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  • 1.
    Backlund, Sara
    et al.
    Interactive Institute.
    Gyllensvärd, M.
    Gustafsson, A.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    SVID (Swedish Industrial Design Foundation).
    Mazé, Ramia
    Interactive Institute.
    Redström, Johan
    Center for Design Research, Royal Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Static!: The aesthetics of energy in everyday life2006In: WonderGround 2006 / [ed] Ken Friedman, Terence Love, Eduardo Côrte-Real, Chris Rust, Lisbon: CEIADE – Centro Editorial do IADE , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Broms, Loove
    et al.
    Interactive Institute.
    Bång, Magnus
    Interactive Institute.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Persuasive Engagement: Exploiting Lifestyle as a Driving Force to Promote Energy-aware Use Patterns and Behaviours2009In: Undisciplined! Proceedings of the Design Research Society Conference 2008, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electricity consumption has been rising significantly in the western world the last decades and this has affected the environment negatively. Efficient use and more energy conservative usage patterns could be ways to approach this problem. However, electricity has for a long time actively been hidden away and it is rarely thought of unless it ceases to exist. From the perspective of critical design, we have been working to find methods to visualise electricity and electricity consumption in everyday life to promote environmentally positive behavioural change. In this paper, we are looking at how aspects of lifestyles can be used in design as central driving forces that could lead to changed behaviour. Attempts to promote behavioural changes related to energy consumption might be successfully carried out when people are offered desirable alternatives that are engaging and that do not impose a perceived extra burden in their everyday life. This argument is exemplified through two design concepts, the AWARE Laundry Lamp and the Energy Plant, which are examples on how to increase people’s energy awareness and offer them means for reducing their energy consumption in the home. Both prototypes are inspired by current trends in lifestyle as well as actual observed user behaviour.

  • 3.
    Broms, Loove
    et al.
    Interactive Institute.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Bång, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    The Energy AWARE Clock: Incorporating Electricity Use in the Social Interactions of Everyday Life2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New interfaces to the energy system can facilitate changes of habits and provide means to control the household’s use of energy. In this paper, we look at energy use and such interfaces in the home from a socio- technical perspective. We describe how interviews and user observations can be used in combination with the theory of domestication to inform and inspire the design of interfaces to the energy system. As a result of our approach, we present the Energy AWARE Clock, an example of a new type of electricity meter that challenges the norm of how the electricity system is typically represented in the home. The Energy AWARE Clock makes use of a clock metaphor to visualise electricity-use in relation to time in everyday life. Energy-awareness products always challenge domestic social patterns and it is important to consider these aspects in the design process to find successful solutions for the future. 

  • 4.
    Broms, Loove
    et al.
    Interactive Intstitute.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    Interactive Institute.
    Bång, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    Nyblom, Åsa
    Interactive Institute.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Coffee Maker Patterns and the Design of Energy Feedback Artefacts2010In: DIS '10 Proceedings of the 8th ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, 2010, p. 93-102Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Smart electricity meters and home displays are being installed in people’s homes with the assumption that households will make the necessary efforts to reduce their electricity consumption. However, present solutions do not sufficiently account for the social implications of design. There is a potential for greater savings if we can better understand how such designs affect behaviour. In this paper, we describe our design of an energy awareness artefact – the Energy AWARE Clock – and discuss it in relation to behavioural processes in the home. A user study is carried out to study the deployment of the prototype in real domestic contexts for three months. Results indicate that the Energy AWARE Clock played a significant role in drawing households’ attention to their electricity use. It became a natural part of the household and conceptions of electricity became naturalized into informants’ everyday language.

  • 5.
    Broms, Loove
    et al.
    Interactive Institute.
    Katzeff, Cecilia
    Interactive Institute.
    Bång, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science.
    Nyblom, Åsa
    Interactive Institute.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Days in the life of the Energy Aware Clock2011In: Design Research Journal, ISSN 2000-639X, E-ISSN 2000-3080, no 1, p. 30-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a potential for greater electricity savings if we can better understand how design affects behaviour. This paper describes om design of an energy awareness artefact - the Energy AWARE Clock- and discusses it in relation to behavioural processes in the home. The Energy AWARE Clock showed to play a significant role in drawing households' attention to their electricity use. It became a natural part of the household and conceptions of electricity became natmalized into informants' everyday language.

  • 6. Börjesson, E.
    et al.
    Isaksson, A.
    Ilstedt, S.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Ehrnberger, K.
    KTH.
    Visualizing gender-norm-critical design and innovation2016In: Research Handbook on Gender and Innovation, Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd. , 2016, p. 252-273Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Ehrnberger, Karin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
    Räsänen, Minna
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Ilstedt, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Visualising gender norms in design: Meet the Mega Hurricane Mixer and the drill Dolphia2012In: International Journal of Design, ISSN 1991-3761, E-ISSN 1994-036X, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 85-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article highlights how a gender perspective can be performed by design as critical practice. Two common household appliances - a drill and a hand blender - were used as a starting point. Inspired by Derrida's term deconstruction, the product language of the tools was analysed and then switched in two new prototypes: the hand blender Mega Hurricane Mixer and the drill Dolphia. The prototypes were shown at exhibitions and lectures. The comments by the audience show that a switching of product language entails that their relationship to the artifact itself also changes. Overall, the elements, which previously had been perceived as 'lacking transparency', were now visible. For example, the drill was identified as a "drill for women" and considered inadequate for drilling, and the mixer revealed needs and functions that the traditional mixer did not satisfy. This implies that design should not only be seen as 'final products' but as a part of a social process that takes place between the user, the artifact and the norms of society. By switching the product languages it was possible to highlight how gender values are connected to each design and each artifact. This means that the design of the artifacts around us is not fixed, but can be renegotiated and situated in time, place, and context.

  • 8.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Behovet av design2000In: Svenska Former:: Ett Upplevelseverk om Nutida Svensk Formgivning / [ed] Susanne Helgeson, Kent Nyberg, Prisma , 2000, p. 38-41Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Design, energi och hållbar utveckling2011Report (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    Stiftelsen svensk industridesign.
    Energi som syns2007In: Under ytan: En antologi om designforskning / [ed] Sara Ilstedt Hjelm, Stockholm: Raster förlag, 2007, 2500, p. 118-131Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Hur kan elkonsumtion i hemmet synliggöras på ett begripligt och engagerande sätt? Kan design användas för att skapa medvetande och ändra beteende? Det var några av utgångspunkterna för Static! som handlade om att skapa medvetenhet kring energiförbrukning i hemmet med hjälp av design.

  • 11.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    Interactive Institute.
    If everything is design, what then is a designer?2005In: In the making: NORDIC DESIGN RESEARCH CONFERENCE, Copenhagen, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Numerical Analysis and Computer Science, NADA.
    Making sense: design for well-being2004Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The theme of this dissertation is the design of IT artefactsfor increased well-being in the home. The goal has been toprovide a better understanding of the coupling between designand health, and to give examples of how to design for increasedwell-being. The context for the investigation has been thehome, and various research initiatives in smart homes andIT-supported care.

    We create our reality in the form of material structuressuch as buildings, products, workplaces and homes. Theseartefacts are a reflection of ourselves, we have created themand we understand ourselves through them. Together withimmaterial artefacts like political systems, educationalsystems and healthcare, they constitute our society. Thetotality of these material and immaterial artefacts forms theconditions of our everyday life. This investigation points at anew way to look at artefacts as social actors in an interactiveworld. In this perspective, use becomes a dialogue andcooperation with the artefact. Design work becomes a carefulcreative practice in which the focus is the interplay betweenthe artefact and its social environment. Stress and ill-healthis an indication that there is an unbalance in the interplay.Well-being on the other hand means that there is a balancebetween the artificial world and the individual. Designpractitioners, and others that create our world, have animportant task in designing new artefacts that do not reproduceobsolete or dysfunctional behaviour.

    Inspired by coping theories, a salutogenic approach todesign aims at identifying and strengthening the aspects ofartefacts that help us handle adversities. This means to createartefacts that form a world, which is comprehensible,manageable and meaningful. People that live in environmentswhere they cannot influence decisions, with high demands andlow control, are likely to become ill. But people that haveenvironments, in which they receive feedback, support and cancontrol their own situation stay well. With new, complextechnology such as ubiquitous computing, it becomes even moreimportant to support recognition and routines. And it becomesessential in domestic use and in IT-support for the disabledand elderly.

    The empirical work reported here consists of four casestudies related to IT artefacts for well-being. The casestudies include field studies, critical analysis, designconcepts, prototype building and evaluation. Based on thefindings in these studies, four considerations for design ofinteractive systems for the home are suggested: design forunderstanding, for detecting and managing of errors, fordisabling and for alternative coping.

    Finally it is suggested that if research is to concernitself not only with evaluations and general laws, but alsowith ideas and practical examples of a better future life–then design knowledge becomes an essential element inresearch. In this endeavour we need more cooperation betweenpractitioners from the social and technical sciences, thehumanities and design.

  • 13.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    On a scale between art and design: On the Aesthetics of Function, from the Bauhaus until Today2008In: (Re)Searching the digital Bauhaus / [ed] Thomas Binder, Jonas Löwgren, Lone Malmborg, Springer, 2008, 1, p. 191-234Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    People in design2010In: Static! Designing for energy Awareness / [ed] Ramia Mazé, Stockholm: Arvinius förlag , 2010, p. 43-48Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Research + design: the making of Brainball2003In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, ISSN 1072-5520, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 26-34Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    The dysfunctionality of everyday things: - on stress, design and artefacts2003In: Techne:: Design wisdom / [ed] Mike Press, Sara Owen, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the increasing issue of stress and burnout in contemporary society and attempts to connect this to product design. Stress can be defined as the reaction of a mismatch between the demands of the world and the needs and capacities of the individual. To what degree does technological products and design artefacts contribute to stress?

  • 17.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    The making of Brainball2003In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. X.1, p. 27-34Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    Stiftelsen svensk industridesign.
    Under ytan: En antologi om designforskning2007Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här boken vänder sig till dem som är intresserade av att veta mer om forskning inom design. det gäller såväl forskare från olika discipliner och praktiker inom området, som lärare och elever på designskolor.

    Hur skapar man en teoretisk grund för en definition av designkunskap? Hur skapas kvinnliga och manliga positioner i designprocesser? Hur fångar man upp människors önskningar och behov i samband med produktutveckling och är tingen medskapare av våra identiteter? Hur förhåller sig innovation, design och teknik till varandra? P vilket sätt kan designtänkande användas för att skapa förändring av stora och komplexa system, som städer och energisystem? Är en satsning på design lönsam för företag?

    Detta är några av de frågor som diskuteras i den här boken som innehåller 23 bidrag från bland andra interaktionsdesigner, industridesigner, ingenjörer, arkitekter, ekonomer och filodofer, uppdelade i sju illustrerade avsnitt.

  • 19.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Visualizing the Vague: Invisible Computers in Contemporary Design2005In: Design Issues, ISSN 0747-9360, E-ISSN 1531-4790, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 71-78Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Gustafsson, Anton
    Interactive Institute.
    Gyllenswärd, Magnus
    Interactive Institute.
    Designing for Energy Awareness: The Power-Aware Cord2005In: Pride and pre-design: The conference for Cultural Heritage and the Science of Design / [ed] Yrjö Sotama, Helsinki: Valopaino OY , 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    et al.
    SVID, Stiftelsen Svensk Industridesign.
    Koskinen, IlpoUniversity of Industrial Arts and Design.
    Design Inquiries: Nordes 20072007Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
    Mårtens, Pehr
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Design as enabler of Social Innovation: - A Swedish Perspective2010Report (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Ilstedt Hjelm, Sara
    et al.
    Interactive Institute.
    Öhman, Christina
    Interactive Institute.
    Gustafsson, Anton
    Interactive Institute.
    Gyllenswärd, Magnus
    Interactive Institute.
    Power Aware cord: En metod och en anordning för visuell indikering av ström- eller effektförbrukning i en elkabel2005Patent (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Ilstedt, Sara
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
    Hesselgren, Mia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Eriksson, Elina
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Sustainable lifestyles: How values affect sustainable practises2017In: Design + Power / [ed] Andrew Morrisson, Dagny Stuedahl, 2017, p. 1-7Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a project that explores how different values and lifestyle choices are related to sustainable practices. The goal has been to develop an understanding of both complexity in people’s everyday practices as well as patterns in this complexity to be used when designing interventions for sustainable lifestyles. In the project, we have used a mixed methods approach in order to develop a more comprehensive picture of both the larger patterns of the complexities of everyday practices as well as the particulars of sustainability engagement in Sweden. In this paper we present the initial results from a Swedish study of people with different values and their relations to sustainability, based on Schwartz Theory of Basic Human Values. In particular, we present their overall perspective on sustainability, their existing sustainable practices, and their needs for transitions towards more sustainable lifestyles.

  • 25.
    Ilstedt, Sara
    et al.
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Wangel, Josefin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Altering expectations: How design fictions and backcasting can leverage sustainable lifestyles2014In: Proceedings from DRS (Design Research Society) 2014: Design's Big Debates - Pushing the Boundaries of Design Research, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sustainable development calls for fundamental societal changes. Technological development alone won’t suffice; in order to reach sustainable development objectives there is a need to rethink the way we live our lives. Sustainable lifestyles are today however often depicted through a sacrifice-based cultural narrative, in which losses, rather than gains stand in focus. The paper takes its starting point in recognizing that the future is open and possible to influence, but also that (ideas about) the future influences present decisions. These ideas, or expectations, about the future thus provide an opportunity for intervention. Through presenting concrete and positive representations of what a sustainable future might imply in terms of everyday life, the expectations for such a future might be altered. This paper aims to explore how design fiction and backcasting can be used to alter expectations regarding sustainable lifestyles, through creating concrete and engaging visions of everyday life in a sustainable future. The paper also presents a project based on this approach as well as some early findings from this.

  • 26.
    Ilstedt, Sara
    et al.
    School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Wangel, Josefin
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
    Designing Sustainable Futures2013In: Nordes 13 Experiments in design research: Online proceedings / [ed] Brandt, E., Ehn, P., Degn Johansson, T., Hellström Reimer, M., Markussen, T., Vallgårda, A. (Eds.), The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools Architecture, Design and Conservation , 2013, p. 218-227Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses how future studies and design could enable a more conscious and participatory engagement in our common future. The starting point being that representations of the future are often done in an abstract and quantitative manner, which hinders a broad engagement, and understanding of the implications of the scenarios presented. We discuss how on-going research including experimental design methodologies can be used to make images of the future more concrete and accessible. Finally, we argue, not only for prototyping as a method to make the ungraspable future more concrete, but foremost for a designerly approach to the most important of all stakes - the future.

1 - 26 of 26
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