Change search
Refine search result
1 - 15 of 15
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Branneby, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Epoxidation catalyzed by a CALB mutantManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Branneby, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Exploiting enzyme promiscuity for rational design2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Enzymes are today well recognized in various industrial applications, being an important component in detergents, and catalysts in the production of agrochemicals, foods, pharmaceuticals, and fine chemicals. Their large use is mainly due to their high selectivity and environmental advantage, compared to traditional catalysts. Tools and techniques in molecular biology offer the possibility to screen the natural sources and engineer new enzyme activities which further increases their usefulness as catalysts, in a broader area.

    Although enzymes show high substrate and reaction selectivity many enzymes are today known to catalyze other reactions than their natural ones. This is called enzyme promiscuity. It has been suggested that enzyme promiscuity is Nature’s way to create diversity. Small changes in the protein sequence can give the enzyme new reaction specificity.

    In this thesis I will present how rational design, based on molecular modeling, can be used to explore enzyme promiscuity and to change the enzyme reaction specificity. The first part of this work describes how Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB), by a single point mutation, was mutated to give increased activity for aldol additions, Michael additions and epoxidations. The activities of these reactions were predicted by quantum chemical calculations, which suggested that a single-point mutant of CALB would catalyze these reactions. Hence, the active site of CALB, which consists of a catalytic triad (Ser, His, Asp) and an oxyanion hole, was targeted by site-directed mutagenesis and the nucleophilic serine was mutated for either glycine or alanine. Enzymes were expressed in Pichia pastoris and analyzed for activity of the different reactions. In the case of the aldol additions the best mutant showed a four-fold initial rate over the wild type enzyme, for hexanal. Also Michael additions and epoxidations were successfully catalyzed by this mutant.

    In the last part of this thesis, rational design of alanine racemase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus was performed in order to alter the enzyme specificity. Active protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and analyzed. The explored reaction was the conversion of alanine to pyruvate and 2-butanone to 2-butylamine. One of the mutants showed increased activity for transamination, compared to the wild type.

  • 3.
    Branneby, Cecilia
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Carlqvist, Peter
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemistry.
    Hult, Karl
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Brinck, Tore
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemistry.
    Berglund, Per
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Aldol Additions with Mutant Lipase: Analysis by Experiments and Theoretical Calculations2004In: Journal of Molecular Catalysis B: Enzymatic, ISSN 1381-1177, E-ISSN 1873-3158, Vol. 31, no 4-6, p. 123-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A Ser105Ala mutant of Candida antarctica lipase B has previously been shown to catalyze aldol additions. Quantum chemical calculations predicted a reaction rate similar to that of natural enzymes, whereas experiments showed a much lower reaction rate. Molecular dynamics simulations, presented here, show that the low reaction rate is a consequence of the low frequencies of near attack complexes in the enzyme. Equilibrium was also considered as a reason for the slow product formation, but could be excluded by performing a sequential reaction to push the reaction towards product formation. In this paper, further experimental results are also presented, highlighting the importance of the entire active site for catalysis.

  • 4.
    Branneby, Cecilia
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Carlqvist, Peter
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemistry.
    Magnusson, Anders
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Hult, Karl
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Brinck, Tore
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemistry.
    Berglund, Per
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Carbon-Carbon Bonds by Hydrolytic Enzymes2003In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 125, no 4, p. 874-875Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enzymes are efficient catalysts in synthetic chemistry, and their catalytic activity with unnatural substrates in organic reaction media is an area attracting much attention. Protein engineering has opened the possibility to change the reaction specificity of enzymes and allow for new reactions to take place in their active sites. We have used this strategy on the well-studied active-site scaffold offered by the serine hydrolase Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB, EC 3.1.1.3) to achieve catalytic activity for aldol reactions. The catalytic reaction was studied in detail by means of quantum chemical calculations in model systems. The predictions from the quantum chemical calculations were then challenged by experiments. Consequently, Ser105 in CALB was targeted by site-directed mutagenesis to create enzyme variants lacking the nucleophilic feature of the active site. The experiments clearly showed an increased reaction rate when the aldol reaction was catalyzed by the mutant enzymes as compared to the wild-type lipase. We expect that the new catalytic activity, harbored in the stable protein scaffold of the lipase, will allow aldol additions of substrates, which cannot be reached by traditional aldolases

  • 5.
    Branneby, Cecilia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Park, Seongsoon
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Berglund, Per
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Investigation of Substrate Specificity of Geobacillus stearothermophilus Alanine RacemaseManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Branneby, Cecilia
    et al.
    Cambrex Karlskoga AB.
    Svedendahl, Maria
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Hult, Karl
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Berglund, Per
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Lipase-Catalyzed Aldol and Michael-Type Reactions2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Branneby, Cecilia
    et al.
    Cambrex Karlskoga AB.
    Svedendahl, Maria
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Hult, Karl
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Berglund, Per
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Lipase-Catalyzed Aldol and Michael-Type Reactions2005In: Book of abstracts, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Carlqvist, Peter
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Physical Chemistry.
    Svedendahl, Maria
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Branneby, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Hult, Karl
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Brinck, Tore
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Physical Chemistry.
    Berglund, Per
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Exploring the Active-Site of a Rationally Redesigned Lipase for Catalysis of Michael-Type Additions2005In: ChemBioChem (Print), ISSN 1439-4227, E-ISSN 1439-7633, Vol. 6, p. 331-336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Michael-type additions of various thiols and alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl compounds were performed in organic solvent catalyzed by wild-type and a rationally redesigned mutant of Candida antarctica lipase B. The mutant locks the nucleophilic serine 105 in the active-site; this results in a changed catalytic mechanism of the enzyme. The possibility of utilizing this mutant for Michael-type additions was initially explored by quantum-chemical calculations on the reaction between acrolein and methanethiol in a model system. The model system was constructed on the basis of docking and molecular-dynamics simulations and was designed to simulate the catalytic properties of the active site. The catalytic system was explored experimentally with a range of different substrates. The k(cat) values were found to be in the range of 10(-3) to 4 min(-1), similar to the values obtained with aldolase antibodies. The enzyme proficiency was 10(7). Furthermore, the Michael-type reactions followed saturation kinetics and were confirmed to take place in the enzyme active site.

  • 9.
    Cassimjee, Karim Engelmark
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Trummer, Martin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Branneby, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Berglund, Per
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Silica-immobilized His(6)-tagged enzyme: Alanine racemase in hydrophobic solvent2008In: Biotechnology and Bioengineering, ISSN 0006-3592, E-ISSN 1097-0290, Vol. 99, no 3, p. 712-716Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new immobilization method for enzymes is presented to facilitate synthetic applications in aqueous as well as organic media. The enzyme Alanine racemase (AlaR) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus was cloned, overexpressed and then immobilized on a silica-coated thin-layer chromatography plate to create an enzyme surface. The enzyme, fused to a His(6)-tag at its N-terminal, was tethered to the chemically modified silica-coated TLC plate through cobalt ions. The immobilized enzyme showed unaltered kinetic parameters in small-scale stirred reactions and retained its activity after rinsing, drying, freezing or immersion in n-hexane. This practical method is a first step towards a general immobilization method for synthesis applications with any enzyme suitable for His(6)-tagging.

  • 10.
    Engelmark Cassimjee, Karim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Branneby, Cecilia
    Cambrex Karlskoga AB.
    Sjöstrand, Ulf
    Cambrex Karlskoga AB.
    Berglund, Per
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    High Yield Transamination with Isopropyl Amine as Donor, by Employment of YADH and in situ Cofactor Regeneration2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Engelmark Cassimjee, Karim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Branneby, Cecilia
    Cambrex Karlskoga AB.
    Sjöstrand, Ulf
    Cambrex Karlskoga AB.
    Berglund, Per
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    High Yield Transamination with Isopropyl Amine as Donor, by Employment of YADH and in situ Cofactor Regeneration2009In: Book of abstracts, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Svedendahl, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biochemistry and Biotechnology.
    Branneby, Cecilia
    Cambrex Karlskoga AB.
    Carlqvist, Peter
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemistry.
    Brinck, Tore
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Physical Chemistry (closed 20110630).
    Hult, Karl
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biochemistry and Biotechnology.
    Berglund, Per
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biochemistry and Biotechnology.
    Michael-type additions catalyzed by a rationally redesigned lipase2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Svedendahl, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biochemistry and Biotechnology.
    Branneby, Cecilia
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biochemistry and Biotechnology.
    Carlqvist, Peter
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemistry.
    Hult, Karl
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biochemistry and Biotechnology.
    Brinck, Tore
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Chemistry.
    Berglund, Per
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biochemistry and Biotechnology.
    Expanding the Synthetic Scope of Hydrolytic Enzymes: Catalysis of Aldol- and Michael-Type Additions2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Svedendahl, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Carlqvist, Peter
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Physical Chemistry.
    Branneby, Cecilia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Allnér, Olof
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Physical Chemistry.
    Frise, Anton
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Physical Chemistry.
    Hult, Karl
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Berglund, Per
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Brinck, Tore
    Direct Epoxidation in Candida antarctica Lipase B Studied by Experiment and Theory2008In: ChemBioChem (Print), ISSN 1439-4227, E-ISSN 1439-7633, Vol. 9, no 15, p. 2443-2451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) is a promiscuous serine hydrolase that, besides its native function, catalyzes different side reactions, such as direct epoxidation. A single-point mutant of CALB demonstrated a direct epoxidation reaction mechanism for the epoxidation of alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes by hydrogen peroxide in aqueous and organic solution. Mutation of the catalytically active Ser105 to alanine made the previously assumed indirect epoxidation reaction mechanism impossible. Gibbs free energies, activation parameters, and substrate selectivities were determined both computationally and experimentally. The energetics and mechanism for the direct epoxidation in CALB Ser105Ala were investigated that the reaction proceeds through a two step-mechanism with formation of an oxyanionic intermediate. The active-site residue His224 functions as a general acid-base catalyst with support from Asp187. Oxyanion stabilization is facilitated by two hydrogen bonds from Thr40.

  • 15.
    Svedendahl, Maria
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Engelmark Cassimjee, Karim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Branneby, Cecilia
    Cambrex Karlskoga AB.
    Sjöstrand, Ulf
    Cambrex Karlskoga AB.
    Berglund, Per
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Biochemistry.
    Rational Redesign of ω-Transaminases2010Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 15 of 15
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf