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  • 1.
    Tingström, Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Design (Div.).
    Product development with a focus on integration of environmental aspects2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental awareness has increased during the past 2-3 decades, and companies have gone from simply following legislation to adding environmental considerations into their business plans. The ongoing developments make it interesting to study how leading companies integrate environmental considerations into their product development processes.

    The aim of this thesis is to study how environmental considerations can be integrated into the product development process. It is based on studies made in the Swedish manufacturing industry. The research has used both quantitative and qualitative methods. The foundation for the conclusion was derived from the four different studies building this thesis.

    The aggregated conclusion from the studies suggests a conceptual model consisting of four cornerstones that should be addressed in order to ease the integration of environmental concerns: the management, product development process, DfE Mindset, and DfE Tools. The development of this model has its foundation in industrial case studies that show how leading companies have integrated environmental considerations in an innovative way.

    Combined with the conceptual model is a discussion concerning the usage of existing tools and how sub-activities carried out within the development process are less formal than before. This non-rigid structure is in line with what is suggested in current innovation research for radical innovation, since it enables creativity to flourish and does not limit designers. This freedom of action for the creativity of the personnel in the projects has raised the environmental work to a new level.

    The thesis also suggests how to use analytical and dialogue-based tools in a development project. It is beneficial to have a dialogue tool in the beginning of a project and in a radical innovation project, while it is beneficial to have an analytical tool later on in a project if more that one tool is used or in an incremental innovation project.

  • 2.
    Tingström, Johan
    Univ Kalmar, Dept Technol..
    The challenge of environmental improvement in different types of innovation projects2005In: Advances in Integrated Design and Manufacturing in Mechanical Engineering / [ed] Bramley A; Brissaud D; Coutellier D; McMahon C, 2005, p. 33-44Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Product development tends to strive towards radical innovations of products to gain an advantage in a competitive market. Which tool should be used to evaluate environmental performance in order to reach the market faster with radically improved products? This paper discusses radical and incremental innovation and combines them with tools for evaluating environmental performance of products. The environmental tools examined or used in this paper are design handbook, life cycle assessment (LCA), and environmental effect analysis (EEA). This paper is based on a literature review in the field of innovation and environmental research. Primarily journal articles and conference papers have been used but also books and dissertations. The result of the discussion is that a radical innovation should use EEA as a supporting tool, and incremental innovation should use LCA. This is based on known facts about EEA and LCA. A design handbook can easily be used as a support for both types of innovation.

  • 3.
    Tingström, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Karlsson, Reine
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    The relationship between environmental analyses and the dialogue process in product development2006In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 14, no 15-16, p. 1409-1419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eco-design tools ought to be made more useful, so that they become effectively used in companies to support improvements of product systems. This article discusses the interconnections between environmental analysis and integrative cooperation in the product development processes. The study focuses on two different assessment tools, life cycle assessment (LCA) and environmental effect analysis (EEA), in three different combined uses. The discussion of the Eco-design methods focuses on integration in product development processes considering the relation to a product competitiveness perspective. The interviews indicate that the interconnection of methods is important as a key to real transformation of design practices.

  • 4.
    Tingström, Johan
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, Department of Technology, Eco Design.
    Swanström, Lennart
    ABB Corporate Research, Västerås.
    Karlsson, Reine
    University of Kalmar, Department of Technology, Eco Design.
    Sustainability management in product development projects: the ABB experience2006In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, Vol. 14, no 15-16, p. 1377-1385Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes how ABB worked with environmental considerations when they developed their new capacitor. The sustainable development priorities are now integrated within their mainstream product development process model. The fact that ABB started a mandatory use of their GATE Model, including the sustainability considerations, verifies that ABB considers it to be a commercially sound methodology. The studied project resulted in a product with considerably better environmental performance than the traditional technology. One key factor is that the sustainability interest was truly advocated and supported by the management of the project.

  • 5. Tingström, Johan
    et al.
    Swartling, Dag
    Non-functional demands in Swedish organisations2004In: Tecnológico de Moterrey Proceedings of 7th International QMOD conference, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Tingström, Johan
    et al.
    Univ Kalmar, Dept Technol..
    Åkermark, Anne Marie
    Univ Kalmar, Dept Technol..
    Integrating environmental aspects in products2004In: Proceedings of NordDesign: Product Development in Changing Enviroment / [ed] Lehtonen T., 2004, p. 244-250Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper present the result from two different interview studies made in Sweden. One study had focus on companies developing consumer products and focus of the other study was product developing companies. The companies in the study were from small to large size.

    Many different aspects need to be considered when a product is developed. Most of them are connected directly to the function of the product such as speed, weight, height etc. Historically the main focus has been the products functionality, other aspects such as environmental, design, and ergonomic have been considered as less important.

    The study show that size of the company affects how the companies work with environmental issues. The larger companies were more active regarding the work more with environmental issue. They have the possibility to have in-house knowledge or to contract external support to study their products.

  • 7.
    Ölundh Sandström, Gunilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Tingström, Johan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Managing Radical Innovation and Environmental Challenges: Development of a Dry Capacitor at ABB2008In: European Journal of Innovation Management, ISSN 1460-1060, E-ISSN 1758-7115, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 182-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the driving forces for taking environmental considerations to a higher level in a project involving radical innovation.

    Design/methodology/approach – This qualitative case study is based on ten in-depth interviews with respondents from the development team for the DryQ project at ABB.

    Findings – In order to achieve substantial environmental benefits, radical product development is essential. Radical product development has attributes that differ from those of incremental product development. It is important that these differences be acknowledged when preparing to manage environmental challenges in development projects. In radical product development, environmental considerations should be taken into account very early on, at the strategic level of the design process.  Setting challenging environmental targets and rewarding environmental improvements was crucial to the outcome of the project presented in this paper.

    Research limitations/implications – The research presented here describes one case in one manufacturing company. Readers can, however, learn from this case and apply the insights gained to their own research or use the findings to promote new thinking in their own organisation.

    Practical implications – Suggestions are made about how to manage environmental considerations in radical product development.

    Originality/value – Few studies combine ecodesign and radical innovation theories, as is done here. Yet this is not a theoretical paper but an industry-based study of eco-innovation, from which researchers and practitioners can learn.

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