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  • 1.
    Boman, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Sanches, Pedro
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Sensemaking in Intelligent Data Analytics2015In: Künstliche Intelligenz, ISSN 0933-1875, E-ISSN 1610-1987Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A systemic model for making sense of health data is presented, in which networked foresight complements intelligent data analytics. Data here serves the goal of a future systems medicine approach by explaining the past and the current, while foresight can serve by explaining the future. Anecdotal evidence from a case study is presented, in which the complex decisions faced by the traditional stakeholder of results—the policymaker—are replaced by the often mundane problems faced by an individual trying to make sense of sensor input and output when self-tracking wellness. The conclusion is that the employment of our systemic model for successful sensemaking integrates not only data with networked foresight, but also unpacks such problems and the user practices associated with their solutions.

  • 2. Buscher, Monika
    et al.
    Bylund, Markus
    SICS.
    Sanches, Pedro
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Ramirez, Leonardo
    Wood, Lisa
    A New Manhattan Project?: Interoperability and Ethics in Emergency Response Systems of Systems2013In: Proceedings of the 10th International ISCRAM Conference, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we discuss ethical challenges arising around IT supported interoperability in multi-agencyemergency management and explore some methodological responses.

  • 3. Cakici, Baki
    et al.
    Sanches, Pedro
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS. SICS.
    Detecting the Visible: The Discursive Construction of Health Threats in a Syndromic Surveillance System Design2014In: Societies, E-ISSN 2075-4698, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 399-413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information and communication technologies are not value-neutral tools that reflect reality; they privilege some forms of action, and they limit others. We analyze reports describing the design, development, testing and evaluation of a European Commission co-funded syndromic surveillance project called SIDARTHa (System for Information on Detection and Analysis of Risks and Threats to Health). We show that the reports construct the concept of a health threat as a sudden, unexpected event with the potential to cause severe harm and one that requires a public health response aided by surveillance. Based on our analysis, we state that when creating surveillance technologies, design choices have consequences for what can be seen and for what remains invisible. Finally, we argue that syndromic surveillance discourse privileges expertise in developing, maintaining and using software within public health practice, and it prioritizes standardized and transportable knowledge over local and context-dependent knowledge. We conclude that syndromic surveillance contributes to a shift in broader public health practice, with consequences for fairness if design choices and prioritizations remain invisible and unchallenged.

  • 4.
    Ferreira, Pedro
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sanches, P.
    Weilenmann, A.
    Awareness, transience and temporality: Design opportunities from Rah Island2013In: Human-Computer Interaction – INTERACT 2013: 14th IFIP TC 13 International Conference, Cape Town, South Africa, September 2-6, 2013, Proceedings, Part II, Springer , 2013, no PART 2, p. 696-713Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with the implications of the socialness of private communication. Drawing upon ethnographic observations of first time mobile phone users in Rah, an island in Vanuatu, we revisit the debate on how the mobile phone reconfigures private and personal communication. Our observations show how the advent of the mobile phone disrupts and challenges existing practices around how private communication is managed on the island. These observations are used to open up a design space where we explore the socialness of personal, private communication. Drawing on the analysis, we discuss three directions for future thinking of mobile interaction design: (1) designing for spatial awareness; (2) designing for transience and (3) designing with temporality. We expand on these to discuss the notion of digital patina, which we argue, is an exciting topic to explore for the design of personal, social communication.

  • 5. Ferreira, Pedro
    et al.
    Sanches, Pedro
    Höök, Kristina
    Jaensson, Tove
    License to chill!: how to empower users to cope with stress2008In: NordiCHI '08: Proceedings of the 5th Nordic conference on Human-computer interaction: building bridges, 2008, p. 123-132Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There exists today a paucity of tools and devices that empower people to take control over their everyday behaviors and balance their stress levels. To overcome this deficit, we are creating a mobile service, Affective Health, where we aim to provide a holistic approach towards health by enabling users to make a connection between their daily activities and their own memories and subjective experiences. This construction is based upon values detected from certain bodily reactions that are then visualized on a mobile phone. Accomplishing this entailed figuring out how to provide real-time feedback without making the individual even more stressed, while also making certain that the representation empowered rather than controlled them. Useful design feedback was derived from testing two different visualizations on the mobile in a Wizard of Oz study. In short, we found that a successful design needs to: feel alive, allow for interpretative openness, include short-term history, and be updated in real-time. We also found that the interaction did not increase our participants stress reactions.

  • 6.
    Karpashevich, Pavel
    et al.
    KTH. Bauhaus-Universität Weimar, Faculty of Media, Bauhausstr.11, Weimar, Germany.
    Hornecker, E.
    Honauer, M.
    Sanches, Pedro
    KTH.
    Reinterpreting schlemmer's Triadic Ballet: Interactive costume for unthinkable movements2018In: Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the 1920s, Oskar Schlemmer, artist in the Bauhaus move-ment, created the Triadic Ballet costumes. These restrict movement of dancers, creating new expressions. Inspired by this, we designed an interactive wire costume. It restricts lower body movements, and emphasizes arm movements spurring LED-light 'sparks' and 'waves' wired in a tutu-like costume. The Wire Costume was introduced to a dancer who found that an unusual bond emerged between her and the costume. We discuss how sensory alteration (sight, kinesthet-ic awareness and proprioception) and bodily training to ad-just to the new soma, can result in novel, evocative forms of expression. The interactive costume can foster a certain mood, introduce feelings, and even embody a whole charac-ter - only revealed once worn and danced. We describe a de-sign exploration combining cultural and historical research, interviews with experts and material explorations that culmi-nated in a novel prototype.

  • 7. Moore, Heather
    et al.
    Sanches, Pedro
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Boman, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Ethnographies of Practice, Visioning, and Foresight2014In: Innovation for Sustainable Economy & Society / [ed] Huizingh, K.R.E., Conn, S., Torkkeli, M. and Bitran, I., 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A comparative study of three concluded projects is presented, to be used as a backdrop for a newly proposed project on critical adoption of 5G network infrastructure, middleware and service proposed solutions. Since the implementation of those proposed solutions lie 5-8 years into the future, forecasting is necessary and the three concluded projects act as a complementary backcasting exercise in this context. All three concluded projects focused on the development and envisioning of infrastructures for future digital services, all with the proviso that involvement of a wide range of stakeholders could be secured. They were all subject to a rapidly changing development, both on the side of engineering advances and on the side of societal views on such advances. Hence, the new project will have an emphasis on transparency of protocol design and participatory engagement of a greater range of perspectives.

  • 8. Moore, Heather
    et al.
    Sanches, Pedro
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Boman, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Ethnographies of Practice, Visioning and Foresight in Future-Oriented Technology Analysis2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Sanches, Pedro
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Data-driven knowledge production in software engineeringManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Sanches, Pedro
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Health Data: Representation and (In)visibility2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Health data requires context to be understood. I show how, by examining two areas: self-surveillance, with a focus on representation of bodily data, and mass-surveillance, with a focus on representing populations. I critically explore how Information and Communication Technology (ICT) can be made to represent individuals and populations, and identify implications of such representations. My contributions are: (i) the design of a self-tracking stress management system, (ii) the design of a mass-surveillance system based on mobile phone data, (iii) an empirical study exploring how users of a fitness tracker make sense of their generated data, (iv) an analysis of the discourse of designers of a syndrome surveillance system, (v) a critical analysis of the design process of a mass-surveillance system, and (vi) an analysis of the historicity of the concepts and decisions taken during the design of a stress management system. I show that producing health data, and subsequently the technological characteristics of algorithms that produce them depend on factors present in the ICT design process. These factors determine how data is made to represent individuals and populations in ways that may selectively make invisible parts of the population, determinants of health, or individual conception of self and wellbeing. In addition, I show that the work of producing data does not stop with the work of the engineers who produce ICT-based systems: maintenance is constantly required.

  • 11.
    Sanches, Pedro
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Positions in technology design: A case study of a stress management systemManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Sanches, Pedro
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Seeing mobility: how software engineers produce unequal representations2016In: Engineering Studies, ISSN 1937-8629, E-ISSN 1940-8374Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Sanches, Pedro
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Brown, Barry
    Data Bites Man: The Production of Malaria by Technology2018In: Proceedings of the ACM on Human-Computer Interaction, Vol. 2, no CSCWArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Sanches, Pedro
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sas, Corina
    Stahl, Anna
    Ambiguity as a resource to inform proto-practices: The case of skin conductance2019In: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, ISSN 1073-0516, E-ISSN 1557-7325, Vol. 26, no 4, article id 21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Skin conductance is an interesting measure of arousal level, largely unfamiliar to most end-users. We designed a mobile application mirroring end-users’ skin conductance in evocative visualizations, purposefully made ambiguous to invite rich interpretations. Twenty-three participants used the system for a month. Through the lens of a practice-based analysis of weekly interviews and the logged data, several quite different—sometimes even mutually exclusive—interpretations or proto-practices arose: as stress management; sports performance; emotion tracking; general life logging; personality representation; or behavior change practices. This suggests the value of a purposefully open initial design to allow for the emergence of broader proto-practices to be followed by a second step of tailored design for each identified goal to facilitate the transition from proto-practice to practice. We contribute to the HCI discourse on ambiguity in design, arguing for balancing openness and ambiguity with scaffolding to better support the emergence of practices around biodata.

  • 15.
    Sanches, Pedro
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS. SICS.
    Höök, Kristina
    Vaara, Elsa
    Weymann, Claus
    Bylund, Markus
    Ferreira, Pedro
    Peira, Nathalie
    Sjölinder, Marie
    Mind the body!: designing a mobile stress management application encouraging personal reflection2010In: Proceedings of the 8th ACM conference on designing interactive systems, 2010, p. 47-56Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have designed a stress management biofeedback mobile service for everyday use, aiding users to reflect on both positive and negative patterns in their behavior. To do so, we embarked on a complex multidisciplinary design journey, learning that: detrimental stress results from complex processes related to e.g. the subjective experience of being able to cope (or not) and can therefore not be measured and diagnosed solely as a bodily state. We learnt that it is difficult, sometimes impossible, to make a robust analysis of stress symptoms based on biosensors worn outside the laboratory environment they were designed for. We learnt that rather than trying to diagnose stress, it is better to mirror short-term stress reactions back to them, inviting their own interpretations and reflections. Finally, we identified several experiential qualities that such an interface should entail: ambiguity and openness to interpretation, interactive history of prior states, fluency and aliveness.

  • 16.
    Sanches, Pedro
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Janson, Axel
    KTH.
    Karpashevich, Pavel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Nadal, Camille
    Qu, Chengcheng
    Daudén Roquet, Claudia
    Umair, Muhammad
    Windlin, Charles
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Doherty, Gavin
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Corina, Sas
    HCI and Affective Health: Taking stock of a decade of studies and charting future research directions2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Sanches, Pedro
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Svee, Eric Oluf
    Bylund, Markus
    Hirsch, Benjamin
    Boman, Magnus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Software and Computer systems, SCS.
    Knowing Your Population: Privacy-Sensitive Mining of Massive Data2013In: Network and Communication Technologies, ISSN 1927-064X, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 34-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Location and mobility patterns of individuals are important to environmental planning, societal resilience, public health, and a host of commercial applications. Mining telecommunication traffic and transactions data for such purposes is controversial, in particular raising issues of privacy. However, our hypothesis is that privacy-sensitive uses are possible and often beneficial enough to warrant considerable research and development efforts. Our work contends that peoples’ behavior can yield patterns of both significant commercial, and research, value. For such purposes, methods and algorithms for mining telecommunication data to extract commonly used routes and locations, articulated through time-geographical constructs, are described in a case study within the area of transportation planning and analysis. From the outset, these were designed to balance the privacy of subscribers and the added value of mobility patterns derived from their mobile communication traffic and transactions data. Our work directly contrasts the current, commonly held notion that value can only be added to services by directly monitoring the behavior of individuals, such as in current attempts at location-based services. We position our work within relevant legal frameworks for privacy and data protection, and show that our methods comply with such requirements and also follow best-practices.

  • 18. Silvăşan, Iuliana
    et al.
    Kreuger, Per
    Sanches, Pedro
    Swedish Institute of Computer Science, Sweden.
    Vaara, Elsa
    Sjölinder, Marie
    Movement identification in Affective Health–a mobile biofeedback monitoring system2010In: 18th Telecommunications Forum TELFOR 2010, 2010, p. 340-343Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19. Svee, Eric-Oluf
    et al.
    Sanches, Pedro
    Swedish Institute of Computer Science, Sweden.
    Bylund, Markus
    Time geography rediscovered: a common language for location-oriented services2009In: Proceedings of the 2nd International Workshop on Location and the Web, LOCWEB'09, 2009, p. 36-39Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose that the concepts of Time Geography be evaluated as a framework for use within location-oriented services. Originally conceived as a system to describe patterns in human migration, Time Geography is ideally suited for providing the common language and concepts necessary for dialogue within this evolving area. Location-oriented services have been the focus of a great deal of attention, but with research occurring in many disparate disciplines, the lack of a common model that can conceptualize these ideas has not received appropriate attention. To demonstrate its applicability within location-oriented services, we present a research activity which makes explicit use of concepts from Time Geography, with the hope that it can be seen as a tractable and practical solution for several difficulties facing this fast growing area of interest.

  • 20.
    Tsaknaki, Vasiliki
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Ståhl, Anna
    Sanches, Pedro
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Windlin, Charles
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Karpashevich, Pavel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Teaching Soma Design2019In: In Proceedings of the 2019 Conference on Designing Interactive Systems (DIS '19), ACM Digital Library, San Diego, CA, USA: ACM , 2019, p. 1237-1249Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Windlin, Charles
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ståhl, Anna
    RISE SICS, Kista, Sweden.
    Sanches, Pedro
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Tsaknaki, Vasiliki
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Karpashevich, Pavel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Balaam, Madeline
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Soma Bits - Mediating Technology to Orchestrate Bodily Experiences2019In: Proceedings of the 4th Biennial Research Through Design Conference19–22/03/2019, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Soma Bits are a prototyping toolkit that facilitates Soma Design. Acting as an accessible ‘sociodigital material’ Soma Bits allow designers to pair digital technologies, with their whole body and senses, as part of an iterative soma design process.The Soma Bits addresses the difficulty we experienced in past Soma Design processes — that articulating ofsensations we want to evoke to others, and thenmaintaining these experiences in memory throughout a design process. Thus, the Soma Bits enable designers to know and experience what a designmight ‘feel like’ and to share that with others.

    The Soma Bits relate to three experiential qualities:‘feeling connected’, ‘feeling embraced’, and ‘being in correspondence’ with the interactive materials. The Soma Bits have a form factor and materiality thatallow actuators (heat, vibration, and shape-changing) to be placed on and around the body; they are easily configurable to enable quick and controllable creations of soma experiences which can be both part of a first-person approach as well as shared withothers. The Soma Bits are a living, growing library ofshapes and actuators. We use them in our own designpractices, as well as when engaging others in soma design processes.

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