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  • 1.
    Galland, Sylvian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berthold, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Innventia AB, Sweden.
    Prakobna, Kasinee
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Holocellulose nanofibers of high molar mass and small diameter for high-strength nanopaper2015In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 2427-2435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wood cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) based on bleached pulp are different from the cellulose microfibrils in the plant cell wall in terms of larger diameter, lower cellulose molar mass, and modified cellulose topochemistry. Also, CNF isolation often requires high-energy mechanical disintegration. Here, a new type of CNFs is reported based on a mild peracetic acid delignification process for spruce and aspen fibers, followed by low-energy mechanical disintegration. Resulting CNFs are characterized with respect to geometry (AFM, TEM), molar mass (SEC), and polysaccharide composition. Cellulose nanopaper films are prepared by filtration and characterized by UV-vis spectrometry for optical transparency and uniaxial tensile tests. These CNFs are unique in terms of high molar mass and cellulose-hemicellulose core-shell structure. Furthermore, the corresponding nanopaper structures exhibit exceptionally high optical transparency and the highest mechanical properties reported for comparable CNF nanopaper structures.

  • 2.
    Neagu, Cristian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.), Solid Mechanics (Div.).
    Gamstedt, Kristofer
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Solid Mechanics (Dept.).
    Berthold, Fredrik
    Stiffness contribution of various wood fibers to composite materials2006In: Journal of composite materials, ISSN 0021-9983, E-ISSN 1530-793X, Journal of Composites Materials, Vol. 40, no 8, p. 663-699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wood pulp fibers can serve as useful reinforcement of plastics for increased stiffness. To assess the potential of various wood fibers as reinforcement, a method has been developed to determine the contribution of the fibers to the elastic properties of the composite. A micromechanical composite model and classical laminate mechanics are used to relate the elastic properties of the fibers to the elastic properties of the composite. A large variety of composites made of various wood pulp fibers in an epoxy vinyl ester matrix was manufactured. From the tensile test results of the composites, the contributing Young's moduli of the fibers in the longitudinal direction are back-calculated and summarized. One finding is that there is an optimum in fiber stiffness as a function of lignin content. It is also found that industrially pulped hardwood fibers have higher stiffness than the corresponding softwood fibers. One example is kraft-cooked Norway spruce fiber, for which a Young's modulus of 40 GPa is found. The effects of hornification, prehydrolysis, and sulfite processing are also investigated. The results indicate that mild defibration process should be used, that does not damage the cell wall structure so that the inherent high stiffness of the native fibers can be retained. It can be concluded that the proposed method works well to rank the wood fiber candidates in terms of their contribution to the composite stiffness.

  • 3.
    Prakobna, Kasinee
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berthold, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Innventia, Sweden.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Mechanical performance and architecture of biocomposite honeycombs and foams from core-shell holocellulose nanofibersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Prakobna, Kasinee
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berthold, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Innventia AB, Sweden.
    Medina, Lilian
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Mechanical performance and architecture of biocomposite honeycombs and foams from core–shell holocellulose nanofibers2016In: Composites. Part A, Applied science and manufacturing, ISSN 1359-835X, E-ISSN 1878-5840, Vol. 88, p. 116-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CNFs (cellulose nanofibers) based on holocellulose have a pure cellulose fibril core, with a hemicellulose coating. The diameter is only around 6–8 nm and the hemicellulose surface coating has anionic charge. These CNFs are used to prepare honeycomb and foam structures by freeze-drying from dilute hydrocolloidal suspensions. The materials are compared with materials based on “conventional” cellulose CNFs from sulfite pulp with respect to mechanical properties in compression. Characterization methods include FE-SEM of cellular structure, and the analysis includes comparisons with similar materials from other types of CNFs and data in the literature. The honeycomb structures show superior out-of-plane properties compared with the more isotropic foam structures, as expected. Honeycombs based on holocellulose CNFs showed better properties than sulfite pulp CNF honeycombs, since the cellular structure contained less defects. This is related to better stability of holocellulose CNFs in colloidal suspension.

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