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  • 1.
    Aidi, Laili
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Huang, Jin
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Selvakumar, Ekambar
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Markendahl, Jan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Blennerud, Greger
    Ericsson.
    How can Mobile Music Streaming Service Take off in India, China and Indonesia?: Analysis of Drivers and Obstacles2012In: , 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Aidi, Laili
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Markendahl, Jan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Blennerud, Greger
    Ericsson.
    Competing or Aligning? Assessment for Telecom Operator's strategy to address OTT TV/Video services2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Up until recently, it was rarely direct competition between telecom operators, cable and satellite Pay-TV providers in digital TV/Video, as their business area were different and value chain was well established. However, technology advance has altered digital TV/Video landscape, made these Communication Service Providers (CSPs) cross other’s area and opened door for new actor (OTT player) to enter the market. This triggers second change in the landscape, as it potentially bypasses CSP’s role in digital media value chain.

    There are generic potential options for telecom operator to address OTT service‘s treat, where the trend shows gradual shifts toward allowing or promoting. This study assesses telecom operator’s reaction strategies to react to this digital TV/Video convergence trend. Our analysis reveals two typical relation patterns in the value network, used by telecom operators based on strategy options above, which are ”point-to-point” and ”point-to-multipoint” relation model. We explore the underlining motivations that based these strategies, as well as analysis of the eco-systems: actors identification, business roles and distributed responsibilities among them, where we use ARA (Actors, Resource, Activities) point of view to model these value networks.

  • 3. Alexanderson, Petter
    et al.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    Department of Informatics, HCID Group.
    Being and mixing: designing interactive soundscapes2006In: Proceedings of the 4th Nordic conference on Human-computer interaction: changing roles, 2006, p. 252-261Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a study of the auditory environment in a chemical factory, and how a group of process operators ascribe meaning to a selection of sound clips from their daily work environment. We argue for a design-oriented phenomenological approach to soundscape studies, and suggest an approach based on an exploration of how already occurring sounds are used. This knowledge will be used to inform the design of new useful auditory environments. Our study shows that the richness of the auditory environment is a crucial aspect of the distributed work environment. An important part of the design process is the operator’s contribution to the concepts suggested. From design workshops several design concepts aiming to explore and test different approaches for making sound affordances available have been developed. This has led us to a new understanding of how interactive soundscapes enable distributed awareness – what we refer to as ’Being and Mixing’.

  • 4.
    Ballesteros, Luis Guillermo Martinez
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab).
    Ickin, Selim
    Fiedler, Markus
    Markendahl, Jan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab).
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Radio Systems Laboratory (RS Lab).
    Wac, Katarzyna
    Energy Saving Approaches for Video Streaming on Smartphone based on QoE Modeling2016In: 2016 13TH IEEE ANNUAL CONSUMER COMMUNICATIONS & NETWORKING CONFERENCE (CCNC), Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we study the influence of video stalling on QoE. We provide QoE models that are obtained in realistic scenarios on the smartphone, and provide energy-saving approaches for smartphone by leveraging the proposed QoE models in relation to energy. Results show that approximately 5J is saved in a 3 minutes video clip with an acceptable Mean Opinion Score (MOS) level when the video frames are skipped. If the video frames are not skipped, then it is suggested to avoid freezes during a video stream as the freezes highly increase the energy waste on the smartphones.

  • 5. Bentley, F.
    et al.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab).
    The power of mobile notifications to increase wellbeing logging behavior2013In: CHI '13 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM Digital Library, 2013, p. 1095-1098Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-logging is a critical component to many wellbeing systems. However, self-logging often is difficult to sustain at regular intervals over many weeks. We demonstrate the power of passive mobile notifications to increase logging of wellbeing data, particularly food intake, in a mobile health service. Adding notifications increased the frequency of logging from 12% in a one-month, ten-user pilot study without reminders to 63% in the full 60-user study with reminders included. We will discuss the benefits of passive notifications over existing interruptive methods.

  • 6. Bentley, F
    et al.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Dernirdjian, D
    Koile, K
    Darrell, T
    Perceptive presence2003In: IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, ISSN 0272-1716, E-ISSN 1558-1756, Vol. 23, p. 26-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perceptive presence systems automatically convey awareness of user states to a remote location or application without the user having to perform explicit commands or mode selection. The article describes a component-based architecture for creating presence applications using perceptual user interface widgets. Each widget performs a machine perception function, such as tracking a face or monitoring activity in a specific 3D location. Widgets provide an abstraction barrier between the perception algorithms and the needs of application writers. Two example applications developed using this framework are presented: one uses a luminous display to express a user’s availability for communication to a colleague at a remote location, and a second uses activity to control devices in a context-aware environment.

  • 7. Bentley, Frank
    et al.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Designing From Data: A Case Study From the Health Mashups Service2013In: Workshop on Informing Future Design via Large-Scale Research Methods and Big Data, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Instrumentation of mobile service interactions now allows for the ability to understand use in new ways and to base the design of system iterations as well as future services on data obtained from use “in the wild”over extended periods of time. This position paper will detail a few specific instances in the Health Mashupsproject where we were able to use usage data to improve the design and to create design implications to increase engagement in new services.

  • 8. Bentley, Frank
    et al.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Stephenson, Peter
    Levy, Laura
    Jones, Brian
    Robertson, Scott
    Price, Ed
    Catrambone, Richard
    Wilson, Jeff
    Health Mashups: Presenting Statistical Patterns between Wellbeing Data and Context in Natural Language to Promote Behavior Change2013In: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, ISSN 1073-0516, E-ISSN 1557-7325, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 30-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People now have access to many sources of data about their health and wellbeing. Yet, most people cannot wade through all of this data to answer basic questions about their long-term wellbeing: Do I gain weight when I have busy days? Do I walk more when I work in the city? Do I sleep better on nights after I work out? We built the Health Mashups system to identify connections that are significant over time between weight, sleep, step count, calendar data, location, weather, pain, food intake, and mood. These significant observations are displayed in a mobile application using natural language, for example, "You are happier on days when you sleep more." We performed a pilot study, made improvements to the system, and then conducted a 90-day trial with 60 diverse participants, learning that interactions between wellbeing and context are highly individual and that our system supported an increased self-understanding that lead to focused behavior changes.

  • 9. Browall, C.
    et al.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Petterson, F.
    Camelot - Rundabordssamtal och seminarier kring framtidens boende (A workshop serie about domestic technologies)2002Book (Other academic)
  • 10. Darrell, T. J.
    et al.
    Yeh, T.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Photo-based mobile deixis system and related techniques2004Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11. Darrell, Trevor
    et al.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Bentley, Frank
    Checka, Neal
    Morency, Loius-Phillipe
    Rahimi, Ali
    Oh, Alice
    Face-Responsive Interfaces: From Direct Manipulation to Perceptive Presence2002In: Proceedings of the 4th international conference on Ubiquitous Computing, ACM Press, 2002, p. 135-151Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systems for tracking faces using computer vision have recently become practical for human-computer interface applications. We are developing prototype systems for face-responsive interaction, exploring three different interface paradigms: direct manipulation, gazemediated agent dialog, and perceptually-driven remote presence. We consider the characteristics of these types of interactions, and assess the performance of our system on each application. We have found that face pose tracking is a potentially accurate means of cursor control and selection, is seen by users as a natural way to guide agent dialog interaction, and can be used to create perceptually-driven presence artefacts which convey real-time awareness of a remote space.

  • 12. Demirdjian, D
    et al.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    Koile, K
    Checka, N
    Darrell, T
    Activity maps for location-aware computing2002In: SIXTH IEEE WORKSHOP ON APPLICATIONS OF COMPUTER VISION, PROCEEDINGS, 2002, p. 70-75Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Location-based context is important for many applications. Previous systems offered only coarse room-level features or used manually specified room regions to determine fine-scale features. We propose a location context mechanism based on activity maps, which define regions of similar context based on. observations of 3-D patterns of location and motion in an environment. We describe an algorithm for obtaining activity maps using the spatio-temporal clustering of visual tracking data. We show how the recovered maps correspond to regions for common tasks in the environment and describe their use in some applications.

  • 13.
    Devlic, Alisa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab).
    Kamaraju, Pavan
    Lungaro, Pietro
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab).
    Segall, Zary
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab).
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab).
    QoE-aware optimization for video delivery and storage2015In: 2015 IEEE 16th International Symposium on "A World of Wireless, Mobile and Multimedia Networks" (WoWMoM) 2015, Boston, MA, USA, 2015, p. 1-10Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The explosive growth of Over-the-top (OTT) online video strains capacity of operators’ networks, which severely threatens video quality perceived by end users. Since video is very bandwidth consuming, its distribution costs are becoming too high to scale with network investments that are required to support the increasing bandwidth demand. Content providers and operators are searching for solutions to reduce this video traffic load, without degrading their customers’ perceived Quality ofExperience (QoE). This paper proposes a method that can programmatically optimize video content for desired QoE accordingto perceptual video quality and device display properties, while achieving bandwidth and storage savings for content providers, operators, and end users. The preliminary results obtained with Samsung Galaxy S3 phone show that up to 60% savings can be achieved by optimizing movies without compromising the perceptible video quality, and up to 70% for perceptible, but not annoying video quality difference. Tailoring video optimization to individual user perception can provide seamless QoE delivery across all users, with a low overhead (i.e., 10%) required to achieve this goal. Finally, two applications of video optimization: QoE-aware delivery and storage, are proposed and examined.

  • 14.
    Devlic, Alisa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab).
    Kamaraju, Pavan
    Lungaro, Pietro
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab).
    Segall, Zary
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab).
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab).
    Towards QoE-aware adaptive video streaming2016In: 2015 IEEE 23rd International Symposium on Quality of Service (IWQoS), IEEE, 2016, p. 75-76, article id 7404713Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a novel QoE-aware adaptive video streaming method that enhances the viewing experience on mobile devices and reduces cellular network bandwidth consumed by Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP (DASH) by considering perceptual video quality and data rate channel conditions in the bitrate adaptation process. By streaming an optimized video for the particular video quality and channel conditions toa mobile device, we can improve the worst video qualities causedby DASH streaming and reduce quality variations using fewer number of bits.

  • 15.
    Devlic, Alisa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab).
    Kamaraju, Pavan
    Lungaro, Pietro
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab).
    Segall, Zary
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab).
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab).
    Towards QoE-aware adaptive video streaming2015In: 2014 IEEE Global Communications Conference (GLOBECOM), IEEE, 2015, p. 1317-1322Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a novel QoE-aware adaptive video streaming method that enhances the viewing experience on mobile devices and reduces cellular network bandwidth consumed by Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP (DASH) by considering perceptual video quality and data rate channel conditions in the bitrate adaptation process. By streaming an optimized video for the particular video quality and channel conditions to a mobile device, we can improve the worst video qualities caused by DASH streaming and reduce quality variations using fewer number of bits.

  • 16.
    Devlic, Alisa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab).
    Lungaro, Pietro
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Kamaraju, Pavan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab).
    Segall, Zary
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Energy consumption reduction via context-aware mobile video pre-fetching2012In: Proceedings - 2012 IEEE International Symposium on Multimedia, ISM 2012, IEEE , 2012, p. 261-265Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The arrival of smartphones and tablets, along with a flat rate mobile Internet pricing model have caused increasing adoption of mobile data services. According to recent studies, video has been the main driver of mobile data consumption, having a higher growth rate than any other mobile application. However, streaming a medium/high quality video files can be an issue in a mobile environment where available capacity needs to be shared among a large number of users. Additionally, the energy consumption in mobile devices increases proportionally with the duration of data transfers, which depend on the download data rates achievable by the device. In this respect, adoption of opportunistic content pre-fetching schemes that exploit times and locations with high data rates to deliver content before a user requests it, has the potential to reduce the energy consumption associated with content delivery and improve the user's quality of experience, by allowing playback of pre-stored content with virtually no perceived interruptions or delays. This paper presents a family of opportunistic content pre-fetching schemes and compares their performance to standard on-demand access to content. By adopting a simulation approach on experimental data, collected with monitoring software installed in mobile terminals, we show that content pre-fetching can reduce energy consumption of the mobile devices by up to 30% when compared to the on demand download of the same file, with a time window of 1 hour needed to complete the content prepositioning.

  • 17.
    Devlic, Alisa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab).
    Lungaro, Pietro
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Segall, Zary
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab). KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Evaluation of energy profiles for mobile video prefetching in generalized stochastic access channels2014In: Mobile and Ubiquitous Systems: Computing, Networking, and Services: 10th International Conference, MOBIQUITOUS 2013, Tokyo, Japan, December 2-4, 2013, Revised Selected Papers, Springer, 2014, p. 209-223Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper evaluates the energy cost reduction of Over-The-Top mobile video content prefetching in various network conditions. Energy cost reduction is achieved by reducing the time needed to download content over the radio interface by prefetching data on higher data rates, compared to the standard on demand download. To simulate various network conditions and user behavior, a stochastic access channel model was built and validated using the actual user traces. By changing the model parameters, the energy cost reduction of prefetching in different channel settings was determined, identifying regions in which prefetching is likely to deliver the largest energy gains. The results demonstrate that the largest gains (up to 70%) can be obtained for data rates with strong correlation and low noise variation. Additionally, based on statistical properties of data rates, such as peak-to-mean and average data rate, prefetching strategy can be devised enabling the highest energy cost reduction that can be obtained using the proposed prefetching scheme.

  • 18. Enquist, Henrik
    et al.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    The memory stone: a personal ICT device in health care2008In: ACM International Conference Proceeding Series: Volume 358, 2008, p. 103-112Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New technology enables novel ways of sharing information between health care recipients and providers. In this study, however, we found that the medical information for pregnant women in Denmark is located in a number of different places, that midwives and doctors spend a considerable amount of time administrating data, and that consultations are felt to be rather inefficient. This paper describes these problems and some solutions. We explore the idea of providing each woman with a digital artifact, called the Memory Stone. The goal is to supply them with tools to collect and review clinical and personal information concerning their pregnancies. The paper discusses: (1) the user-centered methodology for development of a personal device for health care information, (2) the design and evaluation of prototypes, and (3) critical issues concerning the introduction of novel personal ICT in a health care setting. The main focus is on the experiences and interests of the individual pregnant woman in the study. Several insights were gained into more general pervasive health care issues, including technical and ethical ones as well as safety and security concerns.

  • 19. Junestrand, S.
    et al.
    Keijer, U.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Design Patterns for Private and Public Digital SUMMARY Spaces in the Home Environment2001In: International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, Vol. 54, p. 753-778Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20. Junestrand, S
    et al.
    Keijer, U
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Private and public digital domestic spaces2001In: International journal of human-computer studies, ISSN 1071-5819, E-ISSN 1095-9300, Vol. 54, p. 753-778Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the introduction of information and communication technologies into our homes and the different physical and communicative expressions this implies for our living spaces the concepts of being private and of being public become crucial. In this paper, we introduce A Pattern Language, developed by Christopher Alexander in the 1970s, in order to handle these problems systematically. The presentation formally follows Alexander’s structure in five cases all related to practical experiments on being private and public at home. We start with a number of concrete user situations related to human-computer interaction. Social and communicative phenomena or possibilities end up in novel design patterns at the interface between an architectural and a technological perspective. The novel patterns presented are primarily based on experiences from practical work on the development of a conceptual dwelling of the future, comHOME, designed and constructed as a full-scale model of a flat. By creating different zones for video-mediated communication, comZONES, the user can control the private and public digital areas varying in time and space. The novel patterns refer to two separate levels. On the first level a specific pattern, called “PRIVATE AND PUBLIC DIGITAL SPACES”, is designed as a conceptual floor plan layout. This plan distributes private and public digital spaces for video-mediated communication over the flat. At a second level, four patterns show the integration of the specific comZONES aiming at solving four specific problems with video-mediated communication at home. Our intention is to describe the application of design patterns as a method for analysing and solving novel problems encountered with the introduction of information and communication technologies in our homes. The video-mediated set-ups are not dealt with in depth. They serve mainly as designs that make it possible to apply the design patterns. (C) 2001 Academic Press.

  • 21. Junestrand, S.
    et al.
    Keijer, Ulf
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Architecture.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    Private and public digital domestic spaces2001In: International journal of human-computer studies, ISSN 1071-5819, E-ISSN 1095-9300, Vol. 54, no 5, p. 753-778Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the introduction of information and communication technologies into our homes and the different physical and communicative expressions this implies for our living spaces the concepts of being private and of being public become crucial. In this paper, we introduce A Pattern Language, developed by Christopher Alexander in the 1970s, in order to handle these problems systematically. The presentation formally follows Alexander's structure in five cases all related to practical experiments on being private and public at home. We start with a number of concrete user situations related to human-computer interaction. Social and communicative phenomena or possibilities end up in novel design patterns at the interface between an architectural and a technological perspective. The novel patterns presented are primarily based on experiences from practical work on the development of a conceptual dwelling of the future, comHOME, designed and constructed as a full-scale model of a flat. By creating different zones for video-mediated communication, comZONES, the user can control the private and public digital areas varying in time and space. The novel patterns refer to two separate levels. On the first level a specific pattern, called PRIVATE AND PUBLIC DIGITAL SPACES, is designed as a conceptual floor plan layout. This plan distributes private and public digital spaces for video-mediated communication over the flat. At a second level, four patterns show the integration of the specific comZONES aiming at solving four specific problems with video-mediated communication at home. Our intention is to describe the application of design patterns as a method for analysing and solving novel problems encountered with the introduction of information and communication technologies in our homes. The video-mediated set-ups are not dealt with in depth. They serve mainly as designs that make it possible to apply the design patterns.

  • 22. Junestrand, S
    et al.
    Molin, G
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Keijer, U
    User study of video-mediated communication in the domestic environment with intellectually disabled persons2003In: International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 1044-7318, E-ISSN 1532-7590, Vol. 15, p. 87-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A user study of video-mediated communication (VMC) involving six persons with mild intellectual disability is presented. It took place at comHOME, a full-scale model of an apartment of the future, showing innovative architectural and technical designs with regard to the integration of VMC into the domestic environment. Two different zones for VMC, comZONES, in the apartment, were tested, the videoTORSO (a large-screen set-tip for informal everyday,communication) and the workPLACE (a place for professional work tasks). The: purpose of the study was to get a deeper understanding of how people use these comZONES. The final discussion points out that the comZONES seem to be interpreted correctly and to function aptly in relation to the participants, in the study. An assumed explanation is that spatial recognition is a very fundamental human function and thus less significant with regard to the mental capacity of the individual.

  • 23. Junestrand, S.
    et al.
    Molin, G.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    Keijer, Ulf
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Architecture.
    User study of video-mediated communication in the domestic environment with intellectually disabled persons2003In: International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 1044-7318, E-ISSN 1532-7590, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 87-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A user study of video-mediated communication (VMC) involving six persons with mild intellectual disability is presented. It took place at comHOME, a full-scale model of an apartment of the future, showing innovative architectural and technical designs with regard to the integration of VMC into the domestic environment. Two different zones for VMC, comZONES, in the apartment, were tested, the videoTORSO (a large-screen set-tip for informal everyday,communication) and the workPLACE (a place for professional work tasks). The: purpose of the study was to get a deeper understanding of how people use these comZONES. The final discussion points out that the comZONES seem to be interpreted correctly and to function aptly in relation to the participants, in the study. An assumed explanation is that spatial recognition is a very fundamental human function and thus less significant with regard to the mental capacity of the individual.

  • 24. Junestrand, S
    et al.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Video mediated communication for domestic environments - Architectural and technological design1999In: COOPERATIVE BUILDINGS: INTEGRATING INFORMATION, ORGANIZATIONS AND ARCHITECTURE, 1999, Vol. 1670, p. 177-190Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents different solutions for the integration of Video Mediated Communication (VMC) into the home environment considering primarily architectural and technical aspects. The context is entitled comHOME, a concept dwelling of the future designed and built as a full-scale model in collaboration with a telecom operator. The principal problem investigated is the various aspects of private and public zones when using VMC in a home environment. The solution concerns the integration of different comZONES (communicative zones for VMC), where the resident can be seen and heard at different levels varying in time and space. The comZONES presented include, for example, a “videoTORSO” - a large vertically mounted flat screen for informal everyday communication and a “mediaSPACE” - a setup consisting of a wall of screens permitting shared activities in both time and space. The comZONES are mainly described from an architectural (form and function) as well as technological (hardware and software) perspective.

  • 25. Junestrand, Stefan
    et al.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    The Dwelling as a Place for Work1998In: Proceedings of the First International Workshop on Cooperative Buildings, Integrating Information, Organization, and Architecture, 1998, p. 230-247Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper will discuss the future use of the dwelling as a place for cooperative work. It is our opinion that the development of the communication technologies and the architectural design has to be treated in parallel when we discuss new forms of living and work habits. Our analysis is built on a theoretical framework that is reflected through earlier experiences in IT technology in domestic environments as well as field studies of computer-mediated communication. By taking into consideration both architectural and communication technology issues we have developed a framework of how these two areas could fruitfully meet in new design concepts. Some of these concepts are now being used in on-going projects where new forms of communication in domestic environments are studied.

  • 26. Junestrand, Stefan
    et al.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Video Mediated Communication for Domestic Environments - Architectural and Technological Design1999In: Proceedings of the Second International Workshop on Cooperative Buildings, Integrating Information, Organization, and Architecture, 1999, p. 177-190Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27. Junestrand, Stefan
    et al.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    Lenman, Sören
    Thuresson, Björn
    Private and public spaces: the use of video mediated communication in a future home environment2000In: CHI ’00 extended abstracts on Human factors in computing systems, ACM Press, 2000, p. 16-17Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This video demonstration is based on scenarios of a family’s everyday activities supported by video mediated communication (VMC). It was recorded in comHOME, a concept dwelling of the future. The principal issue explored in the comHOME project, and in the video, concerns various aspects of private and public spaces using VMC. The design concept is based on the integration of different comZONES (communication zones), where the resident can be seen and/or heard. The architectural space, then, in combination with information and communication technology (ICT) solutions forms an interface to the digital world. A main observation from the making of the video is that it is a very good complementary method in a complex design-process because of the focus on the user perspective.

  • 28. Koile, K
    et al.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Demirdjian, D
    Shrobe, H
    Darrell, T
    Activity zones for context-aware computing2003In: UBICOMP 2003: UBIQUITOUS COMPUTING, 2003, Vol. 2864, p. 90-106Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Location is a primary cue in many context-aware computing systems, and is often represented as a global coordinate, room number, or a set of Euclidean distances to various landmarks. A user’s concept of location, however, is often defined in terms of regions in which similar activities occur. We discuss the concept of such regions, which we call activity zones, and suggest that such zones can be used to trigger application actions, retrieve information based on previous context, and present information to users. We show how to semi-automatically partition a space into activity zones based on patterns of observed user location and motion. We describe our system and two implemented example applications whose behavior is controlled by users’ entry, exit, and presence in the zones.

  • 29.
    Lungaro, Pietro
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Beelen, Thomas
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Human-to-AI interfaces for enabling future onboard experiences2017In: AutomotiveUI 2017 - 9th International ACM Conference on Automotive User Interfaces and Interactive Vehicular Applications, Adjunct Proceedings, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 94-98Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a novel platform for supporting humancentric design of future on-board user interfaces. This is conceived to facilitate the interplay and information exchange among onboard digital information systems, autonomous AI agents and human passengers and drivers. Two Human-to-AI (H2AI) Augmented Reality (AR) interfaces, characterized by different degrees of immersivity, have been designed to provide passengers with intuitive visualization of information available in the AI modules controlling the car behavior. To validate the proposed usercentric paradigm, a novel testbed has been developed for assessing whether H2AI solutions can be effective in increasing human trust in self-driving cars. The results of our initial experimental studies, performed with several subjects, clearly showed that visualizing AI information brings a critical understanding of the autonomous driving processes, which in turn leads to a substantial increase of trust in the system.

  • 30.
    Lungaro, Pietro
    et al.
    KTH.
    Sjöberg, Rickard
    Ericsson Res, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Valero, Alfredo Jose Fanghella
    KTH.
    Mittal, Ashutosh
    KTH.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH.
    Gaze-Aware Streaming Solutions for the Next Generation of Mobile VR Experiences2018In: IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, ISSN 1077-2626, E-ISSN 1941-0506, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 1535-1544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a novel approach to content delivery for video streaming services. It exploits information from connected eye-trackers embedded in the next generation of VR Head Mounted Displays (HMDs). The proposed solution aims to deliver high visual quality, in real time, around the users' fixations points while lowering the quality everywhere else. The goal of the proposed approach is to substantially reduce the overall bandwidth requirements for supporting VR video experiences while delivering high levels of user perceived quality. The prerequisites to achieve these results are: (1) mechanisms that can cope with different degrees of latency in the system and (2) solutions that support fast adaptation of video quality in different parts of a frame, without requiring a large increase in bitrate. A novel codec configuration, capable of supporting near-instantaneous video quality adaptation in specific portions of a video frame, is presented. The proposed method exploits in-built properties of HEVC encoders and while it introduces a moderate amount of error, these errors are indetectable by users. Fast adaptation is the key to enable gaze-aware streaming and its reduction in bandwidth. A testbed implementing gaze-aware streaming, together with a prototype HMD with in-built eye tracker, is presented and was used for testing with real users. The studies quantified the bandwidth savings achievable by the proposed approach and characterize the relationships between Quality of Experience (QoE) and network latency. The results showed that up to 83% less bandwidth is required to deliver high QoE levels to the users, as compared to conventional solutions.

  • 31.
    Lungaro, Pietro
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab).
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab).
    QoE design tradeoffs for foveated content provision2017In: 2017 9th International Conference on Quality of Multimedia Experience, QoMEX 2017, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2017, article id 7965669Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the key tradeoffs for the design and optimization of eye-gaze based content provision for video streaming services. The proposed end-to-end solution, called "foveated content provision", uses real-time information from connected eye-trackers to dynamically deliver optimized video frames, with higher resolution in areas corresponding to the users' fovea while lowering the quality at the periphery. In this novel approach, the main system constraint is the achievable latency (RTT) in the communication link between content servers and user clients. To cope with various latency levels, several design choices are presented, including varying the size of the high quality region or the resolution for the areas in the user's peripheral field of view. The paper presents a set of experimental results, obtained with real users via a novel event-driven experience sampling method, which is specifically developed to address Quality of Experience (QoE) in foveated content delivery. The results show that several operating points within the system parameter space allows to deliver high levels of QoE, even at latency levels comparable to current 4G networks.

  • 32.
    Lungaro, Pietro
    et al.
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab).
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab).
    Mittal, Ashutosh
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab).
    Fanghella Valero, Alfredo
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab).
    Gaze- and QoE-aware video streaming solutions for mobile VR2017In: Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on Virtual Reality Software and Technology, VRST, Association for Computing Machinery , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This demo showcases a novel approach to content delivery for 360? video streaming. It exploits information from connected eye-trackers embedded in the users' VR HMDs. The presented technology enables the delivery of high quality, in real time, around the users' fixations points while lowering the image quality everywhere else. The goal of the proposed approach is to substantially reduce the overall bandwidth requirements for supporting VR video experiences while delivering high levels of user perceived quality. The network connection between the VR system and the content server is in this demo emulated, allowing users to experience the QoE performances achievable with datarates and RTTs in the range of current 4G and upcoming 5G networks. Users can further control additional service parameters, including video types, content resolution in the foveal region and background and size of the foveal region. At the end of each run, users are presented with a summary of the amount of bandwidth consumed with the used system settings and a comparison with the cost of current content delivery solutions. The overall goal of this demo is to provide a tangible experience of the tradeoffs among bandwidth, RTT and QoE for the mobile provision of future data intensive VR services.

  • 33. Magnusson, Charlotte
    et al.
    Pielot, Martin
    Anastassova, Margarita
    Rassmus-Gröhn, Kirsten
    Tollmar, Konrad
    Lund University.
    Roselier, Samuel
    The mobile Oracle: a tool for early user involvement2009In: Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services, 2009, p. 84-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a novel tool for eliciting user requirements early in the design process of mobile applications. The "Mobile Oracle", as we have called it, is intended to help developers and designers obtain a better understanding of what the user wants at different points in space and time. It is an extension of a lo-fi version of the well-established Wizard of Oz technique, but it adds an "on demand" component to force users to explicitly request the information they need. The technique has been tested in an investigation involving 15 users (sighted, visually impaired, and elderly). Our preliminary results show it to generate valuable information concerning the ways people ask about directions and distances, as well as the services they would like to have in future mobile applications.

  • 34. Magnusson, Charlotte
    et al.
    Rassmus-Gröhn, Kirsten
    Tollmar, Konrad
    Lund University.
    Stigmar, Hanna
    Exploring User Requirements for Non-visual Mobile Navigation Systems2009In: HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION - INTERACT 2009, PT I / [ed] Gross, T; Gulliksen, J; Kotze, P; Oestreicher, L; Palanque, P; Prates, RO, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2009, Vol. 5726, p. 754-757Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes an explorative user study of how two different user groups experience current, as well as envisioned new mobile navigation systems. Two groups have been the primary target in this study; a group of elderly people and a group of relatively young university students that were visually impaired. The study consisted of three parts: a focus group/test, a diary study and a design workshop where the users envisioned new kinds of interaction with mobile navigation systems by building and demonstrating low-fi prototypes. Information about user requirements for these types of applications is obtained and we observe features in the study design which are relevant for a wider range of mobile services.

  • 35. Magnusson, Charlotte
    et al.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    Lund University.
    Brewster, Stephen
    Sarjakoski, Tapani
    Sarjakoski, Tiina
    Roselier, Samuel
    Exploring future challenges for haptic, audio and visual interfaces for mobile maps and location based services2009In: Proceedings of the 2nd International Workshop on Location and the Web, ACM , 2009, p. 24-27Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we give an overview of some challenges in how to make geospatial information more useable and accessible. We also suggest a roadmap for dealing with these challenges – and introduce a new EU project HaptiMap.

  • 36. Müller, J.
    et al.
    Eberle, D.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS, Mobile Service Laboratory (MS Lab).
    Communiplay: A field study of a public display media space2014In: CHI '14 Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, p. 1415-1424Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present Communiplay, a public display media space. People passing by see their own contour mirrored on a public display and can start to play with virtual objects. At the same time, they see others playing at remote displays within the same virtual space. We are interested whether people would use such a public display media space, and if so, how and why. We evaluate Communiplay in a field study in six connected locations and find a remote honey-pot effect, i.e. people interacting at one location attract people at other locations. The conversion rate (percentage of passers-by starting to interact) rose by +136% when people saw others playing at remote locations. We also provide the first quantification of the (local) honey-pot effect (in our case it raised the conversion rate by +604% when people saw others playing at the same location). We conclude that the integration of multiple public displays into a media space is a promising direction for public displays and can make them more attractive and valuable.

  • 37.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    CoDesk-An Interface to TheKnowledgeNet1993In: ADVANCES IN HUMAN FACTORS ERGONOMICS, Vol. 19, p. 238-243Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Design by Use2005In: Lund on Informatics, Liber , 2005Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Participatory design techniques for CSCW1997In: SIGGROUP Bull., Vol. 18, p. 37-38Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Perceptuella interfaces - visions or emergent technolgies?2002In: Friktion - Om mötet mellan olikheter i IT-forskning, Raster Förlag , 2002Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 41. Tollmar, Konrad
    Searching for the Aesthetics of Everyday Technology2004In: Workshop on Aesthetic Approaches to Human-Computer, NordiCHI 2004, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    The Design of a Basic CSCW Environment The Collaborative Desktop Experience2007In: Computers & graphics, ISSN 0097-8493, E-ISSN 1873-7684Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From an analysis of co-operative work as a collaborative process in an information society we state requirements that a CSCW environment should meet. From these we have designed CoDesk, the Collaborative Desktop, a basic environment for CSCW that in its original form looks rather mundane but has the potential to be used both as building blocks for specific CSCW environments and as a fundament for new CSCW systems and applications. CoDesk has been designed in an iterative prototyping process, which is described and evaluated. How new interaction styles can be used in a CSCW environment is presented and analysed.

  • 43.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Towards CSCW design in the Scandinavian tradition2001Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Bentley, F.
    Viedma, Cristobal
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Mobile health mashups: Making sense of multiple streams of wellbeing and contextual data for presentation on a mobile device2012In: 2012 6th International Conference on Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare and Workshops, PervasiveHealth 2012, IEEE , 2012, p. 65-72Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present the Mobile Health Mashups system, a mobile service that collects data from a variety of health and wellbeing sensors and presents significant correlations across sensors in a mobile widget as well as on a mobile web application. We found that long-term correlation data provided users with new insights about systematic wellness trends that they could not make using only the time series graphs provided by the sensor manufacturers. We describe the Mobile Health Mashups system with a focus on analyzing and detailing the technical solution, such as: integration of sensors, how to create correlations between various data sets, and the presentation of the statistical data as feeds and graphs. We will also describe the iterative design process that involved a 2-month field trial, the outcome of this trial, and implications for design of mobile data mashup systems.

  • 45.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Bentley, Frank
    Moore, John
    Olwal, Alex
    Mobile wellness: collecting, visualizing and interacting with personal health data2011In: Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Human Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services, 2011, p. 761-763Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile devices are now able to connect to a variety of sensors and provide personalized information to help people reflect on and improve their health. For example, pedometers, heart-rate sensors, glucometers, and other sensors can all provide real-time data to a variety of devices. Collecting and interacting with personal health or well-being data is a growing research area. This workshop will focus on the ways in which our mobile devices can aggregate and visualize these types of data and how these data streams can be presented to encourage interaction, increased awareness and positive behavior change.

  • 46.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Chincholle, D
    Klasson, B
    Stephanson, T
    VideoCafe - exploring mediaspaces in public places within organizations2001In: Behavior and Information Technology, ISSN 0144-929X, E-ISSN 1362-3001, Vol. 20, p. 101-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes our studies of mediaspaces which are embedded within public places in organizations so as to examine the hypothesis that individuals might benefit even when working apart - from opportunities for light informal interaction. A set of full-scale prototypes were used and assessed over extensive periods of time. The informal observations and reflection in design of these places have been supplemented by formal studies. We found that great care needs to be taken when designing these places from an architectural point of view. For some of the places, we would like to suggest using architectural features when altering the room rather than technology. In other settings, the artful deployment of communication media might be more effective.

  • 47.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Demirdjian, D.
    Darrell, T.
    Gesture + Play Exploring Full-Body Navigation for Virtual Environments2003In: Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition Workshop, 2003. CVPRW ’03. Conference on, 2003, Vol. 5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Navigating virtual environments usually requires a wired interface, game console, or keyboard. The advent of perceptual interface techniques allows a new option: the passive and untethered sensing of users’ pose and gesture to allow them maneuver through and manipulate virtual worlds. We describe new algorithms for interacting with 3-D environments using real-time articulated body tracking with standard cameras and personal computers. Our method is based on rigid stereo-motion estimation algorithms and uses a linear technique for enforcing articulation constraints. With our tracking system users can navigate virtual environments using 3-D gesture and body poses. We analyze the space of possible perceptual interface abstractions for full-body navigation, and present a prototype system based on these results. We finally describe an initial evaluation of our prototype system with users guiding avatars through a series of 3-D virtual game worlds.

  • 48.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    et al.
    Department for Informatics, Lund Univeristy.
    Demirdjian, David
    Darrell, Trevor
    Navigating in virtual environments using a vision-based interface2004In: Proceedings of the third Nordic conference on Human-computer interaction, 2004, p. 113-120Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interacting and navigating virtual environments usually requires a wired interface, game console, or keyboard. The advent of perceptual interface techniques allows a new option: the passive and untethered sensing of users’ pose and gesture to allow them to maneuver through and manipulate virtual worlds. We describe new algorithms for interacting with 3-D environments using real-time articulated body tracking with standard cameras and personal computers. Our method is based on rigid stereo-motion estimation algorithms and can accurately track upper body pose in real-time. With our tracking system users can navigate virtual environments using 3-D gesture and body poses. We analyze the space of possible perceptual interface abstractions for full-body navigation, and present a prototype system based on these results. We finally describe an initial evaluation of our prototype system with users guiding avatars through a series of 3-D virtual game worlds.

  • 49.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Huang, Chengcheng
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Boosting mobile experience sampling with social media2015In: MobileHCI 2015: Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services, ACM Press, 2015, p. 525-530Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a study of how social media could be integrated and used in Mobile Experience Sampling. As addressed in previous studies, Experience Sampling Method relies on high response frequency. However participants may experience it as a burden which may cause delay or even suspension of data collection. We have developed a system that allows participants in Mobile Experience Sampling studies to share their questions and answers on social media. We tested our system in a group of 40 participants. The study shows that enabled sharing of ESM questions significantly increased response and participation rates, in our test by +43%, which also indicates its influence on participants’ compliance and motivation levels. This paper presents the study and discusses some further use and influence of social media in Experience Sampling.

  • 50.
    Tollmar, Konrad
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Junestrand, Stefan
    Torgny, Olle
    Virtually living together - - Using Multiple-Method Design in the Search for Telematic Emotional Communication2000In: Proceedings of the 3rd conference on Designing interactive systems: processes, practices, methods, and techniques, ACM Press, 2000, p. 83-91Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we discuss the possibility of a holistic approach in the design of new media for interpersonal communication. The key argument is that if we base our design on daily practice, this may inhibit truly innovative ideas from taking form, and, on the contrary, if we design using pure intuition and visions, the design is likely to fail due to a lack of connection to daily practice. Scenario-based design was hence used to makes us envision new media while field observations such as ethnographic studies, become a tool to retain the ties with everyday life. This duality can also be implemented, as we will describe, in a design that makes a bi-language/bi-levelled understanding of a product possible.

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