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  • 1.
    Brandenburg, Axel
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Gressel, Oliver
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Jabbari, Sarah
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Kleeorin, Nathan
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Rogachevskii, Igor
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Mean-field and direct numerical simulations of magnetic flux concentrations from vertical field2014In: Astronomy and Astrophysics, ISSN 0004-6361, E-ISSN 1432-0746, Vol. 562, p. A53-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context. Strongly stratified hydromagnetic turbulence has previously been found to produce magnetic flux concentrations if the domain is large enough compared with the size of turbulent eddies. Mean-field simulations (MFS) using parameterizations of the Reynolds and Maxwell stresses show a large-scale negative effective magnetic pressure instability and have been able to reproduce many aspects of direct numerical simulations (DNS) regarding growth rate, shape of the resulting magnetic structures, and their height as a function of magnetic field strength. Unlike the case of an imposed horizontal field, for a vertical one, magnetic flux concentrations of equipartition strength with the turbulence can be reached, resulting in magnetic spots that are reminiscent of sunspots. Aims. We determine under what conditions magnetic flux concentrations with vertical field occur and what their internal structure is. Methods. We use a combination of MFS, DNS, and implicit large-eddy simulations (ILES) to characterize the resulting magnetic flux concentrations in forced isothermal turbulence with an imposed vertical magnetic field. Results. Using DNS, we confirm earlier results that in the kinematic stage of the large-scale instability the horizontal wavelength of structures is about 10 times the density scale height. At later times, even larger structures are being produced in a fashion similar to inverse spectral transfer in helically driven turbulence. Using ILES, we find that magnetic flux concentrations occur for Mach numbers between 0.1 and 0.7. They occur also for weaker stratification and larger turbulent eddies if the domain is wide enough. Using MFS, the size and aspect ratio of magnetic structures are determined as functions of two input parameters characterizing the parameterization of the effective magnetic pressure. DNS, ILES, and MFS show magnetic flux tubes with mean-field energies comparable to the turbulent kinetic energy. These tubes can reach a length of about eight density scale heights. Despite being ≤1% equipartition strength, it is important that their lower part is included within the computational domain to achieve the full strength of the instability. Conclusions. The resulting vertical magnetic flux tubes are being confined by downflows along the tubes and corresponding inflow from the sides, which keep the field concentrated. Application to sunspots remains a viable possibility.

  • 2.
    Jabbari, Sarah
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Brandenburg, Axel
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Kleeorin, Nathan
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Mitra, Dhrubaditya
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Rogachevskii, Igor
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    BIPOLAR MAGNETIC SPOTS FROM DYNAMOS IN STRATIFIED SPHERICAL SHELL TURBULENCE2015In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 805, no 2, article id 166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent work by Mitra et al. (2014) has shown that in strongly stratified forced two-layer turbulence with helicity and corresponding large-scale dynamo action in the lower layer, and nonhelical turbulence in the upper, a magnetic field occurs in the upper layer in the form of sharply bounded bipolar magnetic spots. Here we extend this model to spherical wedge geometry covering the northern hemisphere up to 75 degrees latitude and an azimuthal extent of 180 degrees. The kinetic helicity and therefore also the large-scale magnetic field are strongest at low latitudes. For moderately strong stratification, several bipolar spots form that eventually fill the full longitudinal extent. At early times, the polarity of spots reflects the orientation of the underlying azimuthal field, as expected from Parker's Omega-shaped flux loops. At late times their tilt changes such that there is a radial field of opposite orientation at different latitudes separated by about 10 degrees. Our model demonstrates the spontaneous formation of spots of sizes much larger than the pressure scale height. Their tendency to produce filling factors close to unity is argued to be reminiscent of highly active stars. We confirm that strong stratification and strong scale separation are essential ingredients behind magnetic spot formation, which appears to be associated with downflows at larger depths.

  • 3.
    Jabbari, Sarah
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Brandenburg, Axel
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Kleeorin, Nathan
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Mitra, Dhrubaditya
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Rogachevskii, Igor
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Surface flux concentrations in a spherical alpha 2 dynamo2013In: Astronomy and Astrophysics, ISSN 0004-6361, E-ISSN 1432-0746, Vol. 556, p. A106-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context. In the presence of strong density stratification, turbulence can lead to the large-scale instability of a horizontal magnetic field if its strength is in a suitable range (around a few percent of the turbulent equipartition value). This instability is related to a suppression of the turbulent pressure so that the turbulent contribution to the mean magnetic pressure becomes negative. This results in the excitation of a negative effective magnetic pressure instability (NEMPI). This instability has so far only been studied for an imposed magnetic field. Aims. We want to know how NEMPI works when the mean magnetic field is generated self-consistently by an alpha(2) dynamo, whether it is affected by global spherical geometry, and whether it can influence the properties of the dynamo itself. Methods. We adopt the mean-field approach, which has previously been shown to provide a realistic description of NEMPI in direct numerical simulations. We assume axisymmetry and solve the mean-field equations with the Pencil Code for an adiabatic stratification at a total density contrast in the radial direction of approximate to 4 orders of magnitude. Results. NEMPI is found to work when the dynamo-generated field is about 4% of the equipartition value, which is achieved through strong alpha quenching. This instability is excited in the top 5% of the outer radius, provided the density contrast across this top layer is at least 10. NEMPI is found to occur at lower latitudes when the mean magnetic field is stronger. For weaker fields, NEMPI can make the dynamo oscillatory with poleward migration. Conclusions. NEMPI is a viable mechanism for producing magnetic flux concentrations in a strongly stratified spherical shell in which a magnetic field is generated by a strongly quenched alpha effect dynamo.

  • 4.
    Jabbari, Sarah
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA. Monash Univ, Australia; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Brandenburg, Axel
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA. Stockholm Univ, Sweden; Univ Colorado, USA; Lab Atmospher & Space Phys, USA.
    Kleeorin, Nathan
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA. Stockholm Univ, Sweden; Ben Gurion Univ Negev, Israel.
    Rogachevskii, Igor
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA. Stockholm Univ, Sweden; Ben Gurion Univ Negev, Israel.
    Sharp magnetic structures from dynamos with density stratification2017In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 467, no 3, p. 2753-2765Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent direct numerical simulations (DNS) of large-scale turbulent dynamos in strongly stratified layers have resulted in surprisingly sharp bipolar structures at the surface. Here, we present new DNS of helically and non-helically forced turbulence with and without rotation and compare with corresponding mean-field simulations (MFS) to show that these structures are a generic outcome of a broader class of dynamos in density-stratified layers. The MFS agree qualitatively with the DNS, but the period of oscillations tends to be longer in the DNS. In both DNS and MFS, the sharp structures are produced by converging flows at the surface and might be driven in non-linear stage of evolution by the Lorentz force associated with the large-scale dynamo-driven magnetic field if the dynamo number is at least 2.5 times supercritical.

  • 5.
    Jabbari, Sarah
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA. Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Brandenburg, Axel
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA. Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Mitra, Dhrubaditya
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Kleeorin, Nathan
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA. Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel.
    Rogachevskii, Igor
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA. Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel.
    Turbulent reconnection of magnetic bipoles in stratified turbulence2016In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 459, no 4, p. 4046-4056Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We consider strongly stratified forced turbulence in a plane-parallel layer with helicity and corresponding large-scale dynamo action in the lower part and non-helical turbulence in the upper. The magnetic field is found to develop strongly concentrated bipolar structures near the surface. They form elongated bands with a sharp interface between opposite polarities. Unlike earlier experiments with imposed magnetic field, the inclusion of rotation does not strongly suppress the formation of these structures. We perform a systematic numerical study of this phenomenon by varying magnetic Reynolds number, scale-separation ratio, and Coriolis number. We focus on the formation of a current sheet between bipolar regions where reconnection of oppositely oriented field lines occurs. We determine the reconnection rate by measuring either the inflow velocity in the vicinity of the current sheet or by measuring the electric field in the reconnection region. We demonstrate that for large Lundquist numbers, S > 10(3), the reconnection rate is nearly independent of S in agreement with results of recent numerical simulations performed by other groups in simpler settings.

  • 6.
    Jabbari, Sarah
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA. Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Brandenburg, Axel
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA. Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Rivero Losada, Illa
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA. Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Kleeorin, Nathan
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA. Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel .
    Rogachevskii, Igor
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA. Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel .
    Magnetic flux concentrations from dynamo-generated fields2014In: Astronomy and Astrophysics, ISSN 0004-6361, E-ISSN 1432-0746, Vol. 568, p. A112-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context The mean field theory of magnetized stellar convection gives rise to two distinct instabilities; the large-scale dynamo instability, operating in the bulk of the convection zone and a negative effective magnetic pressure instability (NEMPI) operating in the strongly stratified surface layers. The latter might be important in connection with magnetic spot formation. However, as follows from theoretical analysis, the growth rate of NEMPI is suppressed with increasing rotation rates. On the other hand, recent direct numerical simulations (DNS) have shown a subsequent increase in the growth rate. Aims. We examine quantitatively whether this increase in the growth rate of NEMPI can be explained by an alpha(2) mean field dynamo, and whether both NEMPI and the dynamo instability can operate at the same time. Methods. We use both DNS and mean field simulations (MFS) to solve the underlying equations numerically either with or without an imposed horizontal held, We use the test-field method to compute relevant dynamo coefficients. Results. DNS show that magnetic flux concentrations are still possible up to rotation rates above which the large-scale dynamo effect produces mean magnetic fields. The resulting DNS growth rates are quantitatively reproduced with MPS. As expected for weak or vanishing rotation, the growth rate of NEMPI increases with increasing gravity, but there is a correction term for strong gravity and large turbulent magnetic diffusivity. Conclusions. Magnetic flux concentrations are still possible for rotation rates above which dynamo action takes over For the solar rotation rate, the corresponding turbulent turnover time is about 5 h, with dynamo action commencing in the layers beneath.

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  • apa
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