Change search
Refine search result
1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Ardalan, Arman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Molecular Profiling of the Population Dynamics: Foundation and Expansion of an Archaic Domesticate2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    "An ‘exponential growth of science’ throughout modern history has been frequently boasted by numerous narcissistic accounts of ‘modern humanity.’ Nonetheless, ‘modern science’ seems to have overwhelmingly compromised on its original promises by fitting into an ‘industrial scheme.’ With this concern, ‘molecular phylogeographics with conservational ambitions’ would look an intact ground for research efforts in a ‘school of biotechnology.’ The dog (Canis familiaris) as an earliest domestic animal has a history of conflicts over its origins and dispersal. Having those disputes addressed, valuable knowledge could be acquired on the nature and dynamics of domestication, and of human societies particularly of pre-agricultural ages. We employed two most widely-used genealogical markers, the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and the non-recombining portion of the Y-chromosome (NRY), to address dog demography. Through 582 bps of mtDNA Control Region, complemented with whole mitochondrial genomes, it was established that almost all maternal lineages of the domestic dog worldwide coalesce to a population of at least 51 and perhaps many more female wolves in Asia South of Yangtze River (ASY) approximately 16,000 years before present (BP). This was based on the presence of a maximal diversity in this area, a descending gradient of diversity outward it, and a ubiquitous population structure everywhere in the world. A closer examination of this portrait in Southwest Asia (SwAsia) and the Fertile Crescent (FC), a region which has supplied persuasive evidence on early presence of the domestic dog, retrieved the same information, with implications for backbreeding with the local wolf population. Meanwhile, analyses of mtDNA dispersal showed that dogs took the long way via land to Madagascar Island, and not together with humans via sea. By the other approach, the NRY data in 14,437 bps length supplemented the mtDNA in reporting the height of diversity from ASY with a founding population of at least 13 male wolves, but expectably produced lower inter-regional differentiation by diversity. Screening of NRY by a SNP assay in the dingoes of Australia Island as a population of feral dogs revealed restricted and similar dispersal patterns for sires and dams. Prospects of ancient, multilocus and whole genome assays with the emerging high-throughput technologies has still more to promise on finer elaborations of these issues."

  • 2.
    Ardalan, Arman
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kluetsch, Cornelya F. C.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Zhang, Ai-bing
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Erdogan, Metin
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Houshmand, Massoud
    Tepeli, Cafer
    Ashtiani, Seyed Reza Miraei
    Savolainen, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Comprehensive study of mtDNA among Southwest Asian dogs contradicts independent domestication of wolf, but implies dog–wolf hybridization2011In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 373-385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diversity indicate explicitly that dogs were domesticated, probably exclusively, in southern East Asia. However, Southwest Asia (SwAsia) has had poor representation and geographical coverage in these studies. Other studies based on archaeological and genome-wide SNP data have suggested an origin of dogs in SwAsia. Hence, it has been suspected that mtDNA evidence for this scenario may have remained undetected. In the first comprehensive investigation of genetic diversity among SwAsian dogs, we analyzed 582 bp of mtDNA for 345 indigenous dogs from across SwAsia, and compared with 1556 dogs across the Old World. We show that 97.4% of SwAsian dogs carry haplotypes belonging to a universal mtDNA gene pool, but that only a subset of this pool, five of the 10 principal haplogroups, is represented in SwAsia. A high frequency of haplogroup B, potentially signifying a local origin, was not paralleled with the high genetic diversity expected for a center of origin. Meanwhile, 2.6% of the SwAsian dogs carried the rare non-universal haplogroup d2. Thus, mtDNA data give no indication that dogs originated in SwAsia through independent domestication of wolf, but dog–wolf hybridization may have formed the local haplogroup d2 within this region. Southern East Asia remains the only region with virtually full extent of genetic variation, strongly indicating it to be the primary and probably sole center of wolf domestication. An origin of dogs in southern East Asia may have been overlooked by other studies due to a substantial lack of samples from this region.

  • 3.
    Ardalan, Arman
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. Division of Animal Biotechnology and Genomics, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (NIGEB), Tehran 14965/161, Iran.
    Oskarsson, Mattias C. R.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    van Asch, Barbara
    Rabakonandriania, Elisabeth
    Savolainen, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    African origin for Madagascan dogs revealed by mtDNA analysis2015In: Royal Society Open Science, E-ISSN 2054-5703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Madagascar was one of the last major land masses to be inhabited by humans. It was initially colonized by Austronesian speaking Indonesians 1500–2000 years ago, but subsequent migration from Africa has resulted in approximately equal genetic contributions from Indonesia and Africa, and the material culture has mainly African influences. The dog, along with the pig and the chicken, was part of the Austronesian Neolithic culture, and was furthermore the only domestic animal to accompany humans to every continent in ancient times. To illuminate Madagascan cultural origins and track the initial worldwide dispersal of dogs, we here investigated the ancestry of Madagascan dogs. We analysed mtDNA control region sequences in dogs from Madagascar (n=145) and compared it with that from potential ancestral populations in Island Southeast Asia (n=219) and sub-Saharan Africa (n=493). We found that 90% of the Madagascan dogs carried a haplotype that was also present in sub-Saharan Africa and that the remaining lineages could all be attributed to a likely origin in Africa. By contrast, only 26% of Madagascan dogs shared haplotypes with Indonesian dogs, and one haplotype typical for Austronesian dogs, carried by more than 40% of Indonesian and Polynesian dogs, was absent among the Madagascan dogs. Thus, in contrast to the human population, Madagascan dogs seem to trace their origin entirely from Africa. These results suggest that dogs were not brought to Madagascar by the initial Austronesian speaking colonizers on their transoceanic voyage, but were introduced at a later stage, together with human migration and cultural influence from Africa.

  • 4.
    Ardalan, Arman
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Oskarsson, Mattias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Natanaelsson, Christian
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Wilton, Alan N.
    Ahmadian, Afshin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Savolainen, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Narrow genetic basis for the Australian dingo confirmed through analysis of paternal ancestry2012In: Genetica, ISSN 0016-6707, E-ISSN 1573-6857, Vol. 140, no 1-3, p. 65-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dingo (Canis lupus dingo) is an iconic animal in the native culture of Australia, but archaeological and molecular records indicate a relatively recent history on the continent. Studies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) imply that the current dingo population was founded by a small population of already tamed dogs from Southeast Asia. However, the maternal genetic data might give a unilateral picture, and the gene pool has yet to be screened for paternal ancestry. We sequenced 14,437 bp of the Y-chromosome (Y-chr) from two dingoes and one New Guinea Singing Dog (NGSD). This positioned dingo and NGSD within the domestic dog Y-chr phylogeny, and produced one haplotype not detected before. With this data, we characterized 47 male dingoes in 30 Y-chr single-nucleotide polymorphism sites using protease-mediated allele-specific extension technology. Only two haplotypes, H3 and H60, were found among the dingoes, at frequencies of 68.1 and 31.9 %, respectively, compared to 27 haplotypes previously established in the domestic dog. While H3 is common among Southeast Asian dogs, H60 was specifically found in dingoes and the NGSD, but was related to Southeast Asian dog Y-chr haplotypes. H3 and H60 were observed exclusively in the western and eastern parts of Australia, respectively, but had a common range in Southeast. Thus, the Y-chr diversity was very low, similar to previous observations for d-loop mtDNA. Overall genetic evidence suggests a very restricted introduction of the first dingoes into Australia, possibly from New Guinea. This study further confirms the dingo as an isolated feral dog.

  • 5. Ding, Z. L.
    et al.
    Oskarsson, Mattias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Ardalan, Arman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Angleby, Helen
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Dahlgren, Lars-Göran
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Tepeli, C.
    Kirkness, E.
    Savolainen, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Zhang, Y. P.
    Origins of domestic dog in Southern East Asia is supported by analysis of Y-chromosome DNA2012In: Heredity, ISSN 0018-067X, E-ISSN 1365-2540, Vol. 108, no 5, p. 507-514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) data indicates that the dog originates from domestication of wolf in Asia South of Yangtze River (ASY), with minor genetic contributions from dog-wolf hybridisation elsewhere. Archaeological data and autosomal single nucleotide polymorphism data have instead suggested that dogs originate from Europe and/or South West Asia but, because these datasets lack data from ASY, evidence pointing to ASY may have been overlooked. Analyses of additional markers for global datasets, including ASY, are therefore necessary to test if mtDNA phylogeography reflects the actual dog history and not merely stochastic events or selection. Here, we analyse 14 437 bp of Y-chromosome DNA sequence in 151 dogs sampled worldwide. We found 28 haplotypes distributed in five haplogroups. Two haplogroups were universally shared and included three haplotypes carried by 46% of all dogs, but two other haplogroups were primarily restricted to East Asia. Highest genetic diversity and virtually complete phylogenetic coverage was found within ASY. The 151 dogs were estimated to originate from 13-24 wolf founders, but there was no indication of post-domestication dog-wolf hybridisations. Thus, Y-chromosome and mtDNA data give strikingly similar pictures of dog phylogeography, most importantly that roughly 50% of the gene pools are shared universally but only ASY has nearly the full range of genetic diversity, such that the gene pools in all other regions may derive from ASY. This corroborates that ASY was the principal, and possibly sole region of wolf domestication, that a large number of wolves were domesticated, and that subsequent dog-wolf hybridisation contributed modestly to the dog gene pool.

  • 6. Houshmand, M.
    et al.
    Sanati, M. H.
    Babrzadeh, F.
    Ardalan, Arman
    Teimori, M.
    Vakilian, M.
    Akuchekian, M.
    Farhud, D.
    Lotfi, J.
    Population screening for association of mitochondrial haplogroups BM, J, K and M with multiple sclerosis: interrelation between haplogroup J and MS in Persian patients2005In: Multiple Sclerosis, ISSN 1352-4585, E-ISSN 1477-0970, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 728-730Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immunological inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) which is chronically observed in young adults. On the basis of earlier studies, potential relatedness between MS and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations was postulated. Materials and methods: 246 individuals were screened using the PCR-RFLP method, including 70 MS patients examined for mitochondrial haplogroups BM, J, K and M and 176, 149 and 70 normal controls examined for haplogroups BM and M, J and K, respectively. Results and discussion: Our analysis revealed a relatively high proportion of haplogroup BM in MS patients (∼26%) compared to normal controls (∼13%). In addition, a slightly significant increase of MS patients of haplogroup J (20% in MS patients versus 9.39% in normal controls at P-0.049), while haplogroups M and K did not show contribution to MS contingency (2.85 and 2.27%, respectively at P-1.000 in haplogroup M and 12.85 and 7.14% respectively at P-0.399 in haplogroup K).

  • 7.
    Oskarsson, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Ardalan, Arman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Rabakonandriania, Elisabeth
    Savolainen, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    African origin for Madagascan dogs revealed by mtDNA analysisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Dogs were the only domestic animals accompanying humans to every continent in ancient time, and was along with pig and chicken part of the Austronesian Neolithic culture. Madagascar was one of the last major land masses to be occupied by humans, 1,500-2,000 years ago. It was initially colonized by Austronesian speaking Indonesians but subsequent migration from Africa has resulted in approximately equal genetic contribution from Indonesia and Africa, and the material culture has mainly African influences. To track the initial worldwide dispersal of dogs and illuminate this part of Madagascan cultural origins we here investigate the ancestry of Malagasy dogs. We analysed mtDNA control region sequences in dogs from Madagascar (n=145) and compared with dogs from potential ancestral populations in Island Southeast Asia (n=219) and sub-Saharan Africa (n=493). We found that 90% of the Madagascan dogs carried a haplotype present also in sub-Saharan Africa, and the remaining lineages could all be attributed to a likely origin in Africa. In contrast, only 26% of Malagasy dogs shared a haplotype with Indonesian dogs, all of which universally occurring haplotypes, and three haplotypes typical for Austronesian dogs, carried by >50% of Indonesian and Polynesian dogs, were carried by only 1% of the Madagscan dogs. Thus, in contrast to the human population, the Madagscan dogs seem to trace its origin entirely from Africa. This indicates that dogs were not brought with the initial Austronesian speaking colonizers on their trans-ocean voyage but introduced at a later stage with the migration and cultural influence from Africa.

  • 8. Pang, Jun-Feng
    et al.
    Klütsch, Cornelya
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Zou, Xiao-Ju
    Zhang, Ai-bing
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Luo, Li-Yang
    Angleby, Helen
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Ardalan, Arman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Ekström, Camilla
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Sköllermo, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Matsumura, Shuichi
    Leitner, Thomas
    Zhang, Ya-Ping
    Savolainen, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    mtDNA Data Indicate a Single Origin for Dogs South of Yangtze River, Less Than 16,300 Years Ago, from Numerous Wolves2009In: Molecular biology and evolution, ISSN 0737-4038, E-ISSN 1537-1719, Vol. 26, no 12, p. 2849-2864Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is no generally accepted picture of where, when, and how the domestic dog originated. Previous studies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have failed to establish the time and precise place of origin because of lack of phylogenetic resolution in the so far studied control region (CR), and inadequate sampling. We therefore analyzed entire mitochondrial genomes for 169 dogs to obtain maximal phylogenetic resolution and the CR for 1,543 dogs across the Old World for a comprehensive picture of geographical diversity. Hereby, a detailed picture of the origins of the dog can for the first time be suggested. We obtained evidence that the dog has a single origin in time and space and an estimation of the time of origin, number of founders, and approximate region, which also gives potential clues about the human culture involved. The analyses showed that dogs universally share a common homogenous gene pool containing 10 major haplogroups. However, the full range of genetic diversity, all 10 haplogroups, was found only in southeastern Asia south of Yangtze River, and diversity decreased following a gradient across Eurasia, through seven haplogroups in Central China and five in North China and Southwest (SW)Asia, down to only four haplogroups in Europe. The mean sequence distance to ancestral haplotypes indicates an origin 5,400-16,300 years ago (ya) from at least 51 female wolf founders. These results indicate that the domestic dog originated in southern China less than 16,300 ya, from several hundred wolves. The place and time coincide approximately with the origin of rice agriculture, suggesting that the dogs may have originated among sedentary hunter-gatherers or early farmers, and the numerous founders indicate that wolf taming was an important culture trait.

  • 9. Torkzaban, Bahareh
    et al.
    Kayvanjoo, Amir Hossein
    Ardalan, Arman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. Natl Inst Genet Engn & Biotechnol, Iran.
    Mousavi, Soraya
    Mariotti, Roberto
    Baldoni, Luciana
    Ebrahimie, Esmaeil
    Ebrahimi, Mansour
    Hosseini-Mazinani, Mehdi
    Machine Learning Based Classification of Microsatellite Variation: An Effective Approach for Phylogeographic Characterization of Olive Populations2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 11, article id e0143465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Finding efficient analytical techniques is overwhelmingly turning into a bottleneck for the effectiveness of large biological data. Machine learning offers a novel and powerful tool to advance classification and modeling solutions in molecular biology. However, these methods have been less frequently used with empirical population genetics data. In this study, we developed a new combined approach of data analysis using microsatellite marker data from our previous studies of olive populations using machine learning algorithms. Herein, 267 olive accessions of various origins including 21 reference cultivars, 132 local ecotypes, and 37 wild olive specimens from the Iranian plateau, together with 77 of the most represented Mediterranean varieties were investigated using a finely selected panel of 11 microsatellite markers. We organized data in two '4-targeted' and '16-targeted' experiments. A strategy of assaying different machine based analyses (i.e. data cleaning, feature selection, and machine learning classification) was devised to identify the most informative loci and the most diagnostic alleles to represent the population and the geography of each olive accession. These analyses revealed microsatellite markers with the highest differentiating capacity and proved efficiency for our method of clustering olive accessions to reflect upon their regions of origin. A distinguished highlight of this study was the discovery of the best combination of markers for better differentiating of populations via machine learning models, which can be exploited to distinguish among other biological populations.

  • 10. Yajloo, Mohsen Mohammadian
    et al.
    Lotfi, Abbas Sahebghadam
    Mesbah Namin, Seyed Alireza
    Hasannia, Sadegh
    Biglarzadeh, Maryam
    Ardalan, Arman
    Rapid [alpha]-1-antitrypsin M-variant Genotyping by Primer-induced Restriction Analysis2007In: Diagnostic molecular pathology (Print), ISSN 1052-9551, E-ISSN 1533-4066, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 54-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 4 normal alleles of M1, M2, M3, and M4 are the most common gene products of the human [alpha]-1-antitrypsin (hAAT). Two single substitutions in M1 are responsible for M3 and M4, whereas 2 substitutions in M1 produce M2. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the Arg101/His101 sequence variation can separate M1 and M3 from M2 and M4 alleles. To complete the genotyping procedure of hAAT M variants, the exon-V Glu376/Asp376 sequence variation was directly analyzed using a designer primer with a single-base substitution in its sequence. This substitution induced an artificial site for the same restriction enzyme in the polymerase chain reaction product. The new restriction site was present in M1 and M4 but absent in M2 and M3, which can be applied as a rapid reliable means for the M-variant genotyping of hAAT.

  • 11. Zouganelis, George D.
    et al.
    Ogden, Rob
    Nahar, Niru
    Runfola, Valeria
    Bonab, Maziar
    Ardalan, Arman
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Radford, David
    Barnett, Ross
    Larson, Greger
    Hildred, Alex
    Jones, Mark
    Scarlett, Garry
    An old dog and new tricks: Genetic analysis of a Tudor dog recovered from the Mary Rose wreck2014In: Forensic Science International, ISSN 0379-0738, E-ISSN 1872-6283, Vol. 245, p. 51-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Tudor warship the Mary Rose sank in the Solent waters between Portsmouth and the Isle of Wight on the 19th of July 1545, whilst engaging a French invasion fleet. The ship was rediscovered in 1971 and between 1979 and 1982 the entire contents of the ship were excavated resulting in the recovery of over 25,000 objects, including the skeleton of a small to medium sized dog referred to as the Mary Rose Dog (MRD). Here we report the extraction and analysis of both mitochondrial and genomic DNA from a tooth of this animal. Our results show that the MRD was a young male of a terrier type most closely related to modern Jack Russell Terriers with a light to dark brown coat colour. Interestingly, given the antiquity of the sample, the dog was heterozygotic for the SLC2A9 gene variant that leads to hyperuricosuria when found in modern homozygotic animals. These findings help shed light on a notable historical artefact from an important period in the development of modern dog breeds.

1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf