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  • 1.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nordenström, Malin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ion-induced assemblies of highly anisotropic nanoparticles are governed by ion-ion correlation and specific ion effects2019In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, E-ISSN 2040-3372, Vol. 11, no 8, p. 3514-3520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ion-induced assemblies of highly anisotropic nanoparticles can be explained by a model consisting of ion-ion correlation and specific ion effects: dispersion interactions, metal-ligand complexes, and local acidic environments. Films of cellulose nanofibrils and montmorillonite clay were treated with different ions, and their subsequent equilibrium swelling in water was related to important parameters of the model in order to investigate the relative importance of the mechanisms. Ion-ion correlation was shown to be the fundamental attraction, supplemented by dispersion interaction for polarizable ions such as Ca2+ and Ba2+, or metal-ligand complexes for ions such as Cu2+, Al3+ and Fe3+. Ions that form strong complexes induce local acidic environments that also contribute to the assembly. These findings are summarized in a comprehensive semi-quantitative model and are important for the design of nanomaterials and for understanding biological systems where specific ions are involved.

  • 2.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Nordenström, Malin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Lindstrom, Stefan B.
    Linkoping Univ, Div Solid Mech, Dept Management & Engn, S-58183 Linkoping, Sweden..
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH Royal Inst Technol, Div Fibre Technol, Dept Fiber & Polymer Technol, Tekn Ringen 56-58, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden.;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, Dept Fiber & Polymer Technol, Tekn Ringen 56-58, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Explaining the Exceptional Wet Integrity of Transparent Cellulose Nanofibril Films in the Presence of Multivalent Ions-Suitable Substrates for Biointerfaces2019In: Advanced Materials Interfaces, ISSN 2196-7350, Vol. 6, no 13, article id 1900333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) assemble into water-resilient materials in the presence of multivalent counter-ions. The essential mechanisms behind these assemblies are ion-ion correlation and specific ion effects. A network model shows that the interfibril attraction indirectly influences the wet modulus by a fourth power relationship to the solidity of the network (E-w proportional to phi(4)). Ions that induce both ion-ion correlation and specific ion effects significantly reduce the swelling of the films, and due to the nonlinear relationship dramatically increase the wet modulus. Herein, this network model is used to explain the elastoplastic behavior of wet films of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (TEMPO)-oxidized, carboxymethylated, and phosphorylated CNFs in the presence of different counter-ions. The main findings are that the aspect ratio of the CNFs influences the ductility of the assemblies, that the bivalency of phosphorylate ligands probably limits the formation of interfibril complexes with divalent ions, and that a higher charge density increases the friction between fibrils by increasing the short-range attraction from ion-ion correlation and specific ion effects. These findings can be used to rationally design CNF materials for a variety of applications where wet strength, ductility, and transparency are important, such as biomaterials or substrates for bioelectronics.

  • 3.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nordenström, Malin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Stefan
    Linköping University.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Explaining the exceptional wet integrity of transparent cellulose nanofibril films in the presence of multivalent ions - Suitable substrates for biointerfacesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Kaldéus, Tahani
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nordenström, Malin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Carlmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Insights into the EDC-mediated PEGylation of cellulose nanofibrils and their colloidal stability2018In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 181, p. 871-878Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    EDC-mediated coupling has frequently been utilized to poly(ethylene glycol) functionalize (PEGylate) cellulose-based materials, but no work has previously been reported on the direct N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N-ethylcarbodiimide (EDC)-mediated PEGylation of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF). Herein, we report the first study where CNF has been directly sterically stabilized with amine-terminated PEG employing N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)-assisted EDC-coupling. This work has shown that this coupling reaction is highly sensitive to the reaction conditions and purification procedures, and hence an optimized coupling protocol was developed in order to achieve a reaction yield. Elemental analysis of the nitrogen content also showed the successful PEGylation. It was also shown that a surprisingly low PEGylation (1%) is sufficient to significantly improve the colloidal stability of the PEGylated samples, which reached dispersion-arrested-state-transitions at higher concentrations than neat CNF. The colloidal stability was preserved with increasing ionic strength, when comparably long polymer chains were grafted, targeting only 1% PEGylation.

  • 5.
    Kaldéus, Tahani
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Nordenström, Malin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Redispersibility properties of dried cellulose nanofibrils - influence on structure and mechanical propertiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Kaldéus, Tahani
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Nordenström, Malin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Erlandsson, Johan
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Coating Technology.
    Redispersibility properties of dried cellulose nanofibrils - influence on structure and mechanical properties2019In: Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Nordenström, Malin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Fall, Andreas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nyström, Gustav
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Formation of Colloidal Nanocellulose Glasses and Gels2017In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 33, no 38, p. 9772-9780Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocellulose (NC) suspensions can form rigid volume-spanning arrested states (VASs) at very low volume fractions. The transition from a free-flowing dispersion to a VAS can be the result of either an increase in particle concentration or a reduction in interparticle repulsion. In this work, the concentration-induced transition has been studied with a special focus on the influence of the particle aspect ratio and surface charge density, and an attempt is made to classify these VASs. The results show that for these types of systems two general states can be identified: glasses and gels. These NC suspensions had threshold concentrations inversely proportional to the particle aspect ratio. This dependence indicates that the main reason for the transition is a mobility constraint that, together with the reversibility of the transition, classifies the VASs as colloidal glasses. If the interparticle repulsion is reduced, then the glasses can transform into gels. Thus, depending on the preparation route, either soft and reversible glasses or stiff and irreversible gels can be formed.

  • 8.
    Nordenström, Malin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nystrom, Gustav
    Empa, Lab Appl Wood Mat, Dubendorf, Switzerland..
    Fall, Andreas
    Res Inst Sweden, RISE, Bioecon, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, VinnExcellence Center BiMaC Innovation. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Colloidal gels and glasses from nanocelluloses2019In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 257Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Nordenström, Malin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Riazanova, Anastasia
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Järn, Mikael
    RISE Res Inst Sweden, Div Biosci & Mat, SE-11428 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Paulraj, Thomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Turner, Charlotta
    Lund Univ, Dept Chem, SE-22100 Lund, Sweden..
    Ström, Valter
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
    Olsson, Richard
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Svagan, Anna
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Superamphiphobic coatings based on liquid-core microcapsules with engineered capsule walls and functionality2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 3647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microcapsules with specific functional properties, related to the capsule wall and core, are highly desired in a number of applications. In this study, hybrid cellulose microcapsules (1.2 +/- 0.4 mu m in diameter) were prepared by nanoengineering the outer walls of precursor capsules. Depending on the preparation route, capsules with different surface roughness (raspberry or broccoli-like), and thereby different wetting properties, could be obtained. The tunable surface roughness was achieved as a result of the chemical and structural properties of the outer wall of a precursor capsule, which combined with a new processing route allowed in-situ formation of silica nanoparticles (30-40 nm or 70 nm in diameter). By coating glass slides with "broccoli-like" microcapsules (30-40 nm silica nanoparticles), static contact angles above 150 degrees and roll-off angles below 6 degrees were obtained for both water and low surface-tension oil (hexadecane), rendering the substrate superamphiphobic. As a comparison, coatings from raspberry-like capsules were only strongly oleophobic and hydrophobic. The liquid-core of the capsules opens great opportunities to incorporate different functionalities and here hydrophobic superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPIONs) were encapsulated. As a result, magnetic broccoli-like microcapsules formed an excellent superamphiphobic coating-layer on a curved geometry by simply applying an external magnetic field.

  • 10.
    Nordenström, Malin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Ödberg, Lars Göran
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Colloidal interactions in nanocellulose systems2016In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 251Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Rosén, Tomas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Mittal, Nitesh
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nordenström, Malin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Håkansson, Karl M. O.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Yu, Shun
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Roth, Stephan
    Zhang, Peng
    Iwamoto, Hiroyuki
    Lundell, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    On the applicability of time-resolved synchrotron X-ray techniques for studying rotary diffusion of dispersed cellulose nanofibrilsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Wågberg, Lars
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Fall, Andreas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nordenström, Malin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Colloidal properties of cellulose nanofibrils2016In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 251Article in journal (Other academic)
1 - 12 of 12
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