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  • 1.
    Bengtsson, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Signal Processing.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Norgren, Martin
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Electromagnetic Engineering.
    Skog, Isaac
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Signal Processing.
    Sohlström, Hans
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Micro and Nanosystems.
    Developing and Implementing a Program Interfacing Project Course in Electrical Engineering2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we describe the ideas behind a second-year Design-Build course in Electrical Engineering. Electrical Engineering is a theoretical subject, and in such it is difficult to maintain the theoretical level in project courses introduced too early in the program, especially when core subjects like electromagnetic field theory are involved. This issue is addressed and we also describe our approach for the assessment of the students. We also discuss the different goals that were set up prior to the course from a program perspective; how we reasoned when designing the course, the assessment structure, and the output once the course was implemented

  • 2.
    Ekstedt, Mathias
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Electrical Systems.
    Johnson, Pontus
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Electrical Systems.
    Jonsson, Narcisa
    Making project complexity understandable: the elegance of notations2003In: Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Management of Technology (IA-MOT), Nancy, France, 2003.: From Information to Knowledge to Competencies: Key Success Factors for Innovation and Sustainable Development. / [ed] Hosni, Y.A., Khalil, T.M., Morel-Guimaraes L., 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Ekstedt, Mathias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Johnson, Pontus
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lindström, Åsa
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Gammelgård, Magnus
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Johansson, Erik
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Plazaola, Leonel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Silva, Enrique
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Liliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Consistent enterprise software system architecture for the CIO: a utility-cost based approach2004In: Proceedings of the 37th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, 2004, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previously, business operations of most large companies were supported by a number of isolated software systems performing diverse specific tasks, from real-time process control to administrative functions. In order to better achieve business goals, these systems have in recent years been extended, and more importantly, integrated into a company-wide system in its own right, the enterprise software system. Due to its history, this system is composed of a considerable number of heterogeneous and poorly understood components interacting by means of equally diverse and confusing connectors. To enable informed decision-making, the Chief Information Officer (CIO), responsible for the overall evolution of the company's enterprise software system, requires management tools. This paper proposes enterprise software system architecture (ESSA) as a foundation for an approach for managing the company's software system portfolio. In order to manage the overwhelming information amounts associated with the enterprise software system, this approach is based on two concepts. Firstly, the approach explicitly relates the utility of knowledge to the cost of its acquisition. The utility of knowledge is derived from the increased value of better-informed decision-making. The cost of knowledge acquisition is primarily related to the resources spent on information searching. Secondly, the approach focuses on ensuring the consistency of the architectural model.

  • 4.
    Ekstedt, Mathias
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Electrical Systems.
    Johnson, Pontus
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Electrical Systems.
    Sjölin, Peter
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Electrical Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Electrical Systems.
    The architectural information view for the power electricity industry2003In: Proceedings of the CIGRE SC D2´s Colloquium, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Buschle, Markus
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lillieskold, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Ekstedt, Mathias
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Developing a Design for Six Sigma Framework For the Analysis of Product Development Processes2015In: 2015 PORTLAND INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON MANAGEMENT OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY (PICMET'15), IEEE Communications Society, 2015, p. 1549-1561Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decades the importance of product development (PD) has become apparent for organizations. A majority of companies' total business results are dependent on the outcome of PD activities, results that crucially depends on new product's success and sales revenue. PD must be evaluated continuously, even without a physical final product accessible to measure. Therefore, in product development there is a need to evaluate the PD organization and project activities. This article presents a product development framework for analysis of organizations' product development performance according to Design for Six Sigma and evaluation of DFSS adopted companies' level of implementation.

  • 6.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Gingnell, Liv
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Implementing Design for Six Sigma in large Swedish product developing organisations – an interview study2014In: Total Quality Management and Business Excellence, ISSN 1478-3363, E-ISSN 1478-3371, Vol. 26, no 5/6, p. 648-660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a result of the organisational evolvement towards increased structure in product development (PD), supporting concepts like Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) have arisen. DFSS provides structuring guidelines as well as suggestions regarding tool and technique implementations for PD. Companies’ need for support and structure from such a concept does, however, not always correspond to the real content of the concept. This article examines the DFSS implementation strategy in four organisations to determine which parts of the DFSS concept are being used by companies. Results show that several of the most difficult activities in PD lack concrete support in DFSS. On the other hand, many of the clearly described actions of the concept are already well-operating methods in today's product developing organisations.

  • 7.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Gingnell, Liv
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Successful risk management approaches in product development organizations: A case study experience2014In: 2014 Proceedings of PICMET '14: Infrastructure and Service Integration, IEEE , 2014, p. 2243-2253Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses experiences from case studies conducted at product developing departments in four multinational companies. All organizations are outstanding product developing companies with a long and successful historical background within product development. Therefore it is interesting to understand how these companies deal with risks in their product development processes. The aim of the paper is to find out if the Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) concept supports the need of industrial companies to deal with risks in their product development projects. The results show that DFSS promotes the company needs to some extent. There is a great method support in DFSS regarding how to consider technical risks. On the other hand, all companies included in this study would need more support to highlight the holistic perspective concerning cross functional collaborations, increased communication and avoiding sub-optimizations in development project, a requirement that is not sufficiently supported.

  • 8.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Gustafsson, Pia
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Sörqvist, Lars
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    DFSS - Evolution or Revolution?: A study of critical effects related to successful implementation of DFSS2009In: Proceedings to International QMOD and Toulon-Verona Conference on Quality and Service Sciences, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Identifying weaknesses in the design for six sigma concept through a pedagogical structure2012In: 2012 Proceedings of Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology: Technology Management for Emerging Technologies, PICMET'12, IEEE , 2012, p. 3379-3386Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    All product-developing organizations strive with challenges regarding how to organize and structure their development projects. Faster market changes, increased number of competitors, ambivalent customers, new regulations and standards have made product development become more complex. Due to these challenges organizations need to focus on product development to be able to stay competitive in the market. Therefor several concepts fostering improvement in product development organizations have been developed during the last decades. One such concept is Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) aiming to improve and structure development processes and their included activities. The concept is still considered as new and until today based on a complex structure. This article introduces a pedagogical way to structure the DFSS concept simplifying organizational implementations and benchmarking of the concept. Also remaining gaps in the concept and hypotheses regarding how to counter these gaps are presented in the article.

  • 10.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Gingnell, Liv
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    A Survey of Quality Measurements in Product Development2012In: International Journal of Engineering and Technology, ISSN 1793-8236, E-ISSN 1793-8244, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 258-264Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a lack of definitions of clear quality measurements within existing product development literature. Several literature sources that mention measurements in product development base their attitude on the triple constraints division into time, costs and functionality/quality. This article summarizes proposed literature definitions of what to include within quality measurements in product development. The article also proposes a statement of different existing viewpoints of quality measurements within some organization’s development process.

  • 11.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    von Würtemberg, Liv Marcks
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Integrating DFSS and Lean Product Development: Using Project Management Success Factors to Evaluate Product Development Concepts2010In: Proceedings ASQ World conference on quality and Improvement, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In product development, there is a need for quality focused structures that enable connections between the development divvision and other departments within the company. During the last decade, several concepts for product development have arisen. Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) and Lean Product Development (LPD) are now the most well known quality focused concepts for product development. Even though DFSS and LPD share the same objectives, they are most often regarded independent from each other and most companies chose to work with only one of the concepts. This paper compares and analyzes DFSS and LPD in order to investigate if and how the concepts could be integrated with each other. A widened scope and an objective evaluation of both concepts are ensured by using a general project management approach. The analysis of DFSS and LPD is based on the fulfillment of the ten project management success factors as provided by the Standish Group in their of the cited Chaos report. Based on the analysis, this study concludes that an integration of DFSS and LPD is both possible and beneficial. Together, they meet the requirements of the success factors to a much larger extent than what would be the case for a single concept. From the perspective of The Standish Group a combination of DFSS and LPD generates an almost perfect and complete concept for product development. This paper presents a proposal of how to integrate DFSS and LPD combining parts from the LPD philosophy with concrete tools and structures from DFSS for maximal success.

  • 12.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Würtemberg, Liv Marcks von
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    A Survey of Quality Measurements in Product Development2011In: Proceedings 2011 International Conference on Product Development and Renewable Energy Resources, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Würtemberg, Liv Marcks von
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Visual Planning Applied in a Research Environment2011In: Proceedings QMOD Conference on Quality and Service Sciences ICQSS, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Von Würtemberg, L.M
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Who is the DFSS Black Belt?: An investigation of the competence profile of the role in theory and practice2011In: PICMET: Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology, Proceedings , 2011, p. 6017809-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many companies of today use development concepts like Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) to structure and improve their development processes. An important part of the DFSS concept is the role structure and the role of the Black Belt in particular. That the DFSS Black Belts are given sufficient help to meet the high expectations of the role is therefore of crucial importance for the success of a DFSS initiative. When implementing DFSS in an organization, a training investment related to the role structure is recommended by literature. Little is however said about how this training should be carried out in practice. Interviews on a multinational Swedish organization recognized for its extensive DFSS and Six Sigma program shows that some requirements on DFSS Black Belt competences are not covered by existing literature or by the official descriptions of DFSS Black Belt certification requirements. The purpose of the article is to investigate the gap between what companies whish their DFSS Black Belts to know and what support research and DFSS training companies can offer in this matter. The paper also provides a competence profile for a DFSS Black Belt. The competence profile summarizes recommended knowledge for a DFSS Black Belt derived from literature, DFSS certification companies and practical experience from the case study company.

  • 15.
    Eriksson, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Electrical Systems.
    Haglind, Magnus
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Electrical Systems.
    Helander, Johan
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Electrical Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Electrical Systems.
    Towards a Cost Effective Procurement Process: In Search of New Strategies1999In: 6th International Conference on New Available Technologies: proceedings : June 1-4, 1999, Stockholm, Sweden, 1999Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Eriksson, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Electrical Systems.
    Jonsson, Narcisa
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Electrical Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Electrical Systems.
    Project Management Requirements in Multi-Organizational Projects2000In: Proceedings of the Project Management Institute Annual Seminars and Symposium, Houston, U.S.A., 2000, 2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Eriksson, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    A Handbook for Smaller Projects2004Book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Eriksson, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Electrical Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Electrical Systems.
    Project management competence requirements when procuring complex systems2002In: IEMC-2002: IEEE INTERNATIONAL ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT CONFERENCE, VOLS I AND II, PROCEEDINGS - MANAGING TECHNOLOGY FOR THE NEW ECONOMY, 2002, p. 459-464Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How the client organization (the buyer) should manage its resources when procuring a large technical system, referred to as a complex system, is the scope of this paper. This issue is interesting due to the ever-increased competition, leading to the downsizing of client organizations, and the search for higher organizational effectiveness. Therefore, it is essential that projects be managed in a more efficient way than they have in the past.

    The paper summarizes the results from an ongoing research project carried out at the Department of Industrial Information and Control Systems at the Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden. The results are based on case studies and interviews, which have been conducted in close co-operation with major clients, vendors and consultants in Swedish companies.

    The projects included in the research have been studied from an organizational competence perspective. Finding out "who" is most suitable to do "what" according to different initial conditions in the projects studied. The paper addresses those aspects of management that are critical for successful completion of projects in this field.

  • 19.
    Eriksson, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Projektstyring i praksis2007Book (Other academic)
  • 20. Eriksson, Mikael
    et al.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Electrical Systems.
    Jonsson, Narcisa
    Starting a global project: What is different compared to a "normal" project?2002In: Proceedings from Project Management Institute Annual Seminar & Symposium, San Antonio, Texas, 2002Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Eriksson, Mikael
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Jonsson, Narcisa
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Novosel, Damir
    How to manage complex, multinational R&D projects successfully2002In: Engineering Management Journal, ISSN 1042-9247, E-ISSN 0960-7919, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 53-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The globalization of markets, mergers of international companies, and integration of managerial and business processes in global corporations are changing project management fundamentals. A clearly recognizable trend in multinational companies since the mid-1980s has been globalization of R & D and competence portfolios. Applied development is usually conducted in the form of a distributed project organization. A project team is formed across geographical, organizational, and cultural boundaries, engaging in a project with a global focus. Although a multinational project organization has great potential in many dimensions, there is no doubt that the execution of a distributed high technological project is still a great challenge. This article identifies success factors in the management of distributed projects with global goals. The authors have focused on the practical experiences of the execution of complex multinational projects in the area of applied system development for power industry.

  • 22.
    Franke, Ulrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Närman, Pia
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Höök, David
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Factors Affecting Successful Project Management of Technology-Intense Projects2010In: PICMET '10 - Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology, Proceedings - Technology Management for Global Economic Growth, New York: IEEE , 2010, p. 1538-1543Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, engineering and other technology intense businesses are increasingly carried out in project form. This allows better use of scarce resources, a simplified decision-making process as well as specific organization forms being tailored to the task at hand. However, despite these advantages, complex industrial projects often fail in the sense that budgets, time-frames and customer requirements are not met. Organizations also spend lots of money on introducing project models and certifying their project managers. Are these actions really efficient, i.e. do they lead to improved management of projects? The aim of this article is to describe the impact of (i) use of project model, (ii) project manager certification, and (iii) size of organization on ( a) employment of risk analysis, (b) existence of project sponsor, ( c) existence of steering committee, and (d) existence of project manager task description, respectively. This paper presents correlations derived from N=59 semi-structured interviews with project managers of technology centered projects from several countries. Two statistically significant relations were found through a correlation analysis: between the use of a project models and the existence of steering committee and between the use of a project model and the existence of a project manager task description.

  • 23.
    Gingnell, Liv
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Develop products in half the time: Lead time reduction in Swedish organizations2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports experiences from five Swedish product development organizations,striving to decrease the lead time of the development projects. All companies used different strategies leading to varying results. One of the studied companies managed a50% lead time reduction, another have similar results within reach. The other approaches has not, or not yet, shown satisfying results. The two winning strategies both required a high degree of top management support, however in different ways. Either the courage to make drastic changes or persistence to continue with an initiative over time seems be necessary.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 24.
    Gingnell, Liv
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    IMPROVED VISUAL PLANNING IN A RESEARCH ENVIRONMENT2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose- The purpose of the study is to investigate whether scrum can be of use in a visualplanning system in a research environment with no connection to software development.Design/Methodology/Approach- A cyclical action research approach was used, implyingthat the researchers took part in the design and development of the studied visual planningsystem.Findings- The scrum influences brought increased structure and efficiency to the studiedresearch process and increased the quality of the cooperation and communication betweenthe researchers. To function well in the non-software environment, the scrum techniqueshad to be complemented with visual long term planning.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Gingnell et al_Improved Visual Planning in a Research Environment
  • 25.
    Gingnell, Liv
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lagerström, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    A Case Study on Product Development Performance Measurement2012In: Proceedings of The 2012 International Conference on Innovation, Management and Technology, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a case study that evaluates the performance of the product development performance measurement system used in a Swedish company that is a part of a global corporate group. The study is based on internal documentation and eighteen indepth interviews with stakeholders involved in the product development process. The results from the case study include a description of what metrics that are in use, how these are employed, and its effect on the quality of the performance measurement system. Especially, the importance of having a well-defined process proved to have a major impact on the quality of the performance measurement system in this particular case.

  • 26.
    Gingnell, Liv
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lagerström, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    STRATEGIC PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT IN PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT: A case study on a Swedish company2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Performance evaluation of product development processes is becoming increasingly important as many companies experience tougher competition and shorter product life cycles. This article, based on a case study on a Swedish company investigates the needs and requirements that the company have on a future performance measurement system for product development. The requirements were found to mostly consider cooperation between functions, co-worker motivation and cost-efficient product solutions. These focus areas are common problems in product development since they are addressed in development concepts like Lean Product Development and Design for Six Sigma. Therefore, more research about how they can be supported by performance measurement system for product development would be of interest.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Gingnell et al_Strategic performance measurement in product development
  • 27.
    Gingnell, Liv
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Franke, Ulrik
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lagerström, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Quantifying Success Factors for IT Projects-An Expert-Based Bayesian Model2014In: Information systems management, ISSN 1058-0530, E-ISSN 1934-8703, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 21-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Large investments are made annually to develop and maintain IT systems. Successful outcome of IT projects is therefore crucial for the economy. Yet, many IT projects fail completely or are delayed or over budget, or they end up with less functionality than planned. This article describes a Bayesian decision-support model. The model is based on expert elicited data from 51 experts. Using this model, the effect management decisions have upon projects can be estimated beforehand, thus providing decision support for the improvement of IT project performance.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 28.
    Gustafsson, Pia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Franke, Ulrik
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Johnson, Pontus
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Identifying IT impacts on organizational structure and business value2008In: Proceedings of the Third International Workshop on Business/IT Alignment and Interoperability, 2008, Vol. 344, p. 44-57Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a framework for analysis of how IT systems add business value by causally affecting the structuring of organizations. To aid our understanding of IT benefits related to organizational structure, we put the well established theory of organizational behavior developed by Mintzberg to use. Combining Mintzberg with more recent research on the business value of IT, the result is a qualitative multi-disciplinary theoretical framework that shows which business values are affected by IT in relation to the organizational structure. This framework can be used to analyze what kind of IT system should be used by an organization with a given structure to maximize its business value.

  • 29.
    Gustafsson, Pia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Höök, David
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Analyzing IT Impact on Organizational Structure: A Case Study2009In: PROCEEDINGS OF PICMET 09: TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT IN THE AGE OF FUNDAMENTAL CHANGE, NEW YORK: IEEE , 2009, p. 3113-3126Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Each year companies spend millions of dollars on IT investments hoping they will lead to higher profits. There are many methods for analyzing what these investments actually bring back to the companies, but unfortunately they are not stringent enough to make the analysis repeatable. This means that different investments cannot be compared to each other. The management paradigm of Enterprise Architecture (EA) is commonly used to structure a company from a holistic perspective. In this paper, an EA framework for assessing IT-systems' impact on an organization's business value through changes in its structure is validated. The foundation of the framework is a Bayesian inference engine allowing quantified analysis. For practical usage, this analysis framework is also expressed through modeling the organization with a metamodel. Together they form a structured method for quantitative analysis of the IT impact on organizations. An IT system for maintenance management within a European electric power utility has been used as a case study to validate the method. The organization and IT support have been modeled using the proposed metamodel and thereafter analyzed with the Bayesian network. The study has been conducted using guided interviews and a survey. The results from this study of how the business value has been influenced are compared to the user's perceptions on how the business values have changed are also presented in this paper.

  • 30.
    Hällgren, Markus
    et al.
    Umeå School of Business, Umeå University.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Three modes of deviation handling: Coping with unexpected events in project management2006In: PICMET '06: Technology Management for the Global Future, 2006, p. 2236-2243Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most of theprojectmanagementtools suggested in the literature are effective under perfect conditions with unlimited resources. However by definition,projectsare neither unlimited in time nor resources, which creates a gap between the perfect conditions and the reality that mostprojectmanagers and teams face. The case studies that this paper investigates are based on in-depth participative observations, interviews, emails and other written material. The results are rather surprising asprojectteams do not seem to use methods suggested in the literature when responding to the sudden appearance ofunexpectedsituations, that is;deviations. The cases give an insight into the dynamics ofprojectmanagementand how informal teams are used to increase speed and flexibility. These informal teams could meet when needed in order to discuss and solve problems or changes. Further, in two of the cases, traditionalprojectplanning was not used at the topmanagementlevel to plan and coordinate theprojects. Thus, the cases show that themanagementofprojectsaccording to traditional plans is not the only means of making aprojectsuccessful. Instead, the creation of a flexible organization that can identify, react, and act upon the changes that most likely will occur becomes more crucial in order to be able to successfully deliver theproject. (c) 2006 PICMET.

  • 31.
    Johnson, Pontus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Ekstedt, Mathias
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Simonsson, Mårten
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Organizing for Enterprise Architcture2007In: Enterprise Architcture: Models and Analyses for Information Systems Decision Making, Studentlitteratur, 2007, p. 253-268Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Johnson, Pontus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Ekstedt, Mathias
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Simonsson, Mårten
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Organizing for enterprise architecture2007In: Enterprise Architcture: Models and Analyses for Information Systems Decision Making, Studentlitteratur, 2007, p. 270-291Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Jonsson, Narcisa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Möller, Oscar
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Reasons for not offshoring IT services in Swedish banks2007In: PICMET '07: PORTLAND INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR MANAGEMENT OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, VOLS 1-6, PROCEEDINGS - MANAGEMENT OF CONVERGING TECHNOLOGIES, PORTLAND: PICMET , 2007, p. 1451-1455Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ongoing process of globalization drives the offshoring trend of IT-development and services in Sweden as well as in other industrialized countries. In contrast to the industrial companies that lead the trend, Swedish banks are extremely restrictive in this sense. In comparison to the US banking business, this is considered atypical behavior. In this paper we present the results of an investigation stemming from interviews of the four largest Swedish banks and their main reasons not to offshore IT services

  • 34.
    Jonsson, Narcisa
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Electrical Systems.
    Novosel, Damir
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Electrical Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Electrical Systems.
    Eriksson, Mikael
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Electrical Systems.
    Successful Management of Complex, Multinational R&D Projects2001In: HICSS-34: 34th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, Volume 8, 2001, p. 8044-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Electrical Systems.
    Coordinating dependencies in complex system development projects2003In: IEMC '03: Engineering Management Conference, 2003., 2003, p. 400-404Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper elaborates on different aspects of dependencies in complex system development projects. The empirical setting of the paper is based on studies of Ericsson and ABB and their tools to manage and coordinate these dependencies. The studied projects have shown that it is crucial to create different pictures or abstractions of the reality in order to make the dependencies apparent to all the involved organizations and individuals. Both of these companies have successfully used something they call dependency diagram. The use of such diagrams makes it easier for the project members to be aware of their contribution in the total system solution. Being aware of which parts of the system you are depending on and which parts are depending on your contribution makes the knowledge transfer easier. The ability to transfer knowledge between the different parts is what in the end will be the crucial step to becoming a successful system developer.

  • 36.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Electrical Systems.
    Global project management: developing system solutions in a multi-organizational environment2002Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The traditional view of project management is beingchallenged by the globalization of markets, mergers ofinternational companies, and the integration of managerial andbusi-ness processes in global corporations. The development ofInformation Technology and the rapid growth of the Internet hascreated an opportunity to utilize global resources, resultingin new and unique problems within project management researchthat need to be addressed.

    This thesis focuses on problems in project managementexperienced by global system suppliers trying to adapt theirbusinesses to the rapid changes of customers needs. Itespe-cially focuses on geographically dispersed organizationsconsisting of several organizations in different countries,with disparate history and corporate culture, developing anddeliver-ing complex systems under the company's name.

    In order to identify potential problems faced by globalmulti-organizational companies, especially system supplierswith large research and development (R&D) budgets, aframe-work is suggested. This framework divides the problemsinto three categories: geographi-cal, organizational andcultural. The problems identified in the case studies are thenclassi-fied to these categories. Finally, a description of howthe identified problems can be man-aged is provided when themost important success factors identified in the studies arepresented.

     

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  • 37.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Managing Complex Industrial Projects: A comparison between holistic models2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Even though the management of large projects has been studied for many years, the track record is still poor, especially for those projects developing complex systems. This thesis studies projects such as these and attempts to find clues as to why some succeed while others do not. Among the challenges, is the specific yet basic need to create a shared understanding in a group of hundreds engineering specialists with their own ideas (biases) of how things actually work. Further, complex development projects are likely to change, especially those projects involved with new technologies that should be state of the art when they hit the market after several years of development time. Thus, there is a need for a tool that can be used to adapt to changes.

    An important part of this thesis is the evaluation of different diagram systems that have been used in different development projects. These diagrams function as a device to create a shared understanding of the project and enable those involved to maneuver the project through changes. The evaluation focuses on what the diagrams can express and how easy it is to understand their content. In terms of expressiveness, one of the three evaluated models: the Anatomy Model, answers the largest number of questions relevant to the total project manager. In terms of ease of use, the evaluation shows that the Anatomy did not only answer more questions relevant to the total project manager, but was also easier to maneuver through compared to the alternative models. The thesis concludes that when working with complex development projects, a model like the anatomy provides the project manager with a simple tool that can be used to maneuver through changes and create a communal understanding. Such a simplified model addresses more questions that are relevant to the project manager and is easier to update than the traditional tools that are suggested in most literature.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 38.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Why Do We Need an Anatomy?2011In: The System Anatomy: Enabling Agile Project Management? / [ed] Lars Taxén, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2011, p. 17-24Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Electrical Systems.
    Ekstedt, Mathias
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Electrical Systems.
    Managing Complex IT-Projects: A Need for a Tool Addressing Technical and Organizational Complexity2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Electrical Systems.
    Taxén, Lars
    Coordinating dependencies in global system development projects: the use of dependency diagrams2004In: Engineering Management Conference, 2004: Proceedings. 2004 IEEE International. Vol.2, 2004, p. 755-759Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This work addresses the problems that arise in the coordination of complex system development projects. The empirical setting is based on studies at Ericsson and ABB, and the total project manager's instrument to manage and coordinate these projects. ABB used what they called dependency diagrams. Ericsson developed a method they call the anatomy concept. The approaches are used as a complement to the traditional work breakdown structure. The paper evaluates the ability of these notations to address the needs of the total project management. The studies have shown that it is crucial to create compact high-level pictures of the resulting product and its projects in order to make the dependencies obvious to everyone involved (organizations as well as persons). The paper stresses that when developing complex system solutions the traditional diagrams easily become complex and unreadable. Thus, there is a need for supplementing approaches.

  • 41.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Taxén, Lars
    Manifesting shared affordances in system development: the system anatomy2005In: Action in Language, Organisations and Information Systems: ALOIS* Limerick, Ireland. The 3rd International Conference 15–16 March 2005 / [ed] Pär J Ågerfalk, Liam Bannon and Brian Fitzgerald, 2005, p. 28-47Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In complex systems’ development, it is necessary to understand how things depend on each other in order to plan and control the development task. Ericsson, a major supplier of telecommunication systems all over the world, has successfully used a construct called the system anatomy for this purpose. The anatomy shows, in a compact way, the crucial functional dependencies in the system. Since the anatomy has had a profound practical impact, it is relevant to analyse how this construct can be grounded also theoretically. In this paper, we present such a grounding in which the anatomy and its associated plans are seen as manifestations of affordances. These affordances enable different groups of actors to reconcile their actions. Besides affordances, the theory is grounded in the Russian theory of activity and the Activity Domain Theory. The findings indicate that the suggested theory is a promising socio-technical approach that may complement existing approaches for development of complex systems.

  • 42.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Taxén, Lars
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Operationalizing coordination of mega-projects - a workpractice perspective2006In: Proceedings of IRNOP VII Project Research Conference, BEIJING: PUBLISHING HOUSE ELECTRONICS INDUSTRY , 2006, p. 574-587Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we propose a workpractice approach towards operationalizing the coordination of mega-projects. The approach matured over several years in development practice at Ericsson, a major supplier of telecommunication products and services worldwide. Key points in the approach are the management of critical dependencies and the construction of a communal understanding on how to coordinate projects. Coordination is seen as a workpractice, where actors provide coordination services to the project. We discuss some results from the application of the approach in relation to an ideal-type classification of mega-projects such as Weber, Rambo and Gaia. The main conclusion is that the suggested approach enables the coordination of extraordinarily complex megaprojects.

  • 43.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Taxén, Lars
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    The system anatomy2007In: Tools for Complex Projects / [ed] Remington, Kaye; Pollack, Jullien, Gower Publishing Ltd., 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES).
    Taxén, Lars
    Klasson, Mikael
    Managing complex development projects: a case study of the use if the system anatomy2005In: Proceedings of Portland International Conference on Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), Portland, USA, 2005., 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the use of a construct called the system anatomy for planning and controlling projects developing complex systems. The anatomy shows, in a compact form, the most crucial dependencies in the system from the perspective of how it ‘comes-to-life’, hence the concept of an ‘anatomy’. The key point in using the anatomy for project planning is to develop and verify the system in the same order as it ‘comes-to-life’. The project plan in made up in three steps. The first step is to define the anatomy itself. This is followed by the group-ing of functions into verifiable integration steps called increments. Finally, regular time and resource plans are made for each increment. Thus, the planning can be characterized as an integration driven procedure. This ap-proach has been used extensively at Ericsson, a leading manufacturer of telecommunication systems world wide. It has proven to be very successful, especially in terms of promoting communication and developing a shared under-standing about the project.

  • 45.
    Pettersson, Dan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Network and Systems Engineering.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Computer Science, Network and Systems Engineering.
    Händel, Peter
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Intelligent systems, Information Science and Engineering.
    Agerman, J.
    Usage-based auto insurance on the swedish market: A case study2019In: PICMET 2019 - Portland International Conference on Management of Engineering and Technology: Technology Management in the World of Intelligent Systems, Proceedings, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2019, article id 8893870Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish consumer market for auto insurance is in a process of transformation from traditional insurance to usage-based insurance (UBI) based on telematics. The Swedish market can be characterized as having a high level of diffusion and use of digital technologies, yet while auto UBI is well established on several markets internationally it has been struggling on the Swedish. An exploratory case study has been performed covering actors in the Swedish eco system around UBI: incumbent insurance companies, challengers, and technology providers. Interviews have been carried out with key employees and decision makers to understand which opportunities and challenges they perceive in areas ranging from technology to market and how these influence decisions to engage or not to engage in such innovations. The results indicate among other things that national characteristics influence the establishment of auto UBI; the expected technological development creates a window of opportunity preventing incumbents from engaging; the slowly increasing market penetration by UBI offered by challengers will eventually force incumbents to react; although sales of a UBI service is generally not considered profitable for an incumbent they consider or apply different strategies for self-disruption.

  • 46.
    Rocha Flores, Waldo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Ekstedt, Mathias
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Empirical Analysis of Factors Affecting the Achievement of Information Security Governance Outcomes2012Report (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Sommestad, Teodor
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Development of an effort estimation model: a case study on delivery projects at a leading IT provider within the electric utility industry2010In: International Journal of Services Technology and Management, ISSN 1460-6720, E-ISSN 1741-525X, Vol. 13, no 1-2, p. 152-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When projects are sold with fixed prices, it is utterly important to quickly and accurately estimate the effort required to enable an optimal bidding. This paper desccribes a study performed at a leading IT provider within the electric utility industry, with the purpose of improving the ability to early produce effort estimates of projects where standard functionality is delivered. In absence reliable historic data, an estimation model suitable for incorporating expert estimates was developed. The model is based on decomposition of projects and bottom-up estimation of them, where impact of relevant variables is estimated by assessing discrete scenarios. In addition to a estimating the expected effort of a project the uncertainty of provided estimates are visualised. Together with the transparency of the model this makes it possible to analyse and refine the estimates as more details of a project are known.

  • 48.
    Sommestad, Teodor
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Development of an effort estimation model: A case study on delivery projects at a leading IT provider within the electric utility industry2007In: PICMET '07: PORTLAND INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR MANAGEMENT OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY, VOLS 1-6, PROCEEDINGS - MANAGEMENT OF CONVERGING TECHNOLOGIES, PORTLAND: PICMET , 2007, p. 2175-2185Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When projects are sold with fixed prices, it is utterly important to quickly and accurately estimate the effort required to enable an optimal bidding. This paper describes a case study performed at a leading IT provider within the electric utility industry, with the purpose of improving the ability to early produce effort estimates of projects where standard functionality is delivered. The absence of reliable historic data made expert judgment the only appropriate foundation for estimates, with difficulties of quickly develop estimates and reuse or modify estimates already made. To overcome these troubling issues, the expert estimates were incorporated into a model where they and the factors influencing them are traceable and readily expressed. The model is based on decomposition of projects and bottom-up estimation of them, where impact of relevant variables is estimated by assessing discrete scenarios. It provides quick and straightforward means of developing estimates of the decomposed elements and whole projects in various circumstances, where not only expected effort is considered, but the uncertainty of the individual estimates is visualized as well. Which together with the traceability enables the estimates produced by the model to be assessed, analyzed and refined as more details of the project is known.

  • 49.
    Taxén, L
    et al.
    Campus Norrköping, Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Images as action instruments in complex projects2008In: International Journal of Project Management, ISSN 0263-7863, E-ISSN 1873-4634, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 527-536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Imagessuch as Gantt, WBS, PERT, and CPM have always played an important role inprojectmanagement. In recent years, new types ofimageshave emerged incomplexdevelopmentprojects. The purpose of this paper is to make an inquiry into howprojectmanagement activities are supported by these alternativeimages, and suggest reasons why the more traditionalimagesappear to be inadequate during turbulent andcomplexcircumstances. In conclusion, we find that the alternativeimagesare a means to managing integration activities and critical dependencies in aproject. Typically, they emphasize common understanding and comprehensibility over formalism and rigour. These alternativeimagesseem to be resonant with how our mental cognitive apparatus conceives coordination, thus making it easier to managecomplexdevelopment tasks. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd and IPMA.

  • 50.
    Von Würtemberg, Liv Marcks
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Franke, Ulrik
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Nordström, Lars
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Ericsson, Evelina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lilliesköld, Joakim
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    Lagerström, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
    IT project success factors: An experience report2011In: Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology: Technology Management in the Energy-Smart World, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Large investments are made annually for development and maintenance ofITsystems, systems that support the core business of all types of companies and organizations. Successful outcome ofITprojectsis therefore a crucial issue for the economy at large, yet a majority of theITprojectscarried out today fail whenitcomes to finishing on time, within budget and with the desired quality. The contribution of this paper is theexperiencefrom 28ITprojects. The influence ofITprojectsuccessfactors, derived from previous research, were assessed by theprojectmanagers and compared with theprojectsoutcome in terms of time, budget and quality. Though the dataset is too small to allow generalization, thesuccessfactorsRisk analysis, User involvement and Top management support turned out to be of particular importance for the reviewedprojects.

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