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  • 1.
    Abreu, Rodrigo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA (closed 2012-06-30).
    Jansson, Niclas
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA (closed 2012-06-30).
    Hoffman, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA (closed 2012-06-30).
    Adaptive computation of aeroacoustic sources for a rudimentary landing gear using lighthill's analogy2011In: 17th AIAA/CEAS AeroacousticsConference 2011: 32nd AIAA Aeroacoustics Conference, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present our simulation results for the benchmark problem of the ow past a Rudimentary Landing Gear (RLG) using a General Galerkin (G2) nite element method, also referred to as Adaptive DNS/LES. In G2 no explicit subgrid model is used, instead the compuational mesh is adaptively re ned with respect to an a posteriori error es-timate of a quantity of interest in the computation, in this case the drag force on the RLG. Turbulent boundary layers are modeled using a simple wall layer model with the shear stress at walls proportional to the skin friction, which here is assumed to be small and, therefore, can be approximated by zero skin friction. We compare our results with experimental data and other state of the art computations, where we nd good agreement in sound pressure levels, surface velocities and ow separation. We also compare with detailed surface pressure experimental data where we nd largely good agreement, apart from some local dierences for which we discuss possible explanations.

  • 2. Choudhari, M.
    et al.
    Lockard, D. P.
    Jenkins,
    Neuhart,
    Choudhari,
    Cattafesta,
    Murayama,
    Yamamoto,
    Ura,
    Ito,
    Vilela de Abreu, Rodrigo
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Hoffman, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Jansson, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Lockard,
    Ueno,
    Knacke,
    Thiele,
    Dahan, Jeremy
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering.
    Tamaki,
    Imamura,
    Tanaka,
    Amemiya,
    Hirai,
    Ashton,
    West,
    Mendonca,
    Housman,
    Kiris,
    Ribeiro,
    Fares,
    Casalino,
    Terracol,
    Ewert,
    Boenke,
    Simoes,
    Bonatto,
    Souza,
    Medeiros,
    Bodart,
    Larsson,
    Moin,
    Assessment of slat noise predictions for 30P30N high- lift configuration from Banc-III workshop2015In: 21st AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a summary of the computational predictions and measurement data contributed to Category 7 of the 3rd AIAA Workshop on Benchmark Problems for Airframe Noise Computations (BANC-III), which was held in Atlanta, GA, on June 14-15, 2014. Category 7 represents the first slat-noise configuration to be investigated under the BANC series of workshops, namely, the 30P30N two-dimensional high-lift model (with a slat contour that was slightly modified to enable unsteady pressure measurements) at an angle of attack that is relevant to approach conditions. Originally developed for a CFD challenge workshop to assess computational fluid dynamics techniques for steady high-lift predictions, the 30P30N configurations has provided a valuable opportunity for the airframe noise community to collectively assess and advance the computational and experimental techniques for slat noise. The contributed solutions are compared with each other as well as with the initial measurements that became available just prior to the BANC-III Workshop. Specific features of a number of computational solutions on the finer grids compare reasonably well with the initial measurements from FSU and JAXA facilities and/or with each other. However, no single solution (or a subset of solutions) could be identified as clearly superior to the remaining solutions. Grid sensitivity studies presented by multiple BANC-III participants demonstrated a relatively consistent trend of reduced surface pressure fluctuations, higher levels of turbulent kinetic energy in the flow, and lower levels of both narrow band peaks and the broadband component of unsteady pressure spectra in the nearfield and farfield. The lessons learned from the BANC-III contributions have been used to identify improvements to the problem statement for future Category-7 investigations.

  • 3.
    de Abreu, Rodrigo Vilela
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA.
    Jansson, Niclas
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA.
    Hoffman, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA.
    Adaptive Computation of Aeroacoustic Sources for Rudimentary Landing Gear2010In: Benchmark problems for Airframe Noise Computations I, Stockholm 2010, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Hoffman, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA.
    Jansson, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA.
    De Abreu, Rodrigo Vilela
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA.
    Adaptive modeling of turbulent flow with residual based turbulent kinetic energy dissipation2011In: Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, ISSN 0045-7825, E-ISSN 1879-2138, Vol. 200, no 37-40, p. 2758-2767Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we first review our recent work on a new framework for adaptive turbulence simulation: we model turbulence by weak solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations that are wellposed with respect to mean value output in the form of functionals, and we use an adaptive finite element method to compute approximations with a posteriori error control based on the error in the functional output. We then derive a local energy estimate for a particular finite element method, which we connect to related work on dissipative weak Euler solutions with kinetic energy dissipation due to lack of local smoothness of the weak solutions. The ideas are illustrated by numerical results, where we observe a law of finite dissipation with respect to a decreasing mesh size.

  • 5.
    Hoffman, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Jansson, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    de Abreu, Rodrigo Vilela
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Degirmenci, Niyazi Cem
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Jansson, Niclas
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Müller, Kaspar
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Nazarov, Murtazo
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Spühler, Jeannette Hiromi
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Unicorn: Parallel adaptive finite element simulation of turbulent flow and fluid-structure interaction for deforming domains and complex geometry2013In: Computers & Fluids, ISSN 0045-7930, E-ISSN 1879-0747, Vol. 80, no SI, p. 310-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a framework for adaptive finite element computation of turbulent flow and fluid structure interaction, with focus on general algorithms that allow for complex geometry and deforming domains. We give basic models and finite element discretization methods, adaptive algorithms and strategies for efficient parallel implementation. To illustrate the capabilities of the computational framework, we show a number of application examples from aerodynamics, aero-acoustics, biomedicine and geophysics. The computational tools are free to download open source as Unicorn, and as a high performance branch of the finite element problem solving environment DOLFIN, both part of the FEniCS project.

  • 6.
    Hoffman, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC). Basque Center for Applied Mathematics (BCAM), Bilbao, Spain.
    Jansson, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST). Basque Center for Applied Mathematics (BCAM), Bilbao, Spain.
    Degirmenci, Niyazi Cem
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Spühler, Jeannette Hiromi
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Vilela de Abreu, Rodrigo
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Jansson, Niclas
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Larcher, Aurélien
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    FEniCS-HPC: Coupled Multiphysics in Computational Fluid Dynamics2017In: High-Performance Scientific Computing: Jülich Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) High-Performance Computing Symposium / [ed] Edoardo Di Napoli, Marc-André Hermanns, Hristo Iliev, Andreas Lintermann, Alexander Peyser, Springer, 2017, p. 58-69Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a framework for coupled multiphysics in computational fluid dynamics, targeting massively parallel systems. Our strategy is based on general problem formulations in the form of partial differential equations and the finite element method, which open for automation, and optimization of a set of fundamental algorithms. We describe these algorithms, including finite element matrix assembly, adaptive mesh refinement and mesh smoothing; and multiphysics coupling methodologies such as unified continuum fluid-structure interaction (FSI), and aeroacoustics by coupled acoustic analogies. The framework is implemented as FEniCS open source software components, optimized for massively parallel computing. Examples of applications are presented, including simulation of aeroacoustic noise generated by an airplane landing gear, simulation of the blood flow in the human heart, and simulation of the human voice organ.

  • 7.
    Hoffman, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz). Basque Ctr Appl Math, Spain.
    Jansson, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz). Basque Ctr Appl Math, Spain.
    Jansson, Niclas
    RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, Kobe, Japan.
    De Abreu, Rodrigo Vilela
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Towards a parameter-free method for high Reynolds number turbulent flow simulation based on adaptive finite element approximation2015In: Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, ISSN 0045-7825, E-ISSN 1879-2138, Vol. 288, p. 60-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present work towards a parameter-free method for turbulent flow simulation based on adaptive finite element approximation of the Navier-Stokes equations at high Reynolds numbers. In this model, viscous dissipation is assumed to be dominated by turbulent dissipation proportional to the residual of the equations, and skin friction at solid walls is assumed to be negligible compared to inertial effects. The result is a computational model without empirical data, where the only parameter is the local size of the finite element mesh. Under adaptive refinement of the mesh based on a posteriori error estimation, output quantities of interest in the form of functionals of the finite element solution converge to become independent of the mesh resolution, and thus the resulting method has no adjustable parameters. No ad hoc design of the mesh is needed, instead the mesh is optimised based on solution features, in particular no bounder layer mesh is needed. We connect the computational method to the mathematical concept of a dissipative weak solution of the Euler equations, as a model of high Reynolds number turbulent flow, and we highlight a number of benchmark problems for which the method is validated. 

  • 8.
    Hoffman, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA (closed 2012-06-30).
    Jansson, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA (closed 2012-06-30).
    Jansson, Niclas
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA (closed 2012-06-30).
    Johnsson, Claes
    Vilela de Abreu, Rodrigo
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA (closed 2012-06-30).
    Turbulent flow and fluid-structure interaction; in automated solution of differental equations by the finite element method2011In: Automated Solution of Differential Equations by the Finite Element Method / [ed] Anders Logg Kent-Andre Mardal, Garth Wells, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Hoffman, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Jansson, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz). Basque Center for Applied Mathematics, Spain .
    Jansson, Niclas
    RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, Japan .
    Vilela De Abrea, Rodrigo
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz). KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Time-resolved adaptive FEM simulation of the DLR-F11 aircraft model at high Reynolds number2014In: 52nd AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting - AIAA Science and Technology Forum and Exposition, SciTech 2014, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a time-resolved, adaptive finite element method for aerodynamics, together with the results from the HiLiftPW-2 workshop, where this method is used to compute the flow past a DLR-F11 aircraft model at realistic Reynolds number. The mesh is automatically constructed by the method as part of the computation, and no explicit turbulence model is needed. The effect of unresolved turbulent boundary layers is modeled by a simple parametrization of the wall shear stress in terms of the skin friction. In the extreme case of very high Reynolds numbers we approximate the small skin friction by zero skin friction, corresponding to a free slip boundary condition, which results in a computational model without any model parameter that needs tuning. Thus, the simulation methodology by- passes the main challenges posed by high Reynolds number CFD: the design of an optimal computational mesh, turbulence (or subgrid) modeling, and the cost of boundary layer res- olution. The results from HiLiftPW-2 presented in this report show good agreement with experimental data for a range of different angles of attack, while using orders of magnitude fewer degrees of freedom than what is needed in state of the art methods such as RANS. 

  • 10.
    Hoffman, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Jansson, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Jansson, Niclas
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Vilela de Abreu, Rodrigo
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Johnson, Claes
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Computability and Adaptivity in CFD2018In: Encyclopedia of Computational Mechanics / [ed] Erwin Stein and René de Borst and Thomas J. R. Hughes, John Wiley & Sons, 2018, 2Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Hoffman, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Jansson, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Vilela De Abreu, Rodrigo
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz). KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Computation of slat noise sources using adaptive FEM and lighthill's analogy2013In: 19th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a summary of preliminary results from simulations with the 30P30N high-lift device. We used the General Galerkin finite element method (G2), where no explicit subgrid model is used, and where the computational mesh is adaptively refined with respect to a posteriori error estimates for a quantity of interest. The mesh is fully unstructured and the solutions are time-resolved, which are key ingredients for solving challenging industrial applications in the field of aeroacoustics. We present preliminary results containing time-averaged quantities and snapshots of unsteady quantities, all reasonably agreeing with previous computational efforts. One important finding is that the use of adaptively generated meshes seems to be a more effcient way of computing aeroacoustic sources than by using "handmade" meshes.

  • 12.
    Hoffman, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA.
    Jansson, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA.
    Vilela de Abreu, Rodrigo
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA.
    Degirmenci, Niyazi Cem
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA.
    Jansson, Niclas
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA.
    Müller, Kaspar
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA.
    Nazarov, Murtazo
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA.
    Spühler, Jeannette Hiromi
    Unicorn: Parallel adaptive finite element simulation of turbulent flow and fluid-structure interaction for deforming domains and complex geometry2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a framework for adaptive finite element computation of turbulent flow and fluid-structure interaction, with focus on general algorithms that allow for complex geometry and deforming domains. We give basic models and finite element discretization methods, adaptive algorithms and strategies for e cient parallel implementation. To illustrate the capabilities of the computational framework, we show a number of application examples from aerodynamics, aero-acoustics, biomedicine and geophysics. The computational tools are free to download open source as Unicorn, and as a high performance branch of the finite element problem solving environment DOLFIN, both part of the FEniCS project

  • 13.
    Jansson, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Holmberg, Andreas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics.
    Vilela De Abreu, Rodrigo
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Degirmenci, Niyazi Cem
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Hoffman, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Karlsson, Mikael
    Åbom, Mats
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, MWL Flow acoustics.
    Adaptive stabilized finite element framework for simulation of vocal fold turbulent fluid-structure interaction2013In: Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics: Volume 19, 2013, Acoustical Society of America (ASA), 2013, p. 1-9Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a step toward building a more complete model of voice production mechanics, we assess the feasibility of a fluid-structure simulation of the vocal fold mechanics in the Unicorn incompressible Unified Continuum framework. The Unicorn framework consists of conservation equations for mass and momentum, a phase function selecting solid or fluid constitutive laws, a convection equation for the phase function and moving mesh methods for tracking the interface, and discretization through an adaptive stabilized finite element method. The framework has been validated for turbulent flow for both low and high Reynolds numbers and has the following features: implicit turbulence modeling (turbulent dissipation only occurs through numerical stabilization), goal-oriented mesh adaptivity, strong, implicit fluid-structure coupling and good scaling on massively parallel computers. We have applied the framework for turbulent fluid-structure interaction simulation of vocal folds, and present initial results. Acoustic quantities have been extracted from the framework in the setting of an investigation of a configuration approximating an exhaust system with turbulent flow around a flexible triangular steel plate in a circular duct. We present some results of the investigation as well as results of the framework applied to other problems.

  • 14.
    Jansson, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz). Basque Center for Applied Mathematics, Spain.
    Nava, V.
    Sanchez, M.
    Aguirre, G.
    De Abreu, Rodrigo Vilela
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Hoffman, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz). Basque Center for Applied Mathematics, Spain.
    Villate, J. L.
    Adaptive simulation of unsteady flow past the submerged part of a floating wind turbine platform2015In: MARINE 2015 - Computational Methods in Marine Engineering VI, International Center for Numerical Methods in Engineering (CIMNE), 2015, p. 35-46Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Offshore floating platforms for wind turbines represent challenging concepts for designers trying to combine an optimal compromise between cost effectiveness and performance. Modelling of the hydrodynamic behaviour of the structure is still the subject of wide debate in the technical communities. The assessment of the hydrodynamics of the support structure is not an easy task as the floaters consist of an assembly of columns, braces and pontoons, commonly also with heave plates: Each of these components corresponds to a different hydrodynamic model and it further interacts with the other elements. This results in very complex non-linear modeling, which makes it necessary to resort to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods for the evaluation of the combined hydrodynamics. In the framework of the collaboration between the Basque Centre for Applied Mathematics (BCAM) and Tecnalia R&I, the interaction of the sea flow with a semisubmersible floating offshore wind platform have been calculated by using the open source solver Unicorn in the FEniCS-HPC framework when subject to a steady inflow. The prototype of the platform consists in a semi-submersible 4-columns column stabilized platform - NAUTILUS Floating Solutions concept-; columns are connected by a rigid ring pontoon provided with heave damping plates at the bottom. The novelty of the approach in FEniCS-HPC hinges upon an implicit formulation for the turbulence, a cheap free slip model of the boundary layer and goal-oriented mesh adaptivity [8, 6, 9, 20, 1]. We find that the results are consistent with experimental results for cylinders at high Reynolds number.

  • 15.
    Vilela De Abreu, Rodrigo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz). KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Hoffman, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Jansson, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Towards the development of adaptive finite element methods for internal flow aeroacoustics2013In: 19th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the latest results obtained in the development of an adaptive finite element method for computational aeroacoustics (CAA). The new methodology is based on the General Galerkin (G2) method, which has been successfully used for the computation of incompressible, turbulent flow. Here, we simulate the flow past an in-duct mixer plate and compare the results with available experimental data. The comparisons include mean velocity profiles and frequency content of the turbulent signal. No direct simulation of sound or sound wave propagation has been performed; instead, simple analogy arguments have been used to extract acoustic results from incompressible simulations by assuming a direct correlation between the computed pressure drop signal and the sound at the far field. We were able to reproduce the sound signal from experiments with our incompressible simulation and our results compared well with both the level and the broadband frequency peak of the measured sound. We suggest that the methodology presented here is mainly suitable for the prediction of sound in low Mach number pipe flows.

  • 16.
    Vilela de Abreu, Rodrigo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA (closed 2012-06-30).
    Hoffman, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA (closed 2012-06-30).
    Jansson, Niclas
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA (closed 2012-06-30).
    Towards the development of adaptive finite element methods for aeroacousticsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the latest results obtained in the development of an adaptive nite ele- ment method for computational aeroacoustics (CAA). The new methodology is based on the General Galerkin (G2) method, which has been successfully used for the computation of incompressible, turbulent ow. Here, we simulate the ow past an in-duct mixer plate and compare the results with available experimental data. The compar- isons include mean velocity pro les and frequency content of the turbulent signal. No direct simulation of sound or sound wave propagation has been performed; instead, simple analogy arguments have been used to extract acoustic results from incompressible simulations by assuming a direct correlation between the computed pressure drop signal and the sound at the far eld. We were able to reproduce the sound signal from experiments with our incompressible simulation and our results compared well with both the level and the broadband frequency peak of the measured sound. We suggest that the methodology presented here is mainly suitable for the prediction of sound in low Mach number pipe flows.

  • 17.
    Vilela de Abreu, Rodrigo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA.
    Jansson, Niclas
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA.
    Hoffman, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis, NA.
    Adaptive computation of aeroacoustic sources for a 4-wheel rudimentary landing gear benchmark problem2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present our simulation results for the benchmark Rudimentary Landing Gear using a General Galerkin (G2) nite element method, also referred to as Adaptive DNS/LES. In G2 no explicit subgrid model is used, instead the computational mesh is adaptively re ned with respect to an a posteriori error estimate of a quantity of interest in the computation, in this case drag force. Turbulent boundary layers are modeled using a simple wall shear stress proportional to the skin friction, which here is assumed to be small and is approximated by zero skin friction, resulting in a slip velocity boundary condition. We compare our results with experimental data and other state of the art computations, where we nd good agreement in sound pressure levels, surface velocities and ow separation. We also compare with detailed surface pressure experimental data where we nd largely good agreement, apart from some local dierences for which we discuss possible explanations.

  • 18.
    Vilela de Abreu, Rodrigo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz). KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Jansson, Niclas
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Hoffman, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Adaptive Computation of Aeroacoustic Sources for a Rudimentary Landing Gear2014In: International Journal for Numerical Methods in Fluids, ISSN 0271-2091, E-ISSN 1097-0363, Vol. 74, no 6, p. 406-421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present our simulation results for the benchmark problem of the flow past a rudimentary landing gear using a General Galerkin FEM, also referred to as adaptive DNS/LES. In General Galerkin, no explicit subgrid model is used; instead, the computational mesh is adaptively refined with respect to an a posteriori error estimate of a quantity of interest in the computation, in this case, the drag force on the rudimentary landing gear. Turbulent boundary layers are modeled using a simple wall-layer model with the shear stress at walls proportional to the skin friction, which here is assumed to be small and, therefore, can be approximated by zero skin friction. We compare our results with experimental data and other state of the art computations, where we find good agreement in sound pressure levels, surface velocities, and flow separation. We also compare with detailed surface pressure experimental data where we find largely good agreement, apart from some local differences for which we discuss possible explanations.

  • 19.
    Vilela de Abreu, Rodrigo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Jansson, Niclas
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Hoffman, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Computation of Aeroacoustic Sources for a Gulfstream G550 Nose Landing Gear Model Using Adaptive FEMManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This work is a direct comparison of our unsteady, turbulent flow simulations with measurements performed using a Gulfstream G550 Nose Landing Gear Model. The experimental campaign, which was carried out by researchers from the NASA Langley Research Center, provided a series of detailed, well documented wind-tunnel measurements for comparison and validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational aeroacoustics (CAA) methodologies. Several computational efforts were collected and presented at the Benchmark for Airframe Noise Computation workshops, BANC-I and II. For our simulations, we used a General Galerkin finite element method (G2), where no explicit subgrid model is used, and where the computational mesh is adaptively refined with respect to a posteriori error estimates for a quantity of interest. The mesh is fully unstructured and the solutions are time-resolved, which are key ingredients for solving relevant, industrial applications in the field of aeroacoustics. The comparisons presented here are an attempt to quantify the accuracy of our models, methods and assumptions, and the results, although not perfect, are of relevant quantitative quality. We present several results containing both time-averaged and unsteady flow quantities, always side by side with its corresponding experimental values. The main finding is that we are able to simulate such a complex, unsteady flow problem as the flow past a nose landing gear using a parameter-free methodology for high Reynolds numbers (Re), external aerodynamics and aeroacoustics applications.

  • 20.
    Vilela de Abreu, Rodrigo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz). KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Jansson, Niclas
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Hoffman, Johan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz).
    Computation of aeroacoustic sources for a Gulfstream G550 nose landing gear model using adaptive FEM2016In: Computers & Fluids, ISSN 0045-7930, E-ISSN 1879-0747, Vol. 124, p. 136-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work presents a direct comparison of unsteady, turbulent flow simulations with measurements performed using a Gulfstream G550 nose landing gear model. The experimental campaign, which was carried out by researchers from the NASA Langley Research Center, provided a series of detailed, well documented wind-tunnel measurements for comparison and validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational aeroacoustics (CAA) methodologies. Several computational efforts were collected and presented at the Benchmark for Airframe Noise Computation workshops, BANC-I and II. For our simulations, we used a General Galerkin finite element method (G2), where no explicit subgrid model is used, and where the computational mesh is adaptively refined with respect to a posteriori estimates of the error in a quantity of interest, here the source term in Lighthill's equation. The mesh is fully unstructured and the solution is time-resolved, which are key ingredients for solving problems of industrial relevance in the field of aeroacoustics. Moreover, we choose to model the boundary layers on the landing gear geometry with a free-slip condition for the velocity, which we previously observed to produce good results for external flows at high Reynolds numbers, and which considerably reduces the amount of cells required in the mesh. The comparisons presented here are an attempt to quantify the accuracy of our models, methods and assumptions; to that end, several results containing both time-averaged and unsteady flow quantities, always side by side with corresponding experimental values, are reported. The main finding is that we are able to simulate a complex, unsteady flow problem using a parameter-free methodology developed for high Reynolds numbers, external aerodynamics and aeroacoustics applications.

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