Change search
Refine search result
1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Helander, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Mattsson, Tuve
    Theliander, Hans
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Mikael E.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Parameters Affecting the Cross-flow Filtration of Dissolved LignoBoost Kraft Lignin2015In: Journal of wood chemistry and technology, ISSN 0277-3813, E-ISSN 1532-2319, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 1-8Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the kraft pulping process, the lignin-containing by-product kraft black liquor is currently combusted as an energy source. LignoBoost is a technique that extracts lignin from kraft black liquor, resulting in a lignin-lean black liquor, which is returned to the process, and an extracted kraft lignin. To facilitate the use of the extracted kraft lignin in high-value applications, it can be refined via fractionation to produce a more homogeneous starting raw material. Hence, the aim of this study is to investigate the behavior of dissolved softwood kraft lignin during cross-flow filtration. The effects of the lignin concentration, pH, and ionic strength on the fractionation of the dissolved lignin during cross-flow filtration are investigated. The results indicate that large amounts of low-molecular-weight kraft lignin can be produced from solutions having a low lignin concentration. Furthermore, the effects of pH and ionic strength on the fractionation of low-molecular-weight lignin are identified within the studied ranges.

  • 2.
    Helander, Mikaela
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    The Use of Membrane Filtration to Improve the Properties of Extracted Wood Components2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The forest is alarge and important natural resourcein Sweden, and approximately 70% of the country’s land area is woodland. Wood is an excellent raw material for the replacement of oil-based products because it is renewable, biodegradable and carbon neutral. Furthermore, the forest industry is searching for new processes and methods to utilise by-product streams in a so-called integrated biorefinery. A key to the success of producing new products from wood could be pure and homogenous raw materials. Because wood contains a large variety of components with different characteristics and sizes, cross-flow filtration (CFF) will be a key separation technique to obtain homogenous and pure raw materials in the biorefinery concept.

    Different wood material components have been studied in this thesis. The first part of this work focuses on kraft lignin. Kraft lignin is interesting because approximately 3.5-4 million metric tonnes are produced in Sweden annually (~7million tonnes of kraft pulp/year in 2012), and today it is mainly used as fuel. The second part of this thesis deals with materials in hot water extract (i.e.,  galactoglucomannan, but also other components). These extracted materials are interesting because similar materials are extracted in thermomechanical pulping process by-product streams. Finally, nanocellulose has been studied since it is an interesting raw material for future applications.

    Through CFF, kraft lignin from black liquor has been fractionated into raw material samples with more homogeneous characteristics such as molecular weight, aromatic hydroxyl groups and thermal properties. From dynamic mechanical analysis, low molecular weight fractions were found to have the highest degree softening. To precipitate low molecular weight fractions (<1000 Dacut-off) into a convenient solid, lower temperatures than forhigh molecular weight fractions were needed. To produce low molecular weight lignin (<5000 Da cut-off) from re-dissolved LignoBoost lignin, lower lignin concentrations and higher pH and ionic strength were found to increase the permeate fluxat the tested conditions.

    Nanocellulose has been producedby a novel process called nanopulping and has subsequently been size fractionated by CFF to obtain more homogenous nanocellulose.

    CFF and adsorption chromatography can be used to isolate dissolved wood components, yielding several upgraded products: lignin, lignin-carbohydrate complexes, and galactoglucomannan.

  • 3.
    Helander, Mikaela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Theliander, Hans
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Zhang, Liming
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Mikael E.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Fractionation of Technical Lignin: Molecular Mass and pH Effects2013In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 2270-2282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, lignin from kraft pulping is used mainly as fuel, with only very small amounts being used as raw material for chemicals and materials. This work focuses on using a convenient method for separating large amounts of low molecular weight lignin from the kraft process. Low molecular weight lignin contains larger amounts of phenolic structural units, which are possible modification sites and can be used as antioxidants. Moreover, a product that has reduced polydispersity, low molecular weight, and purified lignin could be a potential material for new applications. The studied process for separating lignin from weak black liquor used a membrane with a cut-off of 1000 Da. During precipitation of the 1000 Da permeate, it is necessary to prevent formation of fairly large, rigid particles/agglomerates of lignin by keeping the temperature low. To improve the dead-end filtration, higher ionic strength is needed for the weak black liquor. Additionally, reducing the end pH will cause more material to precipitate. More sulfur was found in the low molecular weight lignin and at lower precipitation pH, indicating that most sulfur left in the lignin samples might be bound to low molecular weight lignin.

  • 4.
    Helander, Mikaela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Theliander, Hans
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Zhang, Liming
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Lindström, Mikael E.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lignin for new materials - molar mass and pH effects2012In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 243Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5. Mattsson, Tuve
    et al.
    Azhar, Shoaib
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Eriksson, Susanna
    Helander, Mikaela
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Jedvert, Kerstin
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Mikael E.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    McKee, Lauren S.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Oinonen, Petri
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Sevastyanova, Olena
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Westerberg, Niklas
    Theliander, Hans
    The Development of a Wood-based Materials-biorefinery2017In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 9152-9182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several different methods for the extraction, separation, and purification of wood constituents were combined in this work as a unified process with the purpose of achieving a high overall efficiency of material extraction and utilization. This study aimed to present a laboratory-scale demonstrator biorefinery that illustrated how the different wood constituents could be separated from the wood matrix for later use in the production of new bio-based materials and chemicals by combining several approaches. This study builds on several publications and ongoing activities within the Wallenberg Wood Science Center (WWSC) in Sweden on the theme "From wood to material components." Combining the approaches developed in these WWSC projects - including mild steam explosion, membrane and chromatographic separation, enzymatic treatment and leaching, ionic liquid extraction, and fractionation together with Kraft pulping - formed an outline for a complete materials-biorefinery. The process steps involved were tested as integral steps in a linked process. The scale of operations ranged from the kilogram-scale to the gram-scale. The feasibility and efficiency of these process steps in a biorefinery system were assessed, based on the data, beginning with whole wood.

  • 6.
    Sevastyanova, Olena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Helander, Mikaela
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Chowdhury, Sudip
    Wedin, Helena
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Ek, Monica
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Kadla, John F.
    Lindström, Mikael E.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Evaluation of physico-chemical properties and prediction of spinning parameters for high-quality lignins produced by ultra-filtration of industrial Kraft liquor2013In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 245Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Sevasyanova, Olena
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Helander, Mikaela
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Chowdhury, Sudip
    Lange, Heiko
    Wedin, Helena
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Zhang, Liming
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Ek, Monica
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Kadla, John F.
    Crestini, Claudia
    Lindström, Mikael F.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Tailoring the Molecular and Thermo-Mechanical Properties of Kraft Lignin by Ultrafiltration2014In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, ISSN 0021-8995, E-ISSN 1097-4628, Vol. 131, no 18, p. 9505-9515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study has shown that ultrafiltration allows the selective extraction from industrial black liquors of lignin fraction with specific thermo-mechanical properties, which can be matched to the intended end uses. Ultrafiltration resulted in the efficient fractionation of kraft lignin according to its molecular weight, with an accumulation of sulfur-containing compounds in the low-molecular weight fractions. The obtained lignin samples had a varying quantities of functional groups, which correlated with their molecular weight with decreased molecular size, the lignin fractions had a higher amount of phenolic hydroxyl groups and fewer aliphatic hydroxyl groups. Depending on the molecular weight, glass-transition temperatures (T-g) between 70 and 170 degrees C were obtained for lignin samples isolated from the same batch of black liquor, a tendency confirmed by two independent methods, DSC, and dynamic rheology (DMA). The Fox-Flory equation adequately described the relationship between the number average molecular masses (M-n) and T-g's-irrespective of the method applied. DMA showed that low-molecular-weight lignin exhibits a good flow behavior as well as high-temperature crosslinking capability. Unfractionated and high molecular weight lignin (M-w > 5 kDa), on the other hand, do not soften sufficiently and may require additional modifications for use in thermal processings where melt-flow is required as the first step.

  • 8. Westerberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Sunner, Hampus
    Helander, Mikaela
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lawoko, Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Rasmuson, Anders
    Separation Of Galactoglucomannans, Lignin, And Lignin-Carbohydrate Complexes From Hot-Water-Extracted Norway Spruce By Cross-Flow Filtration And Adsorption Chromatography2012In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 4501-4516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A simple method to simultaneously recover polymeric carbohydrates, mainly galactoglucomannans (GGM), lignin, and lignin-carbohydrate complex (LCC) from hot-water-extracted Norway spruce wood is presented. The isolation method consists of cross-flow filtration, where high and low molecular mass species are removed, followed by fixed-bed adsorption on a hydrophobic polymeric resin (XAD-16) to remove lignins and lignans. In the second step of fixed-bed adsorption, a phenylic reversed-phase analytical chromatography column, where mass transport resistance is minimized and a very high selectivity towards aromatic compounds have been observed, was used to separate LCC from GGM. The isolated LCC fraction contained about 10% aromatics, whereas the upgraded GGM fraction contained about 1.5% aromatics and the lignin fraction contained about 56% aromatics. Polymeric xylan was accumulated in the GGM fraction, while mannose was the dominant sugar found in the LCC fraction. As products, approximately 7% was recovered in the lignin fraction in the first adsorptive step, 5% was recovered as LCC, and 88% as upgraded hemicelluloses.

  • 9.
    Zhu, Hongli
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Areskogh, Dimitri
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Helander, Mikaela
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    A preliminary investigation on enzymatic oxidative polymerization of lignin2011In: 16th International Symposium on Wood, Fiber and Pulping Chemistry: Proceedings, ISWFPC, 2011, p. 238-241Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enzyme catalyzed oxidative polymerization of technical bagasse lignin and low-molecular-weight ultra-filtered kraft pulp lignin (UFL) were studied in methanol-water solution. Lignin was dissolved in methanol-water solution at pH 13 in steam heated autoclave at 130°C for 2h. The polymerization reaction was conducted at 40°C with a commercial laccase under oxygen saturation. The weight-average molecular weight (Mw) of original macromonomer and polymerized lignin were characterized with alkaline size exclusion Chromatograph (SEC) system. Enzyme treatment increased the molecular weight of both technical bagasse lignin and ultra-filtered lignin up to 20 times. The reaction time and the enzyme dosage were studied to obtain the maximal molecular weight.

  • 10.
    Zhu, Hongli
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Areskogh, Dimitri
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Helander, Mikaela
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Investigation on enzymatic oxidative polymerization of technical soda lignin2012In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 243Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Zhu, Hongli
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Areskogh, Dimitri
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Helander, Mikaela
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Investigation on enzymatic oxidative polymerization of technical soda lignin2012In: Current organic chemistry, ISSN 1385-2728, E-ISSN 1875-5348, Vol. 16, no 16, p. 1850-1854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enzyme, including laccase and peroxidase, catalyzed oxidative polymerization of technical bagasse soda lignin and low molecular weight ultra-filtrated kraft pulp lignin in methanol-water solution were studied. The weight average molecular weight of original macromonomer and polymerized lignin were characterized with alkaline size exclusion chromatograph system. Laccase treatment increased the molecular weight of both technical bagasse lignin and ultra-filtrated lignin up to 20 times in 24h. Compared to the low molecular weight ultra filtrated lignin, the reaction rate of bagasse lignin was consistant during the whole procedure. The reaction time and the laccase dosage were investigated to obtain the maximal molecular weight. The horseradish peroxidase treatment was a potential method for low molecular weight ultra filtrated lignin.

  • 12.
    Zhu, Hongli
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Wood Chemistry and Pulp Technology.
    Helander, Mikaela
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Moser, Carl
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Ståhlkranz, Adam
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Henriksson, Gunnar
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Mikael
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    A novel nano cellulose preparation method and size fraction by cross flow ultra- filtration2012In: Current organic chemistry, ISSN 1385-2728, E-ISSN 1875-5348, Vol. 16, no 16, p. 1871-1875Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel energy-efficient method called nanopulping (patent pending) to produce nanocellulose from chemical pulp, and a novel cross-flow ultra-filtration method to separate nanofibrils fractions of different size were applied in this study. Pretreatment with endoglucanase or 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) oxidation seems to enhance the nanopulping process. Results were evaluated with atomic force microscope and ultrafiltration. The nanopulping produced a relatively inhomogeneous material with larger particles/ fibers in addition to nanofibers. However, by ultrafiltration of the material it was possible to obtain more homogeneous material in different dimensions with methods industrially acceptable.

1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf