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  • 1.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Design of Cellulose-based Materials by Supramolecular Assemblies2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to climate change and plastic pollution, there is an increasing demand for bio-based materials with similar properties to those of common plastics yet biodegradable. In this respect, cellulose is a strong candidate that is already being refined on a large industrial scale, but the properties differ significantly from those of common plastics in terms of shapeability and water-resilience.

    This thesis investigates how supramolecular interactions can be used to tailor the properties of cellulose-based materials by modifying cellulose surfaces or control the assembly of cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs). Most of the work is a fundamental study on interactions in aqueous environments, but some material concepts are presented and potential applications are discussed.

    The first part deals with the modification of cellulose by the spontaneous adsorption of xyloglucan or polyelectrolytes. The results indicate that xyloglucan adsorbs to cellulose due to the increased entropy of water released from the surfaces, which is similar to the increased entropy of released counter-ions that drives polyelectrolyte adsorption. The polyelectrolyte adsorption depends on the charge of the cellulose up to a limit after which the charge density affects only the first adsorbed layer in a multilayer formation.

    Latex nanoparticles with polyelectrolyte coronas can be adsorbed onto cellulose in order to prepare hydrophobic cellulose surfaces with strong and ductile wet adhesion, provided the glass transition of the core is below the ambient temperature.

    The second part of the thesis seeks to explain the interactions between different types of cellulose nanofibrils in the presence of different ions, using a model consisting of ion-ion correlation and specific ion effects, which can be employed to rationally design water-resilient and transparent nanocellulose films. The addition of small amounts of alginate also creates interpenetrating double networks, and these networks lead to a synergy which improves both the stiffness and the ductility of the films in water.

    A network model has been developed to understand these materials, with the aim to explain the properties of fibril networks, based on parameters such as the aspect ratio of the fibrils, the solidity of the network, and the ion-induced interactions that increase the friction between fibrils. With the help of this network model and the model for ion-induced interactions, we have created films with wet-strengths surpassing those of common plastics, or a ductility suitable for hygroplastic forming into water-resilient and biodegradable packages. Due to their transparency, water content, and the biocompatibility of cellulose, these materials are also suitable for biomaterial or bioelectronics applications. 

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-12-31 23:59
  • 2.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Cranston, Emily D.
    Department of Chemical Engineering, McMaster University.
    Ondaral, Sedat
    Department of Pulp and Paper Technology, Karadeniz Technical University.
    Johansson, Erik
    Cellutech AB.
    Brumer, Harry
    The Michael Smith Laboratories and the Department of Chemistry, The University of British Columbia.
    Rutland, Mark W.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Adsorption of Xyloglucan onto Cellulose Surfaces of Different Morphologies: An Entropy-Driven Process2016In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 17, no 9, p. 2801-2811Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The temperature-dependence of xyloglucan (XG) adsorption onto smooth cellulose model films regenerated from N-methylmorpholine N-oxide (NMMO) was investigated using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, and it was found that the adsorbed amount increased with increasing temperature. This implies that the adsorption of XG to NMMO-regenerated cellulose is endothermic and supports the hypothesis that the adsorption of XG onto cellulose is an entropy-driven process. We suggest that XG adsorption is mainly driven by the release of water molecules from the highly hydrated cellulose surfaces and from the XG molecules, rather than through hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces as previously suggested. To test this hypothesis, the adsorption of XG onto cellulose was studied using cellulose films with different morphologies prepared from cellulose nanocrystals (CNC), semicrystalline NMMO-regenerated cellulose, and amorphous cellulose regenerated from lithium chloride/dimethylacetamide. The total amount of high molecular weight xyloglucan (XGHMW) adsorbed was studied by quartz crystal microbalance and reflectometry measurements, and it was found that the adsorption was greatest on the amorphous cellulose followed by the CNC and NMMO-regenerated cellulose films. There was a significant correlation between the cellulose dry film thickness and the adsorbed XG amount, indicating that XG penetrated into the films. There was also a correlation between the swelling of the films and the adsorbed amounts and conformation of XG, which further strengthened the conclusion that the water content and the subsequent release of the water upon adsorption are important components of the adsorption process.

  • 3.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Engström, Joakim
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Supramolecular double networks of cellulose nanofibrils and algal polysaccharides with excellent wet mechanical properties2018In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, Vol. 20, no 11, p. 2558-2570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Supramolecular double network films, consisting of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) entangled with the algal polysaccharides alginate or carrageenan, were prepared using a rapid vacuum filtration process to achieve water-resistant CNF nanopapers with excellent mechanical properties in both the wet and dry states following the locking of the structures using Ca2+. The rigid network of calcium alginate was more efficient than the more flexible network of calcium carrageenan and 10% by weight of alginate was sufficient to form a network that suppressed the swelling of the CNF film by over 95%. The resulting material could be compared to a stiff rubber with a Young's modulus of 135 MPa, a tensile strength of 17 MPa, a strain-at-break above 55%, and a work of fracture close to 5 MJ m(-3) in the wet state, which was both significantly stronger and more ductile than the calcium-treated CNF reference nanopaper. It was shown that the state in which Ca2+ was introduced is crucial, and it is also hypothesized that the alginate works as a sacrificial network that prevents the CNF from aligning during loading and that this leads to the increased toughness. The material maintained its barrier properties at elevated relative humidities and the extensibility and ductility made possible hygroplastic forming into three-dimensional shapes. It is suggested that the attractive force in the CNF part of the double network in the presence of multivalent ions is due to the ion-ion correlation forces generated by the fluctuating counter-ion cloud, since no significant ion coordination was observed using FTIR.

  • 4.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Henschen, Jonatan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Polyelectrolyte multilayers on differently charged cellulose surfaces2016In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 251Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nordenström, Malin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ion-induced assemblies of highly anisotropic nanoparticles are governed by ion-ion correlation and specific ion effects2019In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 11, no 8, p. 3514-3520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ion-induced assemblies of highly anisotropic nanoparticles can be explained by a model consisting of ion-ion correlation and specific ion effects: dispersion interactions, metal-ligand complexes, and local acidic environments. Films of cellulose nanofibrils and montmorillonite clay were treated with different ions, and their subsequent equilibrium swelling in water was related to important parameters of the model in order to investigate the relative importance of the mechanisms. Ion-ion correlation was shown to be the fundamental attraction, supplemented by dispersion interaction for polarizable ions such as Ca2+ and Ba2+, or metal-ligand complexes for ions such as Cu2+, Al3+ and Fe3+. Ions that form strong complexes induce local acidic environments that also contribute to the assembly. These findings are summarized in a comprehensive semi-quantitative model and are important for the design of nanomaterials and for understanding biological systems where specific ions are involved.

  • 6.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Nordenström, Malin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Lindstrom, Stefan B.
    Linkoping Univ, Div Solid Mech, Dept Management & Engn, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Div Fibre Technol, Dept Fiber & Polymer Technol, Tekn Ringen 56-58, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, Dept Fiber & Polymer Technol, Tekn Ringen 56-58, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Explaining the Exceptional Wet Integrity of Transparent Cellulose Nanofibril Films in the Presence of Multivalent Ions-Suitable Substrates for Biointerfaces2019In: Advanced Materials Interfaces, ISSN 2196-7350, Vol. 6, no 13, article id 1900333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) assemble into water-resilient materials in the presence of multivalent counter-ions. The essential mechanisms behind these assemblies are ion-ion correlation and specific ion effects. A network model shows that the interfibril attraction indirectly influences the wet modulus by a fourth power relationship to the solidity of the network (E-w proportional to phi(4)). Ions that induce both ion-ion correlation and specific ion effects significantly reduce the swelling of the films, and due to the nonlinear relationship dramatically increase the wet modulus. Herein, this network model is used to explain the elastoplastic behavior of wet films of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (TEMPO)-oxidized, carboxymethylated, and phosphorylated CNFs in the presence of different counter-ions. The main findings are that the aspect ratio of the CNFs influences the ductility of the assemblies, that the bivalency of phosphorylate ligands probably limits the formation of interfibril complexes with divalent ions, and that a higher charge density increases the friction between fibrils by increasing the short-range attraction from ion-ion correlation and specific ion effects. These findings can be used to rationally design CNF materials for a variety of applications where wet strength, ductility, and transparency are important, such as biomaterials or substrates for bioelectronics.

  • 7.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nordenström, Malin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Stefan
    Linköping University.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Explaining the exceptional wet integrity of transparent cellulose nanofibril films in the presence of multivalent ions - Suitable substrates for biointerfacesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Dynamic networks of cellulose nanofibrils as a platform for tunable hydrogels, aerogels, and chemical modifications2018In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 255Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Unidirectional Swelling of Dynamic Cellulose Nanofibril Networks: A Platform for Tunable Hydrogels and Aerogels with 3D Shapeability2019In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 2406-2412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A process has been developed to create self-supporting hydrogels with low solids content (down to 0.5 wt %) and anisotropic aerogels with a low density (down to 5 kg/m(3)) from cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs). The CNF networks were formed by vacuum filtration of dilute dispersions (0.2 wt %) of 90% CNFs and 10% alginate. We call this process "the dynamic CNF network approach" since the solids content of these hydrogels can be tuned in the range of 0.5-3 wt % by reswelling the filter cakes in a medium with a controlled osmotic pressure. These hydrogels are significantly stronger than the 1-2 wt % CNF gels typically used to prepare hydrogels and aerogels because the dynamic CNF networks are formed below their arrested state threshold (ca. 0.5 wt %) and are thus homogeneous. The vacuum filtration leads to a directional reswelling vertical to the plane of the filter cake, and this is crucial in order to turn a two-dimensional (2D) shape, cut from the filter cake, into a 3D hydrogel without distorting the 2D shape. The anisotropic swelling was used to create intricate 3D-shaped hydrogels and solved some of the issues involved in the degassing and molding of high-viscosity CNF gels. Multivalent ions were used to lock the CNF and alginate networks at the desired solids content and 3D shape, and resulted in an increase by an order of magnitude in storage modulus. Moreover, the self-supporting nature of the hydrogels allowed us to freeze-cast them into anisotropic aerogels with the same 3D shape without using any container. The 5 kg/m(3) aerogel had a specific modulus of 43 kN m/kg and an anisotropy index of 12, which are impressive properties in relation to earlier experiences. The process can be used for applications where a precise control of density and shape is critical.

  • 10.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Influence of Surface Charge Density and Morphology on the Formation of Polyelectrolyte Multilayers on Smooth Charged Cellulose Surfaces2017In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 968-979Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To clarify the importance of the surface charge for the formation of polyelectrolyte multilayers, layer-by-layer (LbL) assemblies of polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (pDADMAC) and polystyrenesulfonate (PSS) have been investigated on cellulose films with different carboxylic acid contents (20, 350, 870, and 1200 μmol/g) regenerated from oxidized cellulose. The wet cellulose films were thoroughly characterized prior to multilayer deposition using quantitative nanomechanical mapping (QNM), which showed that the mechanical properties were greatly affected by the degree of oxidation of the cellulose. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurements were used to determine the surface potential of the cellulose films by fitting the force data to the DLVO theory. With the exception of the 1200 μmol/g film, the force measurements showed a second-order polynomial increase in surface potential with increasing degree of oxidation. The low surface potential for the 1200 μmol/g film was attributed to the low degree of regeneration of the cellulose film in aqueous media due to increasing solubility with increasing charge. The multilayer formation was characterized using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and stagnation-point adsorption reflectometry (SPAR). Extensive deswelling was observed for the charged films when pDADMAC was adsorbed due to the reduced osmotic pressure when ions inside the film were released, and the 1:1 charge compensation showed that all the charges in the films were reached by the pDADMAC. The multilayer formation was not significantly affected by the charge density above 350 μmol/g due to interlayer repulsions, but it was strongly affected by the salt concentration during the layer build-up.

  • 11.
    Engström, Joakim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    D'Agosto, Franck
    UCBL, CPE Lyon, CPE, C2P2,CNRS, Bat 308F, Villeurbanne, France..
    Lansalot, Muriel
    UCBL, CPE Lyon, CPE, C2P2,CNRS, Bat 308F, Villeurbanne, France..
    Carlmark, Anna
    RISE, Nanocellulose, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Tailored cationic PISA-latexes for strong adhesion to anionic surfaces: Importance of purity and chain-extension as shown by adsorption2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Engström, Joakim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    D'Agosto, Franck
    Université de Lyon, Univ Lyon 1, CPE Lyon, CNRS UMR 5265, C2P2 (Chemistry, Catalysis, Polymers & Processes), LCPP, 69616 Villeurbanne, France .
    Lansalot, Muriel
    Université de Lyon, Univ Lyon 1, CPE Lyon, CNRS UMR 5265, C2P2 (Chemistry, Catalysis, Polymers & Processes), LCPP, 69616 Villeurbanne, France .
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. RISE.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Tailoring adhesion of anionic surfaces using cationic PISA-latexes – towards tough nanocellulose materials in the wet state2019In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 11, p. 4287-4302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cationic latexes with Tgs ranging between −40 °C and 120 °C were synthesised using n-butyl acrylate (BA) and/or methyl methacrylate (MMA) as the core polymers. Reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) combined with polymerisation-induced self-assembly (PISA) allowed for in situ chain-extension of a cationic macromolecular RAFT agent (macroRAFT) of poly(N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl] methacrylamide) (PDMAPMA), used as stabiliser in so-called surfactant-free emulsion polymerisation. The resulting narrowly distributed nanosized latexes adsorbed readily onto silica surfaces and to model surfaces of cellulose nanofibrils, as demonstrated by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) measurements. Adsorption to anionic surfaces increased when increasing ionic strength to 10 mM, indicating the influence of the polyelectrolyte effect exerted by the corona. The polyelectrolyte corona affected the interactions in the wet state, the stability of the latex and re-dispersibility after drying. The QCM-D measurements showed that a lower Tg of the core results in a more strongly interacting adsorbed layer at the solid–liquid interface, despite a comparable adsorbed mass, indicating structural differences of the investigated latexes in the wet state. The two latexes with Tg below room temperature (i.e. PBATg-40 and P(BA-co-MMA)Tg3) exhibited film formation in the wet state, as shown by AFM colloidal probe measurements. It was observed that P(BA-co-MMA)Tg3 latex resulted in the largest pull-off force, above 200 m Nm−1 after 120 s in contact. The strongest wet adhesion was achieved with PDMAPMA-stabilized latexes soft enough to allow for interparticle diffusion of polymer chains, and stiff enough to create a strong adhesive joint. Fundamental understanding of interfacial properties of latexes and cellulose enables controlled and predictive strategies to produce strong and tough materials with high nanocellulose content, both in the wet and dry state.

  • 13.
    Engström, Joakim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Hatton, Fiona
    Loughborough Univ, Dept Mat, Loughborough, Leics, England..
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Freire, Carmen
    Univ Aveiro, Aveiro Inst Mat, Aveiro, Portugal..
    Vilela, Carla
    Univ Aveiro, Aveiro Inst Mat, Aveiro, Portugal..
    Boujemaoui, Assya
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Fibre & Polymer Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Sanchez, Carmen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Lo Re, Giada
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Pulp and Paper Technology. KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Fibre & Polymer Technol, Stockholm, Sweden.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden..
    D'Agosto, Franck
    UCBL, CPE Lyon, C2P2, CNRS,CPE, Bat 308F, Villeurbanne, France..
    Lansalot, Muriel
    UCBL, CPE Lyon, C2P2, CNRS,CPE, Bat 308F, Villeurbanne, France..
    Carlmark, Anna
    RISE, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Tailored PISA-latexes for modification of nanocellulosics: Investigating compatibilizing and plasticizing effects2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Francon, Hugo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    RISE Bioecon, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Larsson, Per A.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, Fibre & Polymer Technol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    3D printable nanocellulose aerogels via a green crosslinking approach and a facile evaporation procedure2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Mittal, Nitesh
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Protein Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Jansson, Ronnie
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Protein Technology.
    Widhe, Mona
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Protein Technology.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Innventia AB, Sweden.
    Håkansson, Karl M. O.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Lundell, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Protein Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hedhammar, My
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Protein Technology.
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Protein Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ultrastrong and Bioactive Nanostructured Bio-Based Composites2017In: ACS Nano, ISSN 1936-0851, E-ISSN 1936-086X, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 5148-5159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nature’s design of functional materials relies on smart combinations of simple components to achieve desired properties. Silk and cellulose are two clever examples from nature–spider silk being tough due to high extensibility, whereas cellulose possesses unparalleled strength and stiffness among natural materials. Unfortunately, silk proteins cannot be obtained in large quantities from spiders, and recombinant production processes are so far rather expensive. We have therefore combined small amounts of functionalized recombinant spider silk proteins with the most abundant structural component on Earth (cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs)) to fabricate isotropic as well as anisotropic hierarchical structures. Our approach for the fabrication of bio-based anisotropic fibers results in previously unreached but highly desirable mechanical performance with a stiffness of ∼55 GPa, strength at break of ∼1015 MPa, and toughness of ∼55 MJ m–3. We also show that addition of small amounts of silk fusion proteins to CNF results in materials with advanced biofunctionalities, which cannot be anticipated for the wood-based CNF alone. These findings suggest that bio-based materials provide abundant opportunities to design composites with high strength and functionalities and bring down our dependence on fossil-based resources.

  • 16.
    Söderberg, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hedhammar, My
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Centre for Bioprocess Technology, CBioPT. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science, Protein Technology.
    Mittal, Nitesh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Jansson, Ronnie
    Spiber AB, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Widhe, Mona
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Protein Science.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Håkansson, Karl
    RISE Bioecon, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lundell, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Bioactive composites of cellulose nanofibrils and recombinant silk proteins2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
1 - 16 of 16
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