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  • 1. Bertram, F.
    et al.
    Zhang, Fan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Evertsson, J.
    Carla, F.
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Messing, M. E.
    Mikkelsen, A.
    Nilsson, J-O
    Lundgren, E.
    In situ anodization of aluminum surfaces studied by x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy2014In: Journal of Applied Physics, ISSN 0021-8979, E-ISSN 1089-7550, Vol. 116, no 3, p. 034902-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present results from the anodization of an aluminum single crystal [Al(111)] and an aluminum alloy [Al 6060] studied by in situ x-ray reflectivity, in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and ex situ scanning electron microscopy. For both samples, a linear increase of oxide film thickness with increasing anodization voltage was found. However, the slope is much higher in the single crystal case, and the break-up of the oxide film grown on the alloy occurs at a lower anodization potential than on the single crystal. The reasons for these observations are discussed as are the measured differences observed for x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  • 2.
    Cao, Yanhui
    et al.
    Xiamen Univ, State Key Lab Phys Chem Solid Surfaces, Dept Chem, Coll Chem & Chem Engn, Xiamen 361005, Fujian, Peoples R China..
    Zheng, Dajiang
    Xiamen Univ, Coll Mat, Xiamen 361005, Fujian, Peoples R China..
    Dong, Shigang
    Xiamen Univ, Coll Energy, Xiamen 361005, Fujian, Peoples R China.;Xiamen Univ, Sch Energy Res, Xiamen 361005, Fujian, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Fan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Lin, Jinyan
    Xiamen Univ, Coll Mat, Xiamen 361005, Fujian, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Cheng
    Xiamen Univ, State Key Lab Phys Chem Solid Surfaces, Dept Chem, Coll Chem & Chem Engn, Xiamen 361005, Fujian, Peoples R China..
    Lin, Changjian
    Xiamen Univ, State Key Lab Phys Chem Solid Surfaces, Dept Chem, Coll Chem & Chem Engn, Xiamen 361005, Fujian, Peoples R China.;Xiamen Univ, Coll Mat, Xiamen 361005, Fujian, Peoples R China.;Xiamen Univ, Coll Energy, Xiamen 361005, Fujian, Peoples R China.;Xiamen Univ, Sch Energy Res, Xiamen 361005, Fujian, Peoples R China..
    A Composite Corrosion Inhibitor of MgAl Layered Double Hydroxides Co-Intercalated with Hydroxide and Organic Anions for Carbon Steel in Simulated Carbonated Concrete Pore Solutions2019In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 166, no 11, p. C3106-C3113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Corrosion of steel in concrete has resulted in shorter service life of concrete constructions and it may also cause serious safety accident. Chloride attack and carbonation of the concrete are two of the most crucial trigger factors for the initiation of corrosion. In order to protect the reinforced steel in concrete from corrosion, in this work, a composite inhibitor of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) intercalated with organic phthalates (PTL) and hydroxide ions (MgAl-LDHs-OH-PTL) were synthesized by calcination-reconstruction methods in ambient atmosphere. The structure, composition and morphology of the prepared MgAl-LDHs-OH-PTL were obtained by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy, respectively. The electrochemical measurements indicated that the inhibition efficiency of MgAl-LDHs-OH-PTL for carbon steel in the simulated carbonated concrete pore (SCCP) solutions reached more than 90% when its concentration was 20 g/L. It was found that the MgAl-LDHs-OH-PTL possessed multifunctional protection roles for the carbon steel in concrete, which mainly included decrease of aggressive Cl-ions, increase of the pH of SCCP solutions and release of PTL anions to the solution gradually. The work indicated the promising potential of LDHs compounds as effective multifunctional inhibitors in the field of corrosion protection of reinforced concrete.

  • 3.
    Chen, Chengdong
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Hou, Ruiqing
    Zhang, Fan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Dong, Shigang
    Claesson, Per Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Lin, Changjian
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Heating-Induced Enhancement of Corrosion Protection of Carbon Steel by a Nanocomposite Film Containing Mussel Adhesive Protein2017In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 164, no 4, p. C188-C193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Application of protective coatings on metals may involve a thermal treatment process. In this study, the effect of thermal treatment up to 200 degrees C on the corrosion protection was investigated for nanocomposite films composed of mussel adhesive protein (MAP), CeO2 nanoparticles and Na2HPO4 deposited on carbon steel. The morphology and microstructure of the pre-formed nanocomposite film were characterized by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The changes in the chemical structure of the nanocomposite film due to the thermal treatment were investigated by infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. The corrosion protection of the unheated and heated nanocomposite films on carbon steel was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and details of the corrosion process were elucidated by in-situ AFM measurements in 0.1 M NaCl solution. The results show a certain increase in the corrosion protection with time of the nanocomposite film for carbon steel. The analyses reveal that thermal treatment leads to a reduction of water molecules in the nanocomposite film, and an enhanced cross-linking and cohesion of the film due to oxidation of catechols to o-quinones. As a result, the film becomes more compact and gives improved corrosion protection for carbon steel.

  • 4.
    Chen, Chengdong
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. Xiamen University, China.
    Zhang, Fan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Lin, C.
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. Xiamen University, China.
    Corrosion protection and self-healing of a nanocomposite film of mussel adhesive protein and CeO2 nanoparticles on carbon steel2016In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 163, no 9, p. C545-C552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A nanocomposite film composed of mussel adhesive protein (MAP) and CeO2 nanoparticles has been explored as a 'green' alternative for corrosion protection of carbon steel. In this work, the nanocomposite film of sub-micron thickness was deposited on carbon steel surface by one-step-dipping method. The film was characterized by using scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive spectroscopy and atomic force microscope (AFM). The measurements of scanning reference electrode technique and in-situ AFM were performed to investigate the initial localized corrosion process at defects and self-healing ability of the nanocomposite film. The results demonstrate that the nanocomposite film possesses a certain self-healing ability and provides excellent corrosion protection for carbon steel in neutral 0.1 M NaCl solution. The self-healing ability is attributed to the functional group (catechol) of the MAP, and the healing process is explained by the fact that Fe ions released from the surface defects promote the formation of Fe-catecholato complexes in the nanocomposite film, which retards the localized corrosion at these defects.

  • 5.
    Chen, Sulin
    et al.
    Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ, Sch Mech Engn, Shanghai 200240, Peoples R China..
    Shen, Bin
    Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ, Sch Mech Engn, Shanghai 200240, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Fan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Hong, Hong
    Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ, Sch Mech Engn, Shanghai 200240, Peoples R China..
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Mussel-Inspired Graphene Film with Enhanced Durability as a Macroscale Solid Lubricant2019In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 11, no 34, p. 31386-31392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Graphene has exhibited massive potential as a macroscale solid lubricant, but its durability is limited due to the weak adhesion between graphene sheets and the substrate. Here, inspired by mussel adhesive protein (MAP), effective reinforcement of the graphene-substrate interaction to attain remarkable enhancement on the durability of the graphene film is presented. The mussel-inspired graphene (mGr) film exhibits a coefficient of friction stabilizing at 0.16 up to 490000 sliding cycles in the friction testing against the silicon nitride ball; in the identical sliding condition, comparatively, the graphene (Gr) film without MAP only lasts 4300 sliding cycles. The analysis of Raman and ATR-FTIR demonstrates that, on the one hand, the MAP film firmly adsorbs onto the substrate via forming metal-catechol coordination bonds with metal atoms; on the other hand, it establishes strong interactions with graphene sheets by hydrogen bonding as well as the pi-pi overlap. As an interlayer, MAP retains graphene sheets within the contact interface in the form of a compact tribo-layer, which results in an over 2 orders of magnitude enhancement of durability for the mGr film. This strategy of improving the graphene-substrate adhesion via MAP offers an avenue for the development of effective and reliable graphene-based solid lubricants for engineering applications.

  • 6. Evertsson, J.
    et al.
    Bertram, F.
    Zhang, Fan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Rullik, L.
    Merte, L. R.
    Shipilin, M.
    Soldemo, Markus
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Material Physics, MF.
    Ahmadi, Sareh
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Material Physics, MF.
    Vinogradov, N.
    Carla, F.
    Weissenrieder, Jonas
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Material Physics, MF.
    Götelid, Mats
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Materials- and Nano Physics, Material Physics, MF.
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Mikkelsen, A.
    Nilsson, J. -O
    Lundgren, E.
    The thickness of native oxides on aluminum alloys and single crystals2015In: Applied Surface Science, ISSN 0169-4332, E-ISSN 1873-5584, Vol. 349, p. 826-832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present results from measurements of the native oxide film thickness on four different industrial aluminum alloys and three different aluminum single crystals. The thicknesses were determined using X-ray reflectivity, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. In addition, atomic force microscopy was used for micro-structural studies of the oxide surfaces. The reflectivity measurements were performed in ultra-high vacuum, vacuum, ambient, nitrogen and liquid water conditions. The results obtained using X-ray reflectivity and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrate good agreement. However, the oxide thicknesses determined from the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy show a larger discrepancy from the above two methods. In the present contribution the reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. We also address the effect of the substrate type and the presence of water on the resultant oxide thickness.

  • 7.
    Forslund, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Hosseinpour, Saman
    Zhang, Fan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Johnson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Claesson, Per
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Leygraf, Christofer
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Corrosion Inhibition of Two Brass Alloys by Octadecanethiol in Humidified Air with Formic Acid2015In: Corrosion, ISSN 0010-9312, E-ISSN 1938-159X, Vol. 71, no 7, p. 908-917Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-assembled monolayers of octadecanethiol (ODT) have previously shown to provide excellent corrosion inhibition on copper exposed to humidified air containing formic acid, mimicking indoor atmospheric corrosion. ODT layers are, however, much less efficient corrosion inhibitors for zinc. In this work, we elucidate the possibility of using ODT monolayers to inhibit corrosion of brass. Based on a quantitative analysis of corrosion products, we found that ODT provides equally good corrosion inhibition of single-phase Cu20Zn as of pure copper, retarding the transportation of corrosion stimulators to the brass surface. On double-phase Cu40Zn, however, local galvanic effects led to less efficient corrosion inhibition and more corrosion products than on Cu20Zn.

  • 8.
    Forslund, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Hosseinpour, Saman
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Zhang, Fan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Johnson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Claesson, Per
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Leygraf, Christofer
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    The atmospheric corrosion inhibition of octadecanethiol adsorbed on two brass alloys exposed to humidified air with formic acidManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-assembled monolayers of octadecanethiol (ODT) have previously shown to provide excellent corrosion inhibition on copper exposed to humidified air containing formic acid - mimicking indoor atmospheric corrosion. ODT layers are, however, much less efficient corrosion inhibitors for zinc. In this work we elucidate the possibility of using ODT monolayers to inhibit corrosion of brass. We find that ODT provides equally good corrosion inhibition of single-phase Cu20Zn as of pure copper, retarding the transport of corrosion stimulators to the brass surface. On double-phase Cu40Zn, however, local galvanic effects lead to less efficient corrosion inhibition and more corrosion products than on Cu20Zn.

  • 9.
    Han, Lei
    et al.
    School of Material Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072.
    Song, Shizhe
    School of Material Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 ; State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Shenyang 110016.
    Zhang, Fan
    School of Material Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072.
    A VIRTUAL INSTRUMENT FOR CORROSION RATE MEASUREMENT BY ELECTROCHEMICAL FREQUENCY MODULATION TECHNIQUE2008In: Journal of Chinese Society for Corrosion and Protection, ISSN 1005-4537, Vol. 28, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An EFM system for corrosion rate test based on electrochemical frequency modulation technique has been established by means of virtual instrument, which consists of a potentiostat, a laptop equipped with a DAQ card and applications developed in LabVIEW. Experiments has been performed in laboratory to determine anodic and cathodic Tafel slopes as well as corrosion current densities for the systems 304 stainless steel/HCl and Q235 steel in H2SO4 and NaCl.It was shown that the EFM system could be used successfully for corrosion rate mea?鄄surement under various corrosion conditions.

  • 10.
    Sababi, Majid
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Zhang, Fan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Krivosheeva, Olga
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Forslund, Mattias
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Dédinaité, Andra
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Thin Composite Films of Mussel Adhesive Proteins and Ceria Nanoparticles on Carbon Steel for Corrosion Protection2012In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 159, no 8, p. C364-C371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thin composite films of the mussel adhesive proteins (Mefp-1) and ceria nanoparticles were deposited on substrate surfaces by alternating immersions. The film formation was studied by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) monitoring. Both the changes in frequency and dissipation recorded by QCM-D demonstrate buildup of a composite film of Mefp-1 and nanoceria. Micro-and nanostructure and composition of the film on carbon steel were characterized by optical and atomic force microscopy (AFM), electron probe micro analyzer (EPMA) and confocal Raman microspectroscopy (CRM). Optical and EPMA observations of the film show micron-sized aggregates and AFM imaging of the compact and smooth areas reveal the nanostructure. EPMA elemental mapping indicates that the micron-sized aggregates are rich in ceria and Mefp-1, whereas CRM analysis shows the presence of Mefp-1-Fe complexes in the film. Corrosion protection of the composite film on carbon steel was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization measurements in NaCl solution, and compared with Mefp-1 added in the solution as an inhibitor. The measurements show that the composite film provides a higher corrosion resistance compared with Mefp-1 added as inhibitor. The corrosion resistance increases with exposure time and approaches a high level.

  • 11.
    Shao, Cairu
    et al.
    Guangdong Res Inst Rare Met, Guangzhou 510651, Guangdong, Peoples R China.;Beihang Univ, Sch Phys & Nucl Energy Engn, 37 Xueyuan Rd, Beijing 100191, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Fan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Li, Xia
    Beihang Univ, Sch Phys & Nucl Energy Engn, 37 Xueyuan Rd, Beijing 100191, Peoples R China..
    Zhang, Jianhua
    Guangdong Res Inst Rare Met, Guangzhou 510651, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Jiang, Yusi
    Guangdong Res Inst Rare Met, Guangzhou 510651, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Cheng, Huayue
    Guangdong Res Inst Rare Met, Guangzhou 510651, Guangdong, Peoples R China..
    Zhu, Kaigui
    Beihang Univ, Sch Phys & Nucl Energy Engn, 37 Xueyuan Rd, Beijing 100191, Peoples R China..
    Influence of Cr doping on the oxygen evolution potential of SnO2/Ti and Sb-SnO2/Ti electrodes2019In: JOURNAL OF ELECTROANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, ISSN 1572-6657, Vol. 832, p. 436-443Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oxygen evolution potential is the determining factor affecting the anode efficiency of the wastewater treatment process. In this study, we focus on increasing oxygen evolution potential of Cr-SnO2/Ti and Cr-Sb-SnO2/Ti electrodes with the pyrolytic method. XRD, SEM and XPS techniques had been applied to characterize the microstructures and chemical compositions of the samples. Electrochemical measurements had been performed to evaluate the oxygen evolution potential as a criterion of the wastewater treatment efficiency. The results show that co-doping of Sb and Cr improved the crystallinity and grain size of SnO2 coating, and Cr existed in the form of Cr(III) valence states. The Cr doping treatment improved the electronic conductivity and the electrocatalytic activity of the electrodes. DFT calculation of the band-structure indicates Cr doped SnO2 had a superior electrical conductivity, where Cr atom acts as an acceptor providing vacancies for electron transportation. The DOS diagrams reveal the Cr doped SnO2 showing a p-type conductivity which would subsequently influence the built-in potential on metal-semiconductor interface. We proposed the mechanism of the increase of oxygen evolution potential is the doping of Cr expands the built-in potential.

  • 12.
    Xie, Guoxin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. Tsinghua Univ, State Key Lab Tribol, Peoples R China.
    Zhang, Fan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Adsorption and friction of Mussel Adhesive Protein (MAP) films under polarization2015In: PROCEEDINGS OF MALAYSIAN INTERNATIONAL TRIBOLOGY CONFERENCE 2015, 2015, p. 19-20Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mussel Adhesive Protein (MAP) is an adhesive protein derived from blue mussel byssus, and has promising applications for a variety of functional coatings. In this work, different analytical techniques including cyclic voltammetry, chronocoulometry experiments, and microtribometer have been used to investigate the interfacial structures and the frictional properties of MAP film on the platinum (Pt) substrate under polarization. MAP adsorption could change electrostatically after polarization. The friction of adsorbed MAP film can be tuned effectively in a suitable potential range, which is promising for future active control over the adsorption and friction of MAP films.

  • 13.
    Yang, Huaiyu
    et al.
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Chem Engn, London, England..
    Zhang, Fan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology.
    We, Han
    UCL, Dept Chem Engn, London, England..
    Review on Life Cycle of Parabens, Synthesis, Degradation, Characterization and Safety Analysis2018In: Current organic chemistry, ISSN 1385-2728, E-ISSN 1875-5348, Vol. 22, no 8, p. 769-779Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this review, we show the life cycle of parabens, commonly used preservatives that exist in nature and commercial products. Typical synthetic methods to produce parabens, and a set of complimentary characterization techniques to monitor the composition of parabens are also highlighted. This includes solid state analysis using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), in-situ monitoring of crystallization process using Focused Beam Reflectance Measurement (FBRM), Particle Vision Measurement (PVM), quantitative detection via High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), and Gas Chromatography (GC). An improved understanding of the overall physical, biophysical and chemical properties of parabens and their life cycle, summarized in this article, are vital for the safety control and extensive applications of relevant products in food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries.

  • 14.
    Zhang, Fan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    The Mussel Adhesive Protein (Mefp-1): A GREEN Corrosion Inhibitor2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Corrosion of metallic materials is a natural process, and our study shows that even in an alkaline environment severe corrosion may occur on a carbon steel surface. While corrosion cannot be stopped it can be retarded. Many of the traditional anti-corrosion approaches such as the chromate process are effective but hazardous to the environment and human health.

    Mefp-1, a protein derived from blue mussel byssus, is well known for its extraordinary adhesion and film forming properties. Moreover, it has been reported that Mefp-1 confers a certain corrosion protection for stainless steel. All these facts indicate that this protein may be developed into corrosion inhibitors with ‘green’, ‘effective’ and ‘smart’ properties.

    In this study, a range of surface-sensitive techniques have been used to investigate adsorption kinetics, film forming and film compaction mechanisms of Mefp-1. In situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) enables the protein adsorption on substrates to be visualized, whereas the ex situ AFM facilitates the characterization of micro- and nano-structures of the protein films. In situ Peak Force AFM can be used to determine nano-mechanical properties of the surface layers. The quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) was used to reveal the build-up of the Mefp-1 film on substrates and measure the viscoelastic properties of the adsorbed film. Analytical techniques and theoretical calculations were applied to gain insights into the formation and compaction processes such as oxidation and complexation of pre-formed Mefp-1 films. The electron probe micro analyzer (EPMA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were utilized to obtain the chemical composition of the surface layer. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements were performed to evaluate the corrosion inhibition efficiency of different forms of Mefp-1 on carbon steel substrates.

    The results demonstrate that Mefp-1 adsorbs on carbon steel surfaces across a broad pH interval, and it forms a continuous film covering the substrate providing a certain extent of corrosion protection. At a higher pH, the adsorption is faster and the formed film is more compact. At neutral pH, results on the iron substrate suggest an initially fast adsorption, with the molecules oriented preferentially parallel to the surface, followed by a structural change within the film leading to molecules extending towards solution. Both oxidation and complexation of the Mefp-1 can lead to the compaction of the protein films. Addition of Fe3+ induces a transition from an extended and soft protein layer to a denser and stiffer one by enhancing the formation of tri-Fe3+/catechol complexes in the surface film, leading to water removal and film compaction. Exposure to a NaIO4 solution results in the cross-linking of Mefp-1, which also results in a significant compaction of the pre-formed protein film. Mefp-1 is an effective corrosion inhibitor for carbon steel when added to an acidic solution, and the inhibition efficiency increases with time. As a film-forming corrosion inhibitor, the pre-formed Mefp-1 film provides a certain level of corrosion protection for short term applications, and the protection efficiency can be significantly enhanced by the film compaction processes.

    For the long term applications, a thin film composed of Mefp-1 and ceria nanoparticles was developed. The deposited Mefp-1/ceria composite film contains micro-sized aggregates of Mefp-1/Fe3+ complexes and CeO2 particles. The Mefp-1/ceria film may promote the further oxidation of ferrous oxides, and the corrosion resistance increases with time. Moreover, phosphate ions react with Fe ions released from the surface and form deposits preferentially at the surface defect sites. The deposits incorporate into the Mefp-1/ceria composite film and heal the surface defects, which result in a significantly improved corrosion inhibition effect for the Mefp-1/ceria composite film in both initial and prolonged exposure situations

  • 15.
    Zhang, Fan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Brinck, Tore
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Brandner, Birgit
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Dédinaité, Andra
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    In situ confocal Raman micro-spectroscopy and electrochemical studies of mussel adhesive protein and ceria composite film on carbon steel in salt solutions2013In: Electrochimica Acta, ISSN 0013-4686, E-ISSN 1873-3859, Vol. 107, p. 276-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thin films composed of Mefp-1 and ceria nanoparticles have shown an increasing corrosion inhibition effect with time for carbon steel in acidic aqueous solutions containing phosphate, which motivates a detailed study of the inhibition mechanism by in situ confocal Raman micro-spectroscopy (CRM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The presence of both CeO2 and ferric oxides in the thin composite film was demonstrated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The Raman spectra assisted by DFT calculations suggest that Mefp-1 forms tri-Fe3+/Mefp-1 complexes and binds to ceria nanoparticles in the composite film. The in situ CRM measurement allow us to follow the development of corrosion products. The measurements show a mixture of Fe oxides/oxyhydroxides, and also indicate that ferrous oxides may be further oxidized by the composite film. Moreover, phosphate ions react with the Fe ions released from the surface to form iron-phosphate deposits, which become incorporated into the corrosion product layer and the composite film. The EIS measurements suggest a layered surface structure formed by the initial Mefp-1/ceria composite layer and the corrosion products/iron-phosphate deposits. These measurements also demonstrate the greatly increased inhibition effect of the composite film in the presence of the phosphate ions. The consistent CRM and EIS results suggest that the iron-phosphate deposits heal defects in the composite film and corrosion product layer, which results in a significantly improved corrosion inhibition of the Mefp-1/ceria composite film during initial and long term exposure.

  • 16.
    Zhang, Fan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Chen, Chengdong
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Hou, R.
    Li, Jing
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Cao, Yanhui
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Dong, S.
    Lin, C.
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Investigation and application of mussel adhesive protein nanocomposite film-forming inhibitor for reinforced concrete engineering2019In: Corrosion Science, ISSN 0010-938X, E-ISSN 1879-0496, Vol. 153, p. 333-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A mussel adhesive protein based nanocomposite thin film was produced to be applied as surface pre-treatment or primer on rebars of reinforced concrete. The film deposition and drying processes were investigated to enhance the corrosion protection, and facilitate large-scale industrial applications. The morphology, chemical composition and microstructure of the film were characterised with SEM, EDS, Micro-IR and AFM techniques. EIS results suggested the film provides excellent and increased corrosion protection for the carbon steel in mild and extreme concrete pore solutions. In-situ AFM results demonstrated the self-healing ability of the film to the pitting corrosion.

  • 17.
    Zhang, Fan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Evertsson, J.
    Bertram, F.
    Rullik, L.
    Carla, F.
    Långberg, Marie
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Lundgren, E.
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Integration of electrochemical and synchrotron-based X-ray techniques for in-situ investigation of aluminum anodization2017In: Electrochimica Acta, ISSN 0013-4686, E-ISSN 1873-3859, Vol. 241, p. 299-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anodization of aluminum alloys AA 6082 and AA 7075 was investigated in-situ with integrated electrochemical and synchrotron-based X-ray reflectivity (XRR) methods providing complementary information about the anodic processes taking place on the alloys. The stepwise potentiostatic polarization measurements reveal dynamic processes of the anodic oxide formation and dissolution, and the following electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements detect the break of the native oxide and the growth of typical two-layer anodic oxide film, while the XRR measurements show the growth of entire anodic oxide film whose thickness increases linearly with the increasing applied potential. The results indicate that while a stable anodic oxide can be formed on the both alloys with a similar growth factor, AA 7075 shows a thinner thickness of the barrier layer and a lower resistance of the oxide film. The electrochemical results suggest both localized and uniform anodic dissolution processes, which are more pronounced on AA 7075, demonstrating the effect of alloying elements on the growth of anodic oxides.

  • 18.
    Zhang, Fan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Nilsson, J. -O
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    In situ and operando AFM and EIS studies of anodization of Al 6060: Influence of intermetallic particles2016In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 163, no 9, p. C609-C618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, anodization of an Al 6060 alloy has been investigated by in-situ electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) under operando conditions, to elucidate the role of intermetallic particles (IMPs) in the alloy. The Volta potential maps measured by scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM) reveal that the relative nobility is higher for AlFeSi type and lower for Mg2 Si type of particles as compared with the alloy matrix. The EIS results obtained at anodizing potentials show that the thickness of the barrier oxide layer increases linearly with the applied potential, but the oxide growth rate is lower than that of single crystal samples reported previously. Moreover, the EIS spectra show an inductive loop at low frequencies indicating an anodic dissolution process. The EC-AFM images display detailed morphological changes related to the IMPs during the anodization, which reveal certain localized dissolution in parallel to anodic Al oxide (AAO) formation on the alloy. The combined AFM and EIS measurements demonstrate that the IMPs in the alloy cause localized dissolution during anodization, resulting in a reduced AAO growth rate. The corrosion resistance of as-produced AAO film is low unless anodized at sufficiently high potential.

  • 19.
    Zhang, Fan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Recent Development of Corrosion Protection Strategy Based on Mussel Adhesive Protein2019In: FRONTIERS IN MATERIALS, ISSN 2296-8016, Vol. 6, article id 207Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many of traditional anti-corrosion approaches using chromate are effective but hazardous to natural environment and human health, so development of green and effective alternatives is desirable. One of the mussel adhesive proteins derived from mussel byssus presents extraordinary adhesion to steel surface and exhibits film-forming and corrosion inhibition properties. Novel strategies for enhancing the corrosion inhibition of steel by the protein have been demonstrated recently. The protein together with ceria nanoparticles presents a great potential for the development of new corrosion inhibitors and thin films that are "green" and "effective," and have "smart" protection properties.

  • 20.
    Zhang, Fan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Claesson, Per Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Electrochemical and AFM studies of mussel adhesive protein (Mefp-1) as corrosion inhibitor for carbon steel2011In: Electrochimica Acta, ISSN 0013-4686, E-ISSN 1873-3859, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 1636-1645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adsorption of mussel adhesive protein (Mefp-1) derived from the marine mussel Mytilus edulis and its corrosion inhibition for carbon steel were studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization measurements in NaCl solutions at 01 4.6. The results indicate that the Mefp-1 confers significant corrosion inhibition of carbon steel, and the chloride concentration of the solution has an influence on the inhibition efficiency. Within a short exposure time, the inhibition efficiency is higher in the solution with a higher chloride concentration, whereas, for longer exposure time, up to one week, higher inhibition efficiency was obtained in the solution with a lower chloride concentration. AFM imaging was used both ex situ and in situ to investigate Mefp-1 adsorption. The in situ AFM measurements enable the protein adsorption on carbon steel to be visualized in real time in the solution. The AFM images illustrate how the Mefp-1 layer is formed on carbon steel. Measurements using bovine serum albumin (BSA) were also performed for comparison. The results showed that BSA also confers significant corrosion inhibition of carbon steel even though the BSA film formation process is slightly different from that of Mefp-1.

  • 21.
    Zhang, Fan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Claesson, Per Martin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Brinck, Tore
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Electrochemical, atomic force microscopy and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy studies of pre-formed mussel adhesive protein films on carbon steel for corrosion protection2012In: Thin Solid Films, ISSN 0040-6090, E-ISSN 1879-2731, Vol. 520, no 24, p. 7136-7143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrochemical measurements, in situ and ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) analysis were performed to investigate the formation and stability as well as corrosion protection properties of mussel adhesive protein (Mefp-1) films on carbon steel, and the influence of cross-linking by NaIO 4 oxidation. The in situ AFM measurements show flake-like adsorbed protein aggregates in the film formed at pH 9. The ex situ AFM images indicate multilayer-like films and that the film becomes more compact and stable in NaCl solution after the cross-linking. The IRAS results reveal the absorption bands of Mefp-1 on carbon steel before and after NaIO 4 induced oxidation of the pre-adsorbed protein. Within a short exposure time, a certain corrosion protection effect was noted for the pre-formed Mefp-1 film in 0.1 M NaCl solution. Cross-linking the pre-adsorbed film by NaIO 4 oxidation significantly enhanced the protection efficiency by up to 80%.

  • 22.
    Zhang, Fan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Lin, Changjian
    Localized corrosion behaviour of reinforcement steel in simulated concrete pore solution2009In: Corrosion Science, ISSN 0010-938X, E-ISSN 1879-0496, Vol. 51, no 9, p. 2130-2138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The correlation of localized corrosion behavior and microstructure of reinforcement steel in simulated concrete pore solutions was investigated. The SEM/EDS analysis showed that most of ferrite, minor amount of pearlite and some MnS inclusions existed on the steel surface. The SKPFM results indicated a higher corrosion tendency at the ferrite grain boundaries, pearlite grains and MnS inclusions. The EIS and electrochemical polarization measurements demonstrated the influence of pH and chloride concentration on the corrosion behavior. in situ optical observations and AFM images revealed a detail of the localized corrosion behavior, which was in good agreement with the results from the other measurements.

  • 23.
    Zhang, Fan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Sababi, Majid
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Brinck, Tore
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Persson, Dan
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Chemistry, Materials and Surfaces.
    In situ investigations of Fe3+ induced complexation of adsorbed Mefp-1 protein film on iron substrate2013In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 404, p. 62-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A range of in situ analytical techniques and theoretical calculations were applied to gain insights into the formation and properties of the Mefp-I film on iron substrate, as well as the protein complexation with Fe3+ ions. Adsorption kinetics of Mefp-1 and the complexation were investigated using QCM-D. The results suggest an initially fast adsorption, with the molecules oriented preferentially parallel to the surface, followed by a structural change within the film leading to molecules extending toward solution. Exposure to a diluted FeCl3 solution results in enhanced complexation within the adsorbed protein film, leading to water removal and film compaction. In situ Peak Force Tapping AFM was employed for determining morphology and nano-mechanical properties of the surface layer. The results, in agreement with the QCM-D observations, demonstrate that addition of Fe-3 induces a transition from an extended and soft protein layer to a denser and stiffer one. Further, in situ ATR-FTIR and Confocal Raman Micro-spectroscopy (CRM) techniques were utilized to monitor compositional/structural changes in the surface layer due to addition of Fe3+ ions. The spectroscopic analyses assisted by DFT calculations provide evidence for formation of tri-Fe3+/catechol complexes in the surface film, which is enhanced by Fe3+ addition.

  • 24.
    Zhang, Fan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Xie, Guoxin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. Tsinghua University, China.
    Pan, Jinshan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Tunable Adsorption and Film Formation of Mussel Adhesive Protein by Potential Control2017In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 33, no 35, p. 8749-8756Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mussel adhesive proteins are of great interest in many applications because of their outstanding adhesive property and film forming ability. Understanding and controlling the film formation and its performance is crucial for the effective use of such proteins. In this study, we focus on the potential controlled film formation and compaction of one mussel adhesive protein, Mefp-1. The adsorption and film-forming behavior of Mefp-1 on a platinum (Pt) substrate under applied potentials were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, potential-controlled electro-chemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Moreover, microfriction measurements were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of the Mefp-1 films formed at selected potentials. The results led to the conclusion that Mefp-1 adsorbs on the Pt substrate through both electrostatic and nonelectrostatic interactions and shows an effective blocking effect for the electroactive sites on the substrate. The properties of the adsorbed Mefp-1 film vary with the applied potential, and the compactness of the adsorbed Mefp-1 film can be reversibly tuned by the applied potential.

1 - 24 of 24
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