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  • 1.
    Carlson, Andreas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics.
    Capillarity and dynamic wetting2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis capillary dominated two–phase flow is studied by means of nu- merical simulations and experiments. The theoretical basis for the simulations consists of a phase field model, which is derived from the system’s thermody- namics, and coupled with the Navier Stokes equations. Two types of interfacial flow are investigated, droplet dynamics in a bifurcating channel and sponta- neous capillary driven spreading of drops.

    Microfluidic and biomedical applications often rely on a precise control of droplets as they traverse through complicated networks of bifurcating channels. Three–dimensional simulations of droplet dynamics in a bifurcating channel are performed for a set of parameters, to describe their influence on the resulting droplet dynamics. Two distinct flow regimes are identified as the droplet in- teracts with the tip of the channel junction, namely, droplet splitting and non- splitting. A flow map based on droplet size and Capillary number is proposed to predict whether the droplet splits or not in such a geometry.

    A commonly occurring flow is the dynamic wetting of a dry solid substrate. Both experiments and numerical simulations of the spreading of a drop are presented here. A direct comparison of the two identifies a new parameter in the phase field model that is required to accurately predict the experimental spreading behavior. This parameter μf [P a · s], is interpreted as a friction factor at the moving contact line. Comparison of simulations and experiments for different liquids and surface wetting properties enabled a measurement of the contact line friction factor for a wide parameter space. Values for the contact line friction factor from phase field theory are reported here for the first time.

    To identify the physical mechanism that governs the droplet spreading, the different contributions to the flow are measured from the simulations. An im- portant part of the dissipation may arise from a friction related to the motion of the contact line itself, and this is found to be dominating both inertia and viscous friction adjacent to the contact line. A scaling law based on the con- tact line friction factor collapses the experimental data, whereas a conventional inertial or viscous scaling fails to rationalize the experimental observation, supporting the numerical finding.

  • 2.
    Carlson, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Bellani, Gabriele
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Contact line dissipation in short-time dynamic wetting2012In: Europhysics letters, ISSN 0295-5075, E-ISSN 1286-4854, Vol. 97, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dynamic wetting of a solid surface is a process that is ubiquitous in Nature, and also of increasing technological importance. The underlying dissipative mechanisms are, however, still unclear. We present here short-time dynamic wetting experiments and numerical simulations, based on a phase field approach, of a droplet on a dry solid surface, where direct comparison of the two allows us to evaluate the different contributions from the numerics. We find that an important part of the dissipation may arise from a friction related to the motion of the contact line itself, and that this may be dominating both inertia and viscous friction in the flow adjacent to the contact line. A contact line friction factor appears in the theoretical formulation that can be distinguished and quantified, also in room temperature where other sources of dissipation are present. Water and glycerin-water mixtures on various surfaces have been investigated where we show the dependency of the friction factor on the nature of the surface, and the viscosity of the liquid.

  • 3.
    Carlson, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Bellani, Gabriele
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Measuring contact line dissipation in dynamic wetting2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Dynamic wetting of a solid surface is a process that is ubiquitous in nature, and also of increasing technological importance. The underlying dissipative mechanisms are however still unclear. We present here dynamic wetting experiments of a droplet on a dry surface, showing that an important part of the dissipation may arise from a friction related to the motion of the contact line itself, and that this may be dominating the viscous friction in the flow adjacent to the contact line. By a combination of simulations and experiments, values of a corresponding friction factor are obtained. By this procedure the contact line friction factor can be distinguished and quantified, also in room temperature where other sources of dissipation are present. Water and glycerin-water mixtures on various surfaces have been investigated. We show the dependency of the friction factor on the nature of the surface, and the viscosity of the liquid.

  • 4.
    Carlson, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Bellani, Gabriele
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Fluid Physics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Universality in dynamic wetting dominated by contact-line friction2012In: Physical Review E. Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics, ISSN 1539-3755, E-ISSN 1550-2376, Vol. 85, no 4, p. 045302-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report experiments on the rapid contact-line motion present in the early stages of capillary-driven spreading of drops on dry solid substrates. The spreading data fail to follow a conventional viscous or inertial scaling. By integrating experiments and simulations, we quantify a contact-line friction mu(f) which is seen to limit the speed of the rapid dynamic wetting. A scaling based on this contact-line friction is shown to yield a universal curve for the evolution of the contact-line radius as a function of time, for a range of fluid viscosities, drop sizes, and surface wettabilities.

  • 5.
    Carlson, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Do-Quang, Minh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Dissipation in rapid dynamic wetting2011In: Journal of Fluid Mechanics, ISSN 0022-1120, E-ISSN 1469-7645, Vol. 682, p. 213-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we present a modelling approach for rapid dynamic wetting based on the phase field theory. We show that in order to model this accurately, it is important to allow for a non-equilibrium wetting boundary condition. Using a condition of this type, we obtain a direct match with experimental results reported in the literature for rapid spreading of liquid droplets on dry surfaces. By extracting the dissipation of energy and the rate of change of kinetic energy in the flow simulation, we identify a new wetting regime during the rapid phase of spreading. This is characterized by the main dissipation to be due to a re-organization of molecules at the contact line, in a diffusive or active process. This regime serves as an addition to the other wetting regimes that have previously been reported in the literature.

  • 6.
    Carlson, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Do-Quang, Minh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Droplet dynamics in a bifurcating channel2010In: International Journal of Multiphase Flow, ISSN 0301-9322, E-ISSN 1879-3533, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 397-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present paper we present a phenomenological description of droplet dynamics in a bifurcating channel that is based on three-dimensional numerical experiments using the Phase Field theory. Droplet dynamics is investigated in a junction, which has symmetric outflow conditions in its daughter branches. We identify two different flow regimes as the droplets interact with the tip of the bifurcation, splitting and non-splitting. A distinct criterion for the flow regime transition is found based on the initial droplet volume and the Capillary (Ca) number. The Rayleigh Plateau instability is identified as a driving mechanism for the droplet breakup close to the threshold between the splitting and non-splitting regime.

  • 7.
    Carlson, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Do-Quang, Minh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Modeling of dynamic wetting far from equilibrium2009In: Physics of fluids, ISSN 1070-6631, E-ISSN 1089-7666, Vol. 21, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present simulations of dynamic wetting far from equilibrium based on phase field theory. In direct simulations of recent experiments [J. C. Bird, S. Mandre, and H. A. Stone, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 234501 (2008)], we show that in order to correctly capture the dynamics of rapid wetting, it is crucial to account for nonequilibrium at the contact line, where the gas, liquid, and solid meet. A term in the boundary condition at the solid surface that naturally arises in the phase field theory is interpreted as allowing for the establishment of a local structure in the immediate vicinity of the contact line. A direct qualitative and quantitative match with experimental data of spontaneously wetting liquid droplets is shown.

  • 8.
    Carlson, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Kim, P.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Stone, H. A.
    Short and long time drop dynamics on lubricated substrates2013In: Europhysics letters, ISSN 0295-5075, E-ISSN 1286-4854, Vol. 104, no 3, p. 34008-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Liquid infiltrated solids have been proposed as functional solvent-phobic surfaces for handling single and multiphase flows. Implementation of such surfaces alters the interfacial transport phenomenon as compared to a dry substrate. To better understand the interface characteristics in such systems we study experimentally the dynamics of a pendant water drop in air that contacts a substrate coated by thin oil films. At short times the water drop is deformed by the oil that spreads onto the water-air interface, and the dynamics are characterized by inertial and viscous regimes. At late times, the the oil film under the drop relaxes either to a stable thin film or ruptures. In the thin film rupture regime, we measure the waiting time for the rupture as a function of the drop equilibrium contact angle on a dry substrate and the initial film height. The waiting time is rationalized by lubrication theory, which indicates that long-range intermolecular forces destabilize the oil-water interface and is the primary mechanism for the film drainage.

  • 9.
    Carlson, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Nuclear Power Safety.
    Kudinov, Pavel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Nuclear Power Safety.
    Narayanan, C.
    ASCOMP GmbH, Technoparkstrasse 1, 8005 Z¨urich, Switzerland.
    Prediction of Two-Phase Flow in Small Tubes: A Systematic Comparison of State-of-The-Art CMFD Codes2008In: 5th European Thermal-Sciences Conference (EUROTHERM), 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multiphase dynamics and its characteristics for two-phase gas-liquid flow have been investigatedby means of advanced numerical simulations. Although important in many engineering applications, methods for robust and accurate simulations for high density and viscosity ratios remainelusive. A comprehensive comparison of two state-of-the-art Computational Multi–Fluid Dynamics (CMFD) codes, Fluent and TransAT, have been performed. The two commonly usedmethods for two–phase flow simulations, namely Volume of Fluid implemented in Fluent andLevel Set implemented in TransAT, could be compared as a result. Significant differences wereobserved between the two flow topologies predicted by the two codes. For the bubbly flow case,a recirculating flow was predicted inside the bubbles by TransAT, meanwhile no significantrecirculation was observed in the solution with Fluent. For the slug flow case a significantdeviation was observed between the results from Fluent and TransAT on the slug formationand frequency. Periodic slug formation was observed with TransAT, in agreement with theexperimental result of Chen et al. [4]. A periodic slug formation was not obtained with Fluent.

  • 10. Laurila, T.
    et al.
    Carlson, Andreas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Do-Quang, Minh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Ala-Nissila, T.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Thermohydrodynamics of boiling in a van der Waals fluid2012In: Physical Review E. Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics, ISSN 1539-3755, E-ISSN 1550-2376, Vol. 85, no 2, p. 026320-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a modeling approach that enables numerical simulations of a boiling Van der Waals fluid based on the diffuse interface description. A boundary condition is implemented that allows in and out flux of mass at constant external pressure. In addition, a boundary condition for controlled wetting properties of the boiling surface is also proposed. We present isothermal verification cases for each element of our modeling approach. By using these two boundary conditions we are able to numerically access a system that contains the essential physics of the boiling process at microscopic scales. Evolution of bubbles under film boiling and nucleate boiling conditions are observed by varying boiling surface wettability. We observe flow patters around the three-phase contact line where the phase change is greatest. For a hydrophilic boiling surface, a complex flow pattern consistent with vapor recoil theory is observed.

  • 11. Lin, Yuan
    et al.
    Skjetne, Paal
    Carlson, Andreas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    A phase field model for multiphase electro-hydrodynamic flow2012In: International Journal of Multiphase Flow, ISSN 0301-9322, E-ISSN 1879-3533, Vol. 45, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The principles of electro-hydrodynamics have been known for more than a century and extensive experimental studies have been carried out. Insight about such types of flows have been widely adopted for industrial applications, e.g. fluid mixing and de-mixing, but analytical solutions only exist in a limited number of cases, e.g. small deformation of a single droplet in a uniform and steady electric field. Numerical modeling of such phenomena can provide significant insights into electro-hydrodynamic multi-phase flows. In the present paper we propose a phase field model for studying two-phase electro-hydrodynamic flow generated by an electric field. The proposed model is validated and found to be in good agreement with existing analytical solutions and numerical studies in the literature. We also investigate the influence of viscosity ratio and surface tension in binary coalescence of drops in an immiscible fluid.

  • 12. Nakamura, Yoshinori
    et al.
    Carlson, Andreas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Amberg, Gustav
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics, Physicochemical Fluid Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Shiomi, Junichiro
    Dynamic wetting at the nanoscale2013In: Physical Review E. Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics, ISSN 1539-3755, E-ISSN 1550-2376, Vol. 88, no 3, p. 033010-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the capillary spreading of a drop on a dry substrate is well studied, understanding and describing the physical mechanisms that govern the dynamics remain challenging. Here we study the dynamics of spreading of partially wetting nanodroplets by combining molecular dynamics simulations and continuum phase field simulations. The phase field simulations account for all the relevant hydrodynamics, i.e., capillarity, inertia, and viscous stresses. By coordinated continuum and molecular dynamics simulations, the macroscopic model parameters are extracted. For a Lennard-Jones fluid spreading on a planar surface, the liquid slip at the solid substrate is found to be significant, in fact crucial for the motion of the contact line. Evaluation of the different contributions to the energy transfer shows that the liquid slip generates dissipation of the same order as the bulk viscous dissipation or the energy transfer to kinetic energy. We also study the dynamics of spreading on a substrate with a periodic nanostructure. Here it is found that a nanostructure with a length scale commensurate with molecular size completely inhibits the liquid slip. The dynamic spreading is thus about 30% slower on a nanostructured surface compared to one that is atomically smooth.

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