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  • 1. Farraj, Yousef
    et al.
    Grouchko, Michael
    Magdassi, Shlomo
    Koch, Fritz
    Wittkötter, Mirko
    Müller, Maik
    Reinhold, Ingo
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for Intelligence in Paper and Packaging, iPACK.
    Zapka, Werner
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for Intelligence in Paper and Packaging, iPACK.
    Ink-Jet Printed Copper Complex MOD Ink for Plastic Electronics2014In: International Conference on Non Impact Printing and Digital Fabrication, 2014, p. 191-193Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of highly conductive copper patterns on low-cost flexible substrates (PET, PEN, etc.) by inkjet printing is reported. Copper films were obtained from a metallo-organic decomposition (MOD) ink composed of a copper complex and suitable low-viscosity solvents. Upon heating the ink decomposed and was converted into metallic copper under nitrogen as inert atmosphere.Additionally samples were prepared using inkjet technology on various substrates. The required layer thickness for current conduction was assessed by printing on PET and sintering at 150 °C in a vacuum oven.

  • 2. Klaman, Marianne
    et al.
    Lofthus, Jon
    Blohm, Erik
    Reinhold, Ingo
    High speed UV inkjet – impact of speed and substrates on print quality2010In: Iarigai, 2010, Vol. 1, p. 1-12Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Reinhold, Ingo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Electronic Systems. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for Intelligence in Paper and Packaging, iPACK.
    Mecea, V.
    Armbrecht, L.
    Voit, W.
    Müller, M.
    Zapka, Werner
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Electronic Systems. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for Intelligence in Paper and Packaging, iPACK.
    Baumann, R. R.
    Measurement of mass of single inkjet drops with a quartz crystal microbalance QCM2012In: Int. Conf. Digit. Print. Technol., The Society for Imaging Science and Technology, 2012, p. 312-314Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Monitoring inkjet performance requires control of parameters such as drop velocity, direction and drop volume. Present methods to determine drop volume utilize optical vision systems or calculation of an average drop mass from large numbers of drops on a precision balance. An alternative technique based on QCM (Quartz Crystal Microbalance) was assessed to measure the mass of single drops. Low-cost plano-convex 6 MHz AT-cut quartz resonators were used to measure single inkjet drops. Since the footprint of these ink drops is of the order 100 μm the QCM detector was used in a 'localized spot' measurement mode in contrast to the typical large area detection mode. The sensitivity of an inner 0.5 mm circle was determined to be 5.46 x 10-10 g/Hz for solid silver films. Single drops of an oil-based ink of 50 pL nominal volume were jetted using a Xaar126 piezo inkjet printhead onto the QCM target area and produced signals with a SNR better than 70:1. This paper presents the technical challenges relating to liquid droplet volume measurements using higher frequency oscillators.

  • 4.
    Reinhold, Ingo
    et al.
    Xaar Jet AB, Sweden.
    Mingirulli, Nicola
    Haschke, Jan
    Voit, Wolfgang
    Müller, Maik
    Rech, Bernd
    Zapka, Werner
    Inkjet printing of isolation layers for back-contacted silicon- heterojunction solar cells2011In: NIP27 : 27th International Conference on Digital Printing Technologies, October 2-6, 2011, Minneapolis, Minnesota ; Digital Fabrication 2011: technical programs and proceedings, The Society for Imaging Science and Technology, 2011, p. 651-654Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For wafer based silicon solar cells, the combination of amorphous/crystalline silicon (a-Si:H/c-Si) heterojunction emitters (SHJ) [1] and back-contacted back-junction solar cell concepts (BCBJ) [2] offer a very high efficiency potential of around 24%. Stangl et al. proposed a relatively simple and therefore attractive cell concept comprising a two level metallization isolated by an insulation layer. The emitter layer consisting of doped amorphous silicon with a thickness of several nm and the emitter metallization layer comprise circular openings where the back surface field layers and the respective metallization establish contact to the absorber. In this work the potential of inkjet printing for the deposition of the isolation layer with photoresists or other polymeric fluids is evaluated. Challenges are the required placement precision and the feature size. In order to produce circular openings of the order 10 μm, the drop formation has to be optimized, and the ink spreading on both surfaces - on the aluminum emitter and on the silicon wafer substrate - have to be controlled.

  • 5.
    Reinhold, Ingo
    et al.
    XaarJet AB, Sweden.
    Müller, Matthias
    Müller, Maik
    Voit, Wolfgang
    Zapka, Werner
    Spectrally Enhanced Photonic Sintering2012In: NIP28 : 28th international conference on digital printing technologies : technical program and proceedings: Digital fabrication 2012 : September 9-13, 2012, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada, The Society for Imaging Science and Technology, 2012, p. 424-430Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inkjet printing with silver nanoparticle inks is frequently being used to print electrically conductive structures. However, typically slow thermal post-processes are applied to produce metallic contact between the nanoparticles resulting in the high electrical conductivity. In an earlier evaluation a number of different post-process were investigated for their capability to sinter the inkjet printed structures within such short time frame to allow for integration into roll-to-roll or roll-to-sheet machines. Among the different techniques like IR-irradiation, and Rapid Electrical Sintering, Photonic Sintering appeared as the most prominent candidate, and was shown to enable electrical conductivities equal to oven sintering. In that previous investigation the inkjet printed structures were dried and subsequently shipped for off-line post treatment. The hybrid process of inkjet printing of silver nanoparticle inks and photonic sintering was further investigated with the goal to implement both processes on a roll-to-roll machine. Specifically it was attempted to perform the photonic sintering process with a single lamp and without an intermediate drying process. In this paper we investigate the sintering characteristics of an inkjet printed, wet deposit having liquid volumes of 510 pL per 100 μm2 on non-absorbing substrates using a single Xenon Sintering 2000 system. The paper specifically highlights the importance of radiation homogeneity, threshold energy, substrate and track morphology onto the sintering process. The influence of the spectral composition of the light is analyzed. The findings allow for spectral tailoring of the process to successfully work on PI and PET irrespective of the illumination source.

  • 6. Reinhold, Ingo
    et al.
    Shafran, Matt
    Longsine, Whitney
    Traub, Matthew
    Srinivasan, Yeshwanth
    Truskett, Van
    Zapka, Werner
    High-Speed, Low-Volume Inkjet and its Role in Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography2014In: NIP & Digital Fabrication Conference, 2014 International Conference on Digital Printing Technologies, The Society for Imaging Science and Technology, 2014, Vol. I, p. 408-412Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Imprint lithography is an effective technique for replication of nanoscale features. Jet and Flash™ Imprint Lithography (J-FIL™) uses field-by-field deposition and exposure of a low viscosity resist deposited by inkjet printing onto the substrate. The patterned mask is lowered into the fluid, where capillary action assists to flow the fluid into the relief patterns. Following the filling step, the resist is UV cured, the mask is removed, and a patterned resist is left on the substrate.J-FIL™ is a technique, where the imprint technology provides the nanoscale pattern resolution while the inkjet technology contributes the throughput that is required for industrial applications. The drop volume and drop placement accuracy of the inkjet-printed resist is critical, allowing the volume to be distributed appropriately across the substrate surface to achieve a uniform target thickness and preventing non-filling of the relief patterns. With J– FIL™, it is possible to resolve 28 nm structures with residual layer thickness of 13 and 20 nm on 300 mm and 450 mm Si-wafers.In this study, improvements during the filling step are explored for low droplet volumes at high ejection frequencies when using standard printheads with jetting performance of 12 kHz, <3 pL and modified printheads with jetting performance of 28 kHz, <2 pL.

  • 7.
    Reinhold, Ingo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for Intelligence in Paper and Packaging, iPACK.
    Sitterberg, K.
    Müller, M.
    Abdulla, Mamat
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics.
    Popov, Sergei
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Optics and Photonics, OFO.
    Voit, W.
    Zapka, Werner
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for Intelligence in Paper and Packaging, iPACK.
    Analysis of formation of an individual droplet using a high-resolution multi-exposure imaging system2013In: NIP29: Digital fabrication 2013, 29th international conference on digital printing technologies, September 29-October 3, 2013, Seattle, Washington : technical program and proceedings, The Society for Imaging Science and Technology, 2013, p. 354-358Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Localized dispensing of precious functional materials has attracted considerable interest in the academic as well as the industrial society. While the number of publications show numerous fields of applications in printed electronics, photovoltaics, display technologies and thin functional coatings, the transition into the industrial sector is often hindered by challenges resulting from ink-printhead combinations and their implications on reliability and stability of the process, as well as side-effects such as mist accumulation in heavy duty printing equipment. While measuring equipment to quantify various rheological and interfacial parameters for fluid optimization has been developed with the accompanying mathematical models, the physical jetting experiment as well as high-duty printing trials cannot yet be substituted by these methods. In order to quantify the generation of a droplet alongside with its tailing behavior and mist formation as well as statistics based on cross-talk effects and relaxation-related effects, high-resolution and high-speed imaging are required. This paper examines the optical setup and outlines the required calculations for establishing sharp, high-resolution images using a combination of a high power laser diode with a resonant ME MS micro mirror with a theoretical resolution of 1.8 pm. The limitations of the setup regarding the achievable resolution as well as potential improvements are assessed. Furthermore, the experimental setup, including repetitive generation of nanosecond-pulses necessary for motion-blur-free images, will be discussed. Additionally, results from imaging a droplet formation process using a Xaar 126 printhead are discussed.

  • 8.
    Reinhold, Ingo
    et al.
    XaarJet AB, Sweden.
    Stürmer, Moritz
    Steinhäußer, Frank
    Sutter, Tom
    Voit, Wolfgang
    Zapka, Werner
    Grayscale Inkjet Printing of Phase-Change Materials with Increased Reliability2010In: Technologies for Polymer Electronics, 2010, p. 239-242Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Reinhold, Ingo
    et al.
    KTH. XaarJet AB, Sweden .
    Thielen, M.
    XaarJet AB, Sweden .
    Voit, Wolfgang
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Engineering Material Physics. XaarJet AB, Sweden .
    Zapka, Werner
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Electronic Systems. XaarJet AB, Sweden .
    Götzen, R.
    Bohlmann, H.
    Electrical through-hole and planar interconnect generation in roll-to-roll LED lighting manufacturing using industrial inkjet printheads2011In: Mater Res Soc Symp Proc, 2011, p. 1-6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the availability of many high-volume and low-cost manufacturing processes for LED-based lighting applications, relying mainly on fixed patterns such as LED-backlights and RGB-pixelated displays, novel applications, such as "mood lighting" or interior wall displays call for more complicated and shaped LED arrangements. The presented work is based of a novel roll-to-roll (R2R) process to adaptively and cost-efficiently generate LED arrangements on RMPD® substrates. Inkjet printing of planar and though-hole electrical interconnections is of high importance to the process, as it provides a fully digital way of interconnecting devices electrically, accounting for the actual position of the component and spatially provide different ink film thicknesses. Xaar's industrial inkjet printheads are used to dispense defined volumes of 50 pL of a silver nanoparticle ink in order to provide high reliability and good positioning accuracy while maintaining low satellite drop densities. Specific printing strategies are investigated at a print speed of 0.1 m/s to allow for a reliable electrical connection in case of up to 50 μm deep via connections to the buried component. Due to the low glass-transition nature of the underlying substrates, low sintering temperatures are required to preserve the mechanical properties of the substrate. Low temperature oven sintering yielding sufficient conductivity to drive a current of 40 mA will be discussed. 

  • 10.
    Reinhold, Ingo
    et al.
    KTH. XaarJet AB, Sweden.
    Thielen, M.
    Voit, Wolfgang
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering, Engineering Material Physics. XaarJet AB, Sweden.
    Zapka, Werner
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Electronic Systems. XaarJet AB, Sweden.
    Götzen, R.
    Bohlmann, H.
    Inkjet printing of electrical vias2011In: EMPC - Eur. Microelectron. Packag. Conf., Proc., 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inkjet printing of planar and via (through-hole) electrical interconnections is developed to be incorporated into a roll-to-roll manufacturing line. The specific roll-to-roll machine uses rotary RMPD® technology, self-alignment of bare LED dies, and inkjet printing of the electrical connections to the LEDs dies. The key problem to be solved is the inkjet printing of electrical connections through via holes with vertical walls Xaar126-50pL industrial inkjet printheads were used to print silver nano particle ink at 0.1 m/s to connect through LED vias of 90 μm diameter and up to 50 μm depth. While high throughput sintering techniques are desirable for the specific roll-to-roll machine standard convection oven sintering was applied for the proof of principle described here. Sintering at temperatures as low as 135 °C for 30 min prevented damage to the substrate and LED dies and yielded electrical connections that allowed to drive LEDs with 20 mA at 3V under emission of bright green light.

  • 11.
    Reinhold, Ingo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for Intelligence in Paper and Packaging, iPACK.
    Voit, W.
    Rawson, I.
    Martin, K.
    Pope, D.
    Farnsworth, S.
    Zapka, Werner
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Electronic Systems. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for Intelligence in Paper and Packaging, iPACK.
    Munson, C.
    Novel developments in photonic sintering of inkjet printed functional inks2013In: NIP29: Digital fabrication 2013, 29th international conference on digital printing technologies, September 29-October 3, 2013, Seattle, Washington : technical program and proceedings, The Society for Imaging Science and Technology, 2013, p. 476-478Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inkjet printing of electrical tracks in roll-to-roll applications was hampered for a long time since nano-particle inks required thermal sintering at temperatures greater than 120 °C for several minutes. Among a large number of potential R2R compatible techniques, photonic sintering of inkjet-printed metal-based inks was shown to enable very fast sintering times and providing high quality of structural integrity and low electrical resistance [1]. While the above investigations were carried out with a low dutylow frequency irradiation source, novel developments allow for pulse shaping on the timescale of several microseconds and, therefore, the combination of drying and sintering pulses into a single piece of equipment. In this contribution the photonic sintering process was investigated numerically and experimentally for the case of inkjetprinted aqueous copper oxide ink and a Pulse Forge®3200 X2 tool, both implemented onto a NovaCentrix roll-to-roll machine. Our finding support the assumption, that pulse shaping and, therefore, energy tailoring as a function of time, is essential for efficient conversion of wet copper oxide deposits into conductive copper with no impact on the underlying substrate. The paper presents and discusses the resulting electrical resistances of features processed with a conventional hybrid solution using IRradiation for pre-drying as well as a single step drying and sintering using a single radiation source.

  • 12.
    Reinhold, Ingo
    et al.
    XaarJet AB, Sweden.
    Voit, Wolfgang
    Thielen, Moritz
    Müller, Maik
    Müller, Matthias
    Farnsworth, Stan
    Rawson, Ian
    Bollström, Roger
    Zapka, Werner
    Inkjet Printing of Electrical Connections in Electronic Packaging2011In: NIP27 : 27th International Conference on Digital Printing Technologies, October 2-6, 2011, Minneapolis, Minnesota ; Digital Fabrication 2011: technical programs and proceedings, The Society for Imaging Science and Technology, 2011, p. 445-451Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two aspects were evaluated of an approach to produce inkjet printed electrical connections in a roll-to-roll application. In the first part it was demonstrated that inkjet printing with silver nanoparticles allows to connect LED dies embedded in a flexible polymeric substrate by way of electrical via connections and to operate the LED dies at their nominal 20 mA and 3 V driving conditions. A standard convection oven process was used to sinter the inkjet printed tracks. The second part of the work focused on identifying sinter technologies that provide the required fast processing times needed for roll-to-roll applications. IR irradiation, Rapid Electrical Sintering, and Broadband Photonic Curing were evaluated and compared with Convective Oven Sintering as benchmark technique. All these techniques produced similar track conductivities. Fastest operation was obtained with Broadband Photonic Curing, which enabled a total process time of three seconds as compared with 150°C and 30 min in the convection oven.

  • 13. Reinhold, Ingo
    et al.
    Wittkötter, Mirko
    Müller, Maik
    Koch, Fritz
    Siviero, Fabrizio
    Murcott, Robert
    Brkić, Boris
    Voit, Wolfgang
    Zapka, Werner
    A Hybrid Approach Combining 3D and Conductive Inkjet Printing for the Generation of Linear Ion Traps for Mass Spectrometry Applications2014In: Proceedings of NIP 30: 30th international conference on digital printing technologies., 2014, The Society for Imaging Science and Technology, 2014, p. 133-136Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Printed conductors have attracted strong interest in academia as well as the industry. While first applications using printed conductors on flat as well as curved surfaces are establishing in the market, extensive research still is conducted on the post-processing technologies needed for high-volume fabrication of solution processed conductors.With regards to the potential low-cost, high-throughput manufacturing of conductors on inexpensive polymeric foils, new applications start to evolve that call for an even more elaborate investigation of the printing and post-processing steps included. This paper assesses the potential of inkjet-printed conductors for the use in low-pressure environments, such as linear ion-traps for mass spectrometry. In these environments remainders of trapped air or organic solvents affect the performance and lifetime of the getter pump systems used. Additionally, high frequency characteristics of the processed conductors are investigated as these are essential for the sensitivity of an ion trap.In this contribution we establish the framework for the application of conductive inkjet printing on curved surfaces for sensing application in low-pressure environments. Inkjet-deposited nanoparticle inks were investigated with respect to their characteristics under vacuum conditions. The deposits on polymeric foils as well as on DLP processed three-dimensional semi-finished parts were subjected to thermal post-processing and measured with respect to their electrical characteristics as well as their outgassing behavior.

  • 14.
    Reinhold, Ingo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for Intelligence in Paper and Packaging, iPACK. XaarJet AB, Järfälla, Sweden .
    Zapka, W.
    Voit, W.
    Stelnhäußer, F.
    Stürmer, U.
    Madjarov, A.
    Völker, M.
    Inkjet printing of phase-change materials with Xaar1001 printheads2010In: NIP & Digital Fabrication Conference, 2010 International Conference on Digital Printing Technologies, 2010, p. 319-322Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inkjet printing of phase-change or hot melt materials allows to produce etch masks by digital and additive processing, thus enabling highly efficient fabrication of printed circuit boards, solar cells etc. Previously the binary inkjet printing with drop volumes of 50 pL was demonstrated with Xaarl26 end-shooter printheads.[1] The present work describes new results on printing with XaarlOOl printheads. These printheads offer both, grayscale printing with a subdrop volume of 6 pL and excellent reliability by way of their unique'true throughflow' capability, respectively. While the advantage of grayscale printing for high-resolution patterning is obvious and straight forward, the complexity lies in the recirculating ink systems that provide the constant ink flow through the printhead channels. A narrow temperature range has to be established throughout the total ink path, which avoids hot spots that would damage the inks as well as cold spots that counteract the ink flow rate. Print results with Sunjet Crystal HEP9520, operating between 80 °C and 90 °C, clearly show good droplet formation for 7 distinct gray levels spanning a range from 5 to 37 pL with increments of 5.3 pL at a frequency of 5 kHz.

  • 15.
    Reinhold, Ingo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Industrial and Medical Electronics. XaarJet, Sweden.
    Černý, T.
    Müller, M.
    Zapka, W.
    Measurement of inkjet printhead reliability by detecting every single droplet in flight2016In: International Conference on Digital Printing Technologies, The Society for Imaging Science and Technology, 2016, p. 60-63Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inkjet printing is adapted for many digital imaging systems including graphical, industrial and advanced manufacturing applications. Reliability was identified to be one of the key challenges for inkjet printheads due to their susceptibility to variations in temperature, ink consistency, debris or external vibration. Hence, lengthy tests with printouts on kilometers of papers are necessary to establish a measure of reliability, which is time-consuming and extends the development cycle for a given application. In this contribution a line-scan camera is used to observe all droplets from a printhead row in flight at full jetting frequency. This allows for the identification of missing droplets as a function of the printed image, external disturbances as well as the drive waveforms used and other print parameters. This provides a quantitative measurement not only of reliability but also of deviations in droplet velocity and trajectory in a laboratory environment. The paper discusses the necessary hard- and software approaches and details the necessity for various image transformations due to the challenges imposed by the illumination. Furthermore, we will present experimental data as well as speed benchmarks.

  • 16. Schuppert, Anna
    et al.
    Thielen, Moritz
    Reinhold, Ingo
    XaarJet AB, Sweden.
    Schmidt, Wolfgang A.
    Ink jet printing of conductive silver tracks from nanoparticle inks on mesoporous substrates2011In: Digital fabrication 2011, NIP27 27th international conference on digital printing technologies: technical program and proceedings, October 2-6, 2011, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 2011, p. -440Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conductive tracks are produced by ink jet printing of a commercial silver nanoparticle ink on different substrates. We observed that applying mesoporous coatings on the substrates resulted in metallic conductivity immediately after printing. The influence of the average pore size and some chemical parameters of the coatings were studied, as well as the thermal treatment after printing. We found that using substrates with slightly acidic cationic coating and small pore sizes of about 15 nm resulted in the highest conductivity for the given ink even without any thermal treatment applied. Another crucial parameter found was the smoothness of the surface, which was estimated by the surface gloss. After drying / "sintering" of the printed tracks for 9 min at 100°C in an oven a specific resistance of 13 μΩ·cm (about eightfold that of bulk silver) could be achieved using a commercially available substrate. This is a significant higher value than recently reported conductivities obtained after heating to much higher temperatures. Additionally, some chemical post treatment of the prints by aqueous solutions can be applied for a further increase in conductivity. Furthermore, samples produced were exposed to "photonic sintering" equipment to assess the potential of this technique for inline post-processing of metallic structures on porous substrates.

  • 17.
    Ungureanu, George
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Electronic Systems.
    Reinhold, Ingo
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Electronic Systems.
    Sander, Ingo
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Electronic Systems.
    Zapka, Werner
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Electronic Systems.
    Parallel software design enabling high-speed reliability testing of inkjet printheads2013In: International Conference on Digital Printing Technologies, 2013, p. 60-65Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With new functional applications emerging in the digital printing industry, the need for quantitative knowledge of the reliability of drop-on-demand inkjet printheads increases. Continuous ink circulation using TF Technology™and the resulting channel self-recovery is one of the technologies which decrease the down-time of a single nozzle, but in turn increase the difficulty of an accurate reliability test. Current measuring techniques, namely the a-posteriori verification of printouts on paper proved to be inappropriate. This paper proposes a novel software approach, exploiting signal processing techniques, strong control loops and powerful system design methodologies in order to allow for the correct detection of single missing droplets at run-time. This new system is meant to relieve the effects of the indefinite environment and sources of human error. Preliminary results and the proof-ofconcept demonstrates both the system's and the design method's versatility and potential.

  • 18. Voit, Wolfgang
    et al.
    Jackson, Nick
    Preckel, Katrin
    Iqbal, Sohail
    Reinhold, Ingo
    Zapka, Werner
    Evaluation of Crosstalk Effects in Inkjet Printing with Xaar 10012011In: NIP27: International Conference on Digital Printing Technologies and Digital Fabrication 2011, 2011, p. 97-100Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Measurements of crosstalk-induced dot placement errors were conducted with the Xaar1001 printhead printing in 3-phase mode using multiple different print patterns containing active pixels from nine neighboring channels on both sides of the monitored channel and including pixels from four earlier print cycles. The test data attributed a 'crosstalk weight factor' to each pixel proportional to its effect on the drop velocity of the monitored channel. The largest crosstalk effect was exerted by the nearest phase neighbor channels, and they reduced the drop velocity from the monitored channel. The 'crosstalk weight factors' of the other pixels was typically one order of magnitude smaller, and they were partially positive or negative, i.e. that they increase or decreased the drop velocity, respectively. The test results further proved that the total crosstalk effect of large print pattern as calculated by a linear superposition of the individual 'crosstalk weight factors' of the active pixels was within 4% of the measured data . The evaluation of crosstalk was further supported by measurements of the meniscus motion within the nozzle in real time. This provided the possibility to measure the pressure variations within printing and non-printing channels, and thus enable to monitor the 'pure' effect of crosstalk from neighboring channels.

  • 19.
    Voit, Wolfgang
    et al.
    XaarJet AB.
    Reinhold, Ingo
    XaarJet AB.
    Zapka, Werner
    XaarJet AB.
    Gaiser, Dietmar
    H.C. Starck Clevios GmbH.
    Deposition of PEDOT-PSS Dispersions with Industrial Inkjet Printheads2010In: Proceedings 4th International Symposium Technologies for Polymer Electronics - TPE 10, 2010, p. 131-137Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Zapka, Werner
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for Intelligence in Paper and Packaging, iPACK.
    Voit, Wolfgang
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for Intelligence in Paper and Packaging, iPACK.
    Reinhold, Ingo
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, VinnExcellence Center for Intelligence in Paper and Packaging, iPACK.
    Drucken jenseits der Farbe2013In: Elektronik, no 12, p. 34-39Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 20 of 20
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