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  • 1.
    Björn, Hedin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Nu ska jag plugga! Jag ska bara färgsortera mina böcker först2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Prokrastinering, eller att mot bättre vetande skjuta upp något, är ett stort problem i samhället i allmänhet och för studenter i synnerhet. I denna artikel beskriver vi en utbildningsmodul om prokrastinering som vi introducerat på två civilingenjörsprogram på KTH, varav denna rapport behandlar datateknikprogrammet där 466 studenter deltog. Utvärderingen hade 100% svarsfrekvens, och visar att 95% av studenterna hade problem med prokrastinering varav 43% hade stora eller mycket stora problem. 88% ansåg att prokrastinering var ett bra tema att ha med i utbildningen, och 57% ansåg att momentet haft positiva effekter på deras studievanor. Endast 7% ansåg att momentet inte hade gett några märkbara effekter på studierna. Då modulen endast kräver ca 8 timmars arbete från studenternas sida anser vi att fördelarna är så stora att denna eller en liknande modul borde ingå i samtliga utbildningsprogram.

  • 2. Borovic, Claudijo
    et al.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Learning in online computer games: the emergence of in-game academies2005In: Internet Research Annual / [ed] Kate O'Riordan, Mia Consalvo, Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2005Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Bradley, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    The sharing economy as the commons of the 21st century2017In: Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, ISSN 1752-1378, E-ISSN 1752-1386, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 231-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to make a contribution to the debate on how contemporary collaborative commons, as part of the wider sharing economy, can be understood and supported. Three cases of contemporary commons are analysed: a DIY bike repair studio, a pop-up home office concept and Wikipedia. The article shows how the design principles developed for governing natural resource commons are only partly applicable to these contemporary commons. It also illustrates the differences in these types of commons in terms of the nature of the resource being shared, scarcity, barriers to entry and how rules are formulated and upheld.

  • 4.
    Cerratto-Pargman, T.
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Nardi, Bonnie
    University of California Irvine.
    The internet at the eco-village: Performing sustainbility in the twenty-first century2016In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 21, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is the digital infrastructure and its footprint an ideological blind spot for recently emerging ecological communities, including eco-villages? This paper examines how a group of people who are concerned with environmental issues such as peak oil and climate change are orchestrating a transition toward a more sustainable and resilient way of living. We studied a Swedish eco-village, considering how computing in this community contributes to defining what alternative ways of living might look like in the twenty-first century. Drawing on a social-ecological perspective, the analysis illustrates, on the one hand, that the Internet, along with the digital devices we use to access it, capitalizes and mobilizes values, knowledge and social relationships that in turn enhance resilience in the eco-village. On the other hand, the analysis shows that an explicit focus on ecological values is not sufficient for a community of individuals to significantly transform Internet use to conform to ecological ideals. This work contributes to a deeper understanding of the imbrication of social technologies with practices that are oriented to perform sustainable and resilient ways of living.

  • 5.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Pargman, Daniel
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    ICT4S Reaching Out: Making sustainability relevant in higher education2014In: Proceedings of the 2014 conference ICT for Sustainability, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many media technology and computer science engineering students suffer from the preconceived opinion that sustainability is at best peripheral, and at worst irrelevant to their education. In this paper we discuss our experiences of integrating sustainability and ICT4S into a media technology engineering programme. An overarching tension has been in finding a balance between teaching about sustainability in general, and teaching about ICT4S in particular. Furthermore, what aspects of the wide and interdisciplinary area of ICT4S are most relevant to teach to media technology students, and how can the connection between ICT and sustainability be “refined”, clarified and expressed We explicate how we have gone about to shape the course in such a way that it becomes both relevant and possible for these students to relate to it, and we exemplify with choices made, of which one had been the implementation and adaption of the GaSuCo board game. While the results presented here are primarily relevant to media technology and computer science educations, we also conclude with recommendations to the larger ICT4S community. We argue that the ICT4S community does not only need to take part in developing education in this area, but also needs to conduct research on how to educate students in ICT4S.

  • 6.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Meeting the future in the past-using counterfactual history to imagine computing futures2018In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series, Association for Computing Machinery , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The future is inherently hard to predict, yet we know there are various factors that will limit the future of computing (scarcity of materials, energy shortages and various biophysical limits) in both substantial and disruptive ways. When we look at the past and at mainstream projected computing futures, all we see is exponential growth. While it is easy to reject such trajectories, it is much harder to imagine and propose credible, preferable and evocative alternatives. Breaking away from default modes of thinking about computing is difficult but possible, and we here present a methodology-counterfactual history-that can help us imagine alternative scenarios for computing. We argue that by learning from counterfactual pasts ("what-if scenarios"), we can more easily liberate our ideas from various preconceptions that hamper them and box them in. This makes it possible to generate and entertain a more diverse "portfolio" of ideas about the future and help us better prepare for meeting future challenges.

  • 7.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    On the inherent contradictions of teaching sustainability at a technical university2017In: Digital Technology and Sustainability: Engaging the Paradox, Taylor and Francis , 2017, p. 154-165Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    On the necessity of rocking the boat Computers and digitalization have greatly shaped our world and are now an unavoidable part of modern society. Weiser’s (1991) vision of ubiquitous computing has in many respects not only been met but has in affluent parts of the world been surpassed (Bell & Dourish, 2007). Digital artifacts and devices surround us and have invisibly and seamlessly permeated everything we do. Our modern societies are however not sustainable. We have overstepped several planetary boundaries and risk overstepping several more (Steffen et al., 2015). We are about to reach limits as to the resources we can extract from the earth (Bardi, 2014), and the changes wreaked are by now so profound that they will likely last for a geological period of time (Steffen et al., 2007). In light of this, it is of utmost importance to strive towards a sustainable society, and this is a responsibility that falls on many disciplines and sectors. We believe that engineering students could be key drivers in this change since many will eventually enter positions of power from which they will make decisions that will shape our future society. 

  • 8.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Bates, Oliver
    Lancaster University.
    Maria, Normark
    Södertörns Högskola.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Anneroth, Mikael
    Ericsson.
    Berndtsson, Johan
    InUse.
    HCI and UN's Sustainable Development Goals: Responsibilities, Barriers and Opportunities2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite increasing interest, Sustainable HCI has been critiqued for doing too little, and perhaps also at times for doing the wrong things. Still, a field like Human-Computer Interaction should aim at being part of transforming our society into a more sustainable one. But how do we do that, and, what are we aiming for?

    With this workshop, we propose that HCI should start working with the new global Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) that were formally adopted by the UN in September 2015. How can Sustainable HCI be inspired by, and contribute to these goals? What should we in the field of HCI do more of, and what should we perhaps do less of? In what areas should we form partnerships in order to reach the Sustainable Development Goals and with whom should we partner? 

  • 9.
    Eriksson, Elina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Björklund, Anna
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Kramers, Anna
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Edvardsson Björnberg, Karin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Sustainable development for ICT engineering students: “What’s in it for me”?2016In: / [ed] Mazijn, Bernard, Brugge, Belgium: Instituut vóór Duurzame Ontwikkeling vzw , 2016, p. 165-172Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of sustainable development (SD) is hardly possible to refute; however, sustainable development has been a relatively peripheral subject in computer-related engineering educations. Sustainability, with its global and potentially all-encompassing connotations, is still seen by many Information and Communication Technology (ICT) students as a topic of little relevance to their future careers. So how can teachers convince these students that sustainability is a topic that can be both relevant and interesting for them? From the point of view of the student; “What’s in it for me?”.

    In this paper we describe and compare our efforts to plan and teach three introductory courses on SD in three different ICT-related educational programmes at KTH Royal Institute of Technology. The courses were planned separately, but they will be analysed together. We discuss two dimensions that we have found to be imperative in our endeavour to engage our students. The first dimension is to handle the balance between sustainability on a general level versus sustainability as specifically related to ICT. The second dimension is to handle the tension between teaching facts versus an emphasis on students’ reflections and/or practicing skills. We argue that overcoming the challenge of making sustainability relevant to the students is central for successfully teaching these courses. 

  • 10.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Höjer, Mattias
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Pargman, Daniel
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Aguiar Borges, Luciane
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Pluralising the Future Information SocietyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the argument that the sustainability challenges that emerge from the production and use of ICT are complex to evaluate due to the high pace of ICT development, the rapid dissemination of new ICT infrastructure and devices and their unpredictable effects on socio-economic structures, this study shows that there are alternatives to contemporary forecasted futures and exemplifies that ICT can be used to facilitate different societal developments. It is argued that creating parallel possible futures (plural) aids in the process of identifying potential benefits and drawbacks of technological development and situate current decisions in a longer time frame. The process of designing five images of the future of Sweden in 2060 is, then, presented and some of the advantages of using these images for different purposes are discussed. Among the concluding reflections it is highlighted that exploring benefits and drawbacks of different possible futures can empower actors that at the present play a role in shaping and implementing ICT strategies and policies and also actors from other sectors getting to see the opportunities and risks with ICT.

  • 11.
    Hedin, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    En systematisk forskningsöversikt av digitala interventioner för mer hållbara beteenden kring livsmedelskonsumtion2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Livsmedelsproduktion och livsmedelskonsumtion medför stora hållbarhetsutmaningar, och det blir allt viktigare att hitta sätt att minska miljöpåverkan orsakad av mat, till exempel genom beteendeförändringar hos konsumenterna. Under de senaste åren har digitala interventioner blivit viktiga verktyg för att förändra beteenden på många områden. I detta projekt har vi gjort en systematisk forskningsöversikt där vi gått igenom forskningsläget rörande digitala beteendeinterventioner för hållbar matkonsumtion. Vi har utgått från PRISMA-checklistan för hur sådana systematiska forskningsöversikter ska genomföras, och vi har genomsökt flera forskningsdatabaser för att hitta vetenskapliga artiklar som rör mat, hållbarhet och digitala beteendeinterventioner. Endast studier där de digitala interventionerna har implementerats och testats ur ett förändringsperspektiv har inkluderats, vilket resulterade i 15 primära studier som ingått i vår slutliga granskning. Kvaliteten på studierna utvärderades ur ett beteendeförändringssperspektiv, och de metoder för beteendeförändring som använts har kategoriserats med hjälp av två ramverk, “Behavior Change Wheel” och “Behavior Change Technique taxonomy v1”. Resultaten visade att alla inkluderade studier hade stora kvalitetsproblem när de utvärderades ur ett beteendeförändrings-perspektiv. Det innebär att vi inte kunde hitta några resultat som visade på om de digitala beteendeinterventionerna som undersöktes fungerade eller ej. De flesta studier saknade vidare en teoretisk bas för hur eller varför interventionerna skulle kunna leda till beteendeförändring för mer hållbar livsmedelskonsumtion. Vår huvudsakliga rekommendation för framtida forskning inom området är att gå vidare från en utforskande fas till att genomföra vetenskapliga studier med tydligare teoretisk bas och metodik.

  • 12.
    Hedin, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Educational use of Social Annotation Systems for Peer Feedback2015In: KTH Scholarship of Teaching and Learning 2015, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social annotation systems provide a way for several students to annotate shared documents in an online environment (Novak, Razzouk & Johnson, 2012). We have for a number of years used social annotation systems in order to allow students to comment on each other's work, and have very positive experiences for using it in academic writing in bachelor theses (Hedin, 2012, Pargman, Hedin, Hrastinski, 2013). In this roundtable we present and demonstrate the method that is used, and add the experiences from using social annotation systems in two other courses, with more strict guidelines for what constitutes good feedback practice inspired by Nicol & Macfarlane-Dick (2006), and by De Bono’s Six thinking hats (De Bono, 1999). After introducing social annotation systems in bachelor thesis writing, the throughput has increased from 78% to almost 100%, even though a causal effect cannot be established. The attitudes of the students have been very positive, where both giving and receiving feedback to and from fellow students has been seen as activities well worth the effort. The feedback guidelines have increased the quality of the feedback given by freshmen students.

  • 13.
    Hedin, Björn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Bälter, Olle
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Sagan om examensringen - en akademisk tragedi2015In: LTHs 9:e Pedagogiska Inspirationskonferens, 15 december 2016, Lund, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    —Hur ska vi som anställda vid universitet och högskolor förhålla oss till frågor såsom tillit, kontroll och likabehandling i förhållande till våra studenter? Tillit, kontroll och likabehandling är alla lovvärda och viktiga, men i daglig verksamhet kan de komma i konflikt med varandra. Vi vill vid denna roundtable lyfta dessa konflikter, och väljer att exemplifiera problematiken med ett konkret fall. Vi hoppas detta exempel dels kan belysa problem vi kan ställas inför, och dels tjäna som grund för en diskussion och för konstruktivt erfarenhetsutbyte om hur vi rent praktiskt ska agera i dessa typer av situationer.

  • 14.
    Jakobsson, Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231). Media / Computer Game Development, School of Humanities and Informatics, University of Skövde.
    Configuring the player: subversive behavior in Project Entropia2005In: Proceedings of DiGRA 2005 Conference: Changing Views – Worlds in Play / [ed] Suzanne de Castell, Jennifer Jenson, 2005, p. 1-6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the concept of a “black box” as a tool for analyzing virtual worlds. The concept comes from the field of Science & Technology Studies (STS) and we employ it here more specifically to study one such virtual world in particular, Project Entropia. The concept of a “black box” is used to describe the developers’ efforts to hide or to build certain assumptions into the very fabric of the virtual world in order to get the players to perform certain prescribed roles. The concept is also used to describe players’ efforts to open up this black box in order to get access to and playother roles – roles not prescribed by the game publisher and that in some cases function as a threat to the publisher’s business model. The focus of the analysis is on the imperative to “pay to play”. This imperative is essential to the developers of the game since Project Entropia does not employ the usual subscription-based revenue model that most other Massively Multiplayer Online Games (MMOGs) use.

  • 15.
    Josefsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE).
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Pargman C, Teresa
    The student, the private and the professional role: Students’ social media use2015In: Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, ISSN 1360-2357, E-ISSN 1573-7608, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 1583-1594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has shown that students perceive a distinct divide between educational and private use of social media. The present study explores this divide by focusing on master students’ perception of roles when using social media in a higher education context. A qualitative method has been used, mainly comprising of analyses of home exams and interviews, which were conducted with students enrolled in the master’s course BSocial media technologies^. Results support previous research stating that students perceived a distinct divide between educational and private use of social media, and furthermore provide a more detailed understanding of this divide. The results from the study also indicate that there is yet another type of use: social media as a tool for career-building purposes, or what is labeled as professional use. Implications of social media for use in higher education are described through the analysis of three roles as performed by the individual: the student role in educational settings, the professional role for career-building, and the private role.

  • 16.
    Joshi, Somya
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Cerratto Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University.
    Gazis, Andreas
    Stockholm University.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Whose Future Is It Anyway?: Limits within Policy Modeling2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the age of Big Open Linked Data (BOLD), we inhabit a landscape where future scenarios are imagined, modeled, planned for and embedded in policy. Between the euphoric techno-utopian rhetoric of the boundless potential of BOLD innovations and the dystopian view of the dangers of such innovations (e.g. ubiquitous surveillance etc.), this paper offers a critical understanding of the boundaries that are traversed by the implementation of BOLD within policy modeling. We examine BOLD as a tool for imagining futures, for reducing uncertainties, for providing legitimacy and for concentrating power. In doing so we further develop the LIMITs community’s conceptualization of the societal limitations on computing, with specific reference to the assumptions, interpretations and trust that we place in these models when making socio-environmental policy decisions. We use an illustrative case of policy modeling, which provides a much-needed critical discussion of the inherent limitations and risks as well as the promises that are offered by BOLD. 

  • 17.
    Lundström, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Developing a framework for evaluating the sustainability of computing projects2017In: LIMITS 2017 - Proceedings of the 2017 Workshop on Computing Within Limits, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc , 2017, p. 111-117Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Toyama [19] has proposed a "preliminary taxonomy" for classifying computing projects as a way of separating sustainable computing efforts from unsustainable ones. In this paper we explore the feasibility of Toyama's taxonomy. We begin by describing how we revised and developed his taxonomy to make it more practically useful and then conducted a pilot study where we used the revised version to evaluate four computing projects. The pilot study was then used as a foundation for further discussing and developing the revised taxonomy into yet another, third and final version which we have chosen to call the Sustainable Computing Evaluation Framework (SCEF). While our proposed framework (SCEF) is more practically useful than Toyama's "preliminary taxonomy", there are still challenges that need to be addressed and we end the paper by suggesting where future efforts could be focused.

  • 18.
    Nardi, Bonnie
    et al.
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Informat, Irvine, CA 92697 USA..
    Tomlinson, Bill
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Informat, Irvine, CA 92697 USA.;Victoria Univ Wellington, Sch Informat Management, Wellington, New Zealand..
    Patterson, Donald J.
    Westmont Coll, Dept Math & Comp Sci, Santa Barbara, CA USA..
    Chen, Jay
    NYU Abu Dhabi, Dept Comp Sci, Abu Dhabi, U Arab Emirates..
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Media Technol & Interact Design, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Raghavan, Barath
    Univ Southern Calif, Comp Sci, Los Angeles, CA USA..
    Penzenstadler, Birgit
    Calif State Univ Long Beach, Dept Comp Engn & Comp Sci, Long Beach, CA 90840 USA..
    Computing within Limits2018In: Communications of the ACM, ISSN 0001-0782, E-ISSN 1557-7317, Vol. 61, no 10, p. 86-93Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    COMPUTING RESEARCHERS AND practitioners are often seen as inventing the future. As such, we are implicitly also in the business of predicting the future. We plot trajectories for the future in the problems we select, the assumptions we make about technology and societal trends, and the ways we evaluate research. However, a great deal of computing research focuses on one particular type of future, one very much like the present, only more so. This vision of the future assumes that current trajectories of ever-increasing production and consumption will continue. This focus is perhaps not surprising, since computing machinery as we know it has existed for only 80 years, in a period of remarkable industrial and technological expansion. But humanity is rapidly approaching, or has already exceeded, a variety of planet-scale limits related to the global climate system, fossil fuels, raw materials, and biocapacity. (28,32,38) It is understandable that in computing we would not focus on limits. While planetary limits are obvious in areas such as extractive capacity in mining or fishing,

  • 19.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    On the limits of limits2015In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 1-1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This discussion paper outlines the connection between the perceived urgency of environmental and resource challenges that humanity is facing during the twenty-first century and the individual researcher's response within the emerging "Computing within Limits" community. What is the relationship between our beliefs as individuals and as researchers and the specific issues we chose to study? Furthermore, is there a relationship between skills and topics we happen to be expert in and the subsequent future scenarios we plan for and deem to be more likely to happen?.

  • 20.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Virtual community management as socialization and learning2005In: Communities and Technologies 2005 / [ed] VandenBesselaar, P; DeMichelis, G; Preece, J, Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2005, p. 95-110Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     How does a (virtual) community thrive and survive over time? From having studied a thirteen-year old Swedish-language adventure mud, I here suggest that our understanding of the answer has to be built on a social theory of learning that takes into account that learning has to do with community, practice, meaning and identity. Making a "career" in a community of practice can be regarded as a movement from the periphery to the core, a movement from being a novice to becoming an expert in the activities that are central to the community. On that journey, the individual is over time "configured" into learning how to act, reason and think about the community in the right way.

  • 21.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Ahlsén, Edvard
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Engelbert, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Designing for sustainability: Breakthrough or suboptimisation?2016In: Proceedings of ICT For Sustainability 2016, Atlantis Press , 2016, Vol. 46, p. 52-59Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technological developments in screen technologies pitches the thinner, brighter and energy-stingy OLED screen as a possible replacement for today’s television, computer and smartphone LCD screens. An OLED screen does not consume any energy at all when it displays the color black, but the potentially large energy savings can unfortunately evaporate and instead turn to losses when white is displayed. There is thus a mismatch between on the one hand the energy profiles of OLED screens and on the other hand user habits and current webpage design practices. This example thus raises important questions about system boundaries and about how to evaluate sustainable (or “sustainable”) technologies.

    We conducted a pilot study of user acceptance of alternative, OLED-adapted color schemes for webpages. We briefly discuss the results of the study, but primarily use it as a starting point for discussing the underlying questions of where, or indeed even if it makes sense to work towards realising the OLED screens’ potential for energy savings. Moving from LED to OLED screens is not only a matter of choosing between competing screen technologies, but would rather have implications for hardware and software design as well as for the practices of web designers, end users and content providers. 

  • 22.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Ctr Sustainable Commun, Sch Comp Sci & Commun, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ahlsén, Edvard
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC). KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Comp Sci & Commun, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Engelbert, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC). KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Comp Sci & Commun, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Designing for sustainability: Breakthrough or suboptimisation?2016In: PROCEEDINGS OF ICT FOR SUSTAINABILITY 2016 / [ed] Grosso, P Lago, P Osseyran, A, ATLANTIS PRESS , 2016, p. 52-59Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technological developments in screen technologies pitches the thinner, brighter and energy-stingy OLED screen as a possible replacement for today's television, computer and smartphone LCD screens. An OLED screen does not consume any energy at all when it displays the color black, but the potentially large energy savings can unfortunately evaporate and instead turn to losses when white is displayed. There is thus a mismatch between on the one hand the energy profiles of OLED screens and on the other hand user habits and current webpage design practices. This example thus raises important questions about system boundaries and about how to evaluate sustainable (or "sustainable") technologies. We conducted a pilot study of user acceptance of alternative, OLED-adapted color schemes for webpages. We briefly discuss the results of the study, but primarily use it as a starting point for discussing the underlying questions of where, or indeed even if it makes sense to work towards realising the OLED screens' potential for energy savings. Moving from LED to OLED screens is not only a matter of choosing between competing screen technologies, but would rather have implications for hardware and software design as well as for the practices of web designers, end users and content providers.

  • 23.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231). Media / Computer Game Development, School of Humanities and Informatics, University of Skövde, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Andreas
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Law, order and conflicts of interest in massively multiplayer online games2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In huge online games where great numbers of players can be connected at the same time, social interaction is complex and conflicts become part of everyday life. There is a set of rules and norms in the game for what is allowed and what is prohibited and these are partly set up by the game publisher and partly evolve among the players themselves over time. This paper describes and exemplifies a number of often-contested behaviors around which most in-game conflicts in the massively multiplayer online games (MMOG) Everquest revolve. Using these examples as a starting point, the paper presents a conceptual framework for analyzing conflicts and allegiance in MMOGs.

  • 24.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    At odds with a worldview: teaching limits at a technical university2016In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 36-39Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    “It’s not fair!”: making students engage in sustainability2013In: Proceedings of the EESD13 Conference, Cambridge, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we address the issue of teaching a subject, sustainability, that ideally should permeate the whole engineering education, but at the moment often plays a minor role in the curriculum. Here we discuss the tactics of planning and conducting a sustainability course with the explicit goal of truly engaging the students and making an impact on their thinking. Furthermore, we here present a framework that can be used in course planning and analysis. Finally, we discuss how this framework was used in our sustainability course for Media Technology engineering students at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, and the engagement and resulting change in students perception of sustainability. Moreover, we argue that beyond rethinking the engineer and the engineering education, we also need to rethink our roles as university teachers.

  • 26.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Comber, Robert
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kirman, Ben
    Bates, Oliver
    The futures of computing and wisdom2018In: Proceedings of the 10th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction - NordiCHI ’18, ACM Press, 2018, p. 960-963Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been an increasing interest in discussing the consequences of the technologies we invent and study in HCI. Whether it is climate change, ethical computing, capitalist and neo-liberal models of commerce and society, grassroots movements, big data or alternative paradigms in distributed systems, this workshop will invite participants to explore these consequences and ask how we move forward with responsibility and new forms of knowing and knowledge. We invite participants to join us, as we cast forward fifty years to 2068 to imagine the future of wisdom, and to reflect on how we got there. By writing Fictional Abstracts, an abstract from a research paper yet to be written, we will unpick critical tensions in the advancement of computing over the next decades. The workshop will develop perspectives on the futures of computing and critically reflect on the assumptions, methods, and tools for enabling (and disabling) such futures.

  • 27.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Friday, Adrian
    University of Lancaster.
    Limits to the Sharing Economy2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been much interest in the Sharing Economy in recent years, accompanied with the hope that it will change and specifically make better use of existing resources. It in- tuitively makes sense, from a sustainability point of view, that the sharing of resources is good. It could even be said that the Sharing Economy ought to align well with Comput- ing within Limits and its underlying premises. In this paper however, we take a critical stance and will elaborate on the intersection between the Sharing Economy and Limits (in- cluding pinpointing potential conflicts) so as to identify and discuss a ‘Limits-compliant Sharing Economy’. We argue that even though there are limits to the Sharing Economy today, it still has potential benefits for a future of scarcity— but only if the practice of sharing is approached with a dual focus on sharing and on limits at the same time. Finally we conclude that even though we have begun to explore the fu- ture of sharing, there is still a need to further develop ideas of how the underlying infrastructure for this movement will look. 

  • 28.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hook, Mikael
    Tanenbaum, Joshua
    Pufal, Marcel
    Wangel, Josefin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    What if there had only been half the oil?: Rewriting history to envision the consequences of peak oil2017In: Energy Research & Social Science, ISSN 2214-6296, E-ISSN 2214-6326, Vol. 31, p. 170-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is unequivocal evidence that we are facing the greatest energy transition since the dawn of the industrial age. We need to urgently shift from a global fossil fuel and CO2-emitting energy system to 1) decrease our CO2 emissions and combat the effects of climate change and 2) face a future of depleting fossil fuel resources. Yet there is still a lack of collective action to start taking effective measures to meet these challenges. We argue that there is a need for narratives in general and for a special type of narrative in particular, allohistorical scenarios, that act as thought experiments whose main function is to defamiliarize us with what is taken for granted. Such scenarios invite us to explore plausible parallel paths, thereby making it possible to imagine futures that are essentially different from the path-dependence of an unyielding historical past. Such futures enable us to grapple with a present that is saturated by the inertia of past decisions and the sunken costs of existing infrastructure. We here present the design rationale for the Coalworld scenario: an alternative world where only half the oil ever existed. We also describe the methodology and the assumptions that underlie the Coalworld scenario.

  • 29.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Aguiar Borges, Luciane
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE). KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Architecture & Built Environm, Stockholm, Sweden..
    The (Un)sustainability of Imagined Future Information Societies2017In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2017 ACM SIGCHI CONFERENCE ON HUMAN FACTORS IN COMPUTING SYSTEMS (CHI'17), ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY , 2017, p. 773-785Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pathway to a sustainable society is not clear, and we need to consider different developmental possibilities. This paper describes the results of a research project in the intersection of HCI and Futures Studies as well as in the intersection between "the future information society" and sustainability. We here present parts of the body of materials that were developed in a multi-year research project with the aim of describing and evaluating the sustainability impact of possible future information societies. We also discuss some of the lessons learned and what HCI and design fiction can learn from Futures Studies in general and from this project in particular. The main stakeholders in this project have been city administrators and corporate partners, and the overarching goal has primarily been to influence planning processes at the regional (Stockholm, Sweden) level.

  • 30.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    Preist, C.
    Håkansson, M.
    Knowles, B.
    Is there a European strand of sustainable HCI?2014In: Proceedings of the NordiCHI 2014: The 8th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Fun, Fast, Foundational, 2014, p. 809-812Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainability has been an established topic at the main CHI conference since 2007. It has, however, not been an equally prominent theme at the NordiCHI conference. It is now time to establish Sustainable HCI as an important and prominent topic also at NordiCHI.

  • 31.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Useless games for a sustainable world2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many adults - not the least in the context their children’s gaming habits - think that computer games are a useless waste of time and money. Even gamers themselves can think that their gaming habit represents a less-than-useful activity and that they ought to do something else (or at least play less). We here make no normative judgements about the utility (or not) of games but instead analyse computer games from a sustainability perspective. Are computer games “useful” or are they “useless” when regarded through a sustainability lens and against a backdrop of problematising the relationship between sustainability and consumption?

     

    In the sustainability discourse it is clear that Westerners urgently need to decrease their consumption. Or, do they actually only need to decrease the material footprint of their consumption? Could it in fact be the case that high-and-increasing volumes of commerce around digital computer game artefacts (downloadable content, virtual objects and badges) could be framed as “environmentally beneficial”, since the money in question is not spent on other activities, products and services with a considerably higher materials footprint? That would mean that spending money for a “useless” virtual badge inside a computer game actually could be framed as “useful” act of anti-conspicuous consumption in a larger - non-digital - societal context[1] . Analysing the materials intensity of consuming digital content and services is however complicated by the fact that digital games can have tangible real-world material (rebound) effect. With this summer’s large-scale Pokémon Go craze, sales of powerbanks exploded and some half-jokingly referred to these as ‘Pokebanks’. This furthermore echoes last year’s increase in the sales of graphic cards then the computationally demanding game “Witcher 3” was released.

     

    We have, as researchers/lecturers in Media Technology and as parents thought about the sustainability impact of computer games for some time and look forward to having the opportunity to develop these ideas in a paper to your workshop on “Uselessness”.

    conspicuous consumption inside the computer game but anti-conspicuous consumption from the point of view of the larger society.

  • 32.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Patterns of Engagement: Using a board game as a tool to address sustainability in engineering educations2016In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Engineering Education for Sustainable Development / [ed] Mazijn, Bernard, Brugge, Belgium: Instituut vóór Duurzame Ontwikkeling vzw , 2016, p. 302-310Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Global Dimension in Engineering Education (GDEE) refers to all non-technical topics that will impact the engineering profession at a global level over the next couple of decades. As teachers at a Media Technology engineering programme at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Computer Science and Communication, we have definitely felt that substantial amounts of ingenuity is required to make students interested in such topics, since many of the students regard them as non- central or of little interest when compared to their (non-GDEE) “core” interests, skills and aspirations.

    We here describe how we have worked to overcome students’ (potential) aversion to one particular GDEE topic, sustainability, by incorporating a board game, Gasuco, into the introductory module of a course about “Media Technology and Sustainability”. We describe and analyse our use of the game in terms of “pedagogical patterns for learning” (Laudrillard, 2012). 

  • 33.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hedin, Björn
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Using Group Supervision and Social Annotation Systems to Support Students’ Academic Writing2013In: Högre Utbildning, ISSN 2000-7558, E-ISSN 2000-7558, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 129-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this best practice paper, we present how we have used a Social annotation system (SAS) in a bachelor’s thesis course in media technology to support students’ academic writing. In the paper, we reflect on both technical and social practices with using SAS. Despite limited instructional support and despite the fact that different groups used SAS in different ways, there have been a high completion rate, good quality of the theses and satisfied students. The combination of group supervision and the use of SAS has been successful, especially when taking into consideration that this was the first year we broadly introduced SAS in the bachelor’s thesis course. 

  • 34.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Jakobsson, Peter
    Do you believe in magic? Computer games in everyday life2008In: European Journal of Cultural Studies, ISSN 1367-5494, E-ISSN 1460-3551, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 225-U114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Huizinga's concept of a 'magic circle' has been used to depict computer games and gaming activities as something separate from ordinary life. In this view, games are special (magical) and they only come to life within temporal and spatial borders that are enacted and performed by the participants. This article discusses the concept of a 'magic circle' and finds that it lacks specificity. Attempts to use the concept of a magic circle create a number of anomalies that are problematic. This is not, as has been suggested earlier, primarily a matter of the genre of the game, or a discussion of what an appropriate definition of a 'game' might be. Rather, in this study with hardcore gamers, playing computer games is a routine and mundane activity, making the boundary between play and non-play tenuous to say the least. This article presents an alternative theoretical framework which should be explored further.

  • 35.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Jakobsson, Peter
    Södertörn University.
    Five perspectives on computer game history2007In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 26-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This column on computer game history, from the perspective of the gaming industry, complements the column from the last issue on the history of virtual worlds. I met Daniel Pargman, then a graduate student studying multiplayer games, exactly ten years ago. He told me that one day there would be a research field dedicated to online games, and he planned to be there. The field is indeed emerging, with Daniel as a major contributor.---Jonathan Grudin, column editor

  • 36.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Jakobsson, Peter
    University of Södertörn.
    The magic is gone: A critical examination of the gaming situation2006In: Proceedings of Mediaterra: Gaming realities: A challenge for digital culture / [ed] Manthos Santorineos, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Palme, Jacob
    Stockholm University.
    ASCII imperialism2009In: Standards and Their Stories: How Quantifying, Classifying, and Formalizing Practices Shape Everyday Life / [ed] Lampland, Martha och Leigh Star, Susan, Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2009, p. 177-199Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Palme, Jacob
    Stockholm University.
    Linguistic standardization on the Internet2004In: 4th International Conference on Cultural Attitudes Towards Technology and Communication / [ed] C. Ess and F. Sudweeks, 2004, p. 385-388Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Raghavan, B.
    Introduction to LIMITS ’15: First workshop on computing within limits2015In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 1-1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Raghavan, B.
    Rethinking sustainability in computing: From buzzword to non-negotiable limits2014In: Proceedings of the NordiCHI 2014: The 8th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Fun, Fast, Foundational, 2014, p. 638-647Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent years have seen a flurry of work on sustainable computing and sustainable HCI, but it is unclear whether this body of work adheres to a meaningful definition of sustainability. In this paper, we review four interlocking frameworks that together provide a rigorous foundation for what constitutes sustainability. Each consecutive framework both builds upon and can loosely be seen as a refinement of the previous framework. More specifically, we leverage prominent ecological thinking from outside of computer science to inform what sustainability means in the context of computing. To this end, we re-evaluate some recent results from the field of sustainable HCI and offer thoughts on further research in the field.

  • 41.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ringenson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Rivera, Miriam Börjesson
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
    Schmitz, Lisa
    KTH.
    Krinaki, Maria
    KTH.
    Prekratic, Nino
    KTH.
    Lundkvist, Björn
    KTH.
    Smart magic city run: Exploring the implications of public augmented reality games2018In: 9th International Conference on Intelligent Technologies for Interactive Entertainment, INTETAIN 2017, Springer, 2018, Vol. 215, p. 151-158Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an augmented reality smart city gaming concept, Magic Run. Magic Run has entertainment value and fulfills its’ original brief, but several aspects of the game were found to be problematic during a workshop with smart city researchers. We present problematic aspects of the game as well as ideas for how to redesign the game to control or ameliorate problematic interaction between future smart city players and bystanders.

  • 42.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Walldius, Åke
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    HCI in a World of Limitations: Addressing the Social Resilience of Computing2013In: Post-Sustainability - A CHI 2013 Sustainability Community Workshop, 2013, Vol. 27Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Most computer scientistsand practitioners assume that we live in a world of possibilities and that inexorable forces of technological development will help bring us a future of increased wellbeing and of growing economic prosperity. An increasing number of scientists however point at the triple crisis(ecology, economy, energy) and imagine radically different futures based not on expansion and possibilities, but on limitations and/or decline. We propose that a broad program should be formulated that takes biophysical and economic limitations as its starting point and outline some areas that are paramount for HCI to come to grips with.

  • 43.
    Pargman, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Wallsten, B.
    Resource scarcity and socially just internet access over time and space2017In: LIMITS 2017 - Proceedings of the 2017 Workshop on Computing Within Limits, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc , 2017, p. 29-36Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Computing within Limits is concerned with "the impact of present and future ecological, material, energetic, and societal limits on computing". This paper discusses limits to computing by adopting a resource perspective on the provisioning of infrastructure for computing with a particular focus on present and future availability of material resources such as minerals and energy. While making claims about resources in general, we use copper as a specific example of coping with finiteness. The first part of the paper summarizes known facts but it is also a set-up for the latter part of the paper where we problematize the concept of "innovation" and argue that the term needs to be both refined and broadened to also take scarcity and just access to resources into account. We suggest that in a resource-constrained world and in the area of computing, a suitable goal for innovation should be to guarantee (to the largest extent possible) internet access over space and time, e.g., to the largest number of people and for the longest duration of time.

  • 44.
    Penzenstadler, Birgit
    et al.
    University of California-Irvine, USA.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Picha Edwardsson, Malin
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    ICT4S 2029: What will be the Systems Supporting Sustainability in 15 Years?2014In: Proceedings of the 2014 conference ICT for Sustainability, Atlantis Press , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research is often inspired by visions of the future. These visions can take on various narrative forms, and can fall anywhere along the spectrum from utopian to dystopian. Even though we recognize the importance of such visions to help us shape research questions and inspire rich design spaces to be explored, the opportunity to discuss them is rarely given in a research context. Imagine how civilization will have changed in 15 years. What is your vision for systems that will be supporting sustainability in that time Which transformational changes will have occurred in the mean time that allow for these systems Is ICT even the right tool or does it contradict sustainability by making our world ever more complex How can we make systems and our societies more sustainable and resilient by ICT4S This paper presents a compilation of fictional abstracts for inspiration and discussion, and provides means to stimulate discussion on future research and contributes to ICT4S community building.

  • 45.
    Picha Edwardsson, Malin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Explorative scenarios of emerging media trends2014In: Journal of Print and Media Technology Research, ISSN 2223-8905, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 195-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dealing with the on-going structural changes in the media landscape is one of the most urgent challenges in today's society, both for people working in the media industry and for consumers trying to adapt to a large and increasing number of new media technologies and services. In this article, we present and discuss a number of current media trends, outline possible future scenarios and evaluate and discuss these scenarios in terms of future media consumption, mainly focusing on the Nordic media market. The research questions are: What are the main media consumption trends today, and what could be the most important characteristics of media consumption in different future scenarios? We have used a combination of a future studies approach, semi-structured expert interviews and design fiction methodology. We have organized two reference group workshops and then interviewed 11 media experts, both from the media industry and the academic world, and combined the results of these interviews and workshops with the significant media trends generated through design fiction methodology in the project course "The Future of Media" at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm.

    One of the conclusions drawn is that the mobile phone (smartphone) and other mobile devices such as tablets, etc., are playing an increasingly important role in current media consumption trends. We can see this through an increased number of mobile devices, an increased use of multiple devices (often used simultaneously) and in the fact that users tend to be "always connected and always synchronized". Another conclusion drawn is that there is an increased focus on personalized and individualized news with more co-creation and sharing of media content. The amount of non-text formats for news, e.g., video, is increasing, as well as the need for a high-speed, high-quality infrastructure/network. The news consumers are increasingly time-pressed, and commute more, which creates new and different demands on the media content, such as being easily accessible at all times and places. Finally, more data is collected by media companies about the consumption habits of media users and more surveillance is performed on citizens by governments and corporations. When interviewed about the scenarios and trends in this study, the experts considered the most desirable future society to have a balanced mix of governmental control and commercial powers. As an example, public service media was considered an important counterbalance to commercially oriented media companies. According to the experts that were interviewed, aspects of all four proposed scenarios could however become true in the future, depending on choices made both on an individual level and on a societal level.

  • 46.
    Raghavan, Barath
    et al.
    ICSI, Berkeley, CA 94704 USA..
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Means and Ends in Human-Computer Interaction: Sustainability through Disintermediation2017In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2017 ACM SIGCHI CONFERENCE ON HUMAN FACTORS IN COMPUTING SYSTEMS (CHI'17), ASSOC COMPUTING MACHINERY , 2017, p. 786-796Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been an increased interest in broader contexts from ecology and economics within the HCI community in recent years. These developments suggest that the HCI community should engage with and respond to concerns that are external to computing yet profoundly impact human society. In this paper we observe that taking these broader contexts into account yields a fundamentally different way to think about sustainable interaction design, one in which the designer's focus must be on a) ecological limits, b) creating designs and artifacts that do not further a cornucopian paradigm, and c) fundamental human needs. It can be hard to be responsive to these contexts in practical HCI work. To address this, we propose that the design rubric of disintermediation can serve as a unifying approach for work that aims to meet the ecological and economic challenges outlined in the literature. After discussing the potential use and impact of disintermedation, we perform an analysis using this design rubric to several key application areas.

  • 47.
    Raghavan, Barath
    et al.
    ICSI.
    Pargman, DanielKTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Computing within Limits: LIMITS'162016Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Raghavan, Barath
    et al.
    ICSI.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Refactoring Society: Systems Complexity in an Age of Limits2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Computing systems can be seen as the latest instance in a long chain of sociotechnical developments that have increased social complexity at an accelerated pace [4, 23, 24]. Today global in- dustrial society is particularly dependent upon and highly medi- ated by many computing systems. Over the past several decades, the growth of such systems have by and large been a boon as they have enabled a revolution in the way we communicate, work, and live. During this time, computer scientists in particular have con- tributed much to the development and spread of systems that have subtly, but unmistakably, transformed global society. Computing systems have also amplified sociotechnical complexity and accel- erated previous trends far more than prior technologies because of the inherent complexity of networked systems and the interlinking of previously independent systems [14]. 

  • 49.
    Rambusch, Jana
    et al.
    University of Skövde.
    Jakobsson, Peter
    University of Södertörn.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    Exploring E-sports: A Case Study of Gameplay in Counter-strike2007In: Situated Play, 2007, p. 157-164Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, a case study of Counter-strike is presented in which cognitive, cultural, onomical, and technological aspects of people’s gameplay activities are discussed. Most attention is given to Counter-strike as an e-sport – competitive gameplay which borrows forms from traditional sports. Also, methodological and theoretical issues related to the study are discussed, including issues of player-centered approaches and issues related to the crossdisciplinarily of the study, which borrows perspectives from cognitive science as well as cultural studies

  • 50.
    Skågeby, Jörgen
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Pargman, Daniel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media.
    File-sharing relationships: Conflicts of interest in online gift-giving2005In: Communities and Technologies 2005 / [ed] VandenBesselaar, P; DeMichelis, G; Preece, J, Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands, 2005, p. 111-127Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper suggests a relationship model for describing, analyzing and foreseeing conflicts of interest in file-sharing networks. The model includes levels of relationship ranging from the individual (ego), to the small group of close peers (micro), to a larger network of acquaintances (meso) to the anonymous larger network (macro). It is argued that an important focal point for analysis of cooperation and conflict is situated in the relations between these levels. Three examples of conflicts from a studied file-sharing network are presented. Finally, the relationship model is discussed in terms of applicability to other domains, recreational as well as professional.

12 1 - 50 of 53
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