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  • 1.
    Bergholtz, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Jayaweera, Prasad
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Johannesson, Paul
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Wohed, Petia
    A pattern and dependency based approach to the design of process models2004In: CONCEPTUAL MODELING: ER 2004, PROCEEDINGS, BERLIN: SPRINGER , 2004, Vol. 3288, p. 724-739Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper an approach for building process models for e-commerce is proposed. It is based on the assumption that the process modeling task can be methodologically supported by a designers assistant. Such a foundation provides justifications, expressible in business terms, for design decisions made in process modeling, thereby facilitating communication between systems designers and business users. Two techniques are utilized in the designers assistant, namely process patterns and action dependencies. A process pattern is a generic template for a set of interrelated activities between two agents, while an action dependency expresses a sequential relationship between two activities.

  • 2.
    Bergholtz, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Jayaweera, Prasad M.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Johannesson, Paul
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Wohed, Petia
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Modelling institutional, communicative and physical domains in agent oriented information systems2004In: Lect Notes Artif Intell, 2004, p. 189-205Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One role of a business system is to provide a representation of a Universe of Discourse, which reflects its structure and behaviour. An equally important function of the system is to support communication within an organisation, by structuring and co-ordinating the actions performed by the organisation's agents. These two roles of a business system may be represented in terms of business and process models, i.e. separating the declarative aspects from the procedural control flow aspects of the system. Although this separation of concerns has many advantages, the differences in representation techniques and focus of the two model types constitute a problem in itself. Abstracting business semantics out of, for instance, technical messaging protocols poses severe problems for business analysts. The main contribution of this paper is a unified framework based on agent oriented concepts for facilitating analysis and integration of business models and process models in a systematic way. The approach suggested bridges the gap between the declarative and social/ economic aspects of a business model and the procedural and communicative aspects of a process model in a technology independent manner. We illustrate how our approach can simplify business and process models integration, process specification, process pattern interpretation and process choreography.

  • 3.
    Johannesson, Paul
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Andersson, Birger
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Wohed, Petia
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Business Process Management with Social Software Systems: A New Paradigm for Work Organisation2009In: BUSINESS PROCESS MANAGEMENT WORKSHOPS / [ed] Ardagna D; Mecella M; Yang J, 2009, Vol. 17, p. 659-665Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Business process management systems are systems aimed to support the management of business processes in organizations. In recent years social software has emerged as all alternative approach for production and work management. In this paper, we contrast the two, identify and analyse similarities and differences, and propose a set of guidelines Suggesting how they can be used ill complementary ways to support work in organizations.

  • 4. Ouyang, C.
    et al.
    Dumas, M.
    Wohed, Petia
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    The business process execution language2010In: Modern Business Process Automation: YAWL and its Support Environment / [ed] Arthur H. M. Hofstede, Wil M. P. Aalst, Michael Adams, Nick Russell, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2010, p. 385-400Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of commercial tools for workflow and business process management that have emerged over the past two decades is considerable. In the past, lack of standardization led to a situation where each of these tools implemented a different language. As shown by the tool evaluations undertaken using the workflow patterns, many of these languages suffered from clear limitations in terms of their expressiveness and suitability to capture nontrivial business processes. By now, industry consolidation has rendered most of these languages obsolete. In parallel, standardization efforts initiated by tool vendors have led to the definition of two standard languages for capturing business processes, namely the Business Process Modeling Notation (BPMN) and the Web Services Business Process Execution Language (WS-BPEL or BPEL for short). BPMN is a business processmodeling notation intended to facilitate communication between domain analysts and to support decision-making based on techniques such as cost analysis, scenario analysis, and simulation. BPMN models are not meant to be directly executable, although they may serve as input to software development projects. A comparison between BPMN and YAWL and a method for mapping BPMN diagrams into YAWL nets are given in Chap. 13. Meanwhile, BPEL is a language for defining executable business processes. In this respect, it can be seen as competing in the same space as YAWL. Yet, the original motivation and design of YAWL are very different from those of BPEL, and this fact transpires in profound differences between these two languages. BPEL is intended to support the definition of a class of business processes known as Web service orchestrations. In a Web service orchestration, one service (the orchestrator) interacts with a number of other services. The focus of BPEL is therefore on capturing interactions between a given process and a set of partners (represented as Web services). The logic of the interactions is described as a composition of communication actions (send, receive, send/receive, etc.). These communication actions are interrelated by control-flow dependencies expressed through constructs corresponding to parallel, sequential, and conditional execution, event, and exception handling.

  • 5. Recker, Jan
    et al.
    Wohed, Petia
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Rosemann, Michael
    Representation theory versus workflow patterns - The case of BPMN2006In: Conceptual Modeling - ER 2006, Proceedings / [ed] Embley, DW; Olive, A; Ram, S, 2006, Vol. 4215, p. 68-83Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Selecting an appropriate process modeling language forms an important task within business process management projects. A wide range of process modeling languages has been developed over the last decades, leading to an obvious need for rigorous theory to assist in the evaluation and comparison of the capabilities of these languages. While academic progress in the area of process modeling language evaluation has been made on at least two premises, Representation Theory and Workflow Patterns, it remains unclear how these frameworks relate to each other. We use a generic framework for language evaluation to establish similarities and differences between these acknowledged reference frameworks and discuss how and to what extent they complement respectively substitute each other. Our line of investigation follows the case of the popular BPMN modeling language, whose evaluation from the perspectives of Representation Theory and Workflow Patterns is reconciled in this paper.

  • 6. Russell, N.
    et al.
    Van Der Aalst, W. M. P.
    Ter Hofstede, A. H. M.
    Wohed, Petia
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    On the suitability of UML 2.0 Activity Diagrams for business process modelling2006In: Conferences in Research and Practice in Information Technology, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    UML is posited as the "swiss army knife" for systems modelling and design activities. It embodies a number of modelling formalisms that have broad applicability in capturing both the static and dynamic aspects of software systems. One area of UML that has received particular attention is that of Activity Diagrams (ADs), which provide a high-level means of modelling dynamic system behaviour. In this paper we examine the suitability of UML 2.0 Activity Diagrams for business process modelling, using the Workflow Patterns as an evaluation framework. The Workflow Patterns are a collection of patterns developed for assessing control-flow, data and resource capabilities in the area of Process Aware Information Systems (PAIS). In doing so, we provide a comprehensive evaluation of the capabilities of UML 2.0 ADs, and their strengths and weaknesses when utilised for business process modelling.

  • 7.
    Wohed, Petia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Andersson, Birger
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Johannesson, P.
    Open source workflow systems2010In: Modern Business Process Automation: YAWL and its Support Environment, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2010, p. 401-434Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The goal of this chapter is to broaden the reader's knowledge in the area of open sourceWfMS. To achieve this we introduce three other open sourceWfMSs. These are OpenWFE, jBPM and Enhydra Shark, which according to download statistics (July 2008) are the open source systems with the largest number of downloads (closely followed by YAWL). The purpose of the presentation is not to provide detailed insight into each of these systems, but rather to expose the reader to different approaches and to discuss the similarities and differences of these approaches with regard to YAWL. The chapter is divided into three parts, each describing one system. The descriptions follow the same format as much as possible. First, some background information is given. Subsequently, the architecture is described. Then an introduction to the underlying process modeling language is given from control-flow, data, and resource perspectives. After that, a part of the Order Fulfillment case is modeled and the solution briefly discussed. Each description concludes with a brief comparison of the system and YAWL. All files containing the discussed examples are distributed for test-runs with the electronic supplement of the book.

  • 8.
    Wohed, Petia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Russell, Nick
    ter Hofstede, Arthur H. M.
    Andersson, Birger
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    van der Aalst, Wil M. P.
    Open source workflow: A viable direction for BPM? Extended abstract2008In: Advanced Information Systems Engineering, Proceedings / [ed] Bellahsene, Z; Leonard, M, 2008, Vol. 5074, p. 583-586Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the growing interest in open source software in general and business process management and workflow systems in particular, it is worthwhile investigating the state of open source workflow management. The plethora of these offerings (recent surveys such as [4,6], each contain more than 30 such systems) triggers the following two obvious questions: (1) how do these systems compare to each other; and (2) how do they compare to their commercial counterparts. To answer these questions we have undertaken a detailed analysis of three of the most widely used open source workflow management systems [1]: jBPM, OpenWFE, and Enhydra Shark. Another obvious candidate would have been the open-source workflow management system YAWL ( www.yawlfoundation.org ). However, given the authors’ close involvement in the development of YAWL, we did not include it in our evaluation.

  • 9.
    Wohed, Petia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Russell, Nick
    ter Hofstede, Arthur H. M.
    Andersson, Birger
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    van der Aalst, Wil M. P.
    Patterns-based evaluation of open source BPM systems: The cases of jBPM, OpenWFE, and Enhydra Shark2009In: Information and Software Technology, ISSN 0950-5849, E-ISSN 1873-6025, Vol. 51, no 8, p. 1187-1216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In keeping with the proliferation of free software development initiatives and the increased interest in the business process management domain, many open source workflow and business process management systems have appeared during the last few years and are now under active development. This upsurge gives rise to two important questions: What are the capabilities of these systems? and How do they compare to each other and to their closed source counterparts? In other words: What is the state-of-the-art in the area?. To gain an insight into these questions, we have conducted an in-depth analysis of three of the major open source workflow management systems - jBPM, OpenWFE, and Enhydra Shark, the results of which are reported here. This analysis is based on the workflow patterns framework and provides a continuation of the series of evaluations performed using the same framework on closed source systems, business process modelling languages, and web-service composition standards. The results from evaluations of the three open source systems are compared with each other and also with the results from evaluations of three representative closed source systems: Staffware, WebSphere MQ and Oracle BPEL PM. The overall conclusion is that open source systems are targeted more toward developers rather than business analysts. They generally provide less support for the patterns than closed source systems, particularly with respect to the resource perspective, i.e. the various ways in which work is distributed amongst business users and managed through to completion.

  • 10.
    Wohed, Petia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
    Van Der Aalst, W. M. P.
    Dumas, M.
    Ter Hofstede, A. H. M.
    Russell, N.
    On the suitability of BPMN for business process modelling2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we examine the suitability of the Business Process Modelling Notation (BPMN) for business process modelling, using the Workflow Patterns as an evaluation framework. The Workflow Patterns are a collection of patterns developed for assessing control-flow, data and resource capabilities in the area of Process Aware Information Systems (PAISs). In doing so, we provide a comprehensive evaluation of the capabilities of BPMN, and its strengths and weaknesses when utilised for business process modelling. The analysis provided for BPMN is part of a larger effort aiming at an unbiased and vendor-independent survey of the suitability and the expressive power of some mainstream process modelling languages. It is a sequel to previous work in which languages including BPEL and UML Activity Diagrams were evaluated.

1 - 10 of 10
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