Change search
Refine search result
1 - 28 of 28
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Almqvist Gref, Andreas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Falkenberg Hansen, Kjetil
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sonification as Catalyst in Training Manual Wheelchair Operation for Sports and Everyday Life2016In: Proceedings of the Sound and Music Computing Conference, SMC 2016, Sound and Music Computing , 2016, p. 9-14Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, a study on sonification of manual wheelchair movements is presented. The aim was to contribute to both rehabilitation contexts and in wheelchair sports contexts, by providing meaningful auditory feedback for training of manual wheelchair operation. A mapping approach was used where key parameters of manual wheelchair maneuvering were directly mapped to different sound models. The system was evaluated with a qualitative approach in experiments. The results indicate that there is promise in utilizing sonification for training of manual wheelchair operation but that the approach of direct sonification, as opposed to sonification of the deviation from a predefined goal, was not fully successful. Participants reported that there was a clear connection between their wheelchair operation and the auditory feedback, which indicates the possibility of using the system in some, but not all, wheelchair training contexts.

  • 2.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Falkenberg Hansen, Kjetil
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Månsson, Lisa
    Tardat, Bruno
    Musikcyklarna/Music bikes: An installation for enabling children to investigate the relationship between expressive music performance and body motion2014In: Proceedings of the Sound and Music Computing Sweden Conference 2014, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2014, p. 1-2Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Frid, Emma
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Favero, Federico
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Annersten, Lars
    Musikverket.
    Berner, David
    Musikverket.
    Morreale, Fabio
    Queen Mary University of London.
    SOUND FOREST/LJUDSKOGEN: A LARGE-SCALE STRING-BASED INTERACTIVE MUSICAL INSTRUMENT2016In: Sound and Music Computing 2016, SMC Sound&Music Computing NETWORK , 2016, p. 79-84Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     In this paper we present a string-based, interactive, largescale installation for a new museum dedicated to performing arts, Scenkonstmuseet, which will be inaugurated in 2017 in Stockholm, Sweden. The installation will occupy an entire room that measures 10x5 meters. We aim to create a digital musical instrument (DMI) that facilitates intuitive musical interaction, thereby enabling visitors to quickly start creating music either alone or together. The interface should be able to serve as a pedagogical tool; visitors should be able to learn about concepts related to music and music making by interacting with the DMI. Since the lifespan of the installation will be approximately five years, one main concern is to create an experience that will encourage visitors to return to the museum for continued instrument exploration. In other words, the DMI should be designed to facilitate long-term engagement. Finally, an important aspect in the design of the installation is that the DMI should be accessible and provide a rich experience for all museum visitors, regardless of age or abilities.

  • 4.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Crafting Experience: Designing Digital Musical Instruments for Long-Term Use in Artistic Practice2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis collects a series of publications that all present work where digital musical instruments (DMIs) played a central role. While the papers focus on the individual projects where the DMIs where created, the first part of this thesis describes patterns and insights arrived at by comparing the projects and the DMIs, as well as discuss them in the context of other contemporary research.

    The projects described in the included papers all are quite different, but the role I performed in them was consistent in many ways. I position my- self as a craftsperson, and trace the practice of crafting digital musical instru- ments through the projects. As a working metaphor, I present the idea of the DMI-craftsperson as a translator between different domains. This requires a broader outlook than the mechanics of the instruments themselves, including some working understanding of the domains that the DMI interacts with.

    The relationship between DMIs and contemporary musical practice is a thread that runs through the work. I criticise the practice of exclusively performing laboratory based evaluations, and the concept of rigid and requirements based evaluations of artistic artefacts. Instead, I argue, relying on Sonic Interaction Design and embodied aesthetics, that the complexities and nuances of perfor- mance can only be fully explored by engaging in long-term artistic practice.

  • 5.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Crafting New Interfaces for Musical Expression2015Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis collects and contextualizes several projects involving artistically directed prototyping where new artifacts have been developed, in multi-disciplinary groups of practitioners, for use in performance contexts. These projects and their resulting publications have been team efforts, and therefore all papers have more than one author. In the introduction, a complementary perspective to that of the publications is offered, engaging with the characteristics of the digital innards of these artifacts and their digital material qualities. The stance that software source code is a design material is argued, and the notion of the crafting coder is used to view processes that use code as material for artistic creation. Code is also prominently featured in the introductory chapter with examples of some of the central components of the sound processing techniques that have been successfully used in the projects described in this thesis.

    The artifacts that are described in the thesis are: The Throat, an instrument for augmenting the singing voice using gestural control in real-time, The Vocal Chorder, a string based instrument using full-body interaction that also allows for audience participation through an installation mode, The Charged Room, a video tracking installation that lets users manipulate sound by moving across a stage, and Nebula, a garment that senses the users movements and responds with sound. These artifacts have been evaluated in the context they are designed for, and not only tested in laboratory settings, to make sure that the knowledge produced is valid. Several performances and peda-gogical courses have been used as empirical foundation for the claims of empowerment, expressivity, and performance qualities ascribed to the developed artifacts.

     

  • 6.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    When Intelligent Machines Say No2015In: Workshop on "Collaborating with Intelligent Machines: Interfaces for Creative Sound", 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is easy to imagine frictionless scenarios where giving intelligence to the tools we use only results in positive additions to our creative experiences. But as soon as we venture further than systems of recommendation and give our machine agency to enact the suggestions they formulate, we must take into account a power equation that is not a zero sum game. In creative networks of humans and machines, performing an action can be seen as imposing a limit on the process as it unfolds. The tools we use today already impose limits on our process, and these very limitations can be conducive to creativity. Therefore, the question of how to handle limitations could be a useful way of framing our design process when developing the intelligent machines of the future.

     

  • 7.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Goina, Maurizio
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Robitaille, Marie Andree
    Stockholm University of the Arts.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Modes of sonic interaction in circus: Three proofs of concept2014In: Proceedings of Sound and Music Computing Conference 2014, Athens, 2014, p. 1698-1706Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The art of circus is a vibrant and competitive culture that embraces new tools and technology. In this paper, a series of exploratory design processes resulting in proofs of concepts are presented, showing strategies for effective use of three different modes of sonic interaction in contemporary circus. Each design process is based on participatory studio work, involving professional circus artists. All of the proofs of concepts have been evaluated, both with studio studies and public circus performances, taking the work beyond theoretical laboratory projects and properly engaging the practice and culture of contemporary circus.The first exploration uses a contortionist’s extreme bodily manipulation as inspiration for sonic manipulations in an accompanying piece of music. The second exploration uses electric amplification of acoustic sounds as a transformative enhancement of existing elements of circus performance. Finally, a sensor based system of real-time sonification of body gestures is explored and ideas from the sonification of dance are translated into the realm of circus.

  • 8.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    NIME Design and Contemporary Music Practice: Benefits and Challenges2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper deals with the question of how the developmentof new musical artifacts can benet from deeply engagingwith contemporary musical practice. With the novel ideasproduced by the NIME community manifested in musicalinstruments in continuous use, new research questions canbe answered and new sources of knowledge can be explored.This can also be very helpful in evaluation, as it is possi-ble to evaluate the qualities of an instrument in a speciedcontext, rather than evaluating a prototyped instrument onthe basis of its unrealised potential. The information fromsuch evaluation can then be fed back into the developmentprocess, allowing researchers to probe musical practice itselfwith their designs.

  • 9.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    university College of Opera, Sweden.
    Artistically directed prototyping in development and in practice2012In: Journal of New Music Research, ISSN 0929-8215, E-ISSN 1744-5027, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 377-387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of technology in artistic contexts presents interestingchallenges regarding the processes in which engineers, artists andperformers work together. The artistic intent and goals of the participantsare relevant both when shaping the development practice, and in definingand refining the role of technology in practice. In this paper wepresent strategies for structuring the development process, basedon iterative design and participatory design. The concepts are describedin theory and examples are given of how they have been successfullyapplied. The cases make heavy use of different types of prototypingand this practice is also discussed. The development cases all relateto a single artifact, a gestural voice processing instrument calledThe Throat. This artifact has been in use since it was developed,and from that experience, three cases are presented. The focus ofthese cases is on how artistic vision through practice can recontextualizetechnology, and, without rebuilding it, redefine it and give it anew role to play.

  • 10.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    University College of Opera, France .
    Exploring the design space: Prototyping "The Throat V3"for the elephant man opera2011In: Proceedings of the 8th Sound and Music Computing Conference, SMC 2011, Padova, Italy: Padova University Press , 2011, p. 141-147Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developing new technology for artistic practice requires other methods than classical problem solving. Some of the challenges involved in the development of new musical instruments have affinities to the realm of wicked problems. Wicked problems are hard to define and have many different solutions that are good or bad (not true or false). The body of possible solutions to a wicked problem can be called a design space and exploring that space must be the objective of a design process.In this paper we present effective methods of iterative design and participatory design that we have used in a project developed in collaboration between the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) and the University College of Opera, both in Stockholm. The methods are outlined, and examples are given of how they have been applied in specific situations.The focus lies on prototyping and evaluation with user participation. By creating and acting out scenarios with the user, and thus asking the questions through a prototype and receiving the answers through practice and exploration, we removed the bottleneck represented by language and allowed communication beyond verbalizing. Doing this, even so-called tacit knowledge could be activated and brought into the development process.

  • 11.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Tsaknaki, Vasiliki
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lewandowski, Vincent
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Nebula: An Interactive Garment Designed for Functional Aesthetics2015In: Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York, NY, USA: ACM , 2015, p. 275-278Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present Nebula, a prototype for examining the properties of textiles, fashion accessories, and digital technologies to arrive at a garment design that brings these elements together in a cohesive manner. Bridging the gap between everyday performativity and enactment, we aim at discussing aspects of the making process, interaction and functional aesthetics that emerged. Nebula is part of the Sound Clothes project that aims at exploring the expressive potential of wearable technologies creating sound from motion.

  • 12.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Tsaknaki, Vasiliki
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lewandowski, Vincent
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hwang, Sungjae
    Song, John
    Gim, Junghyeon
    Griggio, Carla
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Leiva, Germán
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Romero, Mario
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST). Georgia Institute of Technology.
    Sweeney, David
    Regan, Tim
    Helmes, John
    Vlachokyriakos, Vasillis
    Lindley, Siân
    Taylor, Alex
    Demo Hour2015In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 6-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interactivity is a unique forum of the ACM CHI Conference that showcases hands-on demonstrations, novel interactive technologies, and artistic installations. At CHI 2015 in Seoul we hosted more than 30 exhibits, including an invited digital interactive art exhibit. Interactivity highlights the diverse group of computer scientists, sociologists, designers, psychologists, artists, and many more who make up the CHI community.

  • 13.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Singing Interaction: Embodied Instruments for Musical Expression in Opera2014In: Leonardo music journal, ISSN 0961-1215, E-ISSN 1531-4812, Vol. 24, p. 7-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the opera Sing the Body Electric! A Corporatorio, artists from the disciplines of opera, dance and the development of new musical instruments collaborated to create an onstage fusion of different technologies and artistic practices that connected performer, scenography and instrument. Gestures and movements of singers were captured by custom-built technologies. The singers also used custom-built technologies for transforming their vocal qualities and for creating synthesized accompaniment in real time. In this way the singers’ bodily musical processes further extended their vocal performances, rooted in operatic praxis, allowing for heightened expressivity and emergent scenic subjects.

  • 14.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Which Scenic Subjects may Emerge when Interacting With Machines Through Vocal and Bodily Virtuosity?2016In: Proceedings of CARPA4: Colloquium on Artistic Research in Performing Arts / [ed] Annette Arlander, Theatre Academy Helsinki , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    New Scenic Subjects: Explorations of a System of Autonomous On-Stage Observers2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2016, p. 265-268Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    Uncanny Materialities: Digital Strategies for Staging Supernatural Themes Drawn from Medieval Ballads2017In: Leonardo music journal, ISSN 0961-1215, E-ISSN 1531-4812, Vol. 27, p. 62-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the medieval tradition of ballads, a recurring theme is that of transformation. In a staged concert for chamber orchestra, singers and dancers called Varelser och Ballader (Beings and Ballads), we explored this theme using ballads coupled with contemporary poetry and new music. The performance made use of custom-made digital musical instruments, using video analysis and large-scale physical interfaces for transformative purposes. In this article, we describe the piece itself as well as how uncanny qualities of the digital were used to emphasize eerie themes of transformation and deception by the supernatural beings found in the medieval ballads.

  • 17.
    Frid, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Alborno, Paolo
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Interactive Sonification of Spontaneous Movement of Children€: Cross-Modal Mapping and the Perception of Body Movement Qualities through Sound2016In: Frontiers in Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-4548, E-ISSN 1662-453X, Vol. 10, article id 521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present three studies focusing on the effect of different sound models in interactive sonification of bodily movement. We hypothesized that a sound model characterized by continuous smooth sounds would be associated with other movement characteristics than a model characterized by abrupt variation in amplitude and that these associations could be reflected in spontaneous movement characteristics. Three subsequent studies were conducted to investigate the relationship between properties of bodily movement and sound: (1) a motion capture experiment involving interactive sonification of a group of children spontaneously moving in a room, (2) an experiment involving perceptual ratings of sonified movement data and (3) an experiment involving matching between sonified movements and their visualizations in the form of abstract drawings. In (1) we used a system constituting of 17 IR cameras tracking passive reflective markers. The head positions in the horizontal plane of 3-4 children were simultaneously tracked and sonified, producing 3-4 sound sources spatially displayed through an 8-channel loudspeaker system. We analyzed children’s spontaneous movement in terms of energy-, smoothness- and directness index. Despite large inter-participant variability and group-specific effects caused by interaction among children when engaging in the spontaneous movement task, we found a small but significant effect of sound model. Results from (2) indicate that different sound models can be rated differently on a set of motion-related perceptual scales (e.g. expressivity and fluidity). Also, results imply that audio-only stimuli can evoke stronger perceived properties of movement (e.g. energetic, impulsive) than stimuli involving both audio and video representations. Findings in (3) suggest that sounds portraying bodily movement can be represented using abstract drawings in a meaningful way. We argue that the results from these studies support the existence of a cross-modal mapping of body motion qualities from bodily movement to sounds. Sound can be translated and understood from bodily motion, conveyed through sound visualizations in the shape of drawings and translated back from sound visualizations to audio. The work underlines the potential of using interactive sonification to communicate high-level features of human movement data.

  • 18.
    Frid, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Interactive sonification of a fluid dance movement: an exploratory study2019In: Journal on Multimodal User Interfaces, ISSN 1783-7677, E-ISSN 1783-8738, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 181-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present three different experiments designed to explore sound properties associated with fluid movement: (1) an experiment in which participants adjusted parameters of a sonification model developed for a fluid dance movement, (2) a vocal sketching experiment in which participants sketched sounds portraying fluid versus nonfluid movements, and (3) a workshop in which participants discussed and selected fluid versus nonfluid sounds. Consistent findings from the three experiments indicated that sounds expressing fluidity generally occupy a lower register and has less high frequency content, as well as a lower bandwidth, than sounds expressing nonfluidity. The ideal sound to express fluidity is continuous, calm, slow, pitched, reminiscent of wind, water or an acoustic musical instrument. The ideal sound to express nonfluidity is harsh, non-continuous, abrupt, dissonant, conceptually associated with metal or wood, unhuman and robotic. Findings presented in this paper can be used as design guidelines for future applications in which the movement property fluidity is to be conveyed through sonification.

  • 19.
    Frid, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sonification of fluidity -
An exploration of perceptual connotations of a particular movement feature2016In: Proceedings of ISon 2016, 5th Interactive Sonification Workshop, Bielefeld, Germany, 2016, p. 11-17Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we conducted two experiments in order to investigate potential strategies for sonification of the expressive movement quality “fluidity” in dance: one perceptual rating experiment (1) in which five different sound models were evaluated on their ability to express fluidity, and one interactive experiment (2) in which participants adjusted parameters for the most fluid sound model in (1) and performed vocal sketching to two video recordings of contemporary dance. Sounds generated in the fluid condition occupied a low register and had darker, more muffled, timbres compared to the non-fluid condition, in which sounds were characterized by a higher spectral centroid and contained more noise. These results were further supported by qualitative data from interviews. The participants conceptualized fluidity as a property related to water, pitched sounds, wind, and continuous flow; non-fluidity had connotations of friction, struggle and effort. The biggest conceptual distinction between fluidity and non-fluidity was the dichotomy of “nature” and “technology”, “natural” and “unnatural”, or even “human” and “unhuman”. We suggest that these distinct connotations should be taken into account in future research focusing on the fluidity quality and its corresponding sonification.

  • 20.
    Frid, Emma
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lindetorp, Hans
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KMH Royal College of Music, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hansen, Kjetil Falkenberg
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sound Forest - Evaluation of an Accessible Multisensory Music Installation2019In: Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM , 2019, p. 1-12, article id 677Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sound Forest is a music installation consisting of a room with light-emitting interactive strings, vibrating platforms and speakers, situated at the Swedish Museum of Performing Arts. In this paper we present an exploratory study focusing on evaluation of Sound Forest based on picture cards and interviews. Since Sound Forest should be accessible for everyone, regardless age or abilities, we invited children, teens and adults with physical and intellectual disabilities to take part in the evaluation. The main contribution of this work lies in its fndings suggesting that multisensory platforms such as Sound Forest, providing whole-body vibrations, can be used to provide visitors of diferent ages and abilities with similar associations to musical experiences. Interviews also revealed positive responses to haptic feedback in this context. Participants of diferent ages used diferent strategies and bodily modes of interaction in Sound Forest, with activities ranging from running to synchronized music-making and collaborative play.

  • 21.
    Handberg, Leif
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Chafe, C.
    Canfield-Dafilou, E. K.
    Op 1254: Music for neutrons, networks and solenoids using a restored organ in a nuclear reactor2018In: TEI 2018 - Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 537-541Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, an installation is presented that connects Stanford and Stockholm through a one-of-a-kind combination of instrument and venue: the Skandia Wurlitzer theatre organ (Wurlitzer serial no. 1254) situated in the KTH R1 Experimental Performance Space, a disused nuclear reactor. A continuous stream of musical data, audio, and video between the two places explored the capabilities of the digital to play with the concepts of presence and embodiment, virtuality and the physical. In the installation, a series of performances presented new pieces written especially for this setting. The pieces were performed by musicians in Stanford, mediated in real-time, allowing them to play together with the theatre organ in Stockholm, temporarily fusing the two venues to create one ensemble, one audience, in one space.

  • 22. Jenkins, T.
    et al.
    Helms, Karey
    KTH.
    Tsaknaki, Vasiliki
    KTH.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH.
    Hansen, N. B.
    Sociomateriality: Infrastructuring and appropriation of artifacts2018In: TEI 2018 - Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 724-727Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This Studio offers researchers and designers an opportunity to investigate and discuss prototypes and in-process projects from a perspective that expands beyond material aspects, to also cover social and cultural ones. Participants will bring a project, device, or platform, which will be discussed as sociomaterials that actively participate across multiple social and cultural contexts. This perspective, as well as the prototypes and projects brought by the participants, forms the core of the Studio, where conversation will emerge over several phases: from the demonstration of the individual projects as things, to the generation of speculative fictions as to the role and use of these artifacts in the world. Finally, we end with a discussion of infrastructuring and appropriation of the artefacts and their social roles. The themes that will be examined in this Studio are agency, emerging behaviors, embeddedness and design strategies from a sociomaterial perspective of artifacts.

  • 23. Liang, Rong-Hao
    et al.
    Chan, Liwei
    Tseng, Hung-Yu
    Kuo, Han-Chih
    Huang, Da-Yuan
    Yang, De-Nian
    Chen, Bing-Yu
    Grosse-Puppendahl, Tobias
    Beck, Sebastian
    Wilbers, Daniel
    Kuijper, Arjan
    Heo, Heejeong
    Park, Hyungkun
    Kim, Seungki
    Chung, Jeeyong
    Lee, Geehyuk
    Lee, Woohun
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Demo Hour2014In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 6-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Paloranta, Jimmie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Frid, Emma
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Interaction with a large sized augmented string instrument intended for a public setting2016In: Sound and Music Computing 2016 / [ed] Großmann, Rolf and Hajdu, Georg, Hamburg: Zentrum für Mikrotonale Musik und Multimediale Komposition (ZM4) , 2016, p. 388-395Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present a study of the interaction with a large sized string instrument intended for a large installation in a museum, with focus on encouraging creativity,learning, and providing engaging user experiences. In the study, nine participants were video recorded while interacting with the string on their own, followed by an interview focusing on their experiences, creativity, and the functionality of the string. In line with previous research, our results highlight the importance of designing for different levels of engagement (exploration, experimentation, challenge). However, results additionally show that these levels need to consider the users age and musical background as these profoundly affect the way the user plays with and experiences the string.

  • 25.
    Tsaknaki, Vasiliki
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    A wearable nebula material investigations of implicit interaction2019In: TEI 2019 - Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc , 2019, p. 625-633Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present the Nebula, a garment that translates intentional gestures and implicit interaction into sound. Nebula is a studded cloak made from a heavy fabric that envelopes the wearer with pendulous folds and has strong experiential qualities that were especially appreciated by performing artists. We describe the design process in detail, and highlight three material investigations that show material connections that were fundamental to the experience of the garment: How the draping and construction of the garment allowed for implicit interaction, how the studs were used both as a computational sensing material and a strong visual component, and how the sound design exploited tangible material qualities in the garment. We offer these three material investigations as contributions and discuss how material investigations more broadly can produce evocative connections in the materials available in design work, but also as a way to extract legible design intentions for other designers and researchers.

  • 26.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    The throat III: disforming operatic voices through a novel interactive instrument2013In: Proceedings of CHI 2013 Extended Abstracts, ACM Press, 2013, p. 3007-3010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Practitioner-led artistic research, combined with interactive technologies, opens up new and unexplored design spaces. Here we focus on the creation of a tool for opera-singers to dynamically disform, change and accompany their voices. In an opera composed by one of the authors, the title-role singer needed to be able to alter his voice to express hawking, coughing, snuffling and other disturbing vocal qualities associated with the lead role Joseph Merrick, aka "The Elephant Man". In our designerly exploration, we were guided by artistic experiences from the opera tradition and affordances of the technology at hand. The resulting instrument, The Throat III, is a singer-operated artefact that embodies and extends particular notions of operatic singing techniques while at the same time creating accompaniment. It therefore becomes an emancipatory tool, putting a spotlight on some of the power hierarchies between singers, composers, conductors, and stage directors in the operatic world.

  • 27.
    Unander-Scharin, Carl
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Interacting with the Vocal Chorder: Re-empowering the Opera Diva2014In: CHI '14 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With The Vocal Chorder, a large interactive instrument to create accompaniment, opera singers can get more power over the performance. The device allows performers to interactively accompany themselves through pushing, leaning on, and bending steel wires. The design was guided by the unique needs of the solo-singer, explored through autobiographical design and material explorations on stage, and later tested by other singers. Through our designerly exploration, we arrived at a device that offered (1) a tool for singers to appropriate and take control over the rhythmical pace and overall artistic and aesthetic outcome of their performances, (2) an enriched sense of embodiment between their voice and the overall performance; and (3) a means to empower opera singers on stage.

  • 28. Unander-Scharin, Carl
    et al.
    Unander-Scharin, Åsa
    Höök, Kristina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    The Vocal Chorder2014In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 14-15Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 28 of 28
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf