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  • 1.
    Bekele, Abiy
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Materials.
    Birgisson, Björn
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Highway Engineering Laboratory.
    Rydén, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Materials.
    Gudmarsson, Anders
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Materials.
    Slow dynamic diagnosis of asphalt concrete specimen to determine level of damage caused by static low temperature conditioning2017In: 43rd Annual Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation, American Institute of Physics (AIP), 2017, Vol. 1806, article id 080012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phenomenon of slow dynamics has been observed in a variety of materials which are considered as relatively homogeneous that exhibit nonlinearity due to the presence of defects or cracks within them. Experimental realizations in previous work suggest that slow dynamics can be in response to acoustic drives with relatively larger amplitude as well as rapid change of temperature. Slow dynamics as a nonlinear elastic response of damaged materials is manifested as a sharp drop and then recovery of resonance frequency linearly with logarithmic time. In this work, slow dynamics recovery is intended to be used as a means of identifying and evaluating thermal damage on an asphalt concrete specimen. The experimental protocol for measuring slow dynamics is based on the technique of nonlinear resonance spectroscopy and is set up with non-contact excitation using a loud speaker and the data acquisition tool box of Matlab. Sweeps of frequency with low amplitude are applied in order to probe the specimen at its linear viscoelastic state. The drop and then recovery in fundamental axially symmetric resonance frequency is observed after the specimen is exposed to sudden temperature change. The investigation of the viscoelastic contribution to the change in resonance frequency and slow dynamics can help identify micro-damage in asphalt concrete samples.

  • 2.
    Bekele, Abiy
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Rydén, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Gudmarsson, Anders
    Peab Asfalt AB, Drivhjulsvagen 11, S-12630 Hagersten, Sweden..
    Birgisson, Bjorn
    Texas A&M Univ, Dept Civil Engn, College Stn, TX 77843 USA..
    Automated Non-contact Resonance Excitation Method to Assess Low Temperature Dynamic Modulus of Asphalt Concrete2019In: Journal of nondestructive evaluation, ISSN 0195-9298, E-ISSN 1573-4862, Vol. 38, no 2, article id 43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies the applicability of an automated non-destructive testing method to monitor the stiffness of asphalt concrete at low temperatures. A loudspeaker is used as a source of non-contact excitation of the axially symmetric fundamental resonant frequencies of a disc-shaped asphalt concrete specimen positioned inside an environmental chamber. Measured resonant frequencies are used to calculate the dynamic moduli of the specimen at different temperatures. The repeatability of the method as well as the effect of loudspeaker height above the sample are studied. Results show that the main advantage of the non-contact excitation method, compared to manually applied impact hammer excitation, is that repeatable automated measurements can be performed while the specimen is placed inside an environmental temperature chamber. This methodology enables to study the effect of only low temperature conditioning on the dynamic modulus of asphalt concrete without interference from mechanical loading.

  • 3.
    Bekele, Abiy
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Rydén, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Gudmarsson, Anders
    Peab Asfalt AB, Drivhjulsvagen 11, S-12630 Hagersten, Sweden..
    Birgisson, Bjorn
    Texas A&M Univ, Dept Civil Engn, College Stn, TX 77843 USA..
    Effect of cyclic low temperature conditioning on stiffness modulus of asphalt concrete based on non-contact resonance testing method2019In: Construction and Building Materials, ISSN 0950-0618, E-ISSN 1879-0526, Vol. 225, p. 502-509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The stiffness modulus behaviors of three different asphalt concrete specimens that are subjected to cyclic cooling and heating are monitored. In an attempt to identify the sole effect of temperature cycles and to avoid any other biasing effects such as thermal contamination that can possibly corrupt measurements, resonance frequency measurements of the specimens are taken using an automated non-contact resonance method. The resonance frequency measurements are based on the fundamental axially symmetric mode of vibration. A hysteretic effect is observed on the measured resonance frequencies of the specimens with an application of cyclic cooling and heating. Lower stiffness moduli are obtained during the heating phase of a complete cooling and heating cycle. The stiffness moduli are calculated from measured resonance frequencies of the specimens in order to show their relative reductions due to the hysteretic effect. This finding is particularly important since it enables us to observe and understand the effect of the thermal history of asphalt concrete with regards to the reversibility behavior of its stiffness modulus. The damping of the specimens is also calculated from the measured resonance frequencies at the temperatures within the applied cyclic cooling and heating. Their observed behavior is also discussed with respect to a presence of potential micro damage.

  • 4.
    Bjurström, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.
    Gudmarsson, Anders
    Ryden, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.
    Starkhammar, Josefin
    Comparative Seismic Laboratory and Non-Contact Field Measurements of Asphalt Concrete2016In: 2016 Structural Materials Technology Paper Summaries / [ed] American Society for Nondestructive Testing, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-contact acoustic field measurements are performed on a newly built highway to characterize the real part of the dynamicmodulus of the asphalt concrete (AC) top layer. The in situ measurements are performed using an array of 48 micro-electromechanicalsystem (MEMS) sensors. Cores extracted from the field measurement positions are then examined in a laboratory usingseismic modal testing for comparison. The laboratory testing allows master curves to be constructed to characterize the AC over awide temperature and frequency range. It is demonstrated that the real parts of the dynamic moduli are consistent at the fieldtemperatures using the two test methods. The in situ measurements are also shown to be highly repeatable. The presentedcomparative study indicates a possible application for assuring the quality of AC based on mechanical properties using fast noncontactin situ measurements.

  • 5.
    Bjurström, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.
    Gudmarsson, Anders
    Ryden, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.
    Starkhammar, Josefin
    Field and laboratory stress-wave measurements of asphalt concrete2016In: Construction and Building Materials, ISSN 0950-0618, E-ISSN 1879-0526, Vol. 126, p. 508-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Non-contact surface wave measurements are performed on a new asphalt concrete (AC) pavement using 48 micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) sensors as receivers to estimate the real part of the dynamic moduli of the AC top layer. Laboratory measurements of core samples, extracted from the field measurement positions, are used to construct master curves for comparison with the field measurements. The real parts of the dynamic moduli from the two test methods are consistent at the field measurement temperatures, and the non-contact field measurements are highly repeatable. These results indicate a possible application for quality assurance of AC based on mechanical properties.

  • 6.
    Bjurström, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Rydén, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Air-coupled detection of the S1-ZGV lamb mode in a concrete plate based on backward wave propagation2013In: Review Of Progress In Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation, Vols 32a And 32b, American Institute of Physics (AIP), 2013, p. 1294-1300Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Impact Echo is commonly used to determine thickness of concrete plate like structures. The method is based on the generation and detection of the plate thickness resonance frequency, where the group velocity of the first higher symmetric Lamb mode goes to zero (S1-ZGV). When using air-coupled microphones as receivers it is hard to determine the correct resonance frequency due to low signal to noise ratio. In this study multichannel signal processing is used to identify the S1-ZGV frequency, based on backward wave propagation instead of the conventional amplitude spectrum approach.

  • 7.
    Bjurström, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.
    Rydén, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.
    Detecting the thickness mode frequency in a concrete plate using backward wave propagation2016In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 139, no 2, p. 649-657Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Material stiffness and plate thickness are the two key parameters when performing quality assurance/quality control on pavement structures. In order to estimate the plate thickness non-destructively, theImpact Echo (IE) method can be utilized to extract the thickness resonance frequency. An alternativeto IE for estimating the thickness resonance frequency of a concrete plate, and to subsequently enablethickness determination, is presented in this paper. The thickness resonance is often revealed as asharp peak in the frequency spectrum when contact receivers are used in seismic testing. Due to a lowsignal-to-noise ratio, IE is not ideal when using non-contact microphone receivers. In studying thecomplex Lamb wave dispersion curves at a frequency infinitesimally higher than the thickness frequency,it is seen that two counter-directed waves occur at the same frequency but with phase velocitiesin opposite directions. Results show that it is possible to detect the wave traveling with anegative phase velocity using both accelerometers and air-coupled microphones as receivers. Thisalternative technique can possibly be used in non-contact scanning measurements based on aircoupled microphones.

  • 8.
    Bjurström, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.
    Rydén, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.
    Effect of Surface Unevenness on In Situ Measurements and Theoretical Simulation in Non-Contact Surface Wave Measurements Using a Rolling Microphone Array2015In: NDT-CE2015 proceedings, Berlin: NDT , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-destructive seismic testing using air-coupled microphones is today an attractive alternative to the more conventional stationary accelerometer testing, in order to perform fast and reliable material characterization on pavement structures. A multichannel microphone array enables fast mobile data collection using a rolling trolley. It is essential that the microphone array and the material surface are perfectly aligned to receive a correct result. This study presents estimations of the calculation errors due to misalignments between the microphone array and the material surface. It is shown that even small misalignments can cause large errors. A realistic pavement roughness is simulated in order to quantify the errors in different situations and for different materials (stiffness). A simple solution to correct the errors under certain circumstances is also presented.

  • 9.
    Bjurström, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.
    Rydén, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.
    Effect of surface unevenness on non-contact surface wave measurements using a rolling microphone array2015In: 41ST ANNUAL REVIEW OF PROGRESS IN QUANTITATIVE NONDESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION: Volume 34 / [ed] Dale E Chimenti and Leonard J. Bond, American Institute of Physics (AIP), 2015, Vol. 1650, p. 128-135Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Surface wave velocity is measured and evaluated along a straight survey line in order to compare two different data acquisition methods. Results from a rolling microphone array are compared to data acquired using a conventional accelerometer. Results from the two different data acquisition methods are shown to be similar. However, it is demonstrated that the results are very sensitive to misalignments between the microphone array and the measured surface. Practices to overcome problems with misalignments are discussed and demonstrated.

  • 10.
    Bjurström, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.
    Rydén, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Highway Engineering Laboratory.
    Non-contact rolling surface wave measurements on asphalt concreteIn: International Journal on Road Materials and Pavement Design, ISSN 1468-0629, E-ISSN 2164-7402Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Rolling surface wave measurements on a single, thin asphalt concrete (AC) layer arepresented to investigate their use in rapid nondestructive field tests. An array of 47 micro-electromechanicalsensor (MEMS) microphones is mounted on a trailer together with an automated impactsource. Multichannel recordings from single impacts are obtained at 80 equally spaced positions as thetrailer moves at a constant speed. The complete battery-powered data acquisition system enables largescaletesting of newly built pavements. Multiple sets of test results show good repeatability for theassessed shear wave velocity and demonstrate the strong temperature dependency of AC. The presentedresults indicate a possible application for quality assurance of AC using rolling surface wavemeasurements.

  • 11.
    Bjurström, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Soil and Rock Mechanics.
    Rydén, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Building Technology and Design.
    Non-contact rolling surface wave measurements on asphalt concrete2019In: International Journal on Road Materials and Pavement Design, ISSN 1468-0629, E-ISSN 2164-7402, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 334-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rolling surface wave measurements on a single, thin asphalt concrete (AC) layer are presented to investigate their use in rapid nondestructive field tests. An array of 47 micro-electro-mechanical sensor (MEMS) microphones is mounted on a trailer together with an automated impact source. Multichannel recordings from single impacts are obtained at 80 equally spaced array positions as the trailer moves at a constant speed. The complete battery-powered data acquisition system enables large-scale testing of newly built pavements. Multiple sets of test results show good repeatability for the assessed shear wave velocity and demonstrate the strong temperature dependency of AC. The presented results indicate a possible application for quality assurance of AC using rolling surface wave measurements.

  • 12.
    Bjurström, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Rydén, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Birgisson, Björn
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering.
    Non-contact surface wave testing of pavements: comparing a rolling microphone array with accelerometer measurements2016In: Smart Structures and Systems, ISSN 1738-1584, E-ISSN 1738-1991, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rayleigh wave velocity along a straight survey line on a concrete plate is measured in order to compare different non-destructive data acquisition techniques. Results from a rolling non-contact data acquisition system using air-coupled microphones are compared to conventional stationary accelerometer results. The results show a good match between the two acquisition techniques. Rolling measurements were found to provide a fast and reliable alternative to stationary system for stiffness determination. However, the non-contact approach is shown to be sensitive to unevenness of the measured surface. Measures to overcome this disadvantage are discussed and demonstrated using both forward and reverse rolling measurements.

  • 13.
    Gudmarsson, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Rydén, Nils
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Birgisson, Björn
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Application of resonant acoustic spectroscopy to asphalt concrete beams for determination of the dynamic modulus2012In: Materials and Structures, ISSN 1359-5997, E-ISSN 1871-6873, Vol. 45, no 12, p. 1903-1913Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, a new application of resonant acoustic spectroscopy (RAS) is examined for constructing asphalt concrete mastercurves from seismic testing. The frequency-dependent material properties can be characterized from multiple modes of vibration through the use of RAS. Beam-shaped asphalt specimens are tested at multiple temperatures to determine the resonance frequencies of the specimens. The resonance frequencies are estimated by applying a small load impulse and measuring the resulting acceleration through the specimens. Using RAS, the material properties of the specimens are determined numerically using the measured resonance frequencies. The results presented show that the frequency-dependent dynamic modulus of the asphalt concrete specimens can be characterized using several modes of vibration at each testing temperature.

  • 14.
    Gudmarsson, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Rydén, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Birgisson, Björn
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Characterizing the low strain complex modulus of asphalt concrete specimens through optimization of frequency response functions2012In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, E-ISSN 1520-8524, Vol. 132, no 4, p. 2304-2312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Measured and finite element simulated frequency response functions are used to characterize the low strain (similar to 10(-7)) complex moduli of an asphalt concrete specimen. The frequency response functions of the specimen are measured at different temperatures by using an instrumented hammer to apply a load and an accelerometer to measure the dynamic response. Theoretical frequency response functions are determined by modeling the specimen as a three-dimensional (3D) linear isotropic viscoelastic material in a finite element program. The complex moduli are characterized by optimizing the theoretical frequency response functions against the measured ones. The method is shown to provide a good fit between the frequency response functions, giving an estimation of the complex modulus between minimum 500 Hz and maximum 18 vertical bar 000 Hz depending on the temperature. Furthermore, the optimization method is shown to give a good estimation of the complex modulus master curve.

  • 15.
    Gudmarsson, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Rydén, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Birgisson, Björn
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Non-Contact Excitation of Fundamental Resonance Frequencies of an Asphalt Concrete Specimen2015In: AIP Conference Proceedings, 2015, Vol. 1650, p. 1401-1408Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Impact hammer and non-contact speaker excitation were applied to an asphalt concrete, a PVC-U and a concrete specimen to measure the fundamental longitudinal resonance frequency at different strain levels. The impact and the non-contact excitation methods resulted in similar resonance frequencies for the undamaged asphalt concrete and for the PVC-U specimen. However, the two excitation approaches gave different results for the concrete specimen, which was shown to have a nonlinear response to increasing strain levels. A reduction and a following recovery of the resonance frequency of the asphalt concrete were shown after the specimen was exposed to a small amount of damage. However, no fast nonlinear dynamics were observed for the asphalt concrete through the speaker measurements.

  • 16.
    Gudmarsson, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Rydén, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Birgisson, Björn
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Nondestructive evaluation of the complex modulus master curve of asphalt concrete specimens2013In: Review Of Progress In Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation , Vols 32A And 32B / [ed] Donald O. Thompson, Dale E. Chimenti, American Institute of Physics (AIP), 2013, p. 1301-1308Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dynamic Young's modulus of asphalt concrete is directly related to pavement quality and is used in thickness design of pavements. There is a need for a nondestructive laboratory method to evaluate the complex modulus, which can be linked to nondestructive field measurements. This study applies seismic measurements to an asphalt concrete beam where resonant acoustic spectroscopy and optimization of frequency response functions are used to estimate the complex moduli. A good estimation of the master curve is obtained.

  • 17.
    Gudmarsson, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Rydén, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Birgisson, Björn
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Observed deviations from isotropic linear viscoelastic behavior of asphalt concrete through modal testing2014In: Construction and Building Materials, ISSN 0950-0618, E-ISSN 1879-0526, Vol. 66, p. 63-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The complex Young's moduli, complex shear moduli and complex Poisson's ratio of a beam shaped asphalt concrete specimen have been characterized through low strain (similar to 10(-7)) frequency response function measurements. The assumption of isotropic linear viscoelastic behavior has been applied and investigated. The results indicate that the asphalt concrete specimen agree with the isotropic linear viscoelastic assumption at low temperatures and high frequencies (>10 kHz at 0 degrees C), but at higher temperatures and lower frequencies, discrepancies from isotropic linear behavior are shown. The dynamic shear moduli calculated from the estimated Young's moduli and Poisson's ratio of the asphalt concrete specimen are overestimated for frequencies and temperatures often applied to pavements.

  • 18.
    Gudmarsson, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Rydén, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Di Benedetto, H.
    Sauzéat, C.
    Complex modulus and complex Poisson's ratio from cyclic and dynamic modal testing of asphalt concrete2015In: Construction and Building Materials, ISSN 0950-0618, E-ISSN 1879-0526, Vol. 88, p. 20-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The complex moduli and complex Poisson's ratio of two cylindrical asphalt concrete specimens have been determined through modal testing in this paper. These results have been compared to cyclic tension-compression measured complex moduli and complex Poisson's ratio of asphalt concrete specimens with different dimensions. The modal testing has been performed by measuring frequency response functions of the specimens using an impact hammer and an accelerometer. The material properties have been characterized by matching finite element computed frequency response functions to the measurements. The results of the different specimens show that the modal test systematically give a slightly higher absolute value of the complex moduli compared to the cyclic testing. The differences are most likely a result of the different strain levels applied in the two test methods. However, the modal and cyclic tension-compression testing resulted in similar values of the complex Poisson's ratio for the two different asphalt concrete mixtures despite the different applied strain levels.

  • 19.
    Gudmarsson, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Rydén, Nils
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Di Benedetto, Hervé
    University of Lyon/Ecole Nationale des Travaux Publics de l’Etat (ENTPE), France .
    Sauzéat, Cédric
    Tapsoba, Nouffou
    Birgisson, Björn
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Highway and Railway Engineering.
    Comparing Linear Viscoelastic Properties of Asphalt Concrete Measured by Laboratory Seismic and Tension–Compression Tests2014In: Journal of nondestructive evaluation, ISSN 0195-9298, E-ISSN 1573-4862, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 571-582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Seismic measurements and conventional cyclic loading have been applied to a cylindrical asphalt concrete specimen to compare the complex modulus and complex Poisson’s ratio between the two testing methods. The seismic moduli and Poisson’s ratio have been characterized by optimizing finite element calculated frequency response functions to measurements performed at different temperatures. An impact hammer and an accelerometer were used to measure the frequency response functions of the specimen which was placed on soft foam for free boundary conditions. The cyclic loading was performed by applying both tension and compression to the specimen while measuring the displacements in the axial and radial direction. The Havriliak–Negami and the 2S2P1D model have been used to estimate master curves of the complex modulus and complex Poisson’s ratio from the seismic and the tension–compression tests. The seismic measurements performed at a lower strain level than the tension–compression test give a higher absolute value of the complex moduli (e.g.∼12% at 100 Hz) and a lower phase angle compared to the tension–compression results.

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