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  • 1.
    Abid, Muhammad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.). Högskolan i Gävle, Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    Hellberg, Roland
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Factors affecting global supply chain design2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the limited existing knowledge pertaining to the factors which govern localization of operations and capabilities in a global supply chain, the purpose of the paper is to find out which factors and how they jointly affect the design of global supply chains. The relevant literature is reviewed and a concept matrix is developed. Five companies were selected in order to illustrate the issues of global supply chain design. Among them, three companies are considered to have efficient supply chain and less complex products, while the two others are considered to have responsive supply chain and more complex products. The issues discussed with the selected companies cover global sourcing, challenges, technological advancement and issues related to management control. The study identifies about fifty factors that affect global supply chain design, and specifically how theses relate to design decisions on location of factories and production, supplier selection and development, distribution of products and organisation of interfaces along the supply chain. The discrepancies between theory and practice as well as the implications for further research are discussed.

  • 2. Bengtsson, Lars
    et al.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Manufacturing outsourcing and its effect on plant performance-lessons for KIBS outsourcing2009In: Journal of evolutionary economics, ISSN 0936-9937, E-ISSN 1432-1386, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 231-257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the proclaimed advantages and popularity of outsourcing manufacturing and knowledge-intensive business services, there are few and mainly contradictory studies of its short- and long-term effects. The main purpose of this paper is to analyze the way in which outsourcing manufacturing and design work relates to performance at plant level. The study is based on a large-scale survey among a representative sample of Swedish engineering plants. The results show no significant effects from outsourcing manufacturing on plant operating performance. The paper further shows that investments in technological and organizational capabilities explain the improvements of performance to a significantly higher extent than does outsourcing. The problems of additional costs and managing dependencies when applying partial outsourcing and separating interdependent key processes provide important insights to the analysis on the effects of outsourcing knowledge-intensive business services (KIBS).

  • 3. Bengtsson, Lars
    et al.
    Von Haartman, Robin
    University of Gävle.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Low-Cost versus Innovation: Contrasting Outsourcing and Integration Strategies in Manufacturing2009In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 35-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses how two different outsourcing manufacturing strategies relate to plant performance and innovation capability when taking into account the organizational integration of design and manufacturing as well as product complexity. The study discriminates between low-cost-oriented outsourcing and innovation-oriented outsourcing. The empirical data used is based on a survey of 267 engineering firms, of which half have outsourced manufacturing. We found that the two outsourcing strategies do have different effects, which illustrates that outsourcing represents a trade-off between improving innovation capability and lowering costs. The study furthermore shows that manufacturing and supplier integration in product design processes is mainly beneficial when applying innovation-oriented outsourcing, and in particular when products and manufacturing processes are complex.

  • 4.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Acting creatively for enhanced performance: Challenges for Swedish manufacturers in an age of outsourcing2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation aims to contribute to the discourse on the future of manufacturing in Sweden. It is argued that the real threat does not come from lower wages in Eastern Europe and Asia. Rather it comes from an inability to make the most of existing manufacturing systems.

    The joint contribution of the underlying studies that this dissertation is based on provides compelling support for corroborating this line of thought. More important, however, is that in addition to showing that there is room for improvement, a lot of input is provided on how to act creatively for enhanced performance.

    The discussion on how to act mainly focuses on three research issues.

    First, enhancing continuous improvement capability. The continuous improvement abilities considered most important for Swedish manufacturers to develop are pointed out. That is, the ability to adopt a systematic and strategic approach to continuous improvements, the ability to lead the way towards continuous improvements, and finally the ability to involve customers and suppliers in continuous improvements. Furthermore, the likely positive performance impact of accomplishing this is clarified.

    Second, adopting the principles of lean manufacturing. Rather than reinforcing Taylorism, it is shown that lean manufacturing seems to contribute to the creation of sustainable work systems in Sweden. However, a broad process of change awaits the many companies that might aspire to transform their operations in this direction. In order to reap the full potential of this strategy, the work organisation, as well as management accounting and remuneration systems, must change, not only manufacturing processes.

    Third and finally, making more effective outsourcing decisions. It is shown that any positive effects of outsourcing manufacturing are more likely to be realized if concurrent initiatives are taken to develop the capability of the manufacturing function. The analysis also indicates a potential for taking a more strategic approach to outsourcing, i.e., outsourcing in order to increase focus on core manufacturing activities and take advantage of the supplier’s higher innovation capability. Moreover, a potential for selecting suppliers more appropriately is also indicated, such as by trying to achieve greater economies of scale.

    The chosen methodological approach has been to combine two large-scale surveys of representative samples of Swedish engineering industry companies with two multiple case studies. The surveys measured continuous improvement behaviours, lean manufacturing and outsourcing, and provides descriptive statistics as well as tests of theoretical assumptions. The case studies provide a deeper understanding of researched issues. One was designed to illustrate how the Balanced Scorecard may enhance the continuous improvement capability level, and the other, to hearing some voices of the empirical field.

  • 5.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Invest or divest?: On the relative improvement potential in outsourcing manufacturing2006In: Proceedings of the 17th meeting of the Production and Operations ManagementSociety: Operations Management in a New World of Uncertainties, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Mot balanserad styrning i teamorganiserad produktion2003Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    During the 1990s two contrasting paths to the organization of work have emerged in the Swedish engineering industry: the structure-conservative and structure-innovative. This thesis deals with the latter, and focuses primarily on necessary changes in management control systems that support structureinnovative forms of team-organized work. Three types of management control systems are studied in this thesis: performance management and measurement systems, systems for continuous improvements and wage systems.

    The empirical base of this thesis consists of data from an exploratory survey study as well as a multiple case study.

    On a general level, the survey study indicates a lack of congruence between structure and systems. Many companies seem to have started to move along the structure-innovative path but have not changed the management control systems accordingly. However, there are good reasons for doing so. The companies that have chosen the structure-innovative path perform better in terms of productivity, quality and cost reduction. These are also the companies that have changed their management control systems to the greatest extent.

    The case study provides examples of how management control systems may be changed to fit structure-innovative forms of team-organized work. The main focus has been on the use of Balanced Scorecard. How a strategic continuous improvement capability was developed and sustained in the studied companies is illustrated. The findings extend previous research on new production concepts, which, this thesis argues, are not to be regarded as an issue of technology and vertical division of labour only, but also of supportive management control systems.

  • 7.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Trade-offs in make-buy decisions2011In: Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management, ISSN 1478-4092, E-ISSN 1873-6505, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 158-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the previous literature uses transaction cost economics and the resource-based view to theoretically derive the benefits of outsourcing, it has so far overlooked how these theoretical underpinnings must be used to assess trade-offs involved in make-buy decisions as well. This study investigates trade-offs in make-buy decisions for the buying firm. It takes an operations strategy perspective and links manufacturing firms' competitive priorities to outsourcing motives and resulting capabilities. Survey data from a representative sample of 136 manufacturing plants in Sweden is subjected to regressions analysis. In contrast to earlier empirical research, this study shows that resulting capabilities of strategic outsourcing initiatives are distinct, and, furthermore, do not emerge cumulatively. This has important implications for the ongoing debate over trade-offs in the operations strategy literature. Findings are clearly in support of the trade-off model and extend current research into the theoretical domain of make-buy decisions.

  • 8.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Bengtsson, L
    Balanced scorecards for strategic and sustainable continuous improvement capability2004In: Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, ISSN 1741-038X, E-ISSN 1758-7786, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 350-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Illustrates how strategic continuous improvement (CI) capabilities were developed in three Swedish manufacturing companies that have implemented the Balanced Scorecard (BSC). A multiple case study was conducted; each company followed a unique team-based CI strategy. Shows how the use of BSC was adapted to the specific characteristics that each of the CI strategies entail. Furthermore, shows that it could be difficult to sustain the capability that was developed. However, also finds that certain mechanisms in the management control system, as well as the presence of an advanced work organisation, may help in sustaining the strategic CI capability.

  • 9.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Bengtsson, L
    Invest or divest?: On the relative improvement potential in outsourcing manufacturing2008In: Production planning & control (Print), ISSN 0953-7287, E-ISSN 1366-5871, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 212-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study sought to clarify the comparative effect of outsourcing in relation to alternative manufacturing practices. A representative sample of 267 Swedish manufacturing plants was subjected to multiple regression analysis. Results show that in comparison to outsourcing manufacturing, the other practices related to the enhancement of manufacturing capability had a much stronger ability to predict improvements in operating performance. While investments in higher manufacturing capability have only positive effects, outsourcing may entail negative as well as positive effects on operating performance. For the most part, outsourcing leads to negative effects when used as the main strategy to improve performance, but is more likely to cause positive effects if concurrent initiatives are taken to develop manufacturing capabilities. Thus it is argued that there is a far greater performance improvement potential in investing in, rather than divesting, the manufacturing function. Outsourcing is mainly beneficial when used to free resources in order to invest in higher manufacturing capability.

  • 10.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Bengtsson, L
    Lean manufacturing in Sweden: Reinforcement of Taylorism or basis for sustainable work systems?In: international journal of operations and production management, ISSN 0144-3577Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Bengtsson, L
    The role of balanced scorecard in manufacturing: A tool for strategically aligned work on continuous improvements in production teams?2002In: PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT AND MANAGEMENT CONTROL: A COMPENDIUM OF RESEARCH / [ed] Epstein MJ; Manzoni JF, 2002, Vol. 12, p. 181-208Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we analyze the role of balanced scorecard in strategically aligned work on continuous improvements in production teams. The analysis is based on survey responses from 51 engineering industry companies and data from three case studies. Two continuous improvement strategies are identified with the use of cluster analysis, namely, the expert task force strategy and the wide focus strategy. These strategies were found to be closely related to specific features of the local work organization. The case studies shows that there is a clear connection between local work on continuous improvements in teams and implementation and use of the balanced scorecard. A common role of balanced scorecard is to facilitate focus, resource allocation, prioritization and comprehensive coordination of continuous improvement activities, which implies a potential for exploiting the local and operational knowledge base. The balanced scorecard applications, however, are adapted to each strategy for continuous improvements as well as the features of the work organization by a unique emphasis on control of content, process and goals.

  • 12. Dabhilkar, Mandar
    et al.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    Continuous improvement capability in the Swedish engineering industry2007In: International Journal of Technology Management, ISSN 0267-5730, E-ISSN 1741-5276, Vol. 37, no 3-4, p. 272-289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports findings from the Swedish part of the 2nd International Continuous Improvement Survey. Based on Bessant's evolutionary model of continuous improvement behaviour, the continuous improvement capability level of the Swedish engineering industry is estimated. The data analysis shows that there is a need for progression towards higher continuous improvement capability levels. Therefore, the specific abilities to develop in order to support such a move forward are clarified. In addition to being an illustration of manufacturing practices in Sweden from a continuous improvement perspective, this article contributes to the field of Operations Management by being the first attempt to replicate the work of Bessant via a large-scale survey study. The model is found valid and it shows that development of continuous improvement abilities contribute to the enhancement of plant performance.

  • 13.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Bengtsson, Lars
    Bessant, John
    Convergence or National Specificity?: Testing the CI Maturity Model across Multiple Countries2007In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 348-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study empirically tests the Continuous Improvement (CI) maturity model across multiple countries. The analysis is based on data from the 2nd International CINet Survey, limited to the situation in Australia, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom. Despite some differences in Continuous Improvement maturity level between countries, findings lend support to the convergence argument. Regardless of national specificity, Continuous Improvement behaviour patterns emerge in a similar fashion, and furthermore, correspond to improved operational performance if adopted. In addition, findings show that other contextual variables such as company size and type of production system are of limited importance. This implies that Continuous Improvement is something that can be implemented and developed successfully if managed properly, irrespective of contextual influences such as those stemming from cultural and industrial factors.

  • 14.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Bengtsson, Lars
    von Haartman, Robin
    Åhlström, Pär
    Supplier selection or collaboration?: Determining factors of performance improvement when outsourcing manufacturing2009In: Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management, ISSN 1478-4092, E-ISSN 1873-6505, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 143-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An empirical study was designed to determine factors of performance improvement when outsourcing manufacturing. Findings from a survey of 136 manufacturing plants in Sweden show that most of them achieve their outsourcing motives, but not without trade-offs. Factors of performance improvements such as economies of scale or operations in low-cost countries can improve one performance dimension, such as product cost, yet negatively impact volume flexibility, speed or product innovation. The results show part characteristics and supplier operating capabilities are more important than supplier relationship strategies when outsourcing manufacturing, meaning that supplier selection trumps supplier collaboration in the make-or-buy decision.

  • 15.
    Dabhilkar, Mandar
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Niss, Camilla
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Industrial Economics and Management.
    Spridning av produktionsteam och förändrade styrformer2000In: Styrning av team och processer: teoretiska perspektiv och fallstudier / [ed] L. Bengtsson & J. Lind & L. A. Samuelsson, 2000Chapter in book (Other academic)
1 - 15 of 15
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