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  • 1.
    Abbadessa, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Oinonen, Petri
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. Ecohelix AB, Teknikringen 38, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Characterization of Two Novel Bio-based Materials from Pulping Process Side Streams: Ecohelix and CleanFlow Black Lignin2018In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 7606-7627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The characteristics of two novel types of technical lignin, namely Ecohelix (EH) and CleanFlow black lignin (CFBL), isolated from two different pulping process side streams, were analyzed. EH and CFBL were analyzed in terms of general composition, chemical functionalities, molar mass distribution, and thermal stability. For comparison, two relevant types of commercially available lignosulfonate and kraft lignin were used. The results showed that EH contains a large amount of sulfonated lignin, together with carbohydrates and ash. As such, it can be considered a lignin-carbohydrate hybrid molecule. CFBL was found to contain 91.5% Klason lignin and the lowest amount of carbohydrates (0.3%). EH showed the highest content of aliphatic OH groups (5.44 mmol/g) and CFBL a high content of phenols (4.73 mmol/g). EH had a molecular weight of 31.4 kDa and a sufficient thermal stability. CFBL had the lowest molecular weight (M-w = 2.0 kDa) and thermal stability of all kraft lignins analyzed in this study. These properties highlighted that EH is a suitable building block for material development and that CFBL is a promising material for the production of biofuel and biochemicals.

  • 2.
    Akin, Danny E.
    et al.
    Richard B. Russell Agricultural Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, US Department of Agriculture, Athens.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Evans, J. D.
    South Central Poultry Research Laboratory, Agricultural Research Service, US Department of Agriculture, USA.
    Adamsen, A. S. P.
    Agro Business Par, Denmark.
    Foulk, J. A.
    Cotton Quality Research Station, Agricultural Research Service, US Department of Agriculture, USA.
    Dodd, R. B.
    Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Clemson University.
    Progress in enzyme-retting of flax2004In: Journal of Natural Fibers, ISSN 1544-0478, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 21-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New methods for retting flax are sought to overcome problems in the current method of dew-retting of flax. Published data are reviewed and new data presented on the development and testing of a method to ret flax using pectinase-rich enzyme mixtures plus chelators based on cost and fiber yield and properties. In spray enzyme retting (SER), flax stems are crimped to physically disrupt the plant's protective barrier and then sprayed until soaked with, or briefly immersed in, an enzyme/ chelator formulation. Flax is then incubated at temperatures optimal for enzyme activity, washed, and dried. Pilot scale tests, conducted with 10 kg samples of flax retted with a series of formulations, showed that this method effectively retted flax stems from a variety of sources, including fiber flax, mature fiber flax, and linseed straw. Fiber yield, strength, and fineness were significantly influenced by variations in enzyme-chelator amounts. Cellulases in pectinase mixtures appeared to preferentially attack dislocations in fibers and fiber bundles resulting in loss of fiber strength. Polygalacturonases alone effectively separated fiber from non-fiber components. The SER method proved to be an effective framework for further tests on enzyme-chelator formulations that now must be integrated with physical processing to optimize the extraction of flax fibers based on cost and fiber yield and properties.

  • 3.
    Aminzadeh, Selda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Mattsson, Tuve
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    On the crossflow membrane fractionation of lignoboost kraft lignin: Characterization of low molecular weight fractions2016In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 251Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Aminzadeh, Selda
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Zhang, Liming
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    A possible explanation for the structural inhomogeneity of lignin in LCC networks2017In: Wood Science and Technology, ISSN 0043-7719, E-ISSN 1432-5225, Vol. 51, no 6, p. 1365-1376Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignin has a very complex structure, and this is partly due to the monomers being connected by many different types of covalent bonds. Furthermore, there are multiple covalent bonds between lignin and polysaccharides in wood, and it is known that the structure of lignin covalently bound to the hemicellulose xylan is different to lignin bound to the hemicellulose glucomannan. Here, synthetic lignin (DHP) is synthesized at different pH and it is shown that lignin made at lower pH has a structure more similar to the lignin bound to xylan, i.e., having higher relative content of beta-O-4 ethers. It is hypothesized that xylan due to its carboxylic acids forms a locally lower pH and thus "direct" the lignin structure to have more beta-O-4 ethers. The biological significance of these results is discussed.

  • 5.
    Antonsson, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE).
    Johansson, Mats
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Biomimetic synthesis of suberin for new biomaterials2005In: Appita Annual Conference: Vol 2, 2005, p. 561-564Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Suberin is the biopolymer giving cork (oak bark) its hydrophobic and resistant characteristics. It acts as a diffusion barrier in bark and roots of plants. Similarly to lignin, it is a phenolic polymer with good affinity to cellulose and other wood polysaccharides, but it also contains polyaliphatic and strongly hydrophobic elements. In order to produce a lignin derivative similar to suberin, a desired lignin starting material should be of low molecular weight and have a high content of hydroxylic phenolic groups. By means of cross flow nanofiltration of softwood kraft pulping black liquor and pH-precipitation with diluted sulphuric acid, such a lignin has been obtained. Due to the fact that too much organics entering the recovery boiler frequently is the bottleneck for pulp production increases, a removal of part of the lignin can be economically very favourable. By using this lignin together with linola oil, a linseed oil with a large amount of unsaturated structures, an attempt was made to create a new hydrophobic lignin derivative similar tosuberin. The product was analysed with FT-IR, Fourier Transformed Infra Red Spectroscopy and GPC, Gel Permeation Chromatography. The suberin like material obtained from this lignin could be polymerised on thermo mechanical pulp fibres by means of Mn(III)-driven phenolic coupling. The ability of the suberin monomers to act as a hydrophobic paper coating was evaluated with contact angle measurements and the results indicate that this lignin derivative was potentially of interest due to its capability to interact well with wood fibres and make paper hydrophobic.

  • 6.
    Antonsson, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Johansson, Mats
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindström, Mikael E.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Low Mw-lignin fractions together with vegetable oils as available oligomers for novel paper-coating applications as hydrophobic barrier2008In: Industrial crops and products (Print), ISSN 0926-6690, E-ISSN 1872-633X, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 98-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignin residues are available in large amounts as kraft lignin from chemical pulping processes. This lignin is mainly incinerated in recovery boilers. The recovery boilers are often the bottle-necks in the overall pulping process when pulp production increases are desired. Through cross-flow nano-filtration of the black liquor from kraft pulping, a low-molecular weight lignin fraction can be removed thus decreasing the organic load on the recovery boilers. The low-molecular weight lignin fraction furthermore exhibit different characteristics compared to other commercial kraft lignins and represents a new raw material source in novel applications.

    The low-molecular weight lignin was used together with a vegetable oil to produce a new hydrophobic lignin derivative similar to suberin. The lignin and the lignin derivative was analysed with FT-IR, UV-vis and SEC. The ability of the product to make paper surfaces hydrophobic was also evaluated.

    The results demonstrate the possibility to make a suberin-like lignin derivative that is potentially of interest in paper-coating applications due to its capability to interact well with wood fibres and make paper hydrophobic.

  • 7.
    Antonsson, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    The utilization of lignin derivatives and radical coupling reaction to increase wet strength of kraftliner2006In: 6th international paper and coating chemistry symposium. Book of abstracts., 2006, p. 55-55Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Antonsson, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindström, Mikael E.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Adding lignin derivatives to decrease the effect of mechano-sorptive creep in linerboard2008In: Appita journal, ISSN 1038-6807, Vol. 61, no 6, p. 468-471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When load is applied to any type of paper while varying the relative humidity, the paper will creep more than if the same load is applied at constant humidity. This behaviour is called mechano-sorptive creep or accelerated creep, and the reasons for its occurrence in paper are still not fully understood. However, wet strength and the addition of apolar (hydrophobic) compounds to sheets have previously been suggested as factors improving the mechano-sorptive creep performance.

    This work evaluates a method for improving wet strength and tests the addition of a hydrophobic compound, with particular reference to mechano-sorptive creep stiffness. Wet strength was improved by subjecting kraft liner pulp to low-molecular-weight lignin, obtained by cross-flow filtration, and to the radical initiator manganese(III). The hydrophobic compound added was a suberin-like lignin derivative. Adding the suberin-like lignin derivative significantly increased the mechano-sorptive creep stiffness, even though the stiffness at 90% rh decreased in the tested samples. This was probably because of the decrease in hygroexpansion caused by this hydrophobic additive.

    Even though it is possible significantly to increase the wet strength of kraft liner pulp by adding manganese(III) and cross-flow-filtered lignin, doing so has no significant effect on mechano-sorptive creep stiffness.

  • 9.
    Antonsson, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Lindström, Mikael E.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    The influence of lignin and xylan on some kraftliner pulp properties2009In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 403-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the influence of lignin and hemicellulose content on the mechanical and physical properties of softwood kraft liner pulp. Tensile properties, hygroexpansion, and mechano-sorptive creep properties were measured. The lignin and hemicellulose contents were modified by chlorite delignification and xylanase treatment.

    After treatment, the chemical composition of the pulps was 3-14% Klason lignin, 69-77% cellulose, 16-21% hemicellulose, and 4-7% xylan. In the tested pulps, low lignin content tended to decrease hygroexpansion as well as increase tensile stiffness and mechano-sorptive creep stiffness. Xylan contributed less to the pulp sheet properties, but at equal lignin contents, higher xylan content tended to give increased hygroexpansion and worse mechano-sorptive creep properties.

  • 10.
    Areskogh, Dimitri
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Fenton's reaction: a simple and versatile method to structurally modify commercial lignosulphonates2011In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 90-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Treatment of lignosulphonates with hydrogen peroxide and Fe (II) acetate under mild conditions can be used to increase the molecular weight and content of carboxylic acids. Such Fenton's oxidation can produce, in some of the conditions of and lignosulphonate concentration, a two-fold increase in the molecular weight and a 6-7 fold increase in the carboxylic acid content. The structural modifications of lignosulphonate may increase the technical performance of the product in several applications. Possible reaction mechanisms of the Fenton system are proposed and discussed.

  • 11.
    Areskogh, Dimitri
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Immobilisation of laccase for polymerisation of commercial lignosulphonates2011In: Process Biochemistry, ISSN 1359-5113, E-ISSN 1873-3298, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 1071-1075Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The oxidoreductive enzyme laccase has previously been shown to be able to increase the average molecular weight of lignosulphonatesthrough generation of phenoxy radicals on end groups and the subsequent radical-radical coupling reactions that cross-link individual lignosulphonate molecules. Utilisation of laccases for this purpose is a potential industrial process not only to improve the properties of technical lignosulphonates but also to expand their utilisation to new areas. Immobilisation of the laccase is an interesting technique to enable reusage of the enzyme and thus reduce costs involved with such process. In this work, we demonstrate the potential of immobilised laccase to polymerise technical lignosulphonates. A number of factors that limits re-utilisation of the immobilised catalyst such as lignosulphonate adsorption onto the carrier and laccase deactivation have been identified and are discussed. However, by using a low-porosity support and lower reaction temperatures these problems can be limited.

  • 12.
    Areskogh, Dimitri
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Li, Jiebing
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Gellerstedt, Göran
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Investigation of the Molecular Weight Increase of Commercial Lignosulfonates by Laccase Catalysis2010In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 904-910Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignosulfonates are by-products from the sulfite pulping process. During this process, lignin is liberated from pulp fibers through sulfonation and washed away. As a consequence, the lignosulfonate molecules contain both hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties. Lignosulfonates are low-value products with limited performance and are used as such as binders, surfactants, and plasticizers in concrete. Lignosulfonates face strong competition from synthetic petroleum-based plasticizers with superior quality. Therefore, increasing the performance of lignosulfonates is desirable not only from a sustainability point of view but also to expand their usage. One important aspect that describes how well lignosulfonates can act as plasticizers is the molecular weight. In this paper, the molecular weight of four commercial lignosulfonates is increased through oxidation by two laccases without utilization of mediators. Different parameters to obtain maximal molecular weight increase were identified and the technical significance of the experiments is discussed.

  • 13.
    Areskogh, Dimitri
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Li, Jiebing
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Gellerstedt, Göran
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Polymerization of lignosulohonates by laccase - from model studies to application evaluation trials2010In: Oxidative enzymes as sustainable industrial biocatalysts / [ed] G Feijoo and MT Moreira, 2010, p. 151-156Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Areskogh, Dimitri
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Li, Jiebing
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Gellerstedt, Göran
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Reaction mechanism of laccase-catalyzed polymerization of lignin revealed with model study2008In: 10th European workshop on lignocellulosics and pulp proceedings, 2008, p. 101-104Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Areskogh, Dimitri
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Li, Jiebing
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Gellerstedt, Göran
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Structural modification of commercial lignosulphonates through laccase catalysis and ozonolysis2010In: Industrial crops and products (Print), ISSN 0926-6690, E-ISSN 1872-633X, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 458-466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignosulphonates are by-products from the sulphite pulping process, in which lignin is separated from cellulose by the addition of sulphonic acid groups to the alpha-position of lignin, thereby increasing the solubility of lignin in water. The predominant industrial utilisations of lignosulphonates are as dispersants, plasticisers and water-reducing agents in concrete preparation. The ability of lignosulphonates to function as a good plasticisers and water reducers is intimately linked with the purity of the lignosulphonate, its molecular weight and the number of charged groups present in the macromolecule. Currently, lignosulphonates are outrivaled by synthetic plasticisers termed superplasticisers due to their superior properties when used as additives to high-strength concrete. If lignosulphonates are to successfully compete with these superplasticisers, significant modifications are required. This paper describes a two-stage treatment of lignosulphonates in which the molecular weight is increased through laccase oxidation and carboxylic groups are introduced through ozonolysis. The technical significance of the results is also discussed.

  • 16.
    Areskogh, Dimitri
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Li, Jiebing
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Nousiainen, Paula
    University of Helsinki, Department of Chemistry.
    Gellerstedt, Göran
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Sipilä, Jussi
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Oxidative polymerisation of models for phenolic lignin end-groups by laccase2010In: Holzforschung, ISSN 0018-3830, E-ISSN 1437-434X, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 21-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The redox enzyme laccase can lead to cross-linking of lignin molecules by oxidising phenolic end groups to resonance-stabilised radicals that can undergo radical coupling to form covalent bonds. This property has potential for many technical applications. However, laccase treatment can also lead to degradation. Experiments were performed with two laccases of different oxidation potential and pH and temperature optima. The predominant reaction following laccase oxidation is the formation of 5-5' and 4-O-5' bonds. If the 5-position is blocked, other reactions occur, including coupling of the 1-position and oxidation of the a-position, which aggravates cross-linking of different lignin molecules. The product profile generated by the two laccases is somewhat different, mainly because of the different pH rather than differences in enzyme activity. Reaction mechanisms and the technical and biological significance of the results are discussed.

  • 17.
    Areskogh, Dimitri
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Nousiainen, Paula
    University of Helsinki, Department of Chemistry.
    Li, Jiebing
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Gellerstedt, Göran
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Sipilä, Jussi
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Sulfonation of phenolic end groups in lignin directs laccase-initiated reactions towards cross-linking2010In: Industrial Biotechnology, ISSN 1550-9087, E-ISSN 1931-8421, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 50-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of sulfonation of the a-carbon on model compounds representing phenolic end groups on lignin was studied with respect to the reactions initiated by oxidation of laccase, by mass spectrometry. Sulfonation seems to direct the reactions towards formation of 5-5´ and 4-O-5´ bonds, avoiding formation of 1-O-4´ bonds and oxidation of the a-carbon. This, in turn, will facilitate cross-linking reactions between lignin molecules. Sulfonation therefore has potential as an industrial pretreatment prior to laccase treatment for various wood-containing materials.

  • 18.
    Azhar, Shoaib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Theliander, Hans
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Extraction of hemicelluloses from fiberized spruce wood2015In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 117, p. 19-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel mechanical pre-treatment method was used to separate the wood chips into fiber bundles in order to extract high molecular weight wood polymers. The mechanical pre-treatment involved chip compression in a conical plug-screw followed by defibration in a fiberizer. The fiberized wood was treated with hot water at various combinations of time and temperature in order to analyze the extraction yield of hemicelluloses at different conditions. Nearly 6 mg/g wood of galactoglucomannan was obtained at 90◦C/120min which was about three times more than what could be extracted from wood chips. The extracted carbohydrates had molecular weight ranging up to 60 kDa. About 10% of each of the extracted material had a molecular weight above 30 kDa. The extraction liquor could also be reused for consecutive extractions with successive increase in the extraction yield of hemicelluloses. 

  • 19.
    Azhar, Shoaib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wang, Yan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Extraction of polymers from enzyme-treated softwood2011In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 4606-4614Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a biorefinery context it is an advantage to fractionate and extract different wood components in a relatively pure form. However, one major obstacle for efficient extraction of wood polymers (lignin, polysaccharides etc.) is the covalent lignin-polysaccharide networks present in lignified cell walls. Enzymatic catalysis might be a useful tool for a controlled degradation of these networks, thereby enhancing the extraction of high molecular weight polymers. In this work, a methanol-alkali mixture was used to extract two different wood samples treated with endoxylanase and gammanase, respectively. Wood chips were pretreated with alkali prior to enzymatic treatment to enhance the cell-wall accessibility to enzymes. Extractions were also carried out on non-enzyme-treated samples to evaluate the enzymatic effects. Results showed that the enzymatic treatment increased the extraction yield, with gammanase as the more efficient of the two enzymes. Furthermore, polymers extracted from xylanase-treated wood had a higher degree of polymerization than the reference.

  • 20.
    Azhar, Shoaib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wang, Yan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindström, Mikael E.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Enhanced extraction of high-molecular-weight wood polymers with chemoenzymatic treatment2012In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 243Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Azhar, Shoaib
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wang, Yan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindström, Mikale E
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Chemoenzymatic separation of softwood polymers2011In: Proceedings of  the 16th international symposium of wood, fiber and pulp chemistry / [ed] Lijun Wan et al., 2011, p. 932-936Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spruce wood chips were chemically pre-treated with sodium hydroxide to open up the compact structure of wood. The wood was then treated with enzymes (xylanase, gamanase and mannanase) and subjected to extraction with a mixture of methanol and alkali to efficiently isolate lignin and hemicelluloses. Chemical pre-treatment improved enzyme efficiency which consequently enhanced the extraction of lignocelluloses with higher average molar mass than the references.

  • 22.
    Berglund, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Angles d’Ortoli, Thibault
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Bergenstråhle-Wohlert, Malin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    A molecular dynamics study of the effect of glycosidic linkage type in the hemicellulose backbone on the molecular chain flexibility2016In: The Plant Journal, ISSN 0960-7412, E-ISSN 1365-313XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The macromolecular conformation of the constituent polysaccharides in lignocellulosic biomass influences their supramolecular interactions, and therefore their function in plants and their performance in technical products. The flexibility of glycosidic linkages from the backbone of hemicelluloses was studied by evaluating the conformational freedom of the φ and ψ dihedral angles using molecular dynamic simulations, additionally selected molecules were correlated with experimental data by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Three types of β-(1→4) glycosidic linkages involving the monosaccharides (Glcp, Xylp and Manp) present in the backbone of hemicelluloses were defined. Different di- and tetrasaccharides with combinations of such sugar monomers from hemicelluloses were simulated, and free energy maps of the φ – ψ space and hydrogen-bonding patterns were obtained. The glycosidic linkage between Glc-Glc or Glc-Man (C-type) was the stiffest with mainly one probable conformation; the linkage from Man-Man or Man-Glc (M-type) was similar but with an increased probability for an alternative conformation making it more flexible, and the linkage between two Xyl-units (X-type) was the most flexible with two almost equally populated conformations. Glycosidic linkages of the same type showed essentially the same conformational space in both disaccharides and in the central region of tetrasaccharides. Different probabilities of glycosidic linkage conformations in the backbone of hemicelluloses can be directly estimated from the free energy maps, which to a large degree affect the overall macromolecular conformations of these polymers. The information gained contributes to an increased understanding of the function of hemicelluloses both in the cell wall and in technical products.

  • 23.
    Berglund, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Azhar, Shoaib
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    The structure of galactoglucomannan impacts the degradation under alkaline conditions2018In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Galactoglucomannan (GGM) from sprucewas studied with respect to the degradation behavior inalkaline solution. Three reference systems includinggalactomannan from locust bean gum, glucomannanfrom konjac and the linear water-soluble carboxymethylcellulose were studied with focus onmolecular weight, sugar composition, degradationproducts, as well as formed oligomers, to identifyrelative structural changes in GGM. Initially allmannan polysaccharides showed a fast decrease inthe molecular weight, which became stable in the laterstage. The degradation of the mannan polysaccharidescould be described by a function corresponding to thesum of two first order reactions; one slow that wasascribed to peeling, and one fast that was connectedwith hydrolysis. The galactose side group wasstable under conditions used in this study (150 min,90 C, 0.5 M NaOH). This could suggest that, apartfrom the covalent connection to C6 in mannose, thegalactose substitutions also interact non-covalentlywith the backbone to stabilize the structure againstdegradation. Additionally, the combination of differentbackbone sugars seems to affect the stability of thepolysaccharides. For carboxymethyl cellulose thedegradation was linear over time which furthersuggests that the structure and sugar composition playan important role for the alkaline degradation. Moleculardynamics simulations gave details about theconformational behavior of GGM oligomers in watersolution, as well as interaction between the oligomersand hydroxide ions.

  • 24.
    Berglund, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Bergenstråhle, Malin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    d'Ortoli, Thibault Angles
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Organ Chem, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Widmalm, Goran
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Organ Chem, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    How the flexibility properties of hemicelluloses are affected by the glycosidic bonds between different backbone sugars - A molecular dynamics study2016In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 251Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Berglund, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Farahani, Saina Kishani
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    de Carvalho, Danila Morais
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience. AlbaNova University Centre.
    The influence of acetylation and sugar composition on the (in)solubility of mannans, their interaction with cellulose surfaces and thermal propertiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Berglund, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Kishani, Saina
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    de Carvalho, Danila Morais
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wohlert, Jakob
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    The influence of acetylation and sugar composition on the (in)solubility of mannans, their interaction with cellulose surfaces and thermal properties.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Berglund, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Mikkelsen, Deirdre
    Univ Queensland, Queensland Alliance Agr & Food Innovat, Ctr Nutr & Food Sci, ARC Ctr Excellence Plant Cell Walls, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Flanagan, Bernadine
    Univ Queensland, Queensland Alliance Agr & Food Innovat, Ctr Nutr & Food Sci, ARC Ctr Excellence Plant Cell Walls, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Dhital, Sushil
    Univ Queensland, Queensland Alliance Agr & Food Innovat, Ctr Nutr & Food Sci, ARC Ctr Excellence Plant Cell Walls, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Yakubov, Gleb
    Univ Queensland, Sch Chem Engn, ARC Ctr Excellence Plant Cell Walls, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Gidley, Michael
    Univ Queensland, Queensland Alliance Agr & Food Innovat, Ctr Nutr & Food Sci, ARC Ctr Excellence Plant Cell Walls, Brisbane, Qld, Australia..
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Glycoscience.
    Hydrogels of bacterial cellulose and wood hemicelluloses as a model of plant secondary cell walls2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Berglund, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Mikkelsen, Deirdre
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Flanagan, Bernadine M.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Dhital, Sushil
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Yakubov, Gleb E.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Gidley, Michael J.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wood Hemicelluloses Exert Distinct Biomechanical Contributions in Bacterial Cellulose HydrogelsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Bi, Ran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Azhar, Shoaib
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Mckee, Lauren
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Culture Filtrates from a Soil Organism Enhances Extractability of Polymers from Fiberised Spruce WoodManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Bi, Ran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Jennie
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    McKee, Lauren
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    The Degree Of Acetylation Affects The Microbial Degradability Of HemicellulosesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Bi, Ran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Jennie
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Vilaplana, Francisco
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    McKee, Lauren S.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    The degree of acetylation affects the microbial degradability of mannans2016In: Polymer degradation and stability, ISSN 0141-3910, E-ISSN 1873-2321, Vol. 133, p. 36-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hemicelluloses as major components of plant cell walls are acetylated to different extents. The biologicalfunctions of acetylation are not completely understood but suggested that one reason is to decrease themicrobial degradability of cell walls. Model seed galactomannan and glucomannan, which are structurallysimilar to an abundant class of wood hemicelluloses, were acetylated to various degrees and usedas sole carbon source on agar plates for microbial growth. When soil samples were inoculated on theplates, significantly fewer strains grew on the agar plates with highly acetylated mannans than withslightly acetylated or non-acetylated mannans. One filamentous fungus isolated and identified as aPenicillium species was shown to grow faster and stronger on non-acetylated than on highly acetylatedmannan. The data therefore support the hypothesis that a high degree of acetylation (DSac) can decreasethe microbial degradability of hemicelluloses. Possible mechanisms and the technological significance ofthis are discussed.

  • 32.
    Bi, Ran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Isolation and identification of soil microorganisms under anaerobic condition which is able to live on lignin as carbon source2012In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 243Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Bi, Ran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Huang, Shan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    ISOLATION OF EXCEEDINGLY LOW OXYGEN CONSUMING FUNGAL STRAINS ABLE TO UTILIZE LIGNIN AS CARBON SOURCE2016In: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, ISSN 0576-9787, Vol. 50, no 7-8, p. 811-817Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lignin biodegradation is normally related to aerobic microorganisms, and it is often claimed that microbes do not metabolize lignin as a carbon source. In this work, several fungal strains were isolated from the sediment of a small stream located in a forest and tested on agar plates with lignin as the only carbon source. All identified strains were Ascomycetes, Penicillium spinulosum, Pseudeurotium bakeri and Galactomyces geotrichum. When cultivated in shaking flasks with lignosulphonate as a carbon source, the lignin was consumed, and cell free culture filtrates appeared to depolymerize lignosulphonate to some extent. It is suggested that the strains detected are part of a symbiotic community and live in a microbiological niche in which they are able to utilize lignin residues left from brown rot and humus having extremely low oxygen content.

  • 34.
    Bi, Ran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Huang, Shan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. Linnaus University, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Isolation of exceedingly low oxygen consuming fungal strains able to utilize lignin as carbon sourceIn: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, ISSN 0576-9787Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Bi, Ran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Phoma herbarum, a soil fungus able to grow on natural lignin and synthetic lignin (DHP) as sole carbon source and cause lignin degradationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Bi, Ran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Oinonen, Petri
    Ecohelix AB, Teknikringen 38, 10044 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wang, Yan
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    A Method for Studying Effects on Lignin-Polysaccharide Networks during Biological Degradation and Technical Processes of Wood2016In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 1307-1318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Woody tissues consist primarily of a mixture of cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin. Covalent bonds between lignin and polysaccharides likely play a central role in determining the mechanical and physical properties of wood. Intact and defined lignin-polysaccharide networks have not been isolated in large quantities because of the recalcitrance of lignin, which demands harsh chemical treatments that alter its structure. This report presents a method for preparing large quantities of lignin-polysaccharide networks similar to those naturally present in wood based on the enzymatic oxidation of hemicellulose from Norway spruce. Fungal enzymes produced from various carbon sources were used to depolymerize these networks. The method was used for simulating "enzyme mining" - a concept in biorefineries, giving a possible explanation for its mechanisms.

  • 37.
    Bi, Ran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Oinonen, Petri
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wang, Yan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    A method for studying effects on lignin-polysaccharide networks during degradation and technical processing of woodManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Bi, Ran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Spadiut, Oliver
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Brumer, Harry
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Isolation and identification of microorganisms from soil able to live on lignin as acarbon source and to produce enzymes which cleave the β-o-4 bond in a lignin model compound2012In: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, ISSN 0576-9787, Vol. 46, no 3-4, p. 227-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several strains of fungi were isolated and identified from Scandinavian soil using agar plates with lignin as a carbon source. The strains grew significantly faster on this medium than on control plates without lignin. Different types of technical lignins were used, some of which contained trace amounts of sugars, even if the increased growth rate seemed not related to the sugar content. Some strains were cultivated in shaking flask cultures with lignin as a carbon source, with lignin apparently consumed by microbes - while accumulation of the microorganism biomass occurred. The cell-free filtrates of these cultures could reduce the apparent molecular weights of lignosulphonates, while the culture filtrate of one strain could cleave the beta-O-4 bond in a lignin model compound.

  • 39.
    Bi, Ran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Spadiut, Oliver
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Brumer, Harry
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Isolation and identification of microorganisms from soil able to live on lignin as a carbon source and to produce enzymes which cleave beta-O-4 bond in a lignin model compound2012In: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, ISSN 0576-9787, Vol. 46, no 3-4, p. 227-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several strains of fungi were isolated and identified from Scandinavian soil using agar plates with lignin as a carbon source. The strains grew significantly faster on this medium than on control plates without lignin. Different types of technical lignins were used, some of which contained trace amounts of sugars, even if the increased growth rate seemed not related to the sugar content. Some strains were cultivated in shaking flask cultures with lignin as a carbon source, with lignin apparently consumed by microbes - while accumulation of the microorganism biomass occurred. The cell-free filtrates of these cultures could reduce the apparent molecular weights of lignosulphonates, while the culture filtrate of one strain could cleave the beta-O-4 bond in a lignin model compound.

  • 40.
    Bi, Ran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Spadiut, Oliver
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Brumer, Harry
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Isolation and identification of microorganisms from soil able to utilize lignin as single carbon source2011In: Proceedings of the 16th International Symposium of wood, fiber and pulp chemistry, 2011, p. 1091-1095Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Bi, Ran
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Spaduit, Oliver
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Brumer, Harry III
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Isolation and identification of microorganisms from soil  able to ive on lignin as carbon source and produce enzymes that cleave beta-O-4mbond in lignin2011In: Cellulose Chemistry and Technology, ISSN 0576-9787Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Twenty one strains of micro organism from Scandinavian soil had been isolated that could utilize lignin as only carbon source and 11 strains of them were identified. Different types of technical lignins were used.5 faster growing strains were cultivated in shaking flask cultures with ligninosulfonate as sole carbon source,and lignin appeared to be consumed after several days while mycelia was observed accumulated.Cell free filtrates of the 5 faster growing strains could lower the apparent molecular weights of lignosulphonates and the culture filtrate of one strain could cleave the lignin model compound with.The significances of the results are discussed.

  • 42. Christiernin, M.
    et al.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Pulp and Paper Technology.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Brumer, Harry
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Teeri, Tuula T.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Lindström, T.
    Laine, J.
    The effects of xyloglucan on the properties of paper made from bleached kraft pulp2003In: Nordic Pulp & Paper Research Journal, ISSN 0283-2631, E-ISSN 2000-0669, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 182-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Xyloglucan was adsorbed onto bleached soft-wood kraft pulp followed by preparation and analysis of handsheets with respect to sheet formation as well as sheet mechanical and optical properties. Adsorption of xyloglucan was found to be slow. After more than 20 hrs adsorption, equilibrium had not been reached. The amount of xyloglucan adsorbed increased with beating, but neither the rate of adsorption nor the quantity adsorbed was significantly affected by temperature. Xyloglucan was found to be practically irreversibly adsorbed onto the fibres and the effects of xyloglucan on paper sheet properties were investigated after thorough washing of the pulp. The adsorption characteristics of xyloglucan confirm observations by other authors on other cellulose substrates. Tensile index values for handsheets formed with the xyloglucan-containing pulps were higher than those measured for control pulps with a comparable beating degree. The light scattering coefficient was, however, not affected by xyloglucan adsorption. Hence, the increase in tensile strength is attributed to an increased relative bond strength between the fibres. Tensile strength versus tear strength relationship was similar for pulps with and without xyloglucan, but water retention value and dewatering resistance were lower for the xyloglucan treated pulps than for the reference pulps at the same tensile strength. In addition, formation was improved for pulps with adsorbed xyloglucan. The conclusion is that xyloglucan is a promising wet end additive that decreases the necessity for beating of the pulp and improves the formation of paper.

  • 43. Christiernin, Maria
    et al.
    Notley, Shannon M.
    Zhang, Liming
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nilsson, Thomas
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Comparison between 10 000 year old and contemporary spruce lignin2009In: Wood Science and Technology, ISSN 0043-7719, E-ISSN 1432-5225, Vol. 43, no 1-2, p. 23-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Wood from white spruce Picea glauca that had been preserved by rapid burial in lake sediments 10,000 years ago, was investigated and compared to a contemporary reference white spruce wood. The 10,000-year old sample appeared to have an intact primary cell wall and middle lamella, whereas the carbohydrate monomer distribution, and microscopic images showed that the secondary wall was at least partially removed, indicating that this structure had been selectively attacked by bacteria. The Klason lignin amount in the aged spruce was found to be 60%. The relative lignin monomer content in the aged spruce was 9% lower than that of the reference wood, showing that there were fewer beta-O-4' linkages in the aged sample. This finding was supported by SEC analysis of the thioacidolysed samples as a larger proportion of lignin oligomers were observed in the aged spruce than in the reference material. This indicates a somewhat greater number of condensed bonds in the aged spruce than in the reference spruce sample. Quantitative C-13 NMR analysis and HSQC techniques applied on milled wood lignins (MWL) revealed no significant structural differences between the aged spruce and the reference.

  • 44.
    Christiernin, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Ohlsson, Anna B.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Berglund, Torkel
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lignin isolated from primary walls of hybrid aspen cell cultures indicates significant differences in lignin structure between primary and secondary cell wall2005In: Plant physiology and biochemistry (Paris), ISSN 0981-9428, E-ISSN 1873-2690, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 777-785Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x tremuloides) cell cultures were grown for 7, 14 and 21 days. The cell cultures formed primary cell walls but no secondary cell wall according to carbohydrate analysis and microscopic characterization. The primary walls were lignified, increasingly with age, according to Klason lignin analysis. Presence of lignin in the primary walls, with a higher content in 21-day old cells than in 7-day old cells, was further Supported by phloroglucinol/HCI reagent test and confocal microscopy after both immunolocalization and staining with acriflavin. Both laccase and peroxidase activity were found in the cultures and the activity increased during lignin formation. The lignin from the cell culture material was compared to lignin from mature aspen wood, where most of the lignin originates in the secondary cell wall, and which served as our secondary cell wall control. Lignin from the cell walls was isolated and characterized by thioacidolysis followed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The lignin in the cell cultures differed from lignin of mature aspen wood in that it consisted exclusively of guaiacyl units, and had a more condensed structure. Five lignin structures were identified by mass spectrometry in the cell suspension cultures. The results indicate that the hybrid aspen cell culture used in this investigation may be a convenient experimental system for studies of primary cell wall lignin.

  • 45.
    Christiernin, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Ohlsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Berglund, Torkil
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Analysis of lignin isolated from poplar cell suspension cultures2005In: 59th Appita Annual Conference and Exhibition, incorporating the 13th ISWFPC: International Symposium on Wood, Fibre and Pulping Chemistry, 2005, p. 81-86Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have investigated lignin structures in pure primary cell walls. Poplar cell suspension cultures, Populus tremula x tremuloides, were harvested after 7, 14 and 21 days of growth. Carbohydrate monomer analysis also points at the presence of primary wall exclusively. Confocal microscopy of the cells dyed with acriflavin demonstrates that lignin is present. Klason content increases during growth from 0.7 to 3.9 percent. GC analysis of samples subjected to thioacidolysis shows that the lignin constitutes of guaiacyl units as compared to poplar wood which have syringyl as the main monomer. The amount of monomers per unit Klason lignin is lower than in wood and it decreases during cultivation possibly indicating a larger relative content of carbon-carbon bonds in the polymeric lignin in the cell cultures as compared to wood. Five lignin structures were identified with massspectrometry.

  • 46.
    Christiernin, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Zhang, Liming
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Nilsson, Thomas
    Virkeslära, Sveriges Lantrbruksuniversitet, Uppsala.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Analysis of lignin isolated from spruce with secondary cell wall removed2005In: 59th Appita Annual Conference and Exhibition, incorporating the 13th ISWFPC: International Symposium on Wood, Fibre and Pulping Chemistry, 2005, p. 73-79Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wood from white spruce, Picea glauca, that has been preserved by rapid burial in lake sediments 10 000 years ago was investigated and compared to fresh white spruce wood. The old sample has an intact outer cell wall and middle lamella but most of the secondary cell wall has been selectively removed by bacteria. Klason lignin content was found to be 60% in the old sample, more than twice as high as that found in normal wood. This was rather expected since the middle lamella and primary wall has a higher content of lignin than the secondary wall. After thioacidolysis of the samples the lignin monomer content in the old spruce was 9% lower than that of the reference wood, possibly due to more condensed lignin. This finding was supported by SEC analysis of the thioacidolysed samples. A small amount of coumaryl monomers, 3%, was found in the old spruce and none in the reference wood. The carbohydrate monomer distribution showed that galactose and arabinose and xylose content is higher in old spruce than in white spruce reference, and glucose content is 20% lower in old spruce as compared to reference white spruce. This confirms microscopical evidence that secondary wall was at least partially removed. No new oligomeric lignin structures could be identified with GC-MS analysis of the thioacidolysis products. Millwood lignin from samples were subjected to quantitative NMR analysis by combining 13 C and HSQC techniques, which showed that the lignin structures in mill wood lignin from the old spruce sample was almost identical to those of the reference wood.

  • 47.
    Deshpande, Raghu
    et al.
    MoRe Research, SE-89122 Örnsköldsvik, Sweden.
    Giummarella, Nicola
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Germgård, Ulf
    Karlstad University, SE-65188 Karlstad, Sweden.
    Sundvall, Lars
    MoRe Research, SE-89122 Örnsköldsvik, Sweden.
    Grundberg, Hans
    Domsjö Fabriker, SE-89186 Örnsköldsvik, Sweden.
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    The reactivity of lignin carbohydrate complex (LCC) during manufacture of dissolving sulfite pulp from softwood2018In: Industrial crops and products (Print), ISSN 0926-6690, E-ISSN 1872-633X, Vol. 115, p. 315-322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presence of covalent bonds between lignin and polysaccharides was investigated in dissolving pulps made with one-stage and two-stage acidic sulfite pulping for 100% pine heartwood raw material. The covalent bonds between lignin and pulp polysaccharides occurred mainly to xylan and glucomannan and were of the phenyl glycosides and γ–esters types. The α-ethers that are common in wood were missing in the studied pulp samples. Based on these findings and known lignin reactions during sulfite pulping, a mechanism explaining the absence of the α-ethers is discussed. It is suggested that the lignin carbohydrate bonds may play a vital role in lignin recalcitrance.

  • 48.
    Dogaris, Ioannis
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Study on tall oil solubility for improved resource recovery in chemical pulping of wood2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Tall oil is one of the most valuable by products in chemical pulpingof wood and is considered an important renewable alternative to petroleum.Its fractions have a large spectrum of applications including chemicalprecursors, detergents and energy. High recovery of tall oil is important forthe economic, sustainability, and environmental profile of industrial chemicalpulping. The purpose of this study was to develop ways to increase the yieldof tall oil based on its solubility in black liquors.To investigate this in a controlled way, a model system with a “synthetic”black liquor and a complete methodology for soap skimming anddetermination of recovered tall oil was developed based on solvent extractionand colorimetric analysis with good reproducibility. This model system allowsinvestigations of different parameters in small scale with high control overdifferent conditions.The developed system was used to study the effect of fatty acid addition andthe effect of lignin content on improving tall oil recovery. The presence ofrosin acids in the black liquor significantly reduced soap separation, whileincreasing the fatty acid content up to 60-70% greatly improved soaprecovery. Addition of lignin reduced tall oil recovery in the case of liquors withmore than 50% fatty acids, but slightly increased recovery in liquors withmore than 50% rosin acids. Furthermore, the presence of some ligninseemed to promote separation of the tall oil (reduced its solubility), while highamounts led to inhibition of its recovery.The experimental results clearly indicated that manipulating the content offatty acids and/or lignin before the soap skimming step significantly affect thetall oil solubility, opening up for chemical ways to improve its recovery.However, experiments in real industrial liquors and pulp mill conditions shouldbe considered to assess the actual tall oil yield improvement and processeconomics.

  • 49.
    Ek, Monica
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Engström, Ann-Charlott
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Increase Reactivity of Dissolving Pulps by different pretreatments2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Ek, Monica
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Engström, Ann-Christine
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Increased reactivity of dissolving pulps by different pretreatments2006In: Ninth European Workshop on lignocellulosics and pulp: advances in chemistry and processing of lignocellulosics, 2006, p. 106-108Conference paper (Refereed)
1234 1 - 50 of 175
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