobile technology. For research, this study has demonstrated the explanatory power of ST and how students' structures are related to their SRL characteristics.

  • 9.
    Viberg, Olga
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Andersson, Annika
    Örebro Universitet.
    Wiklund, Matilda
    Stockholm University.
    Designing for sustainable mobile learning – re-evaluating the concepts “formal” and “informal”2018In: Interactive Learning Environments, ISSN 1049-4820, E-ISSN 1744-5191, no 46739192417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Practitioners designing for mobile learning (mLearning) and scholars exploring the same are faced with the challenge of planning for and understanding a variety of ways and places of learning. This study focuses on one crucial distinction concerning this; that of formal and informal learning. Through the analysis of contemporary research literature, we found that informal learning is represented as more enriching than formal learning. We also identified that some representations of informal learning, such as subconscious and tacit, actually gainsay the idea of designing the learning process. Based on these results we propose a number of implications to enhance pedagogical sustainability in mLearning design. We argue that in order to fuse informal and formal learning, mLearning designers need to offer more clear definitions of the concepts “formal” and “informal”; they need to omit some design aspects to the learners themselves, or to offer a design in form of a learning path that students themselves can customise according to their learning habits, routines, and preferences.

  • 10.
    Viberg, Olga
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Berg, Lovisa
    Dalarna University.
    Blended Language Learning: A Thematic Overview of the Most Highly Cited Research2018In: Blended Language Learning: International Perspectives on Innovative Practice / [ed] Dr. Agnieszka Palalas, China Central Radio & TV University Press Co. Ltd. , 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter sets out to give an introduction to the blended language learning (BLL) research domain through an analysis of the most impactful BLL research as measured by Harzing’s Publish and Perish software. After an initial outline of the field of BLL and its development, the chapter discusses the research methods and approaches applied in the selected articles and demonstrates that a majority of the articles use a descriptive approach and the dominating method is interpretative studies. The chapter then goes on to analyse the themes of the articles and divides them in to six sections: students’ readiness for BLL, teachers’ perceptions of BLL, learner autonomy and self-regulated learning, second language acquisition, technology and BLL design. Finally, we offer future research directions in order to increase the sustainability of BLL, both as the field of practice and the research area. Overall the 41 reviewed studies present a substantial case for the benefits of BLL. However, to ensure the sustainability of BLL design and thus the generalisability of the research findings further BLL designers and researchers need to apply firm theories.

  • 11.
    Viberg, Olga
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bälter, Olof
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Riese, Emma
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Theoretical Computer Science, TCS.
    Mavroudi, Anna
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Faculty pedagogical developers as enablers of technology‐enhanced learning2018In: British Journal of Educational Technology, ISSN 0007-1013, E-ISSN 1467-8535, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the integration of digital technologies in higher education continues to increase, there is a need to understand how to best support university teachers as designers of technology‐enhanced learning (TEL) in order to support students to achieve academic success. In this study, we have examined the Faculty Pedagogical Developer Initiative at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden, an innovative project to support a bottom‐up change process of teachers as designers of TEL, with the intent to strengthen the professional pedagogical development for the faculty. Data were collected from interviews and official documents. Actor–network theory was applied for the analysis. The results suggest that the initiative stimulated both practical implementation of digital technology in educational programmes and also spurred a debate about teachers as designers of TEL between these pedagogical developers and other teachers across different schools and subjects at KTH. However, there are important social, organisational and technical challenges that should be considered when developing support for university teachers as designers of TEL. This paper concludes that this process requires a deep understanding of four interrelated elements: information, technology, organisation and social arrangements.

  • 12.
    Viberg, Olga
    et al.
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University.
    Cross-cultural analysis of users’ attitudes toward the use of mobile devices in second and foreign language learning in higher education: A case from China and Sweden2013In: Computers and education, ISSN 0360-1315, E-ISSN 1873-782X, Vol. 69, p. 169-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examined the current state of students’ attitudes toward mobile technology use in and for second and foreign language learning in higher education. Moreover, the study investigated if age, gender or cultural factors affect these attitudes. A total of 345 students from two in many aspects different countries, China (Yunnan University) and Sweden (Dalarna University) participated in this study. To access learners’ perceptions toward mobile technology use, we employed Kearney’s pedagogical framework to mobile learning from a socio-cultural perspective (Kearney, Schuck, Burden, & Aubusson, 2012). Hofstede’s cultural dimensions were used to approach students’ cultural views, as these dimensions represent some values – aspects of culture – that may affect attitudes toward technology and learning individually as well as in combination. The findings show the respondents’ attitudes toward mobile learning are very positive with individualization being most positive (83%) followed by collaboration (74%), and authenticity (73%). The statistical analysis indicates that Hofstede’s factors cannot explain the differences in mobile-assisted language learning (MALL) attitudes in the chosen sample. Among the personal factors, gender is identified to be a predictor to explain the differences in students’ attitudes toward MALL. This study shows that technology itself seems to be the most important culture-shaping factor, more important than culture inherited from the physical environment, and more important than age.

  • 13.
    Viberg, Olga
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Systematising the Field of Mobile Assisted Language Learning2013In: International Journal of Mobile and Blended Learning, ISSN 1941-8647, E-ISSN 1941-8655, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 72-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     This study provides a systematic review of mobile assisted language (MALL) research within the specifc area of second language acquisition (SLA) during the period of 2005-2012 in terms of research approaches, theories and methods, technology, and the linguistic knowledge and skills' results. The fndings show a shift from the prevailing SMS-based language learning in 2005-2008 towards the use of more advanced multimedia and intelligent learning systems in the last years. Many highly cited studies focus on design of mobile language learning systems and experimental evaluation of their effectiveness. Studies often draw on mature pedagogic models and methods. However, descriptive and small-scale experimental studies dominate. In terms of theoretical approaches and frameworks, there is a lack of specifc reference to mobile learning conceptual and theoretical models, which makes it diffcult to distinguish any specifc mobile learning theories from other learning theories. Research has so far paid most attention to learners' vocabulary acquisition.

  • 14.
    Viberg, Olga
    et al.
    Dalarna University, Sweden; Örebro University, Sweden.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro University.
    Understanding students’ learning practices: challenges for design and integration of mobile technology into distance education2015In: Learning, Media & Technology, ISSN 1743-9884Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the design requirements for mobile applications for second language learning in online/distance higher education settings. We investigate how students use technology and how they perceive that these technologies-in-practice facilitate their language learning. Structuration Theory is used for the analysis. Results show that design needs to consider that (i) students use their private mobile technologies frequently when conducting self-initiated learning tasks, (ii) students’ mobile technologies-in-practice are important, and course designers should design materials and tools for such use practices, and (iii) students prefer to work on their own due to the limited time they want to devote to their learning. Consequently, in regard to the pervasive nature of mobile technology integration in society and into students’ habitual use, they need various software tools on such devices to support individual learning.

  • 15.
    Viberg, Olga
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hatakka, Mathias
    Örebro Universitet.
    Bälter, Olle
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Mavroudi, Anna
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    The current landscape of learning analytics in higher education2018In: Computers in human behavior, ISSN 0747-5632, E-ISSN 1873-7692, Vol. 89, p. 98-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning analytics can improve learning practice by transforming the ways we support learning processes. This study is based on the analysis of 252 papers on learning analytics in higher education published between 2012 and 2018. The main research question is: What is the current scientific knowledge about the application of learning analytics in higher education? The focus is on research approaches, methods and the evidence for learning analytics. The evidence was examined in relation to four earlier validated propositions: whether learning analytics i) improve learning outcomes, ii) support learning and teaching, iii) are deployed widely, and iv) are used ethically. The results demonstrate that overall there is little evidence that shows improvements in students' learning outcomes (9%) as well as learning support and teaching (35%). Similarly, little evidence was found for the third (6%) and the forth (18%) proposition. Despite the fact that the identified potential for improving learner practice is high, we cannot currently see much transfer of the suggested potential into higher educational practice over the years. However, the analysis of the existing evidence for learning analytics indicates that there is a shift towards a deeper understanding of students’ learning experiences for the last years.

  • 16.
    Viberg, Olga
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Mynard, Jo
    Mavroudi, Anna
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Assessing the Potential Role of Technology in Promoting Self-Directed Language Learning: A Collaborative Project Between Japan and Sweden2018In: Relay Journal, ISSN 2433-5444, Vol. 1, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report begins with a summary of ways in which technology has been used to attempt to increase learning opportunities and support for self-directed learners at Kanda University of International Studies (KUIS) with limited success. A collaboration between KUIS and the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Sweden has highlighted the need for a more thorough needs analysis and evaluation of the learning environment before any technological designs are implemented. In addition, such implementation should be done in collaboration with the end users. The second part of the paper provides preliminary results related to an initial needs analysis conducted with end users at KUIS that will form the basis of ongoing collaboration with the aim of creating a platform and/or series of tools that will enhance self-directed language learning.

  • 17.
    Viberg, Olga
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Mavroudi, Anna
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Digitalisation of Education: Application and Best Practices2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The topic of digitalisation of education has attracted the interest of the research community worldwide owing to unprecedented capabilities provided by technology to capture digital traces of today’s students who, being ‘digital natives’, are active in technology-rich learning environments. The aim of this report is to present solutions on the topic that can be applicable in a Swedish context and raise an awareness of potential barriers and challenges. The solutions emerge as best practices, or as examples from recent literature. 

  • 18.
    Viberg, Olga
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Mavroudi, Anna
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    The Role of Ubiquitous Computing and the Internet of Things for Developing 21st Century Skills Among Learners: Experts’ Views2018In: 13th European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning, EC-TEL 2018, Springer, 2018, Vol. 11082, p. 640-643Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This explorative study aims to understand the role of ubiquitous computing and the IoT for developing and practicing learners’ 21st century skills. Data was collected from ten expert interviews. Based on the conventional content analysis, our results suggest that the integration and use of such technologies in learning settings can enable the development of the learners’ 21st century skills. Also, our findings identified several success factors and challenges that have to be considered when developing and practicing the identified skills. The paper is of interest to practitioners, researchers and to educational policymakers, since our study’s results can guide them in planning effective learning interventions that exploit ubiquitous computing and the IoT with the aim to cultivate 21st century skills among learners.

  • 19.
    Viberg, Olga
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Mavroudi, Anna
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bogdan, Cristian M.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Laaksolahti, Jarmo
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Reducing Free Riding: CLASS–A System for Collaborative Learning Assessment2019In: Methodologies and Intelligent Systems for Technology Enhanced Learning, 9th International Conference, Workshops / [ed] Elvira PopescuAna Belén Gil, Loreto Lancia Luigia Simona Sica, Anna Mavroudi, Springer, 2019, Vol. 1008, p. 132-138Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s era of digitalization of education, Computer Supported Collaborative Learning is becoming increasingly important in higher education. This type of learning has been frequently associated in the recent research literature with student regulation, feedback from peers and a student assessment schema which can incorporate both formative and summative assessment strategies. This work-in-progress paper presents the CLASS system which caters for all these aspects. Furthermore, the system supports mechanisms for the prevention of the free riding phenomenon, which has been reported in the literature as one of the most important disadvantages in group student work. The paper discusses the higher education context in which the CLASS system was developed and used, along with its design affordances and how these affordances can facilitate CSCL. The paper can be useful to designers and developers of CSCL systems as well as to practitioners that are interested in how they can exploit CSCL with their students working in groups.

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