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  • 1.
    Blomkvist, Pär
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Hallin, Anette
    Method for engineering students: Degree projects using the 4-phase Model2015 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Method for engineering students provides an overview of how to formulate, design, produce and deliver a thesis of good quality. The book is relevant for all types of degree projects on bachelors’ and masters’ levels and is also useful when performing research work in other contexts. This is the first comprehensive book on research methodology for engineering students who are performing their degree project within or close to the social sciences. The book has been inspired by modern product design – the thesis is seen as a product – and takes as its starting point the fact that one may have two clients when carrying out a degree project (Academia and Industry). It also describes how to work one’s way through the process through the development of different prototypes. We see the thesis work as a form of craft and the book contains the most important scientific tools that are needed in order to make informed choices.

  • 2.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Hallin, Anette
    Discourses of gender and inclusion: Using women to make peace sustainable2011In: Nordic Academy of Management conference 2011, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Hallin, Anette
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Narcissistic organization: or business as usual?2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Crevani, Lucia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Hallin, Anette
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Entrepreneurship, gender and profession: A research agenda2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5. Dobers, Peter
    et al.
    Hallin, Anette
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Slipping into darkness: A study of the role of ICTs in the making of Stockholm's image2006In: The Journal of urban technology, ISSN 1063-0732, E-ISSN 1466-1853, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 119-127Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Hallin, Anette
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Ledning för innovation i tjänsteföretag2010Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med studien är att undersöka hur ett antal tjänsteföretag ser på affärsutveckling och att ta reda på hur de organiserar sin verksamhet för att utveckla sina affärsmodeller. Studien baseras på 20 intervjuer med representanter för sex kunskapsintensiva tjänsteföretag. Rapporten är ett underlag till redovisningen av regleringsbrevsuppdraget Kunskap och statistik om tjänstesektorn.

  • 7.
    Hallin, Anette
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Marketing the mCity: How a city based ICT-project can make sense2009In: Information Communication Technologies and City Marketing: Digital Opportunities for Cities Around the World, IGI Global, 2009, p. 295-321Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) cannot only be used practically in marketing efforts, but also as symbols, due to the images and associations they provoke of for example modernity and speed. The marketing of a city through the use of ICT-images however, also involve risks, as ICTs among certain people also bring about negative associations. Therefore, marketers need to be aware of what happens with the marketing material after it has been developed and sent out. The main argument of this chapter is that sense making emerges through a dialogic process. By analyzing semiotically a marketing leaflet for the Stockholm-based ICT-project mCity, and two ads for Nokia phones that appeared in Europe at about the same time as mCity, this chapter challenges the traditional cybernetic sender-receiver model of communication, and proposes that when the sender has sent the message, the message becomes a speaker on its own, interacting with the listener through a dialogic process set in the mind of the listener. When understanding this, marketers should benchmark the use of ICTs in other contemporary media in order to ensure the success aimed for with the city marketing material using ICT-imager.

  • 8.
    Hallin, Anette
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Process, Sensemaking a Organizing2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 352-353Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Hallin, Anette
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Producing Stockholm Through Guided Tours2009In: Guiding and guided tours, Göteborg: BAS Publisher , 2009Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Hallin, Anette
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Size Matters: Ostensive and performative dimensions of organizational size2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizational size is a common way to describe and understand organizations invarious settings: in every-day situations as well as in organizational research. Withinorganization theory, organizational size has been seen variously as a basic feature ofthe organization (an independent variable); as a result of a reaction to the environmentof the organization (a dependent variable); or as a basic criterion for the selectionand categorizing of empirical cases (a selective variable). Often, organizationalsize is measured through the number of employees, budget or turnover; but linked toit are also associations that might not always match the organizational reality as experiencedby those managing and working in the organization. "is mismatch can causeproblems for the organization as for its members, and illustrates that organizationalsize is not only a variable that can be operationalized quantitatively, but a figure ofthought, affecting our expectations of the organization. "e purpose of this thesis isto develop the understanding of organizational size as a figure of thought by describinghow it has been used traditionally and by developing an alternative definition ofthe concept.

    This is done with the help of a case study of an organization that was perceived as differentin size compared to what it was when measured traditionally. An ethnographicapproach, including shadowing, semi-structured interviews, and the collection ofprinted and digitally stored material related to the case, has generated the empiricalmaterial which has been analyzed through a narrative approach.

    Understanding organizational size as a figure of thought makes it apparent that thetraditional view of organizational size builds on certain implications regarding theorganization, implications not acknowledging the ongoing organizing aspects. "eempirical case illustrates that the size of the organization is not only a question ofwhere the borders around “the organization” are drawn, but when they are drawn,since it can be seen to be a continuously constructed action net. Two types of actionsare identified: actions of narrativization and actions of realization. Whereas the firsttype involves actions that lead to the emergence of narratives about the organization,the second type constitutes actions that inscribe the organization into differentmaterialities. "ese two types of actions illustrate how the borders around “theorganization” are drawn and help explain the mismatch between expectations of theorganization based on perceptions of its size. "e conclusion is that “organizationalsize” is not only something that is, but something that is done. "ese two dimensionsof the concept are called “the ostensive” and “the performative”, respectively. Eventhough “organizational size” makes “the organization” present, it has limitations as atheoretical concept if its performative dimensions are not acknowledged, since it createsa simplified impression of “the organization” as being a static entity.

  • 11.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen Univ, Sch Sustainable Dev Soc & Technol, Västerås, Sweden .
    Representation of space. Uncovering the political dimension of guided tours in Stockholm2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 8-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to explore the relation between place and its representations through a comparative discourse analysis of two different guided tours of Stockholm. The comparison sheds light on what may otherwise remain blind spots of mainstream guided tours. Applying Lefebvre's notion of representations of space and Bourdieu's ideas on symbolic power the contribution of this article is to show how all guided tours, regardless of their intention, create political, conceived spaces. Hence this article opens up for a debate on a critically aware reading of the verbal (re)presentation of the particular character of sites in and through guided tours.

  • 12.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Jerbrant, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Engwall, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Innovativity or industrialization?: Service managers’ views on competitive service work2009In: Nordic academy of Management: Business as usual, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Digging wider and deeper – revealing the hegemony and symbolic power of 'project' studies and practice2010In: International Journal of Project Organisation and Management, ISSN 1740-2891, E-ISSN 1740-2905, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Building on a brief illustration, this article discusses the need for new empirical fields and methods in project management research. This would not only provide novel insights into project practices and management, but would also entail questioning the hegemony (Gramsci, 1988) of project management and project research. We argue that the hegemony is upheld by, or perhaps even constructed through, the language and the ideal images of the area, developed by project researchers and used by project practitioners; adding to what could be called 'the social power' (Bourdieu, 1991) of those involved in what are called 'projects' and 'project management'. It is also argued that the social power of those familiar with 'projects' and 'project management' is sustained by the silence of all those involved in similar practices, but who do not master the terminology of project work.

  • 14.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Managing Death: Corporate Social Responsibility and Tragedy2009In: Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management, ISSN 1535-3958, E-ISSN 1535-3966, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 206-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on the true story of the actions of a middle manager in a major industrial company after the unexpected death of one of his employees, while participating in one of the most important social rituals to humans and society - the creation of meaning of death - we take an analytical approach to corporate social responsibility (CSR). This is done by discussing the overlap between CSR and human resource management (HRM). The story induces us to question the upholding of CSR an HRM as separate theoretical fields, since the managerial practice seems to indicate that these have merged into one. Also, the story indicates that the borders between the 'private' and 'public' roles in managerial practice are blurred and that to be a middle manager today is quite complicated. The article finishes with a discussion on why the writing of policies may not be the answer to this problem.

  • 15.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Narratives as artifacts and artifacts as narratives: The touchable and the thinkable2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Organisational Communication and Sustainable Development: ICT´s for mobility2009Book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Nuur, Cali
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Dynamics.
    Take to the City? Where?2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Hallin, Anette
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Sergi, Viviane
    Crevani, Lucia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Hot stuff: gendering the academic2010In: ASCOS, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Hallin, Annette
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Lundevall, K.
    mCity: User focused development of mobile services within the city of Stockholm2008In: Evolutionary Concepts in End User Productivity and Performance: Applications for Organizational Progress, IGI Global, 2008, p. 268-280Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents the mCity Project, a project owned by the City of Stockholm, aiming at creating user-friendly mobile services in collaboration with businesses. Starting from the end-users' perspective, mCity focuses on how to satisfy existing needs in the community, initiating test pilots within a wide range of areas, from health care and education, to tourism and business. The lesson learned is that user focus creates involvement among end users and leads to the development of sustainable systems that are actually used after they have been implemented. This is naturally vital input not only to municipalities and governments but also for the IT/telecom industry at large. Using the knowledge from mCity, the authors suggest a new, broader definition of "m-government" which focuses on mobile people rather than mobile technology.

  • 20.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Hallin, Anette
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Guiding in the imaginary city of the future2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Karrbom Gustavsson, Tina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Project Communication.
    Hallin, Anette
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Dobers, Peter
    Mälardalen University, School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology.
    Who are shaping the sustainable cities of tomorrow and how do they do it?2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Linse, Charlotta
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Hallin, Anette
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Standardization and Innovation: The Janus-face of Service Innovation2011In: NFF 2011 - Nordic Academy of Management: A practice about practice, Stockholm University, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is focused on the back-office function of service innovation, in which much service innovation work is executed. The paper shows that standardization is an important and interrelated part in service innovation.

    Standardization is utilized by management at several levels of the development process as a way of organizing the courses of action. The approach utilized for the collection of empirical data is qualitative interviews as a basis for a comparative case study.

  • 23. Lundevall, K.
    et al.
    Hallin, Anette
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.) (closed (20130101).
    Lagergren, M.
    Wretlund, M.
    eGovernment in a swedish municipality-change management in the planning process2012In: Proceedings of the European Conference on e-Government, ECEG, 2012, p. 408-415Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    eGovernment continues to be an interesting area of study, especially since it is not simply about the implementation of ICTs, but rather, as this paper will show, about a larger change management process. When trying to understand the factors behind successful examples of eGovernment in the context of change management, most research so far focuses on the implementation phase in a literal sense and not on the planning phase, that precedes the implementation phase, or theevaluation phase that follows. This paper aims at remedying this by focusing on the planning phase; the development of an eGovernment strategy and vision, which is the departing point for a future implementation process. Through an in-depthcase study of the work done at a Swedish municipality, the city of Vasteras, this paper aims at answering the question: "Which are the key change management aspects of an eGovernment planning process?" By focusing on the planning phase of eGovernment in a Swedish municipality, this paper develops the knowledge and understanding of this kind of endeavour. Even if ICTs can be seen as a means to modernize government, technology alone cannot break down organizational and culturalbarriers - something that is necessary in order for the full benefits of eGovernment to be realized. The paper is hence primarily empirical in contribution. However, this paper also provides useful insights on the planning process for eGovernment and necessary aspects when creating an eGovernment strategy.

  • 24.
    Sergi, Vivianne
    et al.
    Department of Management, HEC Montre´al, Montre´al.
    Hallin, Anette
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Industrial Economics and Management (Div.).
    Thick performances, not just thick descriptions: the processual nature of doing qualitative research2011In: Qualitative research in organization and management, ISSN 1746-5648, E-ISSN 1746-5656, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 191-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the consequences of doing research that uses qualitative approaches. Anchored in a process ontology, this paper starts from the idea that doing research implies a performance in which the researcher is fully immersed, and explores the implications of the processual nature of doing research.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper takes use of vignettes; short stories of research in action, told by different researchers that are analyzed to reveal the richness of the situation in question. These vignettes illustrate how performing qualitative research is an emotional, embodied and deeply personal experience.

    Findings – The authors show that when grounding qualitative research in a process ontology, research is the fruit of the researcher's performance: doing research is performing it, and performing it cannot happen without feeling a wide range of emotions, without appealing to who we are or without questioning what we are doing. Thus, this exploration reveals that doing research is a rich, complex and multi-level experience that mobilizes the whole person conducting this inquiry – that is, that doing research takes the form of a thick performance.

    Originality/value – The value of the paper lies in its roots in a process ontology to understand the doing of qualitative research, which makes it possible to fully acknowledge the importance of subjectivity in all the steps that make up the research endeavor, from the fieldwork to writing – thus offering not only a richer image of what research is about, but an image that is also closer to the experience of doing it.

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