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  • 1.
    Boschloo, Gerrit K.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Physical Chemistry (closed 20110630). KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Edvinsson, Tomas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Physical Chemistry (closed 20110630). KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Hagfeldt, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Physical Chemistry (closed 20110630). KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Dye-Sensitized Nanostructured ZnO Electrodes for Solar Cell Applications2006In: Nanostructured Materials for Solar Energy Conversion, Elsevier, 2006, p. 227-254Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter describes dye-sensitized nanostructured ZnO electrodes for solar cell applications. Dye-sensitized nanostructured solar cells (DNSCs) based on nanostructured metal oxide films have attracted much attention in recent years. This chapter explains the schematic representation of the DNSC. The performance of dye-sensitized ZnO solar cells in terms of solar-to-electrical energy conversion efficiencies is so far significantly lower than that of TiO2, reaching currently about 4-5%. An analysis of the energetics and kinetics of ZnO-based DNSCs suggests that this is mainly because of the lesser degree of optimization in case of ZnO compared to TiO2-based DNSCs. A large potential exists to improve on the performance of dye-sensitized ZnO solar cells by learning how to use new types of anchoring groups and controlling the chemistry at the oxide/dye/electrolyte interface. This, in combination with the possibilities to tailor-make ZnO materials, manifests the opportunities for future research and development of these devices.

  • 2.
    Hagberg, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Marinado, Tannia
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Physical Chemistry (closed 20110630).
    Edvinsson, Tomas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Physical Chemistry (closed 20110630).
    Boschloo, Gerrit
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Physical Chemistry (closed 20110630).
    Brinck, Tore
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Physical Chemistry (closed 20110630).
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Hagfeldt, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Physical Chemistry (closed 20110630).
    Rhodanine Dyes for Dye Sensitized Solar Cells: Spectroscopy, Energy Levels and Photovoltaic Performance2009In: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 11, p. 133-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three new sensitizers for photoelectrochemical solar cells were synthesized consisting of a triphenylamine donor, a rhodanine-3-acetic acid acceptor and a polyene connection. The conjugation length was systematically increased, which resulted in two effects: first, it led to a red-shift of the optical absorption of the dyes, resulting in an improved spectral overlap with the solar spectrum. Secondly, the oxidation potential decreased systematically. The excited state levels were, however, calculated to be nearly stationary. The experimental trends were in excellent agreement with density functional theory (DFT) computations. The photovoltaic performance of this set of dyes as sensitizers in mesoporous TiO2 solar cells was investigated using electrolytes containing the iodide/triiodide redox couple. The dye with the best absorption characteristics showed the poorest solar cell efficiency, due to losses by recombination of electrons in TiO2 with triiodide. Addition of 4-tert butylpyridine to the electrolyte led to a strongly reduced photocurrent for all dyes due to a reduced electron injection efficiency, caused by a 0.15 V negative shift of the TiO2 conduction band potential.

  • 3.
    Hagberg, Daniel P.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Edvinsson, Tomas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Marinado, Tannia
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Boschloo, Gerrit
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Hagfeldt, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    A novel organic chromophore for dye-sensitized nanostructured solar cells2006In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, no 21, p. 2245-2247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel and efficient polyene-diphenylaniline dye for dye-sensitized solar cells has been synthesized. The dye has a short synthesis route and is readily adsorbed on TiO2 under a variety of dye-bath conditions. The overall solar-to-energy conversion efficiency is over 5% in the preliminary tests, in comparison with the conventional N719 dye which gives 6% under the same conditions. The dye is designed for future use also in solid state devices, with triarylamine based hole conductors.

  • 4.
    Marinado, Tannia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Edvinsson, Tomas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Boschloo, Gerrit
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Influence of π-Conjugation Units in Organic Dyes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells2007In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 111, no 4, p. 1853-1860Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two organic dyes with the general structure donor-conjugated chain-acceptor (D-pi-A) have been investigated as sensitizers for nanocrystalline TiO2 solar cells. The electron donor and acceptor groups were pyrrolidine and cyano acrylic acid, respectively. The conjugated chain of 2-cyano-3-{5-[2-(4-pyrrolidin-1-ylphenyl)vinyl]thiophen-2-yl}acrylic acid contains one phenyl ring and a thiophene unit and is therefore denoted PT, while for 2-cyano-3-{5 -[2-(5-pyrrolidin-1-ylthiophen-2-yl)vinyl]thiophen-2-yl}acrylic acid the phenyl ring is replaced by a second thiophene unit (TT). Solar-to-electrical energy conversion efficiencies under simulated AM 1.5 irradiation (1000 W m(-2)) of 2.3% were obtained for solar cells based on PT but of less than 0.05% for those based on TT. The reasons for the dramatic difference of the efficiencies were analyzed. Photoinduced absorption measurements revealed that the TT dye was not properly regenerated by redox electrolyte after electron injection. This sluggish regeneration is probably due to the 0.3 V less positive HOMO level for TT dye compared to the PT dye, resulting in a lower driving force for regeneration of the oxidized dye by iodide in the electrolyte. In addition, regeneration of the oxidized TT dye and electron injection from the excited TT dye may be poor due to formation of dye aggregates/complexes, as FT-IR measurements show an excess of not properly and/or unidentate bound TT dye molecules instead of bidentate bound PT dye molecules. The results highlight that small structural change of dyes results in significant changes in redox energies and binding features, affecting dramatically the performance of these dyes in dye-sensitized solar cells.

  • 5.
    Marinado, Tannia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Hagberg, Daniel P.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry.
    Edvinsson, Tomas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Brinck, Tore
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Physical Chemistry.
    Boschloo, Gerrit
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Tian, Haining
    Yang, Xixhuan
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Hagfeldt, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Energy level tuning of organic dyes for fundamental studies of the oxide/dye/electrolyte interface in solar cellsManuscript (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Vargas-Florencia, Dulce
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Physical Chemistry.
    Furo, Istvan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Physical Chemistry.
    Edvinsson, Tomas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Hagfeldt, Anders
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Centre of Molecular Devices, CMD.
    Pores in nanostructured TiO2 films. Size distribution and pore permeability2007In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 111, no 21, p. 7605-7611Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanoporous films of crystalline anatase with intended application in dye-sensitized photovoltaic cells were investigated by NMR cryoporometry, NMR diffusiometry, electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The nanoparticles from which the films were subsequently sintered were prepared in two ways, one with an acidic and one with a basic aqueous process environment and along different temperature regimes. The average morphology was similar in all films as indicated by the roughly identical < 2 kappa V/S > values where kappa is the mean curvature of the pore surface and S/V denotes the surface-to-volume ratio. Self-diffusion of water in the pores is strongly reduced with respect to that of bulk and is influenced both by micrometer-scale obstructions to molecular displacement and by pore-size effect in pore interconnectivity. The investigated samples exhibit different transport regimes as concerning those phenomena. In this initial study performed on a limited set of samples, we found no linear correlation between particle and pore sizes. Instead, total porosity is controlled by particle-particle jamming which, together with particle size polydispersity, may also dominate the effects that lead to the observed pore size distributions for the different samples. The rich variation of structural effects and transport properties among the few prepared films call for further studies in order to find an optimal film structure.

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