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  • 1.
    Berggren, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Banking and Finance. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Yildiz Dag, Sussi
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Banking and Finance. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Eriksson, Kent
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Banking and Finance. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Hermansson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Banking and Finance. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Karolin, Birgitta
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Banking and Finance. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Lundahl, Nicolaus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Banking and Finance. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Nilsson, Daniel
    Silver, Lars
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Banking and Finance. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Tapper Hoel, Jenni
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Banking and Finance. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Vegholm, Fatima
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Banking and Finance. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Affärer mellan kunder och bank- och finansföretag2006In: Utveckling av kundrelationer i bank- och finansmarknader / [ed] Eriksson, Kent, Studentlitteratur , 2006, 1, p. 13-16Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2. Blomstermo, Anders
    et al.
    Eriksson, Kent
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Lindstrand, Angelika
    Sharma, D. Deo
    The perceived usefulness of network experiential knowledge in the internationalizing firm2004In: Journal of International Management, ISSN 1075-4253, E-ISSN 1873-0620, Vol. 10, p. 355-373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Because networks are a growing mode of doing business, internationalizing firms need to understand how they can use experiential knowledge of networks. In the context of organizational learning theory, we discuss in this article the perceived usefulness of network experiential knowledge, its antecedents, and its performance effects in the internationalization process of firms. A LISREL analysis of 256 firms found that more perceived usefulness of network experiential knowledge has a performance enhancing effect. Preceding the perceived usefulness of network experiential knowledge is internationalization experiential knowledge. In-depth study of interaction effects found that firms that have diverse market experiences and that are in a new foreign expansion situation particularly find their network experiential knowledge useful. This implies that the internationalizing firm builds routines from diverse market experiences for the development of networks in the early stages of a specific new international business expansion.

  • 3. Chetty, Sylvie
    et al.
    Eriksson, Kent
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Lindbergh, Jessica
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    The effect of specificity of experience on a firm's perceived importance of institutional knowledge in an ongoing business2006In: Journal of International Business Studies, ISSN 0047-2506, E-ISSN 1478-6990, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 699-712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study how three types of firm experience, ranging from the specific to the general, influence the perceived importance of institutional knowledge in the ongoing business of internationalising firms based on a sample of 101 small-to-medium-sized firms. The three types of firm experiences are international, country and ongoing business. The results show that firm experience within the ongoing business, and the experience from multiple past business deals in various countries, develop institutional knowledge, whereas experience from multiple past business deals in a specific country does not. The theoretical contribution of this paper is that it establishes a link between different kinds of experience and managerial cognition in terms of institutional knowledge. In addition, it emphasises that firms develop institutional knowledge from multiple diverse country experiences, and experience in the specific ongoing business rather than experiences at the level of the country.

  • 4.
    Eriksson, Kent
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Domestic Activity and Knowledge Development in the Internationalization Process of Firms2004In: Journal of International Entrepreneurship, ISSN 1570-7385, E-ISSN 1573-7349, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 239-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on behavioral theory on internationalization, examining the effect of firms operations in the domestic market on experiential knowledge development in the internationalization of the firm. Five hypotheses are developed on the effects of business operations in the domestic market on: internationalization knowledge, business knowledge and institutional knowledge. The LISREL analysis of 206 firms shows that domestic operations effect the accumulation of experiential knowledge in internationalizing firms.We found that it is harder for a firm with long domestic experience to change their mental models and processes in the internationalization process.

  • 5.
    Eriksson, Kent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Fjeldstad, Oystein D.
    Sasson, Amir
    Knowledge of inter-customer relations as a source of value creation and commitment in financial service firm's intermediation2007In: Service Industries Journal, ISSN 0264-2069, E-ISSN 1743-9507, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 563-582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper develops a knowledge perspective on value creation in organisations that employ mediating technology to facilitate inter-customer relations. Mediators, individually and collectively, build networks of customers between whom linking can take place, and they provide services that facilitate inter-customer exchanges. Earlier research has shown the importance of size and standardisation in mediation. A different stream of research has shown that contextual knowledge is important for problem solving and innovation in organisations. Combining theories of mediating technology and situated problem solving, the paper posits that inter-customer relations constitute the fundamental context for value creation of firms using the mediating technology. LISREL is used to test relationship-level, cross-sectional hypotheses that link knowledge of inter-customer relationships, added value, and customer commitment to bank services for small firms. This work extends Thompson's work on mediating technology with implications for organisation action by demonstrating that mediators' knowledge of inter- customer relationships is an important resource in intermediation. Three contributions are made to strategic management and organisation theory. First, the paper provides a deeper understanding of the relationship between knowledge and committed customers. Second, fundamental resources are developed for firms using mediating technology. Finally, the use of the situated knowledge concept is extended to inter-customer relations, thus explaining performance beyond the contexts to which the concept has previously been applied. The findings have implications for segmentation practices, organisation domain decisions and the corresponding organisational

  • 6.
    Eriksson, Kent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Fjeldstad, T.
    Jonsson, Sara
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Transaction services and SME internationalization: The effect of home and host country bank relationships on international investment and growth2017In: International Business Review, ISSN 0969-5931, E-ISSN 1873-6149, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 130-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building on the argument put forward by North and Wallis (1994) that the transaction sector enables economic growth by lowering the costs of transacting, we investigate how internationalizing firms' host and home country bank relationships affect their international specific investments and growth. Banks provide payment, liquidity, and risk management services, which are essential to international business relationships, yet little is known about how banks affect international business relationships. In a sample of 255 small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), we find that host and home country bank relationships affect the dependent variables differently. We contribute to the literature by explicating the role and effects of banks in international business relationships. Our findings have implications for understanding transaction services in international business as well as the choices made by their customers.

  • 7.
    Eriksson, Kent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin. Global Projects Center, School of Engineering, Stanford University, United States .
    Hermansson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin. Swedbank, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Bank customers’ subjective views on their bank relations and how these relations affect their saving behaviorManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Eriksson, Kent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin. Global Projects Center, School of Engineering, Stanford University, United States .
    Hermansson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin. Swedbank, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Do consumers’ relational attributes surface in transaction exchange in financial services?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Eriksson, Kent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Hermansson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    How relationship attributes affect bank customers' saving2019In: International Journal of Bank Marketing, ISSN 0265-2323, E-ISSN 1758-5937, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 156-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to determine how three relational attributes – duration, context and trust – are subjectively perceived by bank customers, and how these affect their saving behavior, as defined by monthly flows to mutual funds and the financial products bought and held in stock. Design/methodology/approach: The authors use a combination of unique bank register and subjective survey data, and a structural equation model for theory development. Four constructs are developed to estimate the structural model, i.e. saving behavior, duration, context and trust. Findings: The authors find that all three relational attributes have positive effects on saving behavior. The authors also find that duration and context have the largest total effects, and that trust is a mediating variable channeling indirect effects from context and duration to saving behavior. Practical implications: One implication for bank managers is that it takes time and understanding of customer context to gain customer trust, but that this increases customer savings. Another implication is that the authors confirm that relational attributes can be studied using subjective measures in surveys, and that these have an effect on objective savings behavior. The findings provide an understanding that could develop both the customer’s value and the banks’ business opportunities. Originality/value: The impact of relationships between bank advisors and their customers in terms of costs and benefits has been studied, but a little research has focused on the attributes of the relationship and how these affect customers’ saving behavior. The study also uses unique objective bank register data, combined with customers’ subjective perceptions of the relationship.

  • 10.
    Eriksson, Kent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin. Global Projects Center, School of Engineering, Stanford University, United States .
    Hermansson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin. Swedbank, Stockholm, Sweden .
    Searching for new saving behavior theories: How relationships between banks' customers and advisors affect household saving2014In: International Journal of Bank Marketing, ISSN 0265-2323, E-ISSN 1758-5937, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 279-299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop a model of bank advisor/customer relationships and customer saving behavior. Design/methodology/approach: The research is a theoretical review and model development of savings behavior and bank advisor/customer relationships. The review is used for the development of a model of bank advisor/customer relationships, and their effect on savings behavior. Findings: Findings are a model that distinguishes three kinds of exchange (relational, interimistic, and transaction) in between bank advisor and customer. The three kinds of exchange then influence customer savings behavior. Research limitations/implications: The implications of this research is that it points to that relationship marketing theory can be used in the analysis of how bank advisors influence customer savings behavior. Practical implications: For regulators and financial services firms, these findings point to how the role of bank advisors for consumer savings behavior can be analyzed. This is important, as much policy work presumes that advisors influence customer savings behavior, but the knowledge base for that presumption needs to be better understood. Social implications: The paper contributes toward a better understanding of the social exchange between bank employees and customers as regards savings products. Originality/value: This paper is original because it includes many theoretical research fields, and because it connects the bank advisor and customer relationship with the customer's savings behavior.

  • 11.
    Eriksson, Kent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Hermansson, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Är kunder som sparar i bank relations-eller transaktionsbenägna?2006In: Utveckling av kundrelationer inom bank- och finansmarknader / [ed] Kent Eriksson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2006Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Eriksson, Kent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Hohenthal, Jukka
    Uppsala university.
    Jessica, Jessica
    Uppsala university.
    Cultural diversity and culture specific experiences effect on development of institutional experiential knowledge in SMEs2004In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ISSN 1476-1297, E-ISSN 1741-8054, Vol. 1, no 1/2, p. 100-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Institutional experiential knowledge results from experience of cultural diversity and culture specific experiences. It is studied empirically through a field-scenario questionnaire of ongoing business relationships. Cultural diversity has a negative effect on a firm's institutional experiential knowledge, whereas culture specific experience has a positive effect. These two experiences contribute very differently to the development of institutional experiential knowledge and the interaction effect should enable one to differentiate kinds of experience, and thus gain greater insight into scale and scope economies.

  • 13.
    Eriksson, Kent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Hohenthal, Jukka
    Uppsala Universitet, Företagsekonomiska institutionen.
    Lindbergh, Jessica
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Banking and Finance.
    Factors Affecting SME Export Channel Choice in Foreign Markets2006In: Advances in International Marketing, ISSN 1474-7979, Vol. 16, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Determining market channels is usually considered a discrete decision made by the expanding firm (e.g., Anderson & Coughlan, 1987; Bello & Gilliland, 1997; Solberg & Nes, 2002). In reality, this decision is often limited by knowledge constraints and customer demands. We find an example of this in Gamma's attempt at entering the Italian market (Hohenthal, 2001). {A textbox is presented}. Gamma's attempted entry into Italy is not a unique situation facing internationalizing small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The array of possible channels is usually rather limited. A firm's decision regarding what channel to use may be the result of the firm's knowledge or indeed lack of knowledge about a specific customer and the foreign market in general, such as competitors or cultural differences. The internationalization process (IP) model is a theoretical framework that recognizes how a firm's knowledge of a foreign market and the influence business relationships may have on the choice of market channel (Johanson & Vahlne, 1977, 1990, 2003). This framework postulates that firms with increased experience will increase their commitment in a market. Because firms wish to avoid uncertainty and initially lack foreign market knowledge, the IP model claims that firms expand their operations in small sequential steps, starting with no regular export activities and gradually increasing their commitment to the market and finally setting up a manufacturing subsidiary (Johanson & Vahlne, 1977; Johanson & Wiedersheim-Paul, 1975). This outcome of sequential steps, also known as the establishment chain (Johanson & Wiedersheim-Paul, 1975), has been heavily criticized because empirical research has shown that the establishment patterns of firms are less restricted than proposed by the model (Björkman, 1989; Hedlund & Kverneland, 1985; Turnbull, 1987; Welch & Loustarinen, 1988). Even though firms use a variety of establishment patterns when internationalizing, a growing body of research shows that firms gradually develop knowledge from their experiences (Barkema, Bell, & Pennings, 1996; Barkema, Shenkar, Vermeulen, & Bell, 1997; Barkema & Vermeulen, 1998; Delios & Beamish, 1999, 2001; Eriksson, Johanson, Majkgård, & Sharma, 1997; Hitt, Dacin, Tyler, & Park, 1997; Madhok, 1996; Zahra, Ireland, & Hitt, 2000). Thus, the model's fundamental argument that knowledge is developed through experience is generally supported in internationalization research. Based on the critique of the establishment chain proposition, reconsidering the explanatory power of the IP model may be warranted. For example, it may be more appropriate to use the IP model to explain the sequential buildup of knowledge rather than discrete choices of mode of establishment. The accumulation of experience occurs before, during, and after the exact time when a decision to establish in a certain mode is made. Despite the extensive acceptance of behavioral-oriented arguments in foreign-entry mode research (export, joint venture, and subsidiary modes), surprisingly few studies have been conducted on the determinants of integrated and non-integrated channels (see Aulakh & Kotabe, 1997, for notable exception). Thus, a behavioral-oriented approach to the study of firms' choices of market channels in foreign markets may prove enlightening. Adopting this approach is of particular interest because transaction-cost analysis has proved effective in explaining why firms choose either integrated or non-integrated channels (Hennart, 1991). Therefore, the question that needs to be answered is whether or not the IP model can be used to explain why firms choose integrated or non-integrated channels. If the IP model cannot be applied in this case, it should be clarified that this model can be used to explain sequential knowledge accumulation through experience but nothing else. The purpose of this study is to test which IP-related antecedents lead to the use of a specific channel in a foreign market. The two alternatives tested here are integrated and non-integrated channels. To accomplish this objective, we apply an IP approach to international business and then discuss channel choice from a knowledge perspective. Several hypotheses are developed concerning channel choice and tested on a sample of SMEs from Sweden, Denmark, and New Zealand. We use logistic regression to analyze our data. Based on this analysis, we present a discussion of our results and some managerial and research implications.

  • 14.
    Eriksson, Kent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Hohenthal, Jukka
    Uppsala universitet.
    Lindbergh, Jessica
    SME export channel choice in international markets2006In: Advances in International Marketing, ISSN 1571-2990, no 16, p. 1-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Internationalization Process (IP) model claims that firms gradually accumulate knowledge of foreign markets, and that this kind of knowledge determine foreign establishment. Later developments of the model claim that experiences and knowledge of local business relationships are also essential elements of the IP model. The IP model has been found to hold well for incremental resource commitments.

    However, while other theories, such as the transaction-cost theories have managed to explain why firms go from integrated to non-integrated channels, the IP model has produced mixed results. This paper tests some of the fundamental IP model factors on a sample of Small and Medium Sized firms. Findings are that factors included in the initial explanation of the IP model explain choice of channel, but that the later developments of the model does not. Implications are that the foreign market knowledge is, and that more incremental experiential knowledge accumulation is not relevant for export channel choice as regards integrated or non-integrated channel.

  • 15.
    Eriksson, Kent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Johanson, J.
    Majkgård, A.
    Sharma, D. D.
    Experiential knowledge and cost in the internationalization process2015In: Knowledge, Networks and Power, The Uppsala School of International Business , 2015, p. 41-63Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Eriksson, Kent
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Johanson, Jan
    Uppsala universitet.
    Majkgård, Anders
    Uppsala universitet.
    Sharma, D. Deo
    Uppsala universitet.
    EXPERIENTIAL KNOWLEDGE AND COST IN THE INTERNATIONALIZATION PROCESS1997In: Journal of International Business Studies, ISSN 0047-2506, E-ISSN 1478-6990, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 337-360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a behavioral approach, this study identifies and delineates components of experiential knowledge in the internationalization process. Three hypotheses are developed and tested. They center around the lack of knowledge in the areas of foreign business, foreign institutions and firm internationalization, as well as the effect that this lack of knowledge has on the managers´ perceived cost in the internationalization process. With the help of a LISREL-based structural model, the three hypotheses are tested on a sample of 362 service firms. The analysis shows that lack of internationalization knowledge has a strong impact on the lack of both business and institutional knowledge which, in turn, influence the perceived cost in internationalization. But there is no direct effect of lack of internationalization knowledge on perceived cost in internationalization.

  • 17.
    Eriksson, Kent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin. Stanford University, USA.
    Jonsson, Sara
    Lindbergh, Jessica
    Lindstrand, Angelika
    Modeling firm specific internationalization risk: An application to banks' risk assessment in lending to firms that do international business2014In: International Business Review, ISSN 0969-5931, E-ISSN 1873-6149, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 1074-1085Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on internationalization process theory, we develop a new model for firm-specific internationalization risk assessment. The model shows that firm-specific internationalization risks can be determined from a firm's experiences and from current business activities in a firm's network. Experiential risks are categorized as international, country market, network, or relationship experience risks. Risk assessment in current network activities can be determined from a firm's dependency on a network and from the network's performance and evolution. We apply our model to credit risk assessment by banks and other credit institutions. This article adds to research on financial institutions' credit risk assessment by focusing on firm-specific internationalization risk assessment, an area that has previously received little attention in the literature. In addition, this article provides a better understanding of risk assessment in the internationalization process, shedding light not only on the risks involved in firms' commitment to internationalization but also on the risks that banks and other institutions take when they commit by lending to internationalizing firms.

  • 18.
    Eriksson, Kent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Kerem, Katri
    Nilsson, Daniel
    Customer acceptance of internet banking in Estonia2005In: International Journal of Bank Marketing, ISSN 0265-2323, E-ISSN 1758-5937, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 200-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to study technology acceptance of internet banking inEstonia, an emerging east European economy.

    Design/methodology/approach – The present paper modifies the technology acceptance modeland applies it to bank customers in Estonia, because Estonia, a country with a developing economy, has focused on internet banking as an important distribution channel.

    Findings – The findings suggest that internet bank use increases insofar as customers perceive it as useful. The perceived usefulness is central because it determines whether the perceived ease of internetbank use will lead to increased use of the internet bank. Put differently, a well-designed and easy to use internet bank may not be used if it is not perceived as useful. We thus conclude that the perceived usefulness of internet banking is, for banks, a key construct for promoting customer use. We also suggest that models of technology acceptance should be re-formulated to focus more on the key role of the perceived usefulness of the service embedded in the technology.

    Research limitations/implications – Implications for banks are that they need to put much effort not only into making a user-friendly internet bank, but also into explaining to their customers how the internet bank is useful to them.

    Originality/value – Contributes to the literature on internet banking in an East European economy.

  • 19.
    Eriksson, Kent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Kerem, Katri
    Nilsson, Daniel
    The adoption of commercial innovations in the former Central and Eastern European markets: the case of Internet banking in Estonia2008In: International Journal of Bank Marketing, ISSN 0265-2323, E-ISSN 1758-5937, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 154-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Businesses developed in Western markets may be so new to emerging and developing markets that they can be considered innovations. Knowledge of innovation adoption is therefore essential for western firms that expand into these markets.

    Methodology The data presented in this study are based on 1,831 questionnaires collected from individual Internet banking users in Estonia.

    Findings – This study extends the applicability of the innovation adoption model developed by Everett Rogers to Estonian Internet banking. Estonia is one of the fastest-growing Central and Eastern European (CEE) economies. Internet use is more advanced in Estonia than in many Western countries. Because Western banking is steeped in tradition, it is essential to study adoption of innovations by Estonian banks, which, in many respects, have leapfrogged the development path that Western banks experienced.

    Practical implications – The managerial implications of this paper include its contributions toward better understanding of the commercial viability in CEE economies of businesses based on Western-style technology. 

  • 20. Eriksson, Kent
    et al.
    Mattsson, J.
    Managers' perception of relationship management in heterogeneous markets2002In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 535-543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Relationship management holds many promises of becoming a new paradigm in marketing and management. However, the development of relationship marketing is still difficult to accomplish in heterogeneous markets, since different management practices are needed in markets ranging from homogenous segments of customers with the same preferences to customers with individual demands for customized services. This paper investigates managers' perceptions of relationship development in heterogeneous markets. Results from a survey of 135 branch bank managers show that they perceive that the more heterogeneous the market, the more difficult to achieve relationship development. The study also finds that more difficult relationship development leads branch managers to perceive a more centralized locus of realized strategy. This suggests that firm relationship development needs to focus more on customer orientation and that realized strategies need to be at a local level to support this.

  • 21.
    Eriksson, Kent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Nilsson, Daniel
    Determinants of the continued use of self-service technology: The case of Internet banking2007In: Technovation, ISSN 0166-4972, E-ISSN 1879-2383, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 159-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on buyers' continued use of self-service technology (SST). This area is often neglected because most studies focus on buyers' adoption or acceptance of SST. In comparison to new buyer acquisition, continued use is a cost-effective market strategy aimed at retaining buyers. Based on a sample of 1831 Estonian Internet banking customers, we find that continued use of SST is positively affected by buyers' perceived usefulness. We also find that continued use of SST is negatively affected by multichannel satisfaction. As our results show, two important issues are facing developers of SSTs and sellers using SSTs: First, continued use of SST is achieved when the buyer finds the SST useful. Second, SSTs need to be considered in the context of all channels in the buyer-seller interface because the buyer does not separate the service offering of an SST from other channels. The benefits associated with using SSTs will increase if these strategic issues are taken into account.

  • 22. Eriksson, Kent
    et al.
    Sharma, D. D.
    Modeling uncertainty in buyer-seller cooperation2003In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 56, no 12, p. 961-970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The realization of relationship marketing requires cooperative exchange between buyers and sellers. A key determinant of cooperative exchange is the uncertainty perceived by the cooperating parties. This study investigates how cooperation is affected by decision makers' perception of uncertainties in the environmental context, in relationships, and in decision-making routines. A sample of 135 branch managers from banks is used in a LISREL model. The results show that uncertainty regarding relationships and decision making has strong direct effects on buyer-seller cooperation. Relationship and decision making, in turn, are affected by contextual uncertainty. The results highlight the importance of internal resources in firms in facilitating cooperation between buyers and sellers.

  • 23.
    Eriksson, Kent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Sharma, D. Deo
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Buyer loyalty development through seller education of service buyers2007In: Journal of Euromarketing, ISSN 1049-6483, E-ISSN 1528-6967, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 17-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper develops a model where service buyer loyalty can be achieved by seller education of the service buyer. Buyer education implies both offering services and development of the service buyer's capability to use the service. Service buyer education is facilitated by seller competence on the service offering and the buyer's context. The reason for this is that the more embedded the service seller is in the buyer's context, the better able are they to educate the service buyer. Antecedent to seller competence, at any given point of time, or level of relationship development, is the service buyer's current understanding of seller resources. The model is tested and confirmed on 255 small firms. The model identifies that education can align the service offering, buyer resources, and seller resources in buyer - seller relationships.

  • 24.
    Eriksson, Kent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Söderberg, Inga-Lill
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Customers ’ ways of making sense of a financial service relationship through intersubjective mirroring of others2010In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 99-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of relationships between buyer and sellers in marketingresearch is well established. This study contributes to relationship marketing (RM)research as it examines the microfoundations of fi nancial service buyer and sellerrelationships. The study uses intersubjective theory and a qualitative method with thepurpose of conceptualising the qualitatively different ways customers experience faceto-face interactions with a service provider. An empirical study is conducted to determine,based on the customer ’ s own words, what is experienced in the interaction between thecustomer and the provider. Findings from the empirical material show that not all personalinteractions between customers and a service provider, in this case a bank, can belabelled as relationships. Instead, what customers do perceive as a relationship is anencounter where the interaction entails symmetry in the way the customer and the providermirror each other. When customers receive a treatment in opposition to an expectationof intersubjectivity, they will not refer to the situation as a relationship and, subsequently,according to the underlying assumptions of RM, do not willingly engage in further businesswith the provider.

  • 25.
    Eriksson, Kent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Söderberg, Inga-Lill
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Finanssektorns roll i samhällsbyggandet2009Report (Other academic)
  • 26. Eriksson, Kent
    et al.
    Vaghult, A. L.
    Customer retention, purchasing behavior and relationship substance in professional services2000In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 363-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Customer retention is central to the development of business relationships. However, customer retention is specific to the context of each firm, and this is rarely recognized in models for customer retention. This paper studies how customer retention depends on the relationship substance may be of a more or less embedded kind, which is explored here in the form of relationship satisfaction and organizational change in the buying firm. The conceptual model is tested on a sample of business relationships in professional services. The results support the fundamental effect that relationship satisfaction improves customer retention. The article also finds that the purchase development of customers increases customer retention, in particular if the customer who purchases more is also satisfied. However,when the selling firm has achieved change in the customer firm, customer retention is reduced. Evidently, these customers consider that they are done with the seller and move the other seller, or reduce their purchases altogether. This can be mitigated if the seller uncovers new areas for business, or involves value adding partners.

  • 27.
    Eriksson, Kent
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Banking and Finance. Abo Akad Univ, Lab Ind Management, Fac Sci & Engn, Turku, Finland..
    Wikström, Kim
    Hellström, Magnus
    Levitt, Raymond E.
    Projects in the Business Ecosystem: The Case of Short Sea Shipping and Logistics2019In: Project Management Journal, ISSN 8756-9728, E-ISSN 1938-9507, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 195-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article develops a conceptual framework to analyze the governance of projects within a business ecosystem. The framework is applied to the case of a vessel delivery project in the short sea shipping business ecosystem, which is a cargo and logistics infrastructure service at sea. We develop a model that identifies contentious lock-ins among the workflows, and show how they can be resolved by governance that can increase performance of the sea logistics infrastructure. The model shows the interdependence of the short sea shipping business ecosystem and the vessel project, and it shows how performance is enhanced by their integration.

  • 28. Holm, D. B.
    et al.
    Eriksson, Kent
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Johanson, J.
    Business networks and cooperation in international business relationships2015In: Knowledge, Networks and Power: The Uppsala School of International Business, Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, p. 133-152Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Jonsson, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Eriksson, Kent
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    The effects of banks, as institutional actors, on investments in international business relationships and relationship performanceIn: Journal of International Business Studies, ISSN 0047-2506, E-ISSN 1478-6990Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30. Lindstrand, Angelika
    et al.
    Eriksson, Kent
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Sharma, D. Deo
    The perceived usefulness of knowledge supplied by foreign client networks2009In: International Business Review, ISSN 0969-5931, E-ISSN 1873-6149, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 26-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The network surrounding a firm’s foreign clients has large influence on its ability to act in the market. How firms can utilize the knowledge supplied by client networks is therefore of great importance to their business with clients. Many studies show the usefulness of foreign clients and suppliers, whereas less attention has been given to the usefulness of knowledge supplied by clients’ network, such as clients’ clients, clients’ supplementary suppliers and competitors to the firm. This study contributes to international business research on networks by investigating the knowledge supplied by client networks for a firm doing business with a specific foreign client on a sample of 494 firms. A LISREL analysis demonstrates that knowledge supplied by client networks is more useful the more experienced the firm. Client networks are also more useful the more knowledge the firm has of its client, the more the firm needs knowledge of its clients and suppliers, the higher the cost of the client relationship, and the more standardized the product. A major conclusion is that the client network knowledge is more useful the further a firm’s collaboration with the client, presumably as a result of the new, and more embedded business that the firm develops with the client. Implications are that client networks are resources that can be important competitive advantages for the internationalizing firm.

  • 31.
    Lindstrand, Angelika
    et al.
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Sharma, D. Deo
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Eriksson, Kent
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    The perceived usefulness of SMEs previous customer networks in the internationalisation process of firms2012In: International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, ISSN 1476-1297, E-ISSN 1741-8054, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 285-307Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Business networks have been found useful for theinternationalisation process of small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs).This paper presents the next step in research on internationalising SMEs andnetworks, as it investigates the unstudied perceived usefulness of the SME’sprevious foreign customer networks. The paper uses international knowledgedevelopment theory to better understand how firms find previous customernetworks useful in internationalisation. A linear regression analysis of aninternational sample of 494 firms demonstrates that the perceived usefulness ofan SME’s previous foreign customer’s network is increased by the firm’sexperience in diverse national markets, the need for more knowledge about itscustomers and suppliers, and the commitment to a national market. Utilisationof customer networks is thus an important strategic asset that the internationalfirm develops from varied experiences, customer- and supplier-specificexperiences, and national market commitment.

  • 32.
    South, Andrew
    et al.
    Stanford Univ, Civil & Environm Engn, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Eriksson, Kent
    KTH. Abo Akad Univ, Turku, Finland..
    Levitt, Raymond
    Stanford Univ, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    How Infrastructure Public-Private Partnership Projects Change Over Project Development Phases2018In: Project Management Journal, ISSN 8756-9728, E-ISSN 1938-9507, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 62-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research adds to work on the development of infrastructure public-private partnership projects (P3s), which is a rapidly growing mode of infrastructure service delivery. Infrastructure P3 projects typically have a long life cycle, but little is understood about the nature of the changes that such a project goes through over the phases of its life cycle. This article contributes to project research as it studies the changes that an infrastructure P3 project goes through over its life cycle and suggests how those changes can be governed over the life cycle of the project. The research is empirically informed from an in-depth case study of a highway transportation P3 in California over a 20-year period. This research shows that the developmental phases of P3s differ by dramatic changes in the composition of stakeholder networks and the use of institutional logic. First, employing social network analysis (SNA), we map the network of stakeholders in the P3 case and show how the stakeholder network changes over four phases. Second, we identify how different stakeholders use formal and informal institutional logic in their interactions, and demonstrate that the dominant institutional logic employed in the P3 changes from informal to formal over the P3's life cycle. We further show how this change in the P3's dominant institutional logic corresponds to the dynamism in the stakeholder network. We propose that infrastructure P3s should be analyzed and governed as the dynamic arrangements they areconstellations of stakeholders that change individually and undergo change collectively over a long life cycle of different phases.

  • 33.
    Söderberg, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Sallis, James E.
    Uppsala University.
    Eriksson, Kent
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    The dark side of trust and the light side of working alliances in financial services2014In: International Journal of Bank Marketing, ISSN 0265-2323, E-ISSN 1758-5937, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 245-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to use psychological theory to improve our understanding of financial advice-taking. The paper studies how a working alliance between financial service customers and advisors affects the advisor's assessment of the financial service buyer's perceived risk preferences, and what role trust plays as a mediating variable. Design/methodology/approach: The paper obtained data by means of a questionnaire that was answered by 375 matched pairs of bank advisors and customers. Findings: This paper explains how the working alliance method - a concept from psychotherapeutic theory - between financial service customers and advisors affects the advisor's understanding of the financial service buyer's perceived risk preferences. The paper also finds that the role of trust is perceived differently by the advisor and the customer. Advisors see that as their clients learn to trust them they lose touch with the customer's perceived risk preferences, whereas customers do not perceive that their trust in the advisor has any relationship to their risk preferences. Practical implications: This results suggest that advisors lose touch with the risk preferences of trusting customers, and that psychological methods are needed if the advisor should actually understand customer perceived risk preferences. Originality/value: The paper advances psychological methods in marketing, and provides a partial answer to the difficulties of financial advice giving.

  • 34.
    Vegholm, Fatima
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Silver, Lars
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Eriksson, Kent
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Banking and Finance, Cefin.
    Market incongruences in bank-SME relationships: A case study of two international entrepreneurs and their bankIn: International Journal of Bank Marketing, ISSN 0265-2323, E-ISSN 1758-5937Article in journal (Other academic)
1 - 34 of 34
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