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  • 1.
    Quan, Can
    et al.
    Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Uppsala University.
    Werner, Oskar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Turner, Charlotta
    Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Uppsala University.
    Generation of superhydrophobic paper surfaces by a rapidly expanding supercritical carbon dioxide-alkyl ketene dimer solution2009In: Journal of Supercritical Fluids, ISSN 0896-8446, E-ISSN 1872-8162, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 117-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Superhydrophobic alkyl ketene dimer (AKD) layers were successfully produced on top of untreated paper surfaces by a rapid expansion of supercritical CO2 solution (RESS) process. The new method resulted in a degree of hydrophobicity, as measured by contact angles of water droplets on AKD surfaces, dramatically higher, up to 173 degrees, compared to a conventional method consisting in melting AKD granules directly on the paper substrate, giving contact angles of around 109 degrees. Experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of varying pre-expansion pressure (100-300 bar), pre-expansion temperature (40 and 60 degrees C) and spraying distance (10 and 50 mm) on the properties of the treated surfaces. The surfaces were analyzed regarding AKD particle size, surface morphology and hydrophobicity with the aid of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and contact angle measurements. The average AKD particle size after RESS processing was between 1 and 2 mu m depending upon the experimental conditions used, being slightly smaller when using higher pre-expansion pressure and temperature as well as shorter spraying distance.

  • 2. Turner, C.
    et al.
    Werner, Oskar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. Centre for Analysis and Synthesis, Lund University.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Superhydrophobic surfaces produced by supercritical fluid technology2011In: AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Werner, Oskar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Superhydrophobic Cellulosic Surfaces: Preparation and Characterisation of Superhydrophobic Cellulosic Surfaces. Investigation of the Free Energy Barriers Between Cassie-Baxter and Wenzel States of Wetting2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
  • 4.
    Werner, Oskar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Persson, Lisa
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nolte, Marc
    MPI for Colloids and Interfaces, Wissenschaftspark Golm.
    Fery, Andreas
    Universität Bayreuth, Physical Chemistry II.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Patterning of surfaces with nanosized cellulosic fibrils using microcontact printing and a lift-off technique2008In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, Vol. 4, no 6, p. 1158-1160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microfibrillar cellulose has been organised into nanofilms with well-controlled features. This has been achieved with adsorption onto microcontact printed surfaces and with a novel microcontact lift-off technique.

  • 5.
    Werner, Oskar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Pettersson, Bert
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Characterisation of wetting by solidification of agarose solution sessile drops2009In: Superhydrophobic Surfaces, CRC Press , 2009, p. 475-486Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A new method for characterising the wetting of structured surfaces is presented. Sessile drops of a warm agarose solution were placed on test surfaces and then removed after the gelation of the agarose solution caused by the cooling of the drop. By studying the base of the sessile drops using confocal microscopy and image processing it was possible to determine the wetting mode and general appearance of the liquid-gas interface beneath the drop. The method also shows potential to measure the wetted area, and local contact angles beneath the footprint of a sessile drop. The applicability of the method was also demonstrated by its application to periodically structured photopolymer plates and surfaces covered by microsized glass spheres. 

  • 6.
    Werner, Oskar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Pettersson, Bert
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Characterisation of Wetting by Solidification of Agarose Solution Sessile Drops2008In: Journal of Adhesion Science and Technology, ISSN 0169-4243, E-ISSN 1568-5616, Vol. 22, no 15, p. 1919-1929Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new method for characterising the wetting of structured surfaces is presented. Sessile drops of a warm agarose solution were placed on test surfaces and then removed after the gelation of the agarose solution caused by the cooling of the drop. By studying the base of the sessile drops using confocal microscopy and image processing it was possible to determine the wetting mode and general appearance of the liquid-gas interface beneath the drop. The method also shows potential to measure the wetted area, and local contact angles beneath the footprint of a sessile drop. The applicability of the method was also demonstrated by its application to periodically structured photopolymer plates and surfaces covered by microsized glass spheres.

  • 7.
    Werner, Oskar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    The Influence of Geometry on Superhydrophobicity2009In: SMART COATINGS II    / [ed] Provder T; Baghdachi J, 2009, Vol. 1002, p. 250-273Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Super-hydrophobic surface properties may arise from the interplay between an intrinsic, relatively high contact angle of the solid surface involved, and the geometric features of the solid surface. In the present work this relationship was investigated, for a range of different surface geometries, making use of a theoretical model based on surface free energy minimisation. As a rule, the free energy minima (and maxima) occur when the Laplace and Young conditions are simultaneously fulfilled. Special efforts have been devoted to investigating the free energy barriers that are present between the Cassie-Baxter (heterogeneous wetting) and Wenzel (homogeneous wetting) modes of wetting. Along with the above scheme a new experimental method for characterising the wetting of structured surfaces has been developed. Sessile drops of 3 % (by weight) agarose solution were immobilised on test surfaces. The drops could be removed after solidification and by using confocal microscopy and image processing it was possible to characterise the interface between the droplet and the solid surface. This analysis also made it possible to determine wetting mode of the droplet, and to estimate the wet surface area and the local contact angles beneath the drop.

  • 8.
    Werner, Oskar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Lindström, Tom
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wetting of structured hydrophobic surfaces by water droplets2005In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 21, no 26, p. 12235-12243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Super-hydrophobic surfaces may arise due to an interplay between the intrinsic, relatively high, contact angle of the more or less hydrophobic solid surface employed and the geometric features of the solid surface. In the present work, this relationship was investigated for a range of different surface geometries, making use of surface free energy minimization. As a rule, the free energy minima (and maxima) occur when the Laplace and Young conditions are simultaneously fulfilled. Special effort has been devoted to investigating the free energy barriers present between the Cassie-Baxter (heterogeneous wetting) and Wenzel (homogeneous wetting) modes. The predictions made on the basis of the model calculations compare favorably with experimental results presented in the literature.

1 - 8 of 8
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