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  • 1.
    Agüero, Ramón
    et al.
    University of Cantabria, Spain.
    Berg, Miguel
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Choque, Johnny
    University of Cantabria, Spain.
    Hultell, Johan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Jennen, Ralf
    RWTH Aachen University, Germany.
    Markendahl, Jan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Muñoz, Luis
    University of Cantabria, Spain.
    Prytz, Mikael
    Ericsson Research.
    Strandberg, Ove
    Nokia, Finland.
    RRM Challenges for Non-Conventional and Low-Cost Networks in Ambient Networks2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an overview of the Radio Resource Management (RRM) functionalities needed for Non-Conventional and Low-Cost Networks. These types of networks are characterized by increased cooperation between different types of networks and providers and they are believed to play a fundamental role for future wireless network networking. The paper describes three specific concepts, which latter is used to identify new RRM challenges. In addition, it identifies the relation between the RRM challenges and the Ambient Networks architecture and functionalities, in particular the multiradio resource management functionality.

  • 2.
    Berg, Miguel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Hultell, Johan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Access selection in partially Backhaul-limited multi-operator IEEE 802.11 networks2006In: IEEE International Symposium on Personal, Indoor and Mobile Radio Communications, PIMRC, Helsinki, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radio resource management (RRM) across multiple, potentially competing, wireless networks has emerged as a salient feature for future generation system. Besides increased overhead, it will incur more complicated architectures and the question then becomes whether the gains of cooperative RRM (increased throughput, reliability, etc.) can justify these disadvantages. Herein we study potential gains that can be achieved by utilizing sophisticated algorithms in a scenario with two cooperating IEEE 802.11a networks, limited by either the wireless or wired link. Both best-effort (BE) and minimum bitrate (MBR) are treated and throughout the paper we use the rudimentary minimum path-loss (MPL) allocation as reference. Our results indicate that sophisticated access selection methods that besides path-loss, also account for AP load and potential constraints in the wired connection, can increase performance significantly. The maximum gain varies between 30-60% and 100-150% for BE and MBR traffic respectively and is typically obtained when there, on average, is one user per AP. We also studied the case where APs with constrained wired capacity connected (using the MPL criteria) to high-capacity APs in order to reroute traffic. Contrary to the approach in which advanced allocation principles is used, "loose" network integration is sufficient and even though it gave lower gains for BE data, the achievable rates for MBR data could be improved substantially.

  • 3.
    Berg, Miguel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Hultell, Johan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    On Selfish Distributed Access Selection Algorithms in IEEE 802.11 Networks2006In: IEEE VTS VEH TECHNOL CONF, 2006, p. 1097-1102Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important question for future wireless networks is whether the prioritization between different accesses should be controlled by the networks or terminals. Herein we evaluate the performance of distributed access-selection algorithms where terminals are responsible for both AP selection and the necessary measurements. In particular, we focus on determining whether selfish distributed algorithms call perform as well as centralized ones (for comparison we include max-sum, max-min, proportional fair and minimum delay allocations). The study is conducted by time-dynamic simulations in a IEEE 802.11a network and its performance measures we use file transfer delay and supportable load at a maximum tolerable delay. Our results show that selfish algorithms can offer similar performance. both in terms of throughput and fairness, as the centralized schemes as long as they account for both path-loss and access point load. This is an important result and it suggests that terminal-controlled algorithms are Just as efficient as centralized schemes, which besides extensive measurements also require that AP exchange information, for improving the efficiency in WLAN networks. Compared with a minimum path-loss selection criteria, which is standard in the IEEE 802.11 family today, our distributed load-aware algorithm increases the maximum supportable load with more than 200 percent even after accounting for measurement time and estimation errors. With fast reselection during ongoing sessions the gains call be further increased with, typically, 20 percent.

  • 4.
    Blomgren, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Hultell, Johan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Decentralized market-based radio resource management in multi-network environments2007In: IEEE VTS VEH TECHNOL CONF, 2007, p. 2884-2889Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For voice, an efficient radio resource management (RRM) essentially boils down to providing a predefined signal to interference ratio (SIR) at lowest cost possible and centralized schemes has, evidently, been an effective approach to address these problems. Delay-elastic data services, however, introduce both heterogeneous user requirements and possibilities for opportunistic RRM. One way, among others,to handle this would be to let autonomous trade-agents, acting on behalf of users, manage the radio resources, and this is our point of departure. We propose a market-based framework for decentralized RRM in environments populated by multiple, possibly heterogeneous, "access points" (APs), and the provided service for the users consists of file transfers. Resources (transmission time) are partitioned between users through a proportionally fair divisible auction. The problem at hand for the user (trade-agent), is then to determine how much resources it should purchase from the different APs in order to maximize its utility ("value for money"). Our results indicate that decentralized selfish bidding strategies are able to capitalize on temporary beneficial conditions and offer comparable performance with a centralized scheme (based on the 'mu C-rule') that requires knowledge about peak data-rates, queue lengths, and preferences for all users in the system.

  • 5.
    Blomgren, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Hultell, Johan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Demand-responsive pricing in open wireless access markets2007In: IEEE VTS VEH TECHNOL CONF, 2007, p. 2990-2995Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Radio resource management (RRM) across operator boundaries is emerging as a salient feature for wireless systems beyond 3G. Until recently, research has been confined to solutions where cooperating networks enter explicit sharing agreements that define how responsibilities and revenues should be divided. An alternative would be to share the infrastructure implicitly by establishing an open wireless access market wherein networks not only compete for users on a long-term time-scale, but also on a much shorter time-base. This could be realized with an architecture where autonomous trade-agents, that reside in terminals and access points (APs), manage the resources through negotiations. In this paper we develop a framework for studying demand-responsive pricing in contexts where APs with overlapping coverage compete for users. Resources are partitioned through a proportional fair divisible auction and our aim is to establish if, and when, an open market for wireless access can be se sustained. Compared to a scenario where APs cooperate, our results show that, an open access market results in better services at lower price which in the prolonging also yields more satisfied customers. As an effect demand will increase and, from the perspective of the APs, act as a counterbalance to the reduced prices. Thus, the revenue earned by the AN will be comparable to the one in which obtained through AP cooperation and monopoly (cartel) pricing. Generally speaking, the difference between the cooperative and noncooperative RRM is small when the demand is concave and increases with the convexity of demand.

  • 6.
    Blomgren, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Hultell, Johan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Cai, Rui
    Cai, Tao
    Distributed demand-aware access selection in wireless multi-cell data networks2007In: 2007 IEEE 18th International Symposium On Personal, Indoor And Mobile Radio Communications: Vols 1-9, 2007, p. 2888-2892Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Regardless of advances in transmission technology, wireless broadband access will result in that fewer active users can be supported in a given cell. This may, due to lower levels of statistical multiplexing, yield in an unbalanced network. For such contexts load aware access point (AP) selection (load balancing) has been proposed as a means to increase network performance. This paper evaluates the downlink capacity (maximum number of users that can be admitted given a throughput requirement) of distributed load aware AP selection criteria for a well planned network, where the expected number of users per cell coincide. We propose a market based algorithm in which AP selection is aided by market mechanisms. In contrast to most of the existing research, we account for that interference levels generated in different cells depend on user assignment, and therefore varies as terminals perform handoff. Compared to single-frequency systems where users base their selection on the received signal strength our results show that the downlink capacity can be increased with around 25 percent by introducing a channel plan in combination with demand, or load, aware AP selection criteria. This gain is fairly insensitive to the throughput requirement and does not come at the expense of uplink performance. To benefit from demand metrics it is, however, of paramount importance that the entire system bandwidth is not reused in all cells.

  • 7.
    Cedervall, Catarina
    et al.
    TeliaSonera Sweden.
    Karlsson, Peter
    TeliaSonera Sweden.
    Prytz, Mikael
    Ericsson Research.
    Hultell, Johan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Markendahl, Jan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Bria, Aurelian
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Rietkerk, Oscar
    TNO, The Netherlands.
    Karla, Ingo
    Alcatel, Germany.
    Initial findings on business roles, relations and cost savings enabled by Multi-Radio Access Architecture in Ambient Networks2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The multi-radio access architecture within the ambient network concept opens up opportunities for new business roles within the mobile and wireless domain. The new business roles take advantage of the control plane functionality that enables cost efficient connectivity over heterogeneous radio access technologies.

  • 8.
    Hultell, Johan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication: Services and Infrastucture, Communication Systems, CoS.
    Access selection in multi-system architectures: cooperative and competitive contexts2007Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Future wireless networks will be composed of multiple radio access technologies (RATs). To benefit from these, users must utilize the appropriate RAT, and access points (APs). In this thesis we evaluate the efficiency of selection criteria that, in addition to path-loss and system bandwidth, also consider load. The problem is studied for closed as well as open systems. In the former both terminals and infrastructure are controlled by a single actor (e.g., mobile operator), while the latter refers to situations where terminals, selfishly, decide which AP it wants to use (as in a common market-place). We divide the overall problem into the prioritization between available RATs and, within a RAT, between the APs. The results from our studies suggest that data users, in general, should be served by the RAT offering highest peak data rate.

    As this can be estimated by terminals, the benefits from centralized RAT selection is limited. Within a subsystem, however, load-sensitive AP selection criteria can increase data-rates. Highest gains are obtained when the subsystem is noise-limited, deployment unplanned, and the relative difference in number of users per AP significant. Under these circumstances the maximum supported load can be increased by an order of magnitude. However, also decentralized AP selection, where greedy autonomous terminal-based agents are in charge of the selection, were shown to give these gains as long they accounted for load. We also developed a game-theoretic framework, where users competed for wireless resources by bidding in a proportionally fair divisible auction. The framework was applied to a scenario where revenue-seeking APs competed for traffic by selecting an appropriate price. Compared to when APs cooperated, modelled by the Nash bargaining solution, our results suggest that a competitive access market, where infrastructure is shared implicitly, generally, offers users better service at a lower cost. Although AP revenues reduce, this reduction is, relatively, small and were shown to decrease with the concavity of demand. Lastly we studied whether data services could be offered in a discontinuous high-capacity network by letting a terminal-based agent pre-fetch information that its user potentially may request at some future time-instant. This decouples the period where the information is transferred, from the time-instant when it is consumed. Our results show that above some critical AP density, considerably lower than that required for continuous coverage, services start to perform well.

  • 9.
    Hultell, Johan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication: Services and Infrastucture, Communication Systems, CoS.
    Cooperative and non-cooperative wireless access: Resource and infrastructure sharing regimes2008Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    Future wireless networks will combine multiple radio technologies and subsystems, possibly managed by competing network providers. For such systems it may be advantageous to let the end nodes (terminals) make some or all of the resource management decisions. In addition to reducing complexity and costs, increasing redundancy, and facilitating more timely decisions; distributed resource sharing regimes can decouple the individual subsystems. Decoupled subsystems could be desirable both because competing operators can be business-wise separated and because it allows new technologies to be added (removed) in a modular fashion. However, distributed regimes can also lead to “selfish” wireless nodes who only try to maximize their own performance. The first part of this dissertation studies if selfish nodes can make efficient use of wireless resources, using multiaccess and network layers as examples. The related problems are formulated as noncooperative games between nodes. To maintain tractability nodes are confined to simple strategies that neither account for future payoffs nor allow for coordination. Yet, it is demonstrated that selfish nodes can achieve comparable performance to traditional protocols. These results should be interpreted as an argument in favor of distributed regimes.

    The second part of this dissertation evaluates the effects of multi-provider network architectures where users can roam freely across all networks. From a supply side perspective the benefits are improved path gain statistics and the fact that different networks may have non-overlapping busy hours. Several network configurations are analyzed and it is shown that cooperation between symmetric providers can yield significant capacity gains for both downlink and uplink; even if the providers have nearly collocated sites. When the providers have different site densities the gains from cooperation are reduced and the provider with a sparse network always gains more from cooperating. This suggests that initially, voluntary cooperation may be limited to some special cases. Lastly, the architecture is analyzed in a context where the providers compete for users on a per session basis by offering access at different prices. Although such architectures currently only exist in a few special cases, they could emerge in domestic markets where the costs to switch and search for new networks are low. Based on a game theoretic formulation it is shown that a competitive market for wireless access can be advantageous for both users and providers. The results presented suggest that the advantages of cooperation of competing providers occur in more than just a few cases.

  • 10.
    Hultell, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Berg, Miguel
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Generalized Roaming and Access Selection in Multi-Operator Environments2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a multi-operator environment where several operators offer high-speed local wireless access, geographical sharing is an attractive way to increase the coverage and resource effificiency so that 'interesting' services can be offered. This paper investigates two different access selection strategies for three typical environments (hotspot, urban, and suburban) to establish when, and to what extent, the performance can be improved. In the first strategy users simply connect to the strongest access point (AP) whereas the users within the second strategy connect to the AP maximizing the instantaneous aggregated capacity according a greedy algorithm. Both strategies are compared to a reference case where users connect to the strongest AP belonging to their home operator.  We investigated a two-operator scenario with APs using CSMA/CA and the results indicate that a significant improvement, both in terms of coverage and resource efficiency, can be achieved if users simply connect to the strongest AP. Moreover the results show that further improvement is possible, especially in urban and hotspot environments, with more complex strategies.

  • 11.
    Hultell, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Ileri, Ömer
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Zander, Jens
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication: Services and Infrastucture, Communication Systems, CoS.
    Selfish users in energy constrained ALOHA systems with power capture2011In: Wireless networks, ISSN 1022-0038, E-ISSN 1572-8196, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 199-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We consider a slotted ALOHA setting where backlogged, energy-constrained users selfishly select the probability with which they transmit packets. Packets are successfully received, even in case of collision, if the signal to interference plus noise ratio at the access point exceeds some threshold (power capture). The user problem of finding appropriate transmission probabilities is formulated as a static non-cooperative game and the performance limits for stationary and mobile scenarios are determined. The equilibrium analyses show that for stationary scenarios, users with high pathgains share the channel fairly while others never transmit. In the mobile case users utilize a binary strategy where they try to monopolize the channel when their pathgain exceeds some threshold that depends on system parameters (number of users, transmission costs, etc.). Otherwise they shut their transmitters off. Compared to traditional nondiscriminatory distributed multiaccess protocols the operating points achieved by selfish users generally increase sum-utility although this comes at the expense of larger user performance variations.

  • 12.
    Hultell, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Johansson, Klas
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    An Estimation of the Achievable User Throughput with National Roaming.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    National roaming, that is allowing users to access networks of multiple domestic operator's, was discussed already during development of first and second generation mobile systems.For mobile voice services, however, the operators afforded to build networks with (almost) full coverage alone. The benefits with national roaming, in terms of increased coverage, trunking efficiency and lowered risk exposure, did consequently not exceedthe drawbacks associated with increased operator cooperation.Motivated by the considerable investments for providing coverage for mobile data services, and enabled by the commonradio resource management proposed for systems “Beyond 3G”,this paper1 evaluates the benefits with national roaming for besteffort data services. The results show that national roaming more than doubles the data rates for users at the cell border. Thisg ain is motivated by reduced path loss and lowered interference levels. Around half of the potential gain is captured already with nearly co-sited base stations, which suggests that the benefits for operators to coordinate their base station site plans are limited.

  • 13.
    Hultell, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Johansson, Klas
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Performance analysis of non-cosited evolved 2G and 3G multi-access systems2006In: IEEE International Symposium on Personal, Indoor and Mobile Radio Communications, PIMRC, Helsinki, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An efficient combination of radio access technologies, integrated in a multi-access network, will be a key enabler in future provisioning of mobile data services. This paper addresses a scenario where an incumbent mobile network operator, with an existing 2G and 3G infrastructure, has deployed a dense WCDMA/HSPA macro-cell network in an urban area. With this high capacity network deployed, upgrading previous 2G and 3G systems with EDGE and HSPA respectively may seem obsolete. However, even though these systems may not support the intended data rates alone, they could, thanks to favorable propagation characteristics and the additional spectrum available, be useful as complements. Simulation results indicate that upgrading GPRS base stations with EDGE, or a sparse WCDMA macro cell layer with HSPA, mainly would benefit uplink transmission. For this case, the data rate that can be guaranteed with 95 % area availability (coverage) can be increased with approximately 40-100 %. In the downlink, though, the dense WCDMA/HSPA system alone supports user data rates of 500 kpbs for all relevant user densities. Thus, upgrading legacy infrastructure would be obsolete.

  • 14.
    Hultell, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Wireless at KTH.
    Johansson, Klas
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Wireless at KTH.
    Markendahl, Jan
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Wireless at KTH.
    Business models and resource management for shared wireless networks2004In: VTC2004-FALL: 2004 IEEE 60TH VEHICULAR TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE, VOLS 1-7 - WIRELESS TECHNOLOGIES FOR GLOBAL SECURITY, NEW YORK: IEEE , 2004, p. 3393-3397Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we analyze main use cases for sharing wireless access networks between multiple operators and service providers. Network sharing has been proposed as a metho l to lower roll-out costs for 3G operators in Europe, and is widely used in WLAN systems where local access providers offer wireless access to service providers. A similar structure also exist in cellular networks where Mobile Virtual Network Operators (MVNO) provide mobile services without having a mobile network of their own. The development points at a further fragmentation of wireless access networks into specialized service providers that connect to local service and access providers, possibly via an inter-connection provider serving with core network functionality. In this context, we propose a framework for how radio resources could be managed using Service Level Agreements (SLA) and analyze key differences between the SLA for different types of service and network providers.

  • 15.
    Hultell, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Lungaro, Pietro
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Zander, Jens
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Service Provisioning with Ad-Hoc Deployed High-Speed Access Points in Urban environments2005In: 2005 IEEE 16th International Symposium on Personal, Indoor and Mobile Radio Communications, PIMRC 2005, IEEE conference proceedings, 2005, Vol. 3, p. 2019-2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Exploiting user-deployed networks as part of a public infrastructure has been proposed as a concept to radically lower the cost of provisioning access and services in urban environments. An important question is how dense a network with spotty coverage has to be in order to support interesting services. In this paper1, we introduce a framework for evaluating the user-perceived performance for two service types, a time-critical news subscription service (involving streaming) and a more delay tolerant entertainment service ("web browsing"). The user terminals contain a memory cache and an "agent" that opportunistically downloads and stores relevant pieces of information as users walk close to the access points. Results show that above a critical access point density, that is still significantly lower than the one required for continuous coverage, the services start performing very well with little or no outdated information. In most studied scenarios, we are communication limited meaning that memory capacity is not a problem, but energy is.

  • 16.
    Hultell, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Lungaro, Pietro
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Zander, Jens
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Service Provisioning with Ad-hoc Deployed High-Speed Access Points in Urban Environments2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Hultell, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Zander, Jens
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Markendahl, Jan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Competition and Cooperation in Wireless Multi-Access Networks2007In: Cognitive Wireless Networks: Concepts, Methodologies and Visions Inspiring the Age of Enlightenment of Wireless Communications / [ed] Frank H. P. Fitzek and Marcos D. Katz, Springer , 2007, 1, p. 109-132Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Johansson, Klas
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Wireless at KTH.
    Lind, Jonas
    CIC, Stockholm School of Economics.
    Berg, Miguel
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Hultell, Johan
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Wireless at KTH.
    Kviselius, Niklas
    CIC, Stockholm School of Economics.
    Markendahl, Jan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS.
    Prytz, Mikael
    Ericsson Research.
    Integrating User Deployed Local Access Points in a Mobile Operator´s Network2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A concept is outlined for how privately deployed local access points can be integrated in a mobile operator's network. By letting the users deploy multi-radio access points, reusing already installed broadband for `last-mile'-access, we can expect significant cost savings in particular for high data rate services with low QoS requirements.  The concept is presented both from a technical perspective as well as from a business point of view, where the network franchise model is introduced.

  • 19.
    Timus, Bogdan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Hultell, Johan
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Communication Systems, CoS. KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Nilson, Mats
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Centres, Center for Wireless Systems, Wireless@kth.
    Techno-economical viability of deployment strategies for cellular-relaying networks2008In: 2008 IEEE 67TH VEHICULAR TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE-SPRING: Vols 1-7, 2008, p. 2259-2263Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability of an operator to respond to changes in demand by incrementally deploying additional network infrastructure is essential. This paper(1) presents a method for evaluating and comparing the economic viability of incremental deployment strategies given a limited initial investment budget. Any strategy is seen as a sequence of deployment decisions. The time-dynamic relation between service quality and demand is taken into account via the limited investment budget (cash How analysis), while the focus is maintained on the technical properties of the network. As an example, the economic viability of a 1D cellular-relaying network is analyzed under greedy deployment strategies. In order for the cellular-relaying solution to be viable, we show that the maximum allowed relay cost decreases with the investment budget.

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