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  • 1. Bai, Wei
    et al.
    Yin, Ying
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    LEARNING FROM TWO SWEDISH EXAMPLES OF SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENTIn: City Planning Review, ISSN 1002-1329Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Cai, Zhichang
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    Yin, Ying
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Wennersten, Ronald
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Ecology.
    From Energy Efficiency to Integrated Sustainability in Housing Development in China: A Case study in a hot-summer / cold-winter zone in China2013In: Journal of Housing and the Built Environment, ISSN 1566-4910, E-ISSN 1573-7772, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 329-344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    China has introduced a series of policies and laws to promote green building since 2000. Energy efficiency is the central issue, partly due to China’s energy structure. As advocated by these policies and laws, more and more green buildings are being built. The overall aim of this paper is to explore a more sustainable framework for green residential buildings, from energy efficiency to integrated sustainability. A critical case study is presented of the Landsea Housing Project in Nanjing, a hot-summer/cold-winter zone. The analysis suggests applying a systematic approach—covering all aspects of green housing development, including technical, economic, social and environmental—in China, arguing that this is a more effective way to meet the sustainability goals.

  • 3.
    Rader Olsson, Amy
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Yin, Ying
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Håkansson, Maria
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    The role of local governance and environmental policy integration in Swedish and Chinese eco-city development2015In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines institutional conditions for local governance and environmental integration. Four eco-city cases in Sweden and China are analyzed. The theoretical framework is based on theories of Environmental Policy Integration (EPI) and sustainable urban planning. Three categories of institutional conditions guide the analysis: Political will and commitment, Understanding, knowledge and experience, and Inter-organizational coordination. Despite strong local political will and commitment, considerable obstacles to environmental integration still exist, including political instability, lack of understanding, knowledge and experience, and insufficient cross-sector coordination. The current administrative organization based on sector-specific responsibility appears to impede cross-sector coordination for integrating environmental concerns in urban development. The establishment of temporary local administrative organizations may be an effective solution to break cross-sector barriers and generate integrated solutions to realize environmental objectives.

  • 4.
    Yin, Ying
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Environmental integration in China’s eco-city development—from an institutional perspective2015In: Legal Aspects of Sustainable Development: Horizontal and Sectorial Policy Issues, Springer, 2015, p. 471-495Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last decade, Eco-City development has been emerging as test beds in China, not only for environmental technologies but also for a new integrated approach of urban planning to achieve better environmental performance in the urban areas development. The study aims to build knowledge, from legal aspects, on how environmental integration in sustainable urban planning is achieved or hindered in China’s eco-city practice. The lessons are as well supposed to give some implications for sustainable urban development in future. The study is based on an overview of China’s national institutional condition for sustainable urban development and a case study of two examples of Tangshan Bay Eco-city and the Sino-Swedish Low-Carbon Eco-City in China. Methods of literature review, document studies, study visits and interviews were applied for gathering relevant knowledge and collecting empirical data on the cases. To conclude, in spite of some progress, the absence of a holistic perspective and effective guidance and constraints in China’s environmental and planning formal rules at different levels appeared as an institutional weakness, hindering environmental integration in urban planning process. Whether or not environmental requirements and their status was clearly stated in the formal rules, such as regulatory detailed plans and land use agreements, also considerably affected the enforcement of environmental integration in urban planning process. In addition, the results indicate an important role of powerful actors, such as local leaders and governments, in issuing an improved legitimacy of high environmental requirements in sustainable urban development through changing formal institutional conditions.

  • 5.
    Yin, Ying
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Environmental Integration in Sustainable Urban Planning from an Institutional Perspective: A Study of Swedish and Chinese Eco-City Development2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The continuously rising attention to and practice of eco-city development in Sweden and China, as well as the countries’ active cooperation has motivated this study and the exploration of eco-city development in these two countries. In eco-city development, diverse environmental issues may well be beyond the planning sector’s capacity and need to be resolved elsewhere by other authorities and agencies in such areas as energy, water and traffic. This may in practice require the reframing of certain institutions to ensure that relevant sector authorities, scientific institutions and actors have responsibilities for integrative tasks and can cooperate effectively.

    The study aims to investigate how institutional conditions affect environmental integration in urban planning. The approach used is the exploration of how different institutional conditions promote and/or hinder environmental integration by the examination of four examples of eco-city development in Sweden and China. Based on theories of institutions, Environmental Policy Integration (EPI) and sustainable urban planning, an analytical framework is used to describe institutional conditions related to formal rulemaking, informal rules and administrative management and organizations.

    Formal rules provide framework and legitimacy for guiding and enforcing actors in the practice of realizing environmental integration in urban planning. Meanwhile, informal rules; i.e. wills, interests, understanding and knowledge, could considerably affect the design of formal rules and how they are to be implemented. Administrative management and organization serve to realize environmental integration following the formal rules, but the informal institutional conditions of e.g. officials’ interests, understanding, knowledge and experience, as well as political support, affect the organizations’ performance and abilities for implementation, which in turn also largely depends on the specific organizational settings. All three need to be combined to achieve environmental integration in sustainable urban planning, since each one has its own strengths and weaknesses and they gradually affect each other in practices.

    Download full text (pdf)
    Thesis
  • 6.
    Yin, Ying
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Feng, Xiaoxing
    A Comparative study with Swedish and China’s Eco-cities: From planning to implementation, taking the Hammarby Sjöstad, Sweden, and Wuxi Sino-Swedish Eco-City, China, as cases2012In: Natural Resources And Sustainable Development II, Pts 1-4, Trans Tech Publications Inc., 2012, Vol. 524-527, p. 2741-2750Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper targets to improve understanding and explain influential factors of different planning and implementing process of two eco-cities, Hammarby Sjöstad, Sweden, and Sino-Swedish Low-carbon Eco-city, China. The study is approached by examining and comparing the two eco-cities in perspectives of plans formulation, policy and regulations foundation, planning management and implementing mechanisms. Lessons from Hammarby Sjöstad are that integrative planning and management, follow-up and evaluations of implementing results, and lifestyle transitions all need to be concerned, as well as environmental technologies. In Sino-Swedish lowcarbon eco-city, lack of local technologies, supporting policies and regulations, inactive cross-sector cooperation and public participation are summarized as main obstacles. To approach these, efforts are made on formulating local regulations, government documents, and coordinating cross-sector cooperation, promoting mutual learning. Finally, concluding that, besides environmental technologies, the foundation of legislations, policies and environmental objectives, integrative approaches, public awareness are key areas need to be promoted for popularizing sustainability in China.

  • 7.
    Yin, Ying
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Håkansson, MariaKTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.Cars, GöranKTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Environmental governance in Swedish planning practice: Participation and Accountability2012Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Zhou, Guanghong
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Liu, Hongling
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Yin, Ying
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Frostell, Björn
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Industrial Ecology.
    Towards low-carbon cities in China: integrating greenhouse gas management in urban planning2014In: Resilience – The New Research Frontier, Trondheim: Norwegian University of Science and Technology , 2014, p. 150-164Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low-carbon development has been proposed as one of the key national environmental strategies by the central government of China. There are hundreds of Chinese cities that have set low-carbon goals and there are many types of plan within the urban planning system. However, these plans face great challenges. For example, the current urban planning approach focuses on spatial arrangements while it has difficulties in recognising the complexity of GHG metabolism. As another example, urban planning lacks stakeholder involvement and cooperation which contributes to the failure to monitor GHG emissions. This study compares the situation in China with that experienced in Stockholm, Sweden and proposes an approach to improve low-carbon planning. This approach involves integrating GHG accounting into urban planning based on Industrial Ecology knowledge. Using lessons learnt from the Eco-Cycle Model 2.0 in Stockholm, the study highlights the intimate relationship between energy consumption and GHG emissions in Chinese cities, which requires integrating energy systems thinking and GHG thinking into the urban planning process. A life cycle perspective is needed in urban planning to integrate parallel energy consumption and GHG emissions budgeting in different urban sectors. Furthermore, a GHG metabolic approach may become a broad platform for communicating low-carbon development among different stakeholders in a city.

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