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  • 1.
    Brandenburg, Axel
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA. Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado; JILA and Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev.
    Schober, Jennifer
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Rogachevskii, Igor
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA. Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev.
    Kahniashvili, Tina
    Boyarsky, Alexey
    Frohlich, Jog
    Ruchayskiy, Oleg
    Kleeorin, Nathan
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    The Turbulent Chiral Magnetic Cascade in the Early Universe2017In: Astrophysical Journal Letters, ISSN 2041-8205, E-ISSN 2041-8213, Vol. 845, no 2, article id L21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presence of asymmetry between fermions of opposite handedness in plasmas of relativistic particles can lead to exponential growth of a helical magnetic field via a small-scale chiral dynamo instability known as the chiral magnetic effect. Here, we show, using dimensional arguments and numerical simulations, that this process produces through the Lorentz force chiral magnetically driven turbulence. A k(-2) magnetic energy spectrum emerges via inverse transfer over a certain range of wavenumbers k. The total chirality (magnetic helicity plus normalized chiral chemical potential) is conserved in this system. Therefore, as the helical magnetic field grows, most of the total chirality gets transferred into magnetic helicity until the chiral magnetic effect terminates. Quantitative results for height, slope, and extent of the spectrum are obtained. Consequences of this effect for cosmic magnetic fields are discussed.

  • 2.
    Rogachevskii, Igor
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Ruchayskiy, Oleg
    Boyarsky, Alexey
    Frohlich, Jurg
    Kleeorin, Nathan
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Brandenburg, Axel
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Schober, Jennifer
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Laminar and Turbulent Dynamos in Chiral Magnetohydrodynamics. I. Theory2017In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 846, no 2, article id 153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) description of plasmas with relativistic particles necessarily includes an additional new field, the chiral chemical potential associated with the axial charge (i.e., the number difference between right-and left-handed relativistic fermions). This chiral chemical potential gives rise to a contribution to the electric current density of the plasma (chiral magnetic effect). We present a self-consistent treatment of the chiral MHD equations, which include the back-reaction of the magnetic field on a chiral chemical potential and its interaction with the plasma velocity field. A number of novel phenomena are exhibited. First, we show that the chiral magnetic effect decreases the frequency of the Alfven wave for incompressible flows, increases the frequencies of the Alfven wave and of the fast magnetosonic wave for compressible flows, and decreases the frequency of the slow magnetosonic wave. Second, we show that, in addition to the well-known laminar chiral dynamo effect, which is not related to fluid motions, there is a dynamo caused by the joint action of velocity shear and chiral magnetic effect. In the presence of turbulence with vanishing mean kinetic helicity, the derived mean-field chiral MHD equations describe turbulent large-scale dynamos caused by the chiral alpha effect, which is dominant for large fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers. The chiral alpha effect is due to an interaction of the chiral magnetic effect and fluctuations of the small-scale current produced by tangling magnetic fluctuations (which are generated by tangling of the large-scale magnetic field by sheared velocity fluctuations). These dynamo effects may have interesting consequences in the dynamics of the early universe, neutron stars, and the quark-gluon plasma.

  • 3.
    Schober, Jennifer
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA. Universität Heidelberg, Germany.
    Schleicher, D. R. G.
    Federrath, C.
    Bovino, S.
    Klessen, R. S.
    Saturation of the turbulent dynamo2015In: Physical Review E. Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics, ISSN 1539-3755, E-ISSN 1550-2376, Vol. 92, no 2, article id 023010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The origin of strong magnetic fields in the Universe can be explained by amplifying weak seed fields via turbulent motions on small spatial scales and subsequently transporting the magnetic energy to larger scales. This process is known as the turbulent dynamo and depends on the properties of turbulence, i.e., on the hydrodynamical Reynolds number and the compressibility of the gas, and on the magnetic diffusivity. While we know the growth rate of the magnetic energy in the linear regime, the saturation level, i.e., the ratio of magnetic energy to turbulent kinetic energy that can be reached, is not known from analytical calculations. In this paper we present a scale-dependent saturation model based on an effective turbulent resistivity which is determined by the turnover time scale of turbulent eddies and the magnetic energy density. The magnetic resistivity increases compared to the Spitzer value and the effective scale on which the magnetic energy spectrum is at its maximum moves to larger spatial scales. This process ends when the peak reaches a characteristic wave number k(star) which is determined by the critical magnetic Reynolds number. The saturation level of the dynamo also depends on the type of turbulence and differs for the limits of large and small magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm. With our model we find saturation levels between 43.8% and 1.3% for Pm >> 1 and between 2.43% and 0.135% for Pm << 1, where the higher values refer to incompressible turbulence and the lower ones to highly compressible turbulence.

  • 4.
    Schober, Jennifer
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Schleicher, D. R. G.
    Klessen, R. S.
    GALACTIC SYNCHROTRON EMISSION AND THE FAR-INFRARED-RADIO CORRELATION AT HIGH REDSHIFT2016In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 827, no 2, article id 109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Theoretical scenarios, including the turbulent small-scale dynamo, predict that strong magnetic fields already exist in young galaxies. Based on the assumption of energy equipartition between magnetic fields and turbulence, we determine the galactic synchrotron flux as a function of redshift z. Galaxies in the early universe are different from local galaxies, in particular, the former have more intense star formation. To cover a large range of conditions, we consider two different systems: one model galaxy comparable to the Milky Way and one typical high-z starburst galaxy. We include a model of the steady-state cosmic ray spectrum and find that synchrotron emission can be detected up to cosmological redshifts with current and future radio telescopes. The turbulent dynamo theory is in agreement with the origin of the observed correlation between the far-infrared (FIR) luminosity L-FIR and the radio luminosity L-radio. Our model reproduces this correlation well at z = 0. We extrapolate the FIR-radio correlation to higher redshifts and predict a time evolution with a significant deviation from its present-day appearance already at z approximate to 2 for a gas density that increases strongly with z. In particular, we predict a decrease of the radio luminosity with redshift which is caused by the increase of cosmic ray energy losses at high z. The result is an increase of the ratio between L-FIR and L-radio. Simultaneously, we predict that the slope of the FIR-radio correlation becomes shallower with redshift. This behavior of the correlation could be observed in the near future with ultra-deep radio surveys.

  • 5.
    Schober, Jennifer
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA. Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Schleicher, D. R. G.
    Klessen, R. S.
    Tracing star formation with non-thermal radio emission2017In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 468, no 1, p. 946-958Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A key for understanding the evolution of galaxies and in particular their star formation history will be future ultradeep radio surveys. While star formation rates (SFRs) are regularly estimated with phenomenological formulas based on the local FIR-radio correlation, we present here a physically motivated model to relate star formation with radio fluxes. Such a relation holds only in frequency ranges where the flux is dominated by synchrotron emission, as this radiation originates from cosmic rays produced in supernova remnants, therefore reflecting recent star formation. At low frequencies, synchrotron emission can be absorbed by the free-free mechanism. This suppression becomes stronger with increasing number density of the gas, more precisely of the free electrons. We estimate the critical observing frequency below which radio emission is not tracing the SFR, and use the three well-studied local galaxies M51, M82, and Arp 220 as test cases for our model. If the observed galaxy is at high redshift, this critical frequency moves along with other spectral features to lower values in the observing frame. In the absence of systematic evolutionary effects, one would therefore expect that the method can be applied at lower observing frequencies for high-redshift observations. However, in case of a strong increase of the typical gas column densities towards high redshift, the increasing free-free absorption may erase the star formation signatures at low frequencies. At high radio frequencies both, free-free emission and the thermal bump, can dominate the spectrum, also limiting the applicability of this method.

  • 6.
    Schober, Jennifer
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics NORDITA.
    Schleicher, D. R. G.
    Klessen, R. S.
    Tracing star formation with radio emission2017In: Memorie della Societa Astronomica Italiana - Journal of the Italian Astronomical Society, Societa Astronomica Italiana , 2017, no 4, p. 749-750Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Synchrotron emission from cosmic rays, produced in supernova remnants, contains information about a galaxy's star formation rate (SFR). For a quantitative estimate, we construct a model of non-thermal galactic radio flux, including the effect of free-free absorption. The latter can lead to a breakdown of the relation between the SFR and the radio flux at low frequencies and high gas densities. We employ our model to local disk and starburst galaxies and discuss the evolution of SFR-radio relations with redshift.

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