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  • 1.
    Abdullah, Maizura Ailin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, A
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Building Networks for Delivering Integrated Product-Service Offerings (IPSOs)2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Anderson, Helén
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Lindström, Göran
    Uppsala University.
    Blombäck, Anna
    Jönköping University.
    Dahlin, Peter
    Jönköping University.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Lage Hellman, Jens
    Chalmers.
    Olofsson, Christer
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Olsson, Annika
    Lund University.
    Olsson, Magnus
    Lund University.
    Svengren Holm, Lisbeth
    Lund University.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Skapa kundnärvaro i innovationsprocessen2008In: Innovationsförmåga / [ed] Annika Olsson, Malmö: Holmbergs i Malmö AB , 2008, p. 40-59Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Grimheden, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Examples of research areas related to the Product Innovation Engineering Program, PIEp2008Report (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Gutiérres, Ernesto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Project Portfolio Management: research for improving practice2009Report (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Gutiérrez, Ernesto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Designing work procedures for project portfolio management2008In: PROCEEDINGS OF NORDDESIGN 2008 / [ed] Roosimolder, L., TALLINN UNIV TECH , 2008, p. 285-294Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Project Portfolio Management (PPM) is about how companies evaluate, select and prioritize ideas and projects for developing new products. This is aimed to align development investments with company's strategic goals and to reduce the risk caused by uncertainty. Research regarding the procedural aspects of PPM is still considered not enough developed. It is needed a better theoretical ground about which organizational processes should be included in PPM, how they influence each other, and how a work procedure should be designed for suiting a specific company. This paper focuses on understanding the characteristics of processes and activities within PPM. It is grounded on an empirical study in three companies based on qualitative research inter-views. It was found that that processes within PPM have five main characteristics: reciprocal influence, parallel running, network of actors, multiple decision levels and decision-realization gap. It is also discussed the implications of these findings for the design of work procedures for PPM.

  • 6.
    Gutiérrez, Ernesto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Innovation and decision making: understanding selection and prioritization of development projects2008In: 2008 IEEE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON MANAGEMENT OF INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY, VOLS 1-3, IEEE , 2008, p. 333-338Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the problems decision makers experience when selecting and prioritizing new ideas and development projects. It is based on an explorative study, with interviews carried out in three companies that have new product development as a core competitive factor.

    The findings indicate that to deal with all the situations and problems that may arise in the innovation process, various approaches for making decisions and understanding innovation are needed. However, regardless of the appropriateness of these approaches for given circumstances, they receive different levels of acceptance at an organizational plane. This puts decision makers in the conflictive situation of sometimes having to use approaches to work that are appropriate but not accepted, and other times accepted but inappropriate. Furthermore, an organization's potential to create new products, and consequently its future competitiveness, depends on how its members deal with the organizational acceptance of the approaches used.

    We discuss the implications of these findings for designing work procedures for selecting and prioritizing ideas and projects.

  • 7. Lindahl, M.
    et al.
    Sundin, E.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, A.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Integrated Product Service Engineering (IPSE) project: Final report2009Report (Refereed)
  • 8. Lindahl, M.
    et al.
    Sundin, E.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, A.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Integrated Product Service Offerings (IPSO)2008Report (Refereed)
  • 9. Lindahl, M.
    et al.
    Sundin, E.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, A.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Östlin, J.
    Hur skapa mervärde med integrerade produkt- och tjänsteerbjudanden2006In: Uppfinnaren, konstruktören : tidskrift för skapande människor, ISSN 0284-9682, no 5, p. 38-44Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10. Lindahl, M.
    et al.
    Sundin, E.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, A.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Östlin, J.
    Integrated Product and Service Engineering: the IPSE project2006In: Proceedings: Perspectives on Radical Changes to Sustainable Consumption and Production (SCP) / [ed] Maj Munch Andersen, Arnold Tukker, 2006, p. 315-324Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11. Lindahl, M.
    et al.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Sundin, E.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, A.
    Östlin, J.
    Learning networks: a method for Integrated Product and Service Engineering - experiences from the IPSE project2008In: Manufacturing Systems And Technologies For The New Frontier / [ed] Mitsuishi, M; Ueda, K; Kimura, F, Springer-Verlag New York, 2008, p. 495-500Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim with the Integrated Product and Service Engineering (IPSE) project is to develop a methodology for companies that want to make the journey of moving from selling products to also sell Integrated Product and Service Offerings. In order to achieve that major changes are needed in the companies. In this paper the learning network approach is described as well as the content of the workshop series that the companies participated in. The findings show that a learning network approach is beneficial methodology for achieving changes in the companies, since the participants learn from each other and from the researchers.

  • 12. Matsen, D.
    et al.
    Sakao, T.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Comparison of Design Research on Manufacturing Firms Moving Towards2007In: Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Engineering Design (ICED07), 2007, p. 771-772Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13. Matzen, D.
    et al.
    Sakao, T.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Comparison of design research on manufacturing firms moving towards services2007In: Proceedings of ICED 2007, the 16th International Conference on Engineering Design, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corresponding to a steadily advancing integration of products and service operations in the manufacturing industry, a number of research groups within the design community are working with issues of integrated product and service development. Although closely related, the evolving groups focus on different research dimensions, and thus the terminologies and concepts used in research contributions are not fully compatible. This research attempts to promote and support an evolving collaboration between the different research groups within the design community, by analysing and comparing the key contribution areas of three of the existing groups, namely the groups of Integrated Product and Service Engineering, Service/Product Engineering and Product/Service-System development. A review of the groups' research contributions is carried out and the main characteristics' of their research is compared. Furthermore a comparative table of concepts and terms used in the contributions of the three groups in compiled. Based on this comparison, 3 focal research dimensions are identified: the product lifecycle dimension, the customer lifecycle dimension and the provider lifecycle dimension. Finally the research domains' linkages to other related research domains outside the design community are identified.

  • 14.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Hemphälä, Jens
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Management controls and ambidexterity2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh-Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Magnus P.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Innovating every day: making innovation everyone´s businessManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the efforts of a large company when assigning everyone in the organization to work with innovation, and its implication on managing radical and incremental innovation. The analysis rests on an interview investigation within a global high-technology company with 31 managers in different contexts. These managers have been identified as top performers on innovation in an employee survey conducted in the organization. The study illustrates how a large mature organization has involved a broad base of its employees in innovation, emphasizing that innovation is a daily effort and the actions performed in different parts of the organization. The results reveal that it is feasible to both empower people in the organization by having a bottom-up approach supporting daily incremental innovation and combine this with more systematic approaches for managing and enabling radical innovation.

  • 16.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Inducing radical innovation or innovation management as usual2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Gutiérrez, Ernesto
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Probe: managing the project portfolio for competitive advantage2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Research Based Experimentation for Increasing Innovation Capaiblity2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Sandström Ö., Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Barriers to the Circular Economy - Integration of Perspectives and Domains2017In: Procedia CIRP, Elsevier B.V. , 2017, p. 7-12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable development requires disruptive changes and radical innovations, and the capability to deliver this in relation to adapt to a sustainable development is needed in mature large industrial companies. Integration between sustainability and business development is needed, which the Circular Economy model offers. Circular Economy is little implemented in practice, and in the present paper barriers to a transition to Circular Economy is identified. Barriers are financial, structural, operational, attitudinal and technological. They are also, as analyzed in relation to innovation management, characterized by a need to increase integration between a number of different perspectives and domains in industry.

  • 20. Sakao, T.
    et al.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Matsen, D.
    Framing research for service orientation of manufacturers through PSS approaches2009In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 754-778Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In order to respond to the industrial trend towards service design and delivery, research must address a vast area partially related to value creation, marketing and network theories. However, compared to the space to be explored, there is little insight available. Thus, the purpose of this paper, as a first step, is to propose a way to frame such research. Design/methodology/ approach: An extensive literature review is performed of over 100 articles on product/service system (PSS) in general, service design, innovation, and business models in a broad view. Then, the analysis from the authors' viewpoint is carried out to give a frame. Findings: The paper presents three crucial dimensions for service-orientation research, i.e. an offer dimension representing products and services, a provider dimension, and a customer/user dimension. In addition, three research targets are proposed: PSS-offer modelling, PSS development and PSS potential. Furthermore, several promising future research directions are identified. These include evaluating economic consequences or environmental benefits, establishing terminology, organizational issues, and developing methods and tools to support designers. Originality/value: The paper presents a way of viewing research for service orientation, which contributes especially to further research in this area.

  • 21. Sakao, Tomohiko
    et al.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, Anna
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Uncovering benefits and risks of integrated product service offerings - Using a case of technology encapsulation2013In: Journal of Systems Science and Systems Engineering, ISSN 1004-3756, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 421-439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this article is to uncover benefits and risks of Integrated Product Service Offering (IPSO) in a systematic manner. To do so, it adopts an explorative longitudinal in-depth case study (development of an IPSO based on a new technology) and adds insights to the existing literature. The article first proposes a theoretical and generic framework termed the PCP (Provider - Customer - Product) triangle with associated information flow and uncertainty. Second, various types of benefits and risks are presented based on the framework. Among others, the benefit of keeping IPR (Intellectual Property Rights) with the provider and the risk of regulation change are new findings from the case study. In addition, the case study reveals that IPSO is regarded as a positive contributor to innovation. Applying the framework and classification of benefits and risks as norms to other cases has yet to be done for verification. However, the framework contributes scientifically to a better understanding of the benefits and risks of IPSO. In addition, this framework is advantageous with its easiness to understand, which contributes practically to the dissemination of IPSO insight to industry.

  • 22. Sundin, E.
    et al.
    Lindahl, A.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, A.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Östlin, J.
    Integrated Product and Service Engineering Methodology2006In: Proceedings of 11th International Conference of Sustainable Innovation, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23. Sundin, E.
    et al.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Lindahl, M.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, A.
    Using Company: Academic Networks for Improving Product/Service Systems at Large Companies2009In: Introduction to Product/Service-System Design / [ed] T. Sakao and M. Lindahl, London: Springer London, 2009Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24. Sundin, E.
    et al.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Lindahl, M.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, A.
    Using company-academia networks for improving product/service systems at large companies2009In: Introduction to Product/Service-System Design, Springer London, 2009, p. 185-196Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many manufacturers are shifting focus for different reasons from being providers of mainly physical products to providing increased services in their customer offerings. Traditionally, the focus of manufacturing companies has been more on product development than service development; this is one reason why it is important for Product/Service Systems (PSS) developers to meet others who understand this situation. This chapter describes challenges large PSS providers in Sweden are facing, and how these can be explored and discussed within a PSS company-academia network setting. It is concluded that during the three first years of network meetings, this approach has been a success. In addition, the experiences gained from participation in this network have resulted in recommendations for PSS providers and researchers thinking of starting up similar networks and/or building ones has already begun.

  • 25. Sundin, E.
    et al.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Lindahl, M.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, A.
    Sakao, T.
    Larsson, T.
    Challenges for Industrial Product/Service Systems: Experiences from a learning network of large companies2009In: Proceedings of CIRP Industrial Product/Service Systems (IPS2), 2009, p. 298-304Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, there are a growing number of manufacturers that are using the approach of industrial product/service systems. This paper explores how manufacturers and university researchers have started a workshop series where important and topical product/service system issues are elucidated. The companies face many challenges in order to achieve a good product/service system business. Many challenges are related to changing different peoples’ mindset within the company and/or with external companies and customers. Having a learning network approach of dealing with these challenges has been perceived as a good manner of tackling the questions raised within the product/service system providing companies.

  • 26. Sundin, E.
    et al.
    Östlin, J.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, A.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Remanufacturing of Products used in Product Service System Offerings2008In: MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE NEW FRONTIER / [ed] Mitsuishi, M; Ueda, K; Kimura, F, 2008, p. 537-542Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a product service system provider it is important to consider its benefits and drawbacks. Connecting the product service system with a remanufacturing system has a good potential of being economically and environmentally beneficial. This paper elucidates the case of three different remanufacturers and how their relation with their core provider affects their business. Products sold as a part of a product service system have great potential of being remanufactured in an efficient manner. This is for example due to large possibilities to plan the remanufacturing operations and to achieve pre-information about the cores coming in to the remanufacturing facilities.

  • 27.
    Wadell, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Björk, Jennie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Exploring the incorporation of users in an innovating business unit2013In: International Journal of Technology Management, ISSN 0267-5730, E-ISSN 1741-5276, Vol. 61, no 3-4, p. 293-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of user involvement has long been stressed in the innovation management literature. However, we argue that this literature does not take sufficient account to the employment and incorporation of users in innovation. Hence, we explore the role of incorporated users in innovation activities. The research was conducted in a business unit in a large medical technology company with long experience of employing and incorporating physicians and nurses in its new product development activities. Data were collected through a questionnaire and interviews with key individuals. The study reveals that the incorporation of users has an overall positive effect on innovation activities, but that this way of working also raises several managerial issues. The results show that incorporated users play several different roles in the unit as user representatives, networkers, idea promoters and change agents. Based on our findings we propose managerial implications related to the incorporation of users.

  • 28.
    Wadell, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager Stier, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Norell Bergendahl, Margareta
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Early Stages User Involvement as a Product Innovation Capability in the Medical Technology Industry: A Literature Study2010In: Proceedings of the 11th International Design Conference DESIGN 2010 / [ed] Marjanovic D., Storga M., Pavkovic N., Bojcetic N., 2010, p. 1219-1228Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article is presents a literature study related to user involvement in the early stages of the product innovation process in the medical technology industry. Five fundamental capabilities in early stages user involvement are presented and reasoned about. The capabilities are identification of users, acquiring, assimilation, and transformation of user knowledge as well as exploiting. The result of the article contributes to future research in an action research project with the medical technology industry and the public healthcare sector in Sweden.

  • 29.
    Wadell, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Magnusson, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Exploring the utilization of user relationships for the purpose of innovation within sustained producer-user ecosystemsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 30. Öhrwall Rönnbäck, A
    et al.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Developing Integrated Product and Service Offerings: A Comparison Between Large and Small Manufacturing Firms’ Business2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Ölundh, Gunilla
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).
    Modernising ecodesign: ecodesign for innovative solutions2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of environmental work in manufacturing companies has increasingly shifted from end-of-pipe solutions to the environmental performance of products and services. The product development process is central to creating value for customers. This thesis argues that companies can simultaneously create value for consumers and be profitable while taking environmental considerations into account.

    Modernising ecodesign means taking advantage of environmental benefits and the innovation potential when developing solutions rather than using ecodesign simply to ensure that legal requirements or customer demands are met. Ecodesign is a strategic issue and should be included in early product development activities, such as for project selection and when setting product targets. There is also need to perform ecodesign according to the characteristics of specific development processes as for radical product development or when developing integrated solutions, using a combination of services and products.

    This thesis reports on the findings from five different research studies, all of which adopted a qualitative approach in which the emphasis falls on exploring and creating understanding and meaning. The studies focused on three areas of ecodesign: A) rethinking approaches for manufacturing companies, B) setting environmental project targets and project selection and C) redesign of products.

    Recommendations on how to modernise ecodesign have been developed and can be summarised in six points:

    • Perform ecodesign both vertically and horizontally in a company.

    • Increase interaction between organisational units.

    • Take advantage of innovation potential in products, services, user behaviour and the delivery and take-back systems.

    • Take environmental considerations into account in the project selection process.

    • Set environmental targets for ensuring that environmental considerations are taken when developing innovative solutions.

    • Develop ecodesign procedures that fit the characteristics of the development process

  • 32.
    Ölundh, Gunilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    How Do Functional Sales Affect Product Development and Environmental Performance?2003In: Proceeding of ICED ´03 / [ed] Folkeson, A.; Gralen, K.; Norell, M.; Sellgren, U., 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Ölundh, Gunilla
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Machine Design.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Machine Design.
    Making an Ecodesign Choice in Project Portfolio Management2004In: 2004 IEEE EMS International EngineeringManagement Conference: Singapore, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Ölundh, Gunilla
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Machine Design.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Machine Design.
    Making an ecodesign choice in project portfolio selection2004In: Proceedings - 2004 IEEE International Engineering Management Conference: Innovation and Entrepreneurship for Sustainable Development, 2004, p. 913-917Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Project portfolio management is about selecting the right development projects for a company in order to secure that the company is competitive. However, many companies lack a structured process for selecting new development projects. Several significant decisions are taken in the pre-specification phases of product development. Early decisions are taken that affect the environmental impact of a product. In this paper we describe a proactive environmental design approach. Environmental considerations are included into the process of selecting new project development projects and into the decision preparation phase for product development.

  • 35.
    Ölundh, Gunilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).
    Setting Environmental Targets in Product Development2009In: ICED 09 - THE 17TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN, 2009, p. 35-46Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An import factor for reaching environmental improvements in product development is to have relevant environmental targets that actually influence the product development process. In this paper are procedures of setting environmental targets for product development projects identified, described and analyzed based on studies in three large companies operating in different industries. The different procedures have their own advantages and disadvantages and some of them can be combined within a company. The aim is to illustrate approaches of setting environmental targets early on and show different procedures of setting the environmental targets at a strategic level and how the way of setting environmental targets early on influences the product development process. This paper has a strong empirical connection.

  • 36.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Janhager, Jenny
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Öhrwall Rönnbäck, Anna
    Linköping University.
    Lindahl, Mattias
    Linköping University.
    Sundin, Erik
    Linköping University.
    Sakao, Tomohiko
    Linköping University.
    Managing Innovation Processes for a Business-Driven Collaborative Network to Export Total Technical Solutions2008In: Proceedings of the 1st ISPIM Innovation Symposium: Managing Innovation in a Connected World, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a large need of environmental solutions at developing countries, where a network of small firms, e.g. in Sweden, have much opportunity for their business. This paper discusses, from both theoretical and from practical aspects, the high degree of complexity that needs to be managed when small firms export environmental-technology innovation to emerging markets. Especially, it deals with how a network of firms should manage its innovation processes. Based on the review of some 50 literature, the paper explains the methodologies adopted in an on-going project to study these issues. Discussions include differences with development of an integration of products/services within a single firm.

  • 37.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Functional sales as a further approach to Environmental Product Development – case study2001Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Funktionsförsäljning och produkters miljöaspekter – en studie i tre svenska tillverkningsföretag: Rapport 52342002Report (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Ritzén, Sofia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Setting Environmental Targets in Product Development so that they Really Matter2009In: Proccedings of ICED 09, International Conference on Engineering Design / [ed] Norell Bergendahl, M.; Grimheden, M.; Leifer, L.; Skogstad, P.; Lindemann, U., 2009, p. 35-46Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important factor for reaching environmental improvements in product development is to have relevant environmental targets that actually influence the product development process. In this paper are four procedures of setting environmental targets for product development projects identified, described and analyzed based on studies in three large companies operating in different industries. The different procedures have their own advantages and disadvantages and some of them can be combined within a company. The aim is to illustrate procedures of setting environmental targets early on and show different procedures of setting the environmental targets at a strategic level and how the way of setting environmental targets early on influences the product development process. This paper has a strong empirical connection.

  • 40.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Tingström, Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Managing Radical Innovation and Environmental Challenges: Development of a Dry Capacitor at ABB2008In: European Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1460-1060, E-ISSN 1758-7115, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 182-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the driving forces for taking environmental considerations to a higher level in a project involving radical innovation.

    Design/methodology/approach – This qualitative case study is based on ten in-depth interviews with respondents from the development team for the DryQ project at ABB.

    Findings – In order to achieve substantial environmental benefits, radical product development is essential. Radical product development has attributes that differ from those of incremental product development. It is important that these differences be acknowledged when preparing to manage environmental challenges in development projects. In radical product development, environmental considerations should be taken into account very early on, at the strategic level of the design process.  Setting challenging environmental targets and rewarding environmental improvements was crucial to the outcome of the project presented in this paper.

    Research limitations/implications – The research presented here describes one case in one manufacturing company. Readers can, however, learn from this case and apply the insights gained to their own research or use the findings to promote new thinking in their own organisation.

    Practical implications – Suggestions are made about how to manage environmental considerations in radical product development.

    Originality/value – Few studies combine ecodesign and radical innovation theories, as is done here. Yet this is not a theoretical paper but an industry-based study of eco-innovation, from which researchers and practitioners can learn.

1 - 40 of 40
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