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  • 1.
    de Ferreira, Antonio Cavaleiro
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Nerini, Francesco Fuso
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Unit Energy Syst Anal dESA, Brinellvagen 68, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    A Framework for Implementing and Tracking Circular Economy in Cities: The Case of Porto2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 6, article id 1813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Circular economy (CE) is an emerging concept that contrasts the linear economic system. This concept is particularly relevant for cities, currently hosting approximately 50% of the world's population. Research gaps in the analysis and implementation of circular economy in cities are a significant barrier to its implementation. This paper presents a multi-sectorial and macro-meso level framework to monitor (and set goals for) circular economy implementation in cities. Based on literature and case studies, it encompasses CE key concepts, such as flexibility, modularity, and transparency. It is structured to include all sectors in which circular economy could be adopted in a city. The framework is then tested in Porto, Portugal, monitoring the circularity of the city and considering its different sectors.

  • 2.
    Dobbins, Audrey
    et al.
    Univ Stuttgart, Inst Energy Econ & Rat Energy Use, Stuttgart, Germany..
    Nerini, Francesco Fuso
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Deane, Paul
    Univ Coll Cork, Environm Res Inst, MaREI Ctr, Cork, Ireland..
    Pye, Steve
    UCL, UCL Energy Inst, London, England..
    Strengthening the EU response to energy poverty2019In: Nature Energy, ISSN 2058-7546, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 2-5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Fuso Nerini, Francesco
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Shore up support for climate action using SDGs correspondence2018In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 557, no 7703Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Fuso Nerini, Francesco
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Sustainable Energy Access for All: Initial tools to compare technology options and costs2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis presents analytical advances to support quantitative insights into national and local policies for achieving energy access goals. The key objective is the creation of an analytical tool to compare technology options for achieving energy access goals and to estimate the cost of reaching those goals. To achieve that objective, the thesis is divided into three interconnected and complementary foci.

    A pillar for such an analytical tool is an effective energy access metric. As the old adage goes: you cannot manage what you cannot measure. Therefore, the first focus of this thesis is on aspects of measuring energy access. In this thesis, energy access is not considered as a binary metric (access or no access) but as a service-oriented metric including information on how energy is used. Measuring the status of both current and future energy access-and-use goals (as well as tracking the progress in between) is crucial for supporting planning and choosing technology approaches. Different metrics are investigated and priority is given to two families of metrics: those useful for tracking the progress of energy access-and-use with available data, and those adequate for supporting future energy planning. In this context, special emphasis is given to one metric for each of these two groups: first to the Multidimensional Energy Poverty Index (MEPI) and second to the World Bank’s Multi-Tier framework. The MEPI is assessed for as wide a set of countries as possible. The index appears effective to evaluate the status and recent trends in energy access-and-use at the national and regional scale with readily available data. For instance, MEPI results show how the intensity of energy poverty consistently decreases over time in all countries considered. Foci two and three of this thesis rely on the Multi-Tier framework. The Multi-Tier framework appears to be effective (and increasingly adopted) for setting energy access targets and evaluating the implications of those targets on technology choices and costs.

    The second focus of this thesis concentrates on a limited set of case studies to gain insights and develop tools for policy support and national energy planning (focus 3). In fact, information from local energy access studies might be scaled up to advise national and regional-scale energy access planning. In this part, three case studies are evaluated. The first is a multi-criteria analysis (MCA) comparing electrification options in the Brazilian Amazon that explores selected techno-economic, environmental, social and institutional criteria. The multi-criteria analysis shows how renewable and hybrid systems present a number of advantages for application in isolated areas of the region compared to the current dominate practice of using diesel generators. Furthermore, the study outputs reveal key drivers to consider when choosing among electrification options. This provides a basis for contextualizing the electrification tool developed in focus three of the thesis. Specifically, techno-economic criteria provide the backbone of the tool while the remaining parameters offer guidelines for its case-by-case implementation. The second study focuses on the cost-comparison of technology approaches for electrification and cooking. A local level energy system optimization model for a rural village in Timor Leste shows that, in the period 2010-2030, achieving the highest tier of electricity access could be as much as 75 times more costly than achieving the lowest tier. In addition, when moving across tiers, least cost solutions shift from stand-alone to mini-grid and finally grid connected options as electricity access increases. On the other hand, regarding cooking, moving from open fires to some of the more modern solutions has the potential to reduce overall costs over the same period. In the case study, the determinants of the costs of electrification projects are identified. These include (i) target level and quality of energy access, (ii) population density, (iii) local grid connection characteristics and (iv) local energy resource availability, fuel type and technology cost. The third case study analyzes the role of productive uses of energy for both local development and energy access. It adds a piece in the energy access puzzle looking both at the role and costs associated with energy in productive activities, and at the potential role of productive activities for powering rural populations up to different tiers of energy access. The analysis develops an analytical framework to assess and support productive uses of energy in agriculture. The resulting framework is then applied to a specific case of sisal production in rural Tanzania. Results from the case study show how combining the planning of energy access with productive uses could result in win-win-win solutions for the local utilities, companies and residents. This case study provides essential insights into how new policy tools may develop, moving beyond simple household use.

    Finally, the third focus area expands and applies insights gained from the previous case study sections to develop generalized, simplified and scalable models. Key outputs from this thesis thus include both a tool and its corresponding guidelines. The first thesis output considers a deliberately simple model for comparing technology options that support electricity access-and-use goals. The second thesis output provides a series of suggestions for using it to inform electrification planning. When given an electricity access target, the tool permits a cost-comparison of technology approaches under a combination of local characteristics such as population density, resource availability, fossil fuel prices and generation technology costs amongst other things. Furthermore, the cases studies developed in focus two of the thesis provides guidelines on how to structure similar tools for cooking energy access and energy for other productive uses. The easily adaptable model is developed in such a way that it might also be used in geo-spatial toolkits, the utility of which is demonstrated in country specific, geographic information system (GIS) based, electrification analyses. These include applications to Nigeria, Ethiopia and India, presented in this dissertation, as well as to the case studies of all 48 countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, developed in subsequent work to this dissertation. The applications of the tool show how the strategy for expanding electricity access may vary significantly both between and within given regions of energy-poor countries. 

  • 5. Fuso Nerini, Francesco
    et al.
    Andreoni, Antonio
    Bauner, David
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Howells, Mark
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Powering production: The case of the sisal fibre production in the Tanga region, Tanzania2016In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 98, p. 544-556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy plays a crucial role in economic development. The article presents a framework for the analysis of alternative energy technology mixes in agricultural production and applies it in the context of sisal production in the Tanga region, Tanzania. Through scenario analysis, the paper presents both case-specific and generalizable insights. Case-specific insights show the key role that modern uses of energy and modern agricultural technologies could play in increasing productivity and revenues, in minimizing environmental degradation, and in promoting local development. Generalizable insights demonstrate the value of using sector-specific micro-structural frameworks and scenario analysis for assessing different technologies mixes in the energy and agriculture planning process.

  • 6.
    Fuso Nerini, Francesco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis. University College London, United Kingdom.
    Keppo, I.
    Strachan, N.
    Myopic decision making in energy system decarbonisation pathways. A UK case study2017In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 17, p. 19-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With an application on the UK, this paper shows that myopic planning might result in delayed strategic investments and in considerably higher costs for achieving decarbonisation targets compared to estimates done with perfect foresight optimisation energy models. It also suggests that carbon prices obtained from perfect foresight energy models might be under-estimated. The study was performed using a combination of the standard UK Times Model (UKTM), a perfect foresight, bottom-up, technology-rich cost optimisation energy model, and its myopic foresight version: My-UKTM. This also demonstrates that using perfect foresight optimisation models in tandem with their myopic equivalents can provide valuable indications for policy design.

  • 7.
    Fuso Nerini, Francesco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    Valentini, Francesco
    Modi, Anish
    Upadhyay, Govinda
    Abeysekera, Muditha
    Salehin, Sayedus
    Appleyard, Eduardo
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology.
    The Energy and Water Emergency Module: A containerized solution for meeting the energy and water needs in protracted displacement situations2015In: Energy Conversion and Management, ISSN 0196-8904, E-ISSN 1879-2227, Vol. 93, p. 205-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The world has faced many natural and man-made disasters in the past few years, resulting in millions of people living in temporary camps across the globe. The energy and clean water needs of the relief operators in such emergency situations are primarily satisfied by diesel engine based generators and importing clean water to the site, in certain cases even for several years after the emergency. This approach results in problems such as low security of supply and high costs. Especially targeting the prolonged displacement situations, this paper presents an alternative solution - the Energy and Water Emergency Module. The proposed solution aims towards reducing the dependency on fossil fuel in prolonged emergency situations to a minimum while including local energy sources in the energy supply in a flexible and reliable way. The proposed module is built in a standard 20 ft container, and encompasses hybrid generation from solar, wind and biomass, with the possibility of using fossil sources too thanks to a dual fuel gas engine. The module can work both in grid connected and stand-alone mode. In addition the module includes a water purification unit to meet the water needs of displaced population. A demonstration unit was assembled at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm during the year 2012 as a 'concept proof, and is now being tested and optimized for future deployment on the field. Preliminary testing and modelling shows that the proposed solution can reliably support emergency situations, and is already cost competitive with the current water and energy supply solutions for emergency situations.

  • 8.
    Fuso-Nerini, Francesco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Dargaville, Roger
    Howells, Mark
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis. Columbia Univ, NY USA.
    Bazilian, Morgan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Estimating the cost of energy access: The case of the village of Suro Craic in Timor Leste2015In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 79, p. 385-397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy access targets at national, sub-national, and local levels, are often not specified in great detail - and tend to focus on supply. Another approach to better inform policy and investment might benefit from an indicator that focuses on the services derived from electricity access. To provide support for decision-making, this research investigates the costs of reaching different levels of energy access in rural areas, with a case study of a village in the Ainaro district of Timor Leste. Utilizing the multi-tier definition of energy access proposed in the World Bank's "Global Tracking Framework" for Sustainable Energy for All, we present results both on the cost difference of achieving different tiers of energy access, and on the comparison among selected electrification and cooking options. Results show that in the period 2010-2030 achieving the highest tier of electricity access could be as much as seventy-five times more costly than achieving the lowest one. In addition moving across tiers, least cost solutions shift from stand-alone to mini-grid and finally grid connected options as electricity access increases. Regarding cooking, moving from open fires to some of the more modern solutions has the potential to reduce overall costs over the same period.

  • 9.
    Fuso-Nerini, Francesco
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Slob, Adriaan
    TNO Strateg Anal & Policy, NL-2509 The Hague, Netherlands..
    Engström, Rebecka Ericsdotter
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Trutnevyte, Evelina
    Univ Geneva, Sect Earth & Environm Sci, Renewable Energy Syst Grp, Inst Environm Sci, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland..
    A Research and Innovation Agenda for Zero-Emission European Cities2019In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 6, article id 1692Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Paris Agreement and SDG13 on Climate Action require a global drop in Green House Gases (GHG) emissions to stay within a "well below 2 degrees" climate change trajectory. Cities will play a key role in achieving this, being responsible for 60 to 80% of the global GHG emissions depending on the estimate. This paper describes how Research and Innovation (R&I) can play a key role in decarbonizing European cities, and the role that research and education institutions can play in that regard. The paper highlights critical R&I actions in cities based on three pillars: (1) innovative technology and integration, (2) governance innovation, and (3) social innovation. Further, the research needed to harmonize climate mitigation and adaptation in cities are investigated.

  • 10.
    Mentis, Dimitrios
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Welsch, Manuel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Fuso-Nerini, Francesco
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Broad, Oliver
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Howells, Mark
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Bazilian, Morgan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Rogner, Holger
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis. International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg, Austria.
    A GIS-based approach for electrification planning-A case study on Nigeria2015In: Energy for Sustainable Development, ISSN 0973-0826, Vol. 29, p. 142-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to the latest Global Tracking Framework (2015), 18% of the global and 57% of the African population live without access to electricity services a key impediment towards social and economic growth. Accelerating access to electricity requires, inter alia, strategies and programmes that effectively address and account for the geographical, infrastructural and socioeconomic characteristics of a country or region. This paper focuses on considering these characteristics by developing a Geographic Information Systems (GIS)-based methodology to inform electrification planning and strategies. The methodology is applied to Nigeria in order to identify the optimal mix of electrification options, ranging from grid extensions to mini-grid and off-grid solutions. The case study illustrates how this optimal mix is influenced by a range of parameters including population density, existing and planned transmission networks and power plants, economic activities, tariffs for grid-based electricity, technology costs for mini-grid and off-grid systems and fuel costs for consumers. For a certain level of energy access, on-grid connections would be optimal for the majority of the new connections in Nigeria; grid extension constitutes the lowest cost option for approximately 86% of the newly electrified population in this modelling effort with 2030 as the time horizon. However, there are some remote areas with low population densities where a mini-grid or a stand-alone solution are the most economic options; deploying some combination of solar, wind, hydro and diesel technologies depending on the locational resource availability.

  • 11.
    Nerini, Francesco Fuso
    KTH.
    Use SDGs to guide climate action2018In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 557, no 7703, p. 31-31Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Nerini, Francesco Fuso
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Broad, Oliver
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Mentis, Dimitris
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Welsch, Manuel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Bazilian, Morgan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Howells, Mark
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    A cost comparison of technology approaches for improving access to electricity services2016In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, E-ISSN 1873-6785, Vol. 95, p. 255-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The UN's Sustainable Energy For All initiative has made universal access to energy by 2030 a key target. Countries wherein budgets are constrained and institutions stressed are faced with the challenge of further extending energy services and doing so significantly. To meet this goal for the power sector in a cost-effective way, governments have to consider the deployment of a mix of stand-alone, mini-grid and grid-based solutions. To help inform analysis, planning and the decision process, this paper presents a simple, transparent, least-cost model for the electrification of rural areas. The approach builds on four key parameters, namely: (i) target level and quality of energy access, (ii) population density, (iii) local grid connection characteristics and (iv) local energy resources availability and technology cost. From an application perspective, this work can be used both for (1) fast assessments of specific energy access projects, and (2) to inform more complex regional studies using a geo-referencing software to analyze the results. Such applications are presented in the results using country case studies developed for Nigeria and Ethiopia. These show how the strategy for expanding energy access may vary significantly both between and within given regions of energy-poor countries.

  • 13.
    Nerini, Francesco Fuso
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Howells, Mark
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Bazilian, Morgan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Gomez, Maria F.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy and Climate Studies, ECS.
    Rural electrification options in the Brazilian Amazon A multi-criteria analysis2014In: Energy for Sustainable Development, ISSN 0973-0826, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 36-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Worldwide, approximately 1.2 billion people still lack access to electricity. Recognized by the Brazilian Government as a citizen's right, access to electricity was extended to almost 15 million people since 2003 as a result of the "Luz Para Todos" (Light for all - LPT) program. However, considerable parts of the Amazon region still lack access to electricity services, largely due to the long distances that need to be covered and to challenging topography. This paper explores electrification using selected renewable sources, both for new installations and for hybridization of existing diesel generators. We present results from a multi-criteria analysis that explores trade-offs associated with electrification options. Techno-economic, environmental, social and institutional criteria and attributes are explored. We find that renewable and hybrid systems present a number of advantages for application in isolated areas of the region.

  • 14.
    Nerini, Francesco Fuso
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis. Colorado Sch Mines, Payne Inst, Golden, CO 80401 USA..
    Sovacool, Benjamin
    Univ Sussex, Sch Business Management & Econ, Sci Policy Res Unit, Brighton, E Sussex, England..
    Hughes, Nick
    UCL, Inst Sustainable Resources, London, England..
    Cozzi, Laura
    Int Energy Agcy, World Energy Outlook Team, Paris, France..
    Cosgrave, Ellie
    UCL, Dept Sci Technol Engn & Publ Policy, London, England..
    Howells, Mark I.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Tavoni, Massimo
    Politecn Milan, Dept Management Econ & Ind Engn, Milan, Italy.;Ctr Euromediterraneo Cambiamenti Climat, RFF CMCC European Inst Econ & Environm, Milan, Italy..
    Tomei, Julia
    UCL, Inst Sustainable Resources, London, England..
    Zerriffi, Hisham
    Colorado Sch Mines, Payne Inst, Golden, CO 80401 USA.;Univ British Columbia, Forest Sci Ctr, Dept Forest Resources Management, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Milligan, Ben
    Univ New South Wales, Fac Law, Kingsford, NSW, Australia..
    Connecting climate action with other Sustainable Development Goals2019In: Nature Sustainability, ISSN 2398-9629, Vol. 2, no 8, p. 674-680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The international community has committed to combat climate change and achieve 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Here we explore (dis)connections in evidence and governance between these commitments. Our structured evidence review suggests that climate change can undermine 16 SDGs, while combatting climate change can reinforce all 17 SDGs but undermine efforts to achieve 12. Understanding these relationships requires wider and deeper interdisciplinary collaboration. Climate change and sustainable development governance should be better connected to maximize the effectiveness of action in both domains. The emergence around the world of new coordinating institutions and sustainable development planning represents promising progress.

  • 15.
    Nerini, Francesco Fuso
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis. UCL Energy Institute, University College London, London, UK.
    Tomei, Julia
    To, Long Seng
    Bisaga, Iwona
    Parikh, Priti
    Black, Mairi
    Borrion, Aiduan
    Spataru, Catalina
    Broto, Vanesa Castan
    Anandarajah, Gabrial
    Milligan, Ben
    Mulugetta, Yacob
    Mapping synergies and trade-offs between energy and the Sustainable Development Goals2018In: NATURE ENERGY, ISSN 2058-7546, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 10-15Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development-including 17 interconnected Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and 169 targets-is a global plan of action for people, planet and prosperity. SDG7 calls for action to ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all. Here we characterize synergies and trade-offs between efforts to achieve SDG7 and delivery of the 2030 Agenda as a whole. We identify 113 targets requiring actions to change energy systems, and published evidence of relationships between 143 targets (143 synergies, 65 trade-offs) and efforts to achieve SDG7. Synergies and trade-offs exist in three key domains, where decisions about SDG7 affect humanity's ability to: realize aspirations of greater welfare and well-being; build physical and social infrastructures for sustainable development; and achieve sustainable management of the natural environment. There is an urgent need to better organize, connect and extend this evidence, to help all actors work together to achieve sustainable development.

  • 16. Nussbaumer, Patrick
    et al.
    Nerini, Francesco Fuso
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Onyeji, Ijeoma
    Howells, Mark
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Global Insights Based on the Multidimensional Energy Poverty Index (MEPI)2013In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 5, no 5, p. 2060-2076Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy access metrics are needed to track the progress towards providing sustainable energy for all. This paper presents advancements in the development of the Multidimensional Energy Poverty Index (MEPI), as well as results and analysis for a number of developing countries. The MEPI is a composite index designed to shed light on energy poverty by assessing the services that modern energy provides. The index captures both the incidence and intensity of energy poverty. It provides valuable insights-allowing the analysis of determinants of energy poverty-and, subsequently insights into policy efficacy. Building on previous work, this paper presents results obtained as a result of both increased data availability and enhanced methodology. Specifically, this analysis (i) includes an increased number of countries, and (ii) tracks the evolution of energy poverty over time of energy poverty in selected countries is reported.

  • 17.
    Runsten, Simon
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Fuso Nerini, Francesco
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    Tait, L.
    Energy provision in South African informal urban Settlements - A multi-criteria sustainability analysis2018In: Energy Strategy Reviews, ISSN 2211-467X, E-ISSN 2211-4688, Vol. 19, p. 76-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In South Africa, as in much of sub-Saharan Africa, strong urbanization trends lead to people settling in ever less suitable informal locations, which are often considered ineligible for basic service provision. This study explores how access to basic energy services can be provided to informal urban households in South Africa that are ineligible for grid electrification. This is done through a multi-criteria sustainability analysis of current and alternative ways of accessing energy services. The case of the Western Cape Province is explored, showing that barriers for electrification can be overcome in some cases, given that there is political will at the local level to do so. When electrification is unviable, off-grid electricity alternatives combined with support for access to modern cooking fuels may provide short or medium-term solutions. This study further suggests that governmental efforts of meeting basic energy needs must be persistently oriented and structured towards access to energy services, as opposed to supply of electricity. 

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