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  • 1.
    Palmberg, Robin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Peters, Christopher
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Qureshi, Adam
    When Facial Expressions Dominate Emotion Perception in Groups of Virtual Characters2017In: 2017 9th International Conference on Virtual Worlds and Games for Serious Applications, VS-Games 2017 - Proceedings, IEEE, 2017, p. 157-160Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Virtual characters play a central role in populating virtual worlds, whether they act as conduits for human expressions as avatars or are automatically controlled by a machine as agents. In modern game-related scenarios, it is economical to assemble virtual characters from varying sources of appearances and motions. However, doing so may have unintended consequences with respect to how people perceive their expressions. This paper presents an initial study investigating the impact of facial expressions and full body motions from varying sources on the perception of intense positive and negative emotional expressions in small groups of virtual characters. 21 participants views a small group of three virtual characters engaged in intense animated behaviours as their face and body motions were varied between positive, neutral and negative valence expressions. While emotion perception was based on both the bodies and the faces of the characters, we found a strong impact of the valence of facial expressions on the perception of emotions in the group. We discuss these findings in relation to the combination of manually created and automatically defined motion sources, highlighting implications for the animation of virtual characters.

  • 2.
    Yang, Fangkai
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Li, Chengjie
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Palmberg, Robin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Van der Heide, Ewoud
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Peters, Christopher
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Expressive Virtual Characters for Social Demonstration Games2017In: 2017 9th International Conference on Virtual Worlds and Games for Serious Applications, VS-Games 2017 - Proceedings, IEEE, 2017, p. 217-224Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Virtual characters are an integral part of many game and learning environments and have practical applications as tutors, demonstrators or even representations of the user. However, creating virtual character behaviors can be a time-consuming and complex task requiring substantial technical expertise. To accelerate and better enable the use of virtual characters in social games, we present a virtual character behavior toolkit for the development of expressive virtual characters. It is a midlleware toolkit which sits on top of the game engine with a focus on providing high-level character behaviors to quickly create social games. The toolkit can be adapted to a wide range of scenarios related to social interactions with individuals and groups at multiple distances in the virtual environment and supports customization and control of facial expressions, body animations and group formations. We describe the design of the toolkit, providing an examplar of a small game that is being created with it and our intended future work on the system.

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