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  • 1.
    Bredican, John
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing.
    Vigar-Ellis, Debbie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing.
    Smartphone applications - Idea sourcing and app development: Implications for firms2014In: South African Journal of Economic and Management Sciences, ISSN 1015-8812, E-ISSN 2222-3436, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 232-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The smartphone has become the uniquely personal computing device choice for consumers. Applications (apps) for smartphones are set to reach revenues of 25 pound billion according to Gartner. This presents great opportunities for marketing as apps can provide great benefits for consumers and firms. However it is Information Systems (IS) departments that have traditionally been tasked with the acquisition and/or development of such information technologies within organisations. With such strong implications for marketing, this exploratory research has focused on the sources of app ideas within firms, locations for app development and perceptions of app development success. Results indicate that while most ideas for apps currently come from IS and marketing departments within the organisation, and development of apps is also done mainly within the organisation, these development strategies are not necessarily the most effective. Managerial implications' regarding the role of IS, Marketing and the customer in app development, are discussed.

  • 2. Lee, Linda
    et al.
    McCarthy, Ian
    Simon Fraser University.
    Ellis, Debbie
    University of KwaZulu-Natal.
    Customer cohort climates: A conceptual model for group service encountersIn: Service Business: An International Journal, ISSN 1862-8516, E-ISSN 1862-8508Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Lilford, Neil
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Vigar-Ellis, Debbie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing. University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa .
    Nel, Deon
    University of Pretoria, South Africa.
    Big Five personality traits and financial salesperson performance: An application of Chernoff faces2014In: Journal of Financial Services Marketing, ISSN 1363-0539, E-ISSN 1479-1846, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 146-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying the personality traits of effective sales people has been a long-standing challenge to sales managers and researchers in a wide range of contexts, from business to business, to retail and services. A definitive identification of the characteristics of the ideal salesperson remains elusive. We investigate the impact of the Big 5 personality traits on the performance of salespersons in a large financial services organization, our purpose being to graphically illustrate how personality traits differ, according to different levels of sales performance. We present the results graphically using Chernoff faces. The study demonstrates that this approach provides valuable insights to sales managers, and has several possible applications in relation to financial salesperson-performance management.

  • 4.
    Pelet, Jean-Eric
    et al.
    ESCE Int Business Sch, Dept Mkt, Paris, France..
    Lecat, Benoit
    Calif Polytech State Univ San Luis Obispo, Dept Wine & Viticulture, San Luis Obispo, CA 93407 USA..
    Khan, Jashim
    Univ Surrey, Dept Mkt & Retail Management, Guildford, Surrey, England..
    Rundle-Thiele, Sharyn
    Griffith Univ, Dept Mkt, Nathan, Qld, Australia..
    Lee, Linda W.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Marketing and Entrepreneurship.
    Vigar-Ellis, Debbie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Marketing and Entrepreneurship. Univ KwaZulu Natal, Sch Management IT & Governance, Scottsville, South Africa..
    Wolf, Marianne McGarry
    Calif Polytech State Univ San Luis Obispo, Dept Wine & Viticulture, San Luis Obispo, CA 93407 USA..
    Kavoura, Androniki
    Technol Educ Inst Athens, Dept Mkt, Athens, Greece..
    Katsoni, Vicky
    Technol Educ Inst Athens, Dept Mkt, Athens, Greece..
    Wegmann, Anne Lena
    Weincampus Neustadt, Dept Mkt, Neustadt, Germany.;Ludwigshafen Univ Appl Sci, Ludwigshafen, Germany..
    Winery website loyalty: the role of sales promotion and service attributes2018In: International Journal of Wine Business Research, ISSN 1751-1062, E-ISSN 1751-1070, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 138-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose This paper aims to examine the relationship between feelings toward buying wine on mobile phones and m-commerce website loyalty by examining the mediating role of sales promotion and the moderating role of service attributes of the m-commerce websites in influencing the mediation. Design/methodology/approach A total of 3,318 completed surveys were collected. Drawing on a large non-probability criterion-based purposive sample across six countries (France, Germany, Greece, South Africa, USA and Canada), mediation analysis was performed to examine the hypothesized relationships. Findings Results show that sales promotion mediates the relationship between feelings toward buying wine on mobile phones and m-commerce website loyalty. Moderated mediation reveals that the indirect pathways (sales promotion) through which feelings toward buying wine over mobile exert its effect on m-commerce website loyalty are dependent on the value of service (wine delivery) attributes of the website. The results demonstrate that sales promotion and service are of paramount importance to wineries and wine marketers. Research limitations/implications Wine producers and retailers should consider the use of sales promotion to enhance sales and loyalty to m-commerce websites. Practical implications Wine producers and retailers should consider use sales promotion (such as SMS or push notifications) to enhance sales and influence consumer feelings and hence their loyalty. Originality/value Wine m-commerce studies are limited, especially with an international perspective comparing six different countries: three from the old world (France, Germany and Greece) and three from the new world (North America with USA and Canada; and South Africa). Altogether, these six countries represent around 40 per cent of the world's wine consumption.

  • 5. Scott, Lyndsey
    et al.
    Vigar-Ellis, Debbie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing. University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa .
    Consumer understanding, perceptions and behaviours with regard to environmentally friendly packaging in a developing nation2014In: International Journal of Consumer Studies, ISSN 1470-6423, E-ISSN 1470-6431, Vol. 38, no 6, p. 642-649Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been very little research conducted into sustainable consumption patterns, knowledge and attitudes in relation to environmentally friendly packaging in South Africa. Market research that has been conducted in relation to sustainable consumption has largely been based on overseas studies and is therefore limited in that its reflection of information is from a first world country perspective. Environmental knowledge has been found to impact environmentally friendly behaviour both directly and indirectly. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected to investigate South African respondents' understanding (knowledge) and perceptions of environmentally friendly packaging as well as the extent to which they exhibited green behaviour with regard to environmentally friendly packaging activities such as reusing and recycling. The data gathered for this study were collected by means of a questionnaire distributed to respondents using snowball sampling through Facebook networks. The snowball sample required respondents to answer the questionnaire and pass it on to other Facebook users. The unique benefit of this study is that it is conducted in a developing nation where issues such as sustainable consumption are new and evolving. There is limited promotion or implementation of environmentally responsible practices by authorities or industry. South African consumers in this study were found to exhibit limited knowledge of what environmentally friendly packaging is, how to differentiate it from normal packaging, as well as its benefits. However, actions are even less evident with regard to environmentally friendly packaging. Recommendations of how to improve knowledge as well as facilitate purchase of environmentally friendly packaging are provided.

  • 6.
    Vigar-Ellis, Debbie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing. Univeversity of KwaZulu-Natal.
    Consumer Knowledge: A New Basis for Segmentation?In: Journal of General Management, ISSN 0306-3070, E-ISSN 1759-6106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What consumers know about a product affects many aspects of their behaviour and is particularly important for marketers to understand when it comes to information-intensive products. The purpose of this paper is to understand the components and antecedents of consumer knowledge of wine, an information-intensive product, and to investigate consumer knowledge as a potential basis for wine market segmentation and targeting. A survey using the MTurk platform found that consumers differ in their levels and types of knowledge.  A new and useful basis for segmenting the wine market is proposed which may have use for other information-intensive product markets.

  • 7.
    Vigar-Ellis, Debbie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing.
    Consumer knowledge and its implications for aspects of consumer purchasing behaviour in the case of information-intensive products2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this research was to better understand consumer knowledge, its constituents, antecedents and consequences or implications for other consumer behaviours so as to assist wine marketers and marketers of other information-intensive products with their marketing strategy development.  Wine is a complex product difficult for consumers to evaluate particularly prior to purchase but it is also a difficult product for marketers.  Wine has a very large number of both intrinsic and extrinsic attributes.  As a result of the numerous attributes and the multitude of combinations of these attributes there is a plethora of wine brands available making for a highly competitive industry and a complicated product for consumers.   

    Consumer knowledge affects all aspects of consumer purchasing behaviour and is thus an important phenomenon for marketers to research and understand.  Consumer knowledge also affects all aspects of the marketing strategy developed to satisfy target segments.  Marketing decision makers need to understand consumers to be able to analyze and profile segments, choose target markets and develop marketing strategies that will best align with those target markets.  Calls particularly for better understanding of different segments within the wine market provide justification for this research.

    The research problem was divided into three components: Consumer wine knowledge constituents, Antecedents of consumer wine knowledge and the Implications of consumer wine knowledge.  The latter component of the research problem explored the implications of consumer wine knowledge for segmentation, as well as the relationships between consumer wine knowledge and exploratory purchasing behaviour, variety-seeking behaviour and opinion leadership and opinion-seeking behaviours. 

    This study provides evidence of the existence of two distinct constituents of consumer knowledge i.e. what consumers know (objective knowledge) and what they think they know (subjective knowledge) and these constituents in the context of wine are significantly related.  However it is also clear that these constituents are significantly different, with different antecedents and implications for other consumer behaviours.  This study provides a visual depiction of a simplistic nomological map developed for the construct of consumer knowledge based on the studies reported in this thesis in the context of an information-intensive product such as wine.  Objective knowledge is largely driven by demographic antecedents, specifically age, gender and education while subjective knowledge is mostly driven by, or affected by consumption.  On the implications side of the map, objective knowledge significantly positively correlates with exploratory acquisition, and opinion leadership while subjective knowledge is positively related to opinion leadership and negatively to opinion-seeking behaviours.  Theoretical implications as well as recommendations for wine marketers and researchers are provided.

  • 8.
    Vigar-Ellis, Debbie
    et al.
    KTH.
    Caruana, Albert
    Univ Malta, Dept Corp Commun, Msida, Malta.;Univ Bologna, Dept Business Sci, Forli, Italy..
    Consumer wine knowledge: components and segments2018In: International Journal of Wine Business Research, ISSN 1751-1062, E-ISSN 1751-1070, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 277-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose What consumers know about a product affects many aspects of their behaviour and is particularly important for marketers to understand when it comes to developing marketing strategy. The purpose of this paper is to understand the components of consumer knowledge of wine and to investigate these as a potential basis for wine market segmentation and targeting. Design/methodology/approach A quantitative, descriptive research design is adopted. An online survey consisting of three sections, measuring objective knowledge, subjective knowledge and classificatory variables, was developed and fielded, and data were collected from US wine consumers via Amazon.com's MTurk platform. The psychometric properties of the measures used were determined, and a two-dimensional segmentation typology was developed. Findings The study supported the positive relationship between objective and subjective wine knowledge, while the combination of the two components led to the identification of four groups of consumers titled: neophytes, snobs, modest and experts. Practical implications In a market that is highly fragmented, consumer knowledge about wine has been shown to provide a useful basis for wine market segmentation allowing for different marketing activities to target the four groups identified. Originality/value While other research has considered either objective or subjective knowledge on its own, this study's major contribution is the investigation of the wine consumer segments on the basis of the combination of objective and subjective consumer knowledge. A consumer knowledge type grid is developed that has implications for marketing segmentation and targeting. Implications of this new typology for future research are identified.

  • 9.
    Vigar-Ellis, Debbie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing.
    Mattison Thompson, F.
    The effect of wine knowledge type on variety seeking behavior in wine purchasing2018In: Journal of Wine Research, ISSN 0957-1264, E-ISSN 1469-9672, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 71-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wine is a prolific, but complex and information-intensive product, so it is important for marketers to understand the behaviors and characteristics of different wine market segments, in order to better target their marketing strategies to these different segments’ needs. Yet little is known about how the characteristics of consumers’ subjective and objective knowledge of wine impact their variety seeking purchasing behavior. As variety seeking behavior affects customer retention and loyalty, a better understanding of this behavior is important to wine marketers. Results of a survey show that wine knowledge types are a significant predictor of variety seeking purchasing behavior of wine. Wine consumers who think they know a lot about wine, tend to engage in more variety seeking behavior in their wine purchasing. This suggests that marketers should adapt their segmentation, targeting and channel strategies to individual knowledge types to be more successful.

  • 10.
    Vigar-Ellis, Debbie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing. Univeversity of KwaZulu-Natal.
    Mattison Thompson, F.
    The Effect of Wine Knowledge Type on Variety Seeking in Wine PurchasingIn: Journal of General Management, ISSN 0306-3070, E-ISSN 1759-6106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With wine being a prolific, but complex and information-intensive product, it is important for marketers to understand the behaviors and characteristics of different wine market segments, in order to better target their marketing strategies to these different segments’ needs. Yet little is known about how the characteristics of consumers’ subjective and objective knowledge of wine impact their variety seeking purchasing behavior. Our results show that wine knowledge types are a significant predictor of variety seeking purchasing behavior of wine. This suggests that marketers should adapt their segmentation, targeting and channel strategies to individual knowledge types to be more successful.

     

  • 11.
    Vigar-Ellis, Debbie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing.
    Pitt, L.
    Simon Fraser University.
    Caruana, A.
    University of Malta.
    Knowledge effects on the exploratory acquisition of wine2015In: International Journal of Wine Business Research, ISSN 1751-1062, E-ISSN 1751-1070, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 84-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This paper aims to determine whether exploratory wine purchasing behaviour is affected by consumers’ objective and subjective wine knowledge. Design/methodology/approach – A questionnaire was developed using recognised scales for exploratory consumer tendencies, objective and subjective wine knowledge. The survey was administered using the MTurk platform. A factor analysis was first used to test the psychometric properties of the measures of the three constructs. Once the robustness of the measures was ascertained, cross-tabulations and testing via ANOVA’s of the demographics of age, gender, weekly wine consumption and education on the constructs was undertaken. In addition the causal relationship of subjective and objective wine knowledge on exploratory purchase behaviour was investigated via the use of multiple regression analysis. Findings – The results show that consumers with more real (objective) knowledge of wines are more likely to participate in exploratory wine purchasing. Objective wine knowledge is greatest amongst older consumers and those who consume more wine. Research limitations/implications – While attempts were made to limit biases due to the research approach, the results may lack generalisability because a US sample only, was used. Recommendations for future research extending the sample population as well as for changes to the question formats are suggested. Practical implications – The findings of this study have implications for wine marketers in that marketing strategies and activities (labelling, distribution, media, etc.) may need to be adapted depending on the exploratory purchasing behaviour and wine knowledge of their target customers. Originality/value – Exploratory wine acquisition behaviour is important to wine marketers. This behaviour encourages trial but, at the same time, impacts brand loyalty. This paper identifies the characteristics of consumers in terms of wine knowledge, consumption and demographics most likely to exhibit this behaviour and provides support for the need for marketers to identify these consumers and adapt their marketing activities targeting them.

  • 12.
    Vigar-Ellis, Debbie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing. University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.
    Pitt, Leyland
    Simon Fraser University.
    Caruana, Albert
    University of Malta.
    Does Objective and Subjective Knowledge Vary between Opinion Leaders and Opinion Seekers?: Implications for Wine Marketing2015In: Journal of Wine Research, ISSN 0957-1264, E-ISSN 1469-9672, Vol. 26, no 04, p. 306-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wine is a heterogeneous, information-rich offering, with a plethora of brands in the market.  Knowledge of wines amidst such diversity understandably varies.  In addition, some offer opinions on wine while others seek them.  Yet the interplay between opinion leadership and opinion seeking on the one hand, and wine knowledge, both objective and subjective, has received little attention by wine marketing researchers.  Thus, this paper explores the relationships between opinion leadership and opinion seeking among wine consumers, and investigates whether objective and subjective knowledge varies between opinion leaders and seekers.  An online survey was used to collect data on the four constructs and correlation analysis was undertaken to investigate the relationships between them.  Key findings indicate that those who tend to seek opinions about wine tend not to have high objective knowledge of wine, as may be expected.  On the other hand, opinion leaders think that they know about wine, and generally are objectively knowledgeable.  Thus, their influence on others is not only based on communication, but on fact, representing a valuable source of influence for wine marketers.  Understanding target consumers’ wine knowledge levels can potentially impact every aspect of wine marketing strategy.

  • 13.
    Vigar-Ellis, Deborah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial marketing. School of Management, IT and Governance, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.
    Pitt, L.
    Simon Fraser University.
    Berthon, P.
    Bentley University.
    Knowing what they know: A managerial perspective on consumer knowledge2015In: Business Horizons, ISSN 0007-6813, E-ISSN 1873-6068, Vol. 58, no 6, p. 679-685Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What a consumer knows about a product or service is crucial to how it is marketed, and this is particularly true in the case of information-intensive products. However, there are two important sides to consumer knowledge: first, there is what consumers really know, or objective knowledge; second, there is what consumers think they know, or subjective knowledge. Interestingly, relatively little is known about the relationship between these two aspects of consumer knowledge or about the variables that impact this knowledge. Using data from a study of consumers’ knowledge of wine, the relationships between and influencers of objective and subjective knowledge are explored in this installment of Technology & Marketing, and a typology of customer knowledge is developed. This has useful implications for the marketing of wine and other information-rich products.

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