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  • 1. Beretta, M.
    et al.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product Innovation Technology.
    Moderating Ideation in Web-Enabled Ideation Systems2018In: The Journal of product innovation management, ISSN 0737-6782, E-ISSN 1540-5885, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 389-409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While organizations increasingly implement web-enabled ideation systems to access the collective intelligence of their distributed employees, recent studies show that most attempts to use these systems underperform or fail. This article draws on a qualitative case study of the Ericsson system “Idea Boxes” to explore a novel approach to manage ideation based on the use of the moderator role. The aim of this study is to understand to what extent and how the introduction of moderators can contribute to a better management of web-enabled ideation systems and to overcome the shortcomings commonly associated with their use. The contribution of this study to innovation literature is threefold. First, it develops a conceptual framework that gives insights into the practices implemented by moderators to manage ideation, namely: (1) formulating an ideation strategy, (2) combining means for community building, and (3) formalizing the ideation process. It focuses on unfolding their key complementarities. Second, this study relates these practices to the shortcomings of web-enabled ideation systems with respect to the sourcing, filtering, and handling of employees' ideas. It discusses how the identified practices can help organizations address these shortcomings by stimulating sustained employee participation, increasing the quality and fit of the ideas generated, and ensuring their efficient selection and integration. Third, this article compares moderators to other innovation roles discussed in the new product development literature with the aim of broadening the future research agenda toward an investigation of emerging organizational roles having limited formal authority to manage innovation. The findings of this study provide valuable guidelines to managers to implement more sophisticated approaches for a better management of the ideation process through web-enabled ideation tools.

  • 2. Bergendahl, Magnus
    et al.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Sapucci, Mirco
    Making collaborative ideation work: Challenges and success factors for the use of collaborative ideation tools2012In: IAMOT 2012, Taiwan, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Bergendahl, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ideation High Performers: A Study of Motivational Factors2015In: Creativity Research Journal, ISSN 1040-0419, E-ISSN 1532-6934, Vol. 27, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As innovation today is one of the keys to success for firms, creativity among its employees becomes a key asset and the understanding about what motivates employees in ideation is consequently of high interest. This article addresses differences in motivation among high- and low performers in ideation and contributes to existing theory by enhancing the understanding about what characterizes motivation among ideation high performers. The quantitative analysis used is based on a study performed at a multinational consumer goods company based in Sweden, surveying employees’ performance, motivation and their preferences towards collaboration and competition. Among key findings is the possible combination of collaboration and competition mechanisms as motivating means in firms’ ideation management. 

  • 4.
    Bergendahl, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Inducing ideation collaboration through competition?2015Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Björk, Jennie
    Chalmers tekniska högskola.
    Analyzing and realizing collective ideation in firms2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Analyzing and realizing collective ideation in firms Jennie Björk Department of Technology Management and Economics Chalmers University of Technology Abstract This thesis investigates collective aspects of ideation. An increasing body of literature has moved away from regarding ideation as solely the act of single individuals to acknowledge the importance of inter-individual relationships. This opens up new opportunities for companies but it also brings about a number of new challenges. For example, it raises the question of how collective ideation contributes to the creation of ideas for innovation and how it can be used in a purposeful way. While previous research has addressed collective ideation in groups, research on ideation networks, comprising individuals and their interactions contributing to the creation of ideas, has been far less researched. The aim of this thesis is to broaden the view of collective ideation by moving beyond the group level. It does so through investigating how individual and collective ideation activities take place within firms, by using a social network perspective. More specifically, the aim is to describe and analyze collective ideation activities in firms, and explore how these can be fruitfully used to nurture innovation efforts. Drawing upon data on all the ideas created within an organization over a number of years, the thesis uses social network analysis to map and analyze the internal networks contributing to idea generation. Several types of analyses have been used to increase our understanding of how various structural properties in an ideation network interrelate with ideation performance by individuals and groups. First, the research shows that individuals who collaborate with larger numbers of different individuals are associated with a higher probability of generating useful and novel ideas themselves. However, this pattern was only seen to a certain extent. Second, the results showed that network structure and ideation performance are interrelated for spontaneously formed groups but not for formal project groups. Formal and informal collective ideation activities are two different kinds that take place in parallel but the results show that they function under different conditions. Third, the thesis explores the lack of agreement in existing theory about the effect of so-called structural holes on organization performance, by focusing explicitly on structural holes in collective ideation. This research adds to an understanding of how the structural properties of interest potentially influence ideation performance, and offers a more nuanced discussion of the potential positive and negative effects of structural holes on ideation. Managing collective ideation addresses the well documented challenges of managing distributed knowledge systems. In order to investigate this further, data from four different case studies have been scrutinized. The results indicate that involvement, focus and formalization stand out as three major dimensions, with implications for how firms use and nurture collective ideation. This thesis argues for that companies can benefit from a deliberate approach to ideation that encompasses the creation of prerequisites for both emergent and planned ideation activities.

  • 6.
    Björk, Jennie
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Dual-connected individuals in ideation2010In: 11th International CINet Conference - Practicing innovation in times of discontinuity, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Idéskapande nätverk: en kollektiv innovationspotential2011In: Management of Technology, no 1, p. 3-4Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nätverk stödjer idéprocessen2011In: Entré : forskning om entreprenörskap & småföretag, ISSN 1650-1691, no 2, p. 9-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Boccardelli, P
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ideation capabilities for continuous innovation2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    Center for Business Innovation, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Boccardelli, P.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ideation capabilities for continuous innovation2010In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 385-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores ideation capabilities in large organizations. Based on the dynamic capabilities framework, it is seen that ideation capabilities are managerial and organizational processes for the stimulation, identification, selection and implementation of ideas. In order to explore how these capabilities are manifested and used in firms, case studies of four Swedish companies have been performed. The results of the study show that there are different approaches to ideation. In terms of the nature of innovative ideas, the observations lead to the suggestion that ideation presents some seemingly paradoxical issues to management. Firms with an explicit focus on building ideation practices experience that there are some negative consequences of the resultant formalization. Furthermore, the extent to which many employees should be involved in ideation is a difficult aspect, even though new technologies make this more viable. Also the degree to which the search for ideas should be directed is a non-trivial question, as the ideation processes can be facilitated by both freedom and limitations. It is nevertheless seen that firms can benefit from more deliberate approaches to ideation, in particular if these are broad and balanced and focus on both building capabilities that formalize the informal, in terms of establishing explicit processes, roles and systems, and building capabilities needed to manage informal structures in new ways.

  • 11.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Di Vincenzo, F
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Mascia, D
    Ideation Potential of Internal Networks: Does Social Capital Matter?2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Center for Business Innovation.
    Di Vincenzo, F
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Mascia, D
    The Impact of Social Capital on Ideation: untapping the knowledge creation potential of internal networks2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the impact of social capital on the quality of ideas generated by individuals at work. Two dimensions of social capital are compared – the degree (i.e. the size) of an individual’s network of work relations, and the structural holes (i.e. gaps between nodes) of those relations. Analyzing a database from a Swedish company which has worked systematically with idea management, and which today has a well-established information technology system that collects ideas from a large number of employees, this study presents evidence indicating that the larger is the size of an individual’s’ ego network – specifically the number of social interactions with other actors – the larger this individual’s innovative performance in terms of high quality ideas, whereas the larger is the number of structural holes in the ego network, the lower is the quality of ideas generated by the individual. Our findings support the conclusion that individuals’ relationships within firms play a key role for value-creating behavior, and thereby contribute to a deeper understanding of how social capital influences idea generation.

  • 13.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Di Vincenzo, Fausto
    Department of Economic Studies, Faculty of Economics, G. d'Annunzio University, Pescara, Italy.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Mascia, Daniele
    Department of Public Health, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy.
    The Impact of Social Capital on Ideation2011In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 631-647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the impact of social capital on the quality of ideas generated by individuals at work. Two dimensions of social capital are investigated—the degree (i.e. size) of individuals' networks of ideation relations, and the structural holes (i.e. gaps between nodes) of those relations. Previous research has presented different and even conflicting empirical results concerning the effect of structural holes on innovation activities, and has not dealt specifically with the ideation phase of the innovation process. By drawing upon an idea database from a Swedish company that has worked systematically with idea management for an extensive period, this study investigates the interrelationship between social capital and ideation. The empirical study reveals that the larger the size of an individual's ego network, the higher is this individual's innovative performance in terms of high-quality ideas, whereas the larger the number of structural holes in an ego network, the lower is the quality of ideas generated by the individual in question. These findings support the conclusion that social capital, in terms of individuals' relationships with fellow employees within firms, has a positive influence on idea-generating behavior. Moreover, the results reveal that the presence of structural holes is negative for ideation performance, thus providing important new input to the recent debate on the interrelationship between structural holes and innovation in general.

  • 14.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Hoelze, Katharina
    Univ Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany..
    Editorial2019In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 289-290Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Holzle, Katharina
    Univ Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany..
    Editorial2018In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 373-374Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Turning ideas into innovation: the need for collaborative demand-driven innovation2011In: Proceedings of the 18th International Product Development Conference, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Magnus P.
    New Business Development and Innovation, Group Function Strategy, Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Turning ideas into innovations: introducing demand-driven collaborative ideation2014In: International Journal of Innovation and Regional Development, ISSN 1753-0660, E-ISSN 1753-0679, Vol. 5, no 4/5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Web-enabled tools for ideation are becoming increasingly diffused in companies, but their true impact on innovation performance has been questioned. A factor that can explain some of the so far missing performance of these firm-internal systems for ideation is a lack of attention to the demand-side of ideation. Frequently, the focus of ideation is put more or less unilaterally on the supply-side, with the aim to generate as many or as good ideas as possible, instead of focusing on innovation needs. The aim of this article is to describe and analyse demand-driven collaborative ideation, with a particular emphasis on its management aspects. In order to empirically investigate how to manage this new approach to ideation, a case study of Ericsson, a Swedish multi-national corporation, has been performed. The results highlight that incentives, visibility and resources are three main components of demand-driven collaborative ideation and outline key challenges with this new approach to ideation.

  • 18.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Mats
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Heterogeneity and performance in innovation idea networks2008In: Proceedings of the 9th CINet conference, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the influence of heterogeneity on the creativityperformance of formal and informal groups when generating innovation ideas.Data on all innovation ideas generated at a company during three years havebeen gathered and analyzed. The empirical results showed that heterogeneityin formal groups has a positive influence on the quality of the ideas generated.However, after a certain amount of heterogeneity the performance drasticallydecreased, showing that there is an optimum for when heterogeneityinfluences the performance of the formal groups positively. The informalgroups did not show the same results.Managerial implications of the findings are that both the strategic input toideation and its organizing need to be considered.

  • 19.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Mats
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Ideation performance in projects and informal groups2009In: Proceedings of the 1st ISPIM Innovation Symposium, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ideation activities take place in all parts of an organization and in different settings. Received theory points out that both formal and informal groups hold potential for creativity and knowledge creation, but how these groups differ in terms of ideation is not known. The importance of group heterogeneity and access to information and knowledge through network connections has been stressed in earlier research and the performed study has focused on these factors. More specifically, this research explores the ideation performance of project teams and informal groups, respectively, by studying how heterogeneity and network connectivity might influence the quality of the innovation ideas created. Drawing upon an internal database from a large Swedish consumer goods company, all innovation ideas created by both formal and informal group constellations during three years have been analyzed. The investigation showed that a moderate level of heterogeneity in formal groups has a positive influence on the quality of the ideas generated. The ideation performance of informal groups did not reveal any interdependence with heterogeneity. Network connectivity was interdependent with creative performance for informal groups, where a certain amount of connectivity positively influenced the performance of the group. The performance of formal groups did not show this pattern and also revealed no significant relationship with network connectivity. Based on the analysis, implications for management and theory are drawn and discussed.

  • 20.
    Björk, Jennie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Where do good innovation ideas come from?: Exploring the influence of network connectivity on innovation idea quality2009In: The Journal of product innovation management, ISSN 0737-6782, E-ISSN 1540-5885, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 662-670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to add to innovation management theory and practice by exploring the interrelationship between innovation idea quality and idea providers' network connectivity, using social network analysis. The study uses a database from a company that has worked systematically with idea management over a long period of time and today has a well-established information technology system that collects ideas from a large number of employees. In addition to the idea database, a number of interviews with key individuals within innovation were conducted to create rich contextual knowledge and understand more in detail how ideas are handled in the company. The analysis indicated that there is a clear interrelationship between the network connectivity and the quality of the innovation ideas created. The analysis was done for all the innovation ideas and then for ideas created by single individuals and by groups, respectively. In all three analyses the proportion of high-quality innovation ideas increased, as a step function, between the least connected group and the group thereafter. There is apparently a need for a certain amount of relations to increase the proportion of high-quality innovation ideas generated. Regarding only ideas provided by single individuals, more connections within the network resulted in a higher proportion of high-quality ideas. A different pattern was seen for ideas provided by groups as the proportion of high-quality innovation ideas grew with some increase in the connectivity of groups but declined with a further increase in connectivity. The findings suggest a number of implications for ideation management. To increase the number of high-quality innovation ideas created by individuals, the possibility to interact with other people should be supported and facilitated. However, in these settings, where individuals work with others in different groups, the most connected groups perform worst in terms of the proportion of high-quality ideas generated, which points to the necessity to consider a multitude of factors when managing ideation.

  • 21.
    Frishammar, Johan
    et al.
    Lulea Univ Technol, Entrepreneurship & Innovat Res Grp, SE-97187 Lulea, Sweden..
    Richtner, Anders
    Stockholm Sch Econ, Dept Management & Org, SE-11383 Lulea, Sweden..
    Brattstrom, Anna
    Lund Univ, Sch Econ & Management, Dept Business Adm, Box 117, S-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Opportunities and challenges in the new innovation landscape: Implications for innovation auditing and innovation management2019In: European Management Journal, ISSN 0263-2373, E-ISSN 1873-5681, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 151-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation auditing is a well-established practice used by managers to identify strengths and weaknesses in innovation. Existing audit frameworks fall short, however, because they neglect three major trends that currently transform the innovation landscape. These trends are as follows: 1) a shift from closed to more open models of innovation ("openness"), 2) a shift from providing physical products to industrial product services ("servitization"), and 3) a shift from an analog to a highly digitalized world ("digitalization"). This article identifies new innovation practices, opportunities, and challenges that arise for manufacturing firms along these trends. The article proposes a revised innovation audit framework, which acknowledges these trends and supports innovation management in increasingly dynamic and competitive environments. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 22.
    Holzle, Katharina
    et al.
    Univ Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany..
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Visscher, Klaasjan
    Univ Twente, Enschede, Netherlands..
    Editorial2019In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 3-4Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Johansson, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Kullström, Malin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Anna
    Sandvik Coromant.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The consequences of managerial controls for digital innovation projects2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitalization has provided new opportunities for firms in the manufacturing industry but also brought a wide range of new challenges. This paper focuses managerial controls in order to further our understanding in what managers can do in order to manage and support digital innovation projects. More specifically the aim of this paper is to explore the role of managerial controls for digital innovation projects in manufacturing firms. Data has been collected from two manufacturing firms through interviews. The results further our understanding of the consequences of different managerial controls for digital innovation projects. Surprisingly the findings show that digital innovation projects demand more control than regular projects. The results bring a number of managerial implications, 1) there is a need to deliberately use a combination of controls, 2) it is important to use controls also for decision making, both in terms of speed and the ability to make good decisions and 3) there is a need to have controls also for customers and partners

  • 24. Karlsson, A.
    et al.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Establishing and managing a network for continuous innovation: Invoking organizational pressure2017In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 128-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social networks in organizations have been identified as important both in terms of increasing our understanding of innovation and for organizations to realize innovation outcomes. While previous studies have informed us of the importance of networks for innovation, we know little of how companies intentionally can design and utilize networks to achieve continuous innovation. The aim of this paper is to explore how a network for continuous innovation can be established and managed. A longitudinal case study has been performed using data covering the establishment and subsequent management of a network for supporting continuous innovation, spanning the product management and R&D department of a large multinational company. The results reveal the potential to use intra-organizational networks to invoke organizational pressure conducive for making innovation happen. This pressure is induced by autonomy and self-organizing in the network and consists of reciprocal expectations and demands between the top (management) and the bottom (employees involved in the network) of the organizational hierarchy. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

  • 25.
    Karlsson, Anna
    et al.
    Sandvik Coromant.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The role of attention for radical innovation: Identifying moves that matter2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the human problem of managing attention has been identified as a central problem in the management of innovation, limited research has considered how attention is handled by different actors in the various phases of the innovation process. Moreover, more attention and commitment may be needed for radical ideas to succeed, making this type of innovations particularly interesting to study. This study aims to contribute to the literature addressing the development of radical innovations in established companies by focusing on the role of attention for this type of innovations. Based on an in-depth longitudinal case study, this paper provides an account of how attention was handled in such a setting. Interview data was collected from individuals involved in the project at two different points in time–adjacent to the formal start of the development project and close to the launch. Results reveal three attentional streams (‘Providing input & motivation’,‘Propelling the idea forward’and ‘Protecting the idea & individuals’) involving different actors during the innovation process. Along with the finding that managers engage in diverting behavior, and their rationales for doing so, this contributes to theory. Lastly, two of the attentional streams identified highlight an organizational-level paradox connected to radical innovation. A paradox that leaves managers in an ambiguous position.

  • 26.
    Knudsen, Mette Præst
    et al.
    SDU, Department of Marketing & Management.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Frederiksen, Marianne Harbo
    SDU, Dept. of Technology and Innovation.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Unleashing the Power of Internal Crowds2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much is already known about why and what firms can gain from external crowdsourcing of ideation activities, whereas internal crowdsourcing where firms seek ideas for innovation among its employees has so far received less attention. The rationale for using external and internal crowds has thus been assumed to be the same, to collect a diversity and large number of ideas. This article pinpoints that the design principles known from the external crowdsourcing literature cannot simply be used for internal crowds. In fact, an attempt to do so entails a need for considering several tradeoffs. Drawing on the extant theory and the knowledge that we have accumulated over the years from researching large firm’s use of IT-based ideation systems, we identify these trade-offs, propose several design decisions to consider, which are linked to the innovation ambition of a firm, and develop a model of employee engagement in internal crowdsourcing.

  • 27. Mascia, Daniele
    et al.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats G.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Organizing Ideation, Creativity and Innovation: The Role of Social Networks2012In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 458-459Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28. Mascia, Daniele
    et al.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    The Role of Social Networks in Organizing Ideation, Creativity and Innovation: An Introduction2015In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 102-108Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Mascia, Daniele
    et al.
    University of Bologna, Dept. Management.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Di Vincenzo, Fausto
    D'Annunzio University of Chieti–Pescara, Dept. Economics.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Exploring the role of homophily in innovation jam: A case study2016In: Proceedings of the 17th Continuous Innovation Network Conference, Torino, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper social networks analysis techniques and regression model are used to conduct an exploratory analysis on how homophily influences ideation activity in an organizational ideation jam. A business unit within a Sweden-based global company has been selected in order to investigate our research question. Our findings document that self-organized ideation networks exhibit a tendency towards collaborative homophily, expressed in terms of similarity in participants’ attributes. Specifically, we found that most active people in posting ideas are also the most active in commenting on the ideas contributed by others. In addition, our results highlight that gender and belonging to the same organizational unit have an impact on the activity to post ideas and comments during the jam. Our results provide valuable input for innovation theory and for the management of ideation jams within organizations.

  • 30.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Anna
    Sandvik Coromant.
    Developing radical innovations: Introducing Tangibility, Tolerance and Tightness2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates what actions can be taken in order to support the development

    of radical innovations. The contribution adds to our understanding of how radical

    innovation projects develops over time and what and how managerial actions can be

    taken in order to support this development. Six radical innovation projects from two

    different empirical settings have been investigated though semi-structured interviews

    and the use of a project journey mapping technique allowing for a combination of both

    narrative and critical incident data collection. The data was analyzed in Nvivo. The

    results revealed three different flows of activities for radical innovation projects that

    iteratively and interactively took place over time from the emergence of the idea to

    commercialization, namely: (1) the configuration of the product system, (2) the

    understanding of customer value and (3) the experimentation of understanding of how

    to monetizing value form radical innovation projects. Three mechanisms in order to

    manage these flows are presented: (1) making the radical innovation and its potential

    more tangible, (2) creating a tolerance for the uncertainties and ambiguities related to

    the innovation during its development in the organization and (3) handling the

    management control tightness of the project in order for it to make it to the

    commercialization. Two main practical implications of the results are discussed. First

    of all, organizations that aim to develop radical innovations need to understand and

    support the three different flows of activities early on and what it implies in terms of

    competences needed and resources allocated. Second, the presented mechanisms

    provide distinct examples of actions that can be taken in order to support the

    development flows of radical innovations.

  • 31.
    Qian, Chen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product Innovation Technology.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Collective firm-internal online idea development: Exploring the impact of feedback timeliness and knowledge overlapIn: European Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1460-1060, E-ISSN 1758-7115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – New opportunities to nurture good ideas for innovation arise as firms use web-based ideation platforms for collective idea generation and development. What influences creative performance in firm-internal collective idea development is however not as well researched as idea generation and thus an important area of research is the feedback and commenting on ideas. More specifically, the aim of this paper is to explore the role of feedback timeliness and knowledge overlap between feedback providers and ideas in collective firm-internal online idea development.Design/methodology/approach – An empirical study has been performed, drawing on data collected from a Swedish multi-national company using a web-based system for collective firm-internal ideation. The investigation explicitly captures the effects on ideation performance played by idea development contributions, in terms of: 1) feedback timeliness and 2) knowledge overlap between feedback providers and ideas.Findings – The empirical results show that idea development is significantly influenced by feedback timeliness as well as by the knowledge overlap between feedback providers and ideas. Specifically, it is found that longer time interval for feedback and an increased knowledge overlap result in an increased likelihood of idea acceptance. However, beyond a certain point, the positive effect of a longer feedback time interval decreases, resulting in a curvilinear relationship. Research limitations/implications – The results do not only shed new light on theory about collective idea development, but also provides management implications for collective firm-internal ideation. As the data used in the study has been collected in one single firm, care should be taken in generalizing the results to other domains.Practical implications – The results inform managers that it is not always better to involve more individuals in these emergent and distributed ideation systems, but that it might be beneficial to take measures to exercise some control in terms of when distributed and diverse employees can freely join in and out, especially considering the diversity of ideas, comments and creators. Originality/value – The results from the empirical study reveal the effects of of feedback timeliness and knowledge overlap on idea development. This provides us with new insights on the complex dynamics at place in collective firm-internal idea development, and offers implications for how we can fruitfully manage this process.

  • 32. Qian, Chen
    et al.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Exploring the effects of feedback sentiment and expertise in internal crowdsourcing for ideasManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With the increased usage of internal crowdsourcing for ideas, many firms are able to receive feedback from the voluntary collective wisdom with diverse expertise instead of a limited number of specified experts, potentially resulting in a large amount of diverse and complex input to ideas. Given the so-far limited knowledge about how feedback to ideas can be managed, firms face challenges in fruitfully managing this. Two aspects playing critical roles in feedback on proposed ideas for innovation are arguably feedback sentiment and feedback providers’ expertise. This paper aims to explore the roles of feedback sentiment and expertise in internal crowdsourcing for ideas. It does so through an empirical study drawing on data collected from a Swedish multinational company using internal crowdsourcing for innovation ideas. The investigation explicitly captures the effects of feedback sentiment and expertise in terms of: 1) positive and negative feedback; 2) expertise of feedback providers; 3) interaction effect between feedback sentiment and expertise of feedback providers. The effects of these dimensions are investigated by performing a logistic regression analysis. Regression results reveal that both feedback sentiment and expertise are potentially impacting ideas in internal crowdsourcing and that the latter of these acts as a moderator on the effect of negative feedback on idea acceptance. More specifically, it is found that positive feedback outperforms negative feedback in an overall view when it comes to idea acceptance, and the expertise of negative feedback providers has an inverted U-shaped relationship with the likelihood of idea acceptance. Furthermore, more negative information provided by experts could be helpful for idea development in internal crowdsourcing. As one of the first studies to explore the feedback sentiment in conjunction with expertise, this study not only extends previous knowledge about feedback mechanisms, but also provides practical implications to manage feedback in terms of contributors as well as their contributions to internal crowdsourcing of ideas.

  • 33.
    QIAN, CHEN
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Reframing or refining ideas?: Exploring the effects of peer contribution in idea developmentManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Qian, Chen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. Chongqing University, China.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product Innovation Technology.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    What drives the emergence of innovation contribution behaviors in online ideation?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to explore what different contribution behaviors there are in online ideation. Based on a data collected from a Swedish multi-national company using an idea management system, two main factors for ideation, namely: 1) motivational proactivity and 2) cognitive specificity, were used for clustering contribution behaviors through Latent Class Analysis. The results revealed four main behavioral categories and individuals belonging to different behavioral categories contributed differently to idea generation and idea development. A logistic regression model was used to test the different behavioral categories’ impacts on ideation performance. The results showed that contribution behaviors displayed in idea development impact ideation performance more than the ones in idea generation. These results contribute to existing theory through shedding new light on innovation behaviors in different ideation processes and how these behaviors impact ideation performance. Moreover, it provides management implications for online ideation at both the individual- and the firm level.

  • 35. Richtner, Anders
    et al.
    Brattstrom, Anna
    Frishammar, Johan
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Creating Better Innovation Measurement Practices2017In: MIT Sloan Management Review, ISSN 1532-9194, E-ISSN 1532-8937, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 45-53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36. Sandström, Christian
    et al.
    Björk, Jennie
    Center for Business Innovation, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Idea management systems for a changing innovation landscape2010In: International Journal of Product Development, ISSN 1477-9056, E-ISSN 1741-8178, Vol. 11, no 3-4, p. 310-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last few decades, the nature of innovation has changed from being primarily related to incremental product innovation towards more business model innovation, discontinuous innovation and open innovation. These changes impose new demands on the ideation phase of the innovation process and on idea management systems. This article explores what an idea management system that handles some of these different forms of innovation ideas may look like. The studied idea management system differs from previous typologies in that it is dual, i.e., aiming to generate, evaluate and select both continuous and discontinuous innovation ideas and employing different processes and criteria within the same system.

  • 37.
    Wadell, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Boundary spanners of user information2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Wadell, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    How do R&D employees use their social networks to acquire user information?2014In: Journal of Knowledge Management, ISSN 1367-3270, E-ISSN 1758-7484, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 919-936Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - This article aims to investigate how R&D employees use their social networks to acquire user information and how this information is used in the development of new products.

    Design/methodology/approach - A single case study was conducted within a business unit at a multinational medical technology company. Data were collected through a mixed method.

    Findings - The results show that many R&D employees lack social networks through which they can acquire information about the users' needs. However, some R&D employees establish cost-efficient relationships to people with a direct experience of using the company's products. These relationships are established over time and are often used in a rather informal way to acquire user information. Moreover, the results show how R&D employees are purposefully complementing these relationships with more occasional interactions with people who hold direct and indirect use experiences.

    Research limitations/implications - As with most single-case studies, it will be important to replicate this investigation in other contexts to clarify the generalizability of the findings.

    Practical implications - The article shows how important it is that management provides R&D employees with opportunities to establish, nurture and utilize relationships conducive to information about the users' needs. The article provides some advice on how this can be accomplished.

    Originality/value - This is one of the first articles that clearly explain how R&D employees use their social networks to acquire user information for the development of new products.

  • 39.
    Wadell, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Exploring the incorporation of users in an innovating business unit2013In: International Journal of Technology Management, ISSN 0267-5730, E-ISSN 1741-5276, Vol. 61, no 3-4, p. 293-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of user involvement has long been stressed in the innovation management literature. However, we argue that this literature does not take sufficient account to the employment and incorporation of users in innovation. Hence, we explore the role of incorporated users in innovation activities. The research was conducted in a business unit in a large medical technology company with long experience of employing and incorporating physicians and nurses in its new product development activities. Data were collected through a questionnaire and interviews with key individuals. The study reveals that the incorporation of users has an overall positive effect on innovation activities, but that this way of working also raises several managerial issues. The results show that incorporated users play several different roles in the unit as user representatives, networkers, idea promoters and change agents. Based on our findings we propose managerial implications related to the incorporation of users.

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