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  • 1.
    Bienkowska, Dzamila
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), History of Science and Technology.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), History of Science and Technology.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), History of Science and Technology.
    Public-private innovation: Mediating roles and ICT niches of industrial research institutes2010In: INNOV-MANAG POLICY PRACT, ISSN 1447-9338, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 206-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation processes involve diverse sets of organizations including universities, private firms, corporate research labs and public research institutes. Collaborative forms of knowledge production and innovative activity enable actors to reduce risk, specialize, and take advantage of knowledge internal and external to the own organization. This paper discusses interactions and collaborations between public and private sector innovation. This is done through an analysis of semi-public research institutes in Sweden and their roles as arenas for R&D processes involving industry, university and government in terms of funding, research and public-private innovation. Particular attention is paid to technological niches of research institutes and utilization of research findings from collaborative R&D. The results show that institutes occupy specific niches which influence their ways of transferring knowledge. It is argued that diversity among R&D performers as well as funding opportunities is paramount for innovation systems to thrive.

  • 2.
    Bruno, Karl
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Larsen, Katarina
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    van Leeuwen, Thed N.
    Knowledge production at industrial research institutes: Institutional logics and struggles for relevance in the Swedish Institute for Surface Chemistry, 1980-20052017In: Research Evaluation, ISSN 0958-2029, E-ISSN 1471-5449, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 337-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines dynamics of knowledge production and discourses of basic-applied science and relevance at the Swedish Institute for Surface Chemistry, a semi-public industrially oriented research institute, from 1980 to 2005. We employ a three-pronged method, consisting of (1) an analysis of how the institute articulated its research priorities and goals in publications primarily directed to stakeholders, (2) an analysis of retrospective narratives by researchers and managers about research ideologies and priorities, and (3) a bibliometric analysis of the institute's scientific publications. Using a theoretical framework centered on the notions of institutional logics and struggles for relevance, we show how the transformations of the institute amount to a substitution of an internalized institutional logic of scientific autonomy with a new logic of industrial utility, and how the institute's knowledge production was managed during this change. We also point out various strategies used by the institute to preserve and advance its own goals while still remaining relevant with regard to changing policy objectives. Another important finding is that although the institute by the end of the study period was fully committed to an industrial service role, parts of the originally deeply entrenched scientific logic were still manifested, although then discussed in the new industrial terminology.

  • 3.
    Christensen, Miyase
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Åberg, Anna
    Chalmers tekniska universitet.
    Lidström, Susanna
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Larsen, Katarina
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Environmental Themes in Popular Narratives2018In: Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, ISSN 1752-4032, E-ISSN 1752-4040, Vol. 12, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Frigotto, Laura
    et al.
    Trento University, Italy.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Nobel Prizes as breakthrough innovators2012In: Sunbelt Conference, arranged by INSNA - International Network for Social Network Analysis, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Climate change scenarios and behavioural change: Navigating between heuristics of deliberative planning processes and astroturfing2008Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In constructing normative scenarios images of the future are generated illustrating potential ways of living, travelling and consuming products and services where certain goals such as a reduced climate impact are fulfilled (Börjeson et al, 2006; Myers and Kitsuse, 2000). This paper analyses the sustainability framing of behavioural changes in such normative scenarios (Larsen and Höjer, 2007) and how it relates to the participatory processes used to generate the scenarios. We discuss this building on concepts of deliberative planning processes as a means to achieve legitimate, effective and sustainable futures (Connelly and Richardson, forthcoming; Hendriks et al., 2007). The theoretical arguments are combined with examples from environmental scenario construction in practice (Carlsson-Kanyama et al., 2003, Dreborg et al., forthcoming). This illustrates fields of tension arising when either sustainability or process values are veneering goals of a scenario making process. When focus is on content values such as reduced climate impact, the process values might be depreciated. On the other hand, when focus is on process values such as legitimacy, content sustainability and possibilities for actual change might be downgraded.

  • 6.
    Höjer, Mattias
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630). School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Wintzell, Helene
    Helene Wintzell AB.
    Sustainable communications and innovation: Different types of effects from collaborative research including university and companies in the ICT-sector2012In: ICT Critical Infrastructures and Society: 10th IFIP TC 9 International Conference on Human Choice and Computers, HCC10 2012, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, September 27-28, 2012. Proceedings, Springer, 2012, p. 170-182Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents experiences from the Centre for Sustainable Communications (CESC) located at KTH – The Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm. Since 2007, the centre has carried out research in collaboration with private firms in the information and communication technology (ICT) and media sectors as well as with public sector organizations in the city of Stockholm. The aim is to share experiences from how the partners of the centre describe benefits and effects from collaborative research. Since the centre is focusing on use of ICT and media technology, rather than technology development per se, this provides an account of a wide range of effects from university-industry collaborations and new insights into the innovation processes targeting sustainability in the ICT and media sectors. This is an important perspective of sustainable and responsible innovation that is not captured in traditional innovation surveys (counting the number of new products or patents). Areas examined here include: increased knowledge and competence, new contacts and networks, publications, methods and new technology as well as changes in business operations and behaviour targeting sustainable solutions. The results also confirm firm-level business value as a driver for sustainability and provide experiences from involving users in the quest for sustainable and responsible innovation.

  • 7.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, Superseded Departments, History of Science and Technology.
    A survey on requirements and needs in the field of environmental technology2000In: Environmental Management and Health, ISSN 0956-6163, E-ISSN 1758-7085, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 369-381Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Bloggare sprider KTHs forskning: Artikel i KTH Campi om forskarbloggen Soligadagar, Publicerad 2010-03-05 http://campi.kth.se/bloggare-sprider-kth-s-forskning-1.562192010Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Frågor hon ser fram mot att lyfta i bloggform är blanda annat hur innovationsprocesser ser ut i utveckling av förnybar energi, och på vilket sätt olika aktörer samarbetar med tvärvetenskapliga forskningsteam. Men även hur man utvecklar nya material och använder solceller på skyskrapor i San Francisco.

    Klimatfrågan är ju aktuell och det känns viktigt att även förmedla hur detta diskuteras i andra länder. Just nu arbetar jag med forskning om innovationer och miljö, och skriver en text om en cleantech-konferens i Washington DC där jag deltog, säger Katarina Larsen.

  • 9.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), History of Science and Technology.
    Co-authorship Networks in Development of Solar Cell Technology: International and Regional Knowledge Interaction2009In: NEW DIRECTIONS IN REGIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT / [ed] Andersson AE; Cheshire PC; Stough RR, 2009, p. 347-372Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Corporate environmental strategies and education2005In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Demonstrators and dual-logics of knowledge production: consumers and user-driven innovation at research institutes2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Dåtidens framtida innovationer: träteknisk forskning i det europeiska landskapet2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Industrial research institutes' collaboration: institutional agreements, networks and interdisciplinary technology2008In: Proceedings of Scancor 20th Anniversary Conference, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Innovation Processes and Environmental Planning: Science and Technology Policies in a Regional Context2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    The understanding of environmental change and how it is influenced by innovation processes and advances in science and technology is multifaceted given the inherent uncertainty of the pace and direction of technology change, but also given the limits to anticipate future environmental effects of new technology.

    The doctoral thesis is organised in two parts. The covering essay constitutes the first part and is aimed at introducing the scope of the research; outlining theoretical perspectives and central concepts and positioning the research to other research studies. Reprints of the six papers included in the thesis comprise the second part of the thesis.

    The first aim of this doctoral thesis is to contribute to an increased understanding of the conditions for environmental policy and planning through innovation, science policy and technological change. Particular attention is paid to the institutional frameworks for policy processes, public-private interactive policy and strategic planning with futures studies. The second aim is to explore and analyse approaches applied for assessing the output, impact and structure of science in the area of strategic environmental research. This includes an examination of research assessment criteria and an analysis of knowledge networks in strategic environmental research, characterised by socio-economic expectations of generating innovations that benefit the environment through the industrial application of science. Four types of environmental planning are studied using a combined qualitative and quantitative research approach. These are corporate environmental planning, public environmental planning, strategic long-term planning, and strategic science planning targeting advances in science and technology to attain environmental objectives.

    The findings of the study show that institutional frameworks of science and technology policy affecting environmental planning are found in organisational forms, such as science parks, but also in institutions understood as values and norms of the science system. With an increased focus on assessment of research as well as future technology, the findings of the study also contributes by examining approaches applied for assessing the output, structure and impact of research, using bibliometrics and social network analysis in the area of strategic environmental research.

  • 15.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Institutsektorn i omvandling: [Institute sector in transition]2009In: KTH&Co, no 3, p. 3-6Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Interactive activities of researchers captured in research impact assessment2007In: Proceedings IATUL-conference 2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Interdisciplinarity in environmental technology applications - Examining knowledge interaction between physics and chemistry research teams2007In: Proceedings of ISSI 2007: 11th International Conference of the International Society for Scientometrics and Informetrics, Vols I and II / [ed] TorresSalinas, D; Moed, HF, LEUVEN: INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR SCIENTOMETRICS & INFORMETRICS-ISSI , 2007, p. 463-468Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines interdisciplinarity in science-based environmental technology applications including nanoscience applications in solar cell technology and sensor technology for pollution monitoring (of for example vehicle exhaust gas). Data and methods include analysis of co-authorship links, citation data combined with content analysis and interviews with researchers active in the field. Interdisciplinarity of science and technology areas has been analysed at the level of researcher affiliation, journal type and keywords. In addition to these measures of interdisciplinarity, this study acknowledges the importance to recognise the character of links. This includes both their content and the context that generates interdisciplinary links between research teams trough citations or co-authorships interaction. To illustrate this, the knowledge networks of two research teams from the same university are examined and visualised using bibliographic coupling and co-authorship networks. The findings show that although there are no direct co-authorship links between the two research teams in the dataset analysed, links were identified though bibliographic coupling. In examining the context generating a shared reference between the research teams, one of the teams show citation patterns described here as "interdisciplinary outlook" compared to the "intradisciplinary magnifier" pattern of the other research team.

  • 18.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    International knowledge networks and regional hubs: science-based technical opportunities in development of nanostructured solar cell technology2006In: Proceedings: The future of science, technology and innovation policy - linking research and practice, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Inventing innovation?: Analyzing science and technology interfaces at industrial research institutes2010In: Proceedings European Association for Studies of Science and Technology  (EASST), 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Knowledge hubs and co-authorship networks in development of nanostructures solar cell technology.2005In: Innovation Dynamic Regions and Regional Dynamics. / [ed] Karlsson, C., Stough, R., Andersson, Å..E. and Cheshire, P., Heidelberg: Springer Verlag , 2005Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), History of Science and Technology.
    Knowledge network hubs and measures of research impact, science structure, and publication output in nanostructured solar cell research2008In: Scientometrics, ISSN 0138-9130, E-ISSN 1588-2861, Vol. 74, no 1, p. 123-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study on co-authorship networks in the area of nanostructured solar cells aims to contribute to a further understanding of the use of research evaluation measures of science output, impact and structure in an emerging research field. The study incorporates quantitative bibliometric methods of analysis and social network analysis in combination with a qualitative case study research approach. Conclusions drawn from the results emphasise, firstly, the importance of distinguishing between early and later phases of the evolution of a novel research field, and secondly, the application of a systemic view on learning processes and knowledge diffusion in a science-based technology field.

  • 22.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Knowledge network hubs and measures of research output, impact and structure in development of nanostructured solar cell technology2006In: Proceedings, 9th International Science and Technology Indicators conference, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Local and regional innovation processes in the green economy: experiences from Sweden and Silicon Valley2010In: Proceedings National Council for Science and the Environment (NCSE 2010): The new green economy, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Mirrors and milestones in citation networks2007In: Proceedings ISSI-conference 2007, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure and Planning.
    Modes and nodes of innovation: Results from Swedish cases in project: Innovation systems and the periphery funded by The Nordic Innovation Centre.2004In: Proceedings, Innovation and entrepreneurship, 2004, CESIS-conference: Conference arranged by KTH-CESIS, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Nanotechnology in solar cells and technology trajectories2011In: Proceedings Low Carbon Earth Summit (LCES-2011), 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Planning for sustainable building and ecological food - experiences from environmental procurement in the Stockholm metropolitan area2004In: Proceedings, AESOP congress, Grenoble, France, 2004, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Regionalization and internationalization of public-private research collaboration: a comparative study of Sweden and the Netherlands2010In: Science and Technology Indicators conference proceedings, CWTS, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure.
    Research assessment criteria and university-industry links in the social contract of applicable science: Experiences from funding of biomedical science andstrategic environmental research in Sweden and the UK2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is concerned with research assessment procedures adopted by funding agents that target research with industrial applications and close links to socio-economic goals. The funding bodies of research are confronted with a ‘cry for applicability’ although it is argued that research and innovation are highly uncertain activities where all applications of science cannot be foreseen. This paper argues that analysis research funding with a strong rationale for ‘applicable’ science (such as private non-profit and strategic research foundations) can contribute to an improved understanding of university-industry relations in research. The aim of this study is to address what characterises the research assessment criteria used by funding agents that target research with industrial application and close links to socio-economic goals.Special attention is paid to university-industry links in the social contract for ‘applicable’science in Sweden and the UK. Case studies from research funding in biomedical science and strategic environmental research are selected to address the assessment procedures and criteria that research-funding organisations use to assess prospects of successful application of science. A typology addressing views on university-industry relations is used to characterise the case studies. The study shows that the foundations and trusts are attributing value to university-industry interaction in research. Promotion of such links is focusing on aspects ofhuman resources, best practices and intellectual property in targeting socio-economic goals.

  • 30.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Researcher Mobility in the Knowledge Making Process of Nobel laureates: Studies of Creativity in the Science and Technology Interface2012In: Scence in Society: University of California, Berkeley, USA, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Larsen, Katarina
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Rhetoric of engineering skills and heroes: institutional logics of university-industry relations in engineering education2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engineering education and narratives told about engineers’ roles in society are study objects at the heart of organizational studies discussing professions and how engineering ideals are narrated, institutionalized and moulded into practices and categories of knowledge and skills. This study engages with the topics of educational mission of universities and university-industry relations as transfer activities by raising a set of questions about engineering narratives and university rhetoric of academia-industry relations.

  • 32.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Infrastructure.
    Science and technology parks and the integration of environmental policy2004In: Innovation, ISSN 1447-9338, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 294-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses processes of integration of environmental policy in science and technology parks (S&T parks). Drivers for environmental policy integration in two S&T park districts are explored in the framework of environmental policy opportunities, i.e. what opportunities of environmental policy integration that arise given characteristic features of the parks, such as spatial proximity, stakeholder interaction, and the park's role in regional innovation policy. The study focuses on ICT-companies and the environmental policy opportunities arising from vertical and horizontal interaction in the park context. Rather than assuming interaction by virtue of geographic proximity, the study shows that knowledge exchange on environmental aspects to some extent is localised within the park by exchange of best practices among individual firms as well by guidelines implemented at a park level. However, drivers promoting environmental management in ICT-companies are identified both at the firm level as well as in environmental regulation and customer demands.

  • 33.
    Larsen, Katarina
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), History of Science and Technology.
    The impact of R&D on innovation for wind energy in Denmark, Germany and the United Kingdom2005In: Ecological Economics, ISSN 0921-8009, E-ISSN 1873-6106, Vol. 54, no 2-3, p. 227-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the impact of public research and development (R&D) support on cost reducing innovation for wind turbine farms in Denmark, Germany and the United Kingdom (UK). First we survey the literature in this field. The literature indicates that in Denmark R&D policy has been more successful than in Germany or the UK in promoting innovation of wind turbines. Furthermore, such studies point out that (subsidy-induced) capacity expansions were more effective in the UK and Denmark in promoting cost-reducing innovation than in Germany. The second part of the paper describes the quantitative analysis of the impact of R&D and capacity expansion on innovation. This is calculated using the two-factor learning curve (2FLC) model, in which investment cost reductions are explained by cumulative capacity and the R&D based knowledge stock. Time-series data were collected for the three countries and organized as a panel data set. The parameters of the 2FLC model were estimated, focusing on the homogeneity and heterogeneity of the parameters across countries. We arrived at robust estimations of a learning-by-doing rate of 5.4% and a learning-by-searching rate of 12.6%. The analysis underlines the homogeneity of the learning parameters, enhancing the validity of the 2FLC formulation.

  • 34.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Bienkowska, Dzamila
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS (closed 20110701).
    Industrial research institutes' collaboration: a three-way solution to integrating new research skills2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation processes in emerging fields of technology frequently utilize scientific knowledge and technical skills from several research areas. Likewise, technological development frequently involves a diverse set of organizations including for example private firms, universities, corporate research labs and public or semi-public research and technology organizations (RTOs). These processes spur the need for both organizational and institutional change and adjustment, e.g. in order to facilitate research and development (R&D) and formation of innovation networks. The main question analyzed in the paper is how RTOs cope with integrating new skills in their competence base in the quest for exploring new emerging science fields and technology applications. The empirical setting consists of Swedish semi-public industrial research institutes active in the fields of pulp & paper technology and electronics, optics & communication technology respectively. The results of the study bring attention to three ways of integrating diverse skills and types of actors in R&D networks. These are: organization of collaborative research in formalized industry-specific R&D programs, purposeful organizational change also including redefinition of categories of core research competence and finally by targeting ‘open’ innovation processes characterized by incorporation of both end-users and skills of neighboring technology areas.

  • 35.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Bruno, Karl
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Basic and applied research and modes of knowledge production: a study of the Swedish institute for surface chemistry 1975-20052011In: Proceedings, 16th Nordic Bibliometric Workshop 2011, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Bruno, Karl
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Sörlin, Sverker
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Vetenskaplig publicering som strategi för industrisamarbete (Scientific publication as a strategy for collaboration with industry)2011In: Forskningspolitikk, ISSN 0333-0273, E-ISSN 0805-8210, no 4, p. 22-23Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kunskapsproduktionen vid industriellt inriktade forskningsinstitut sker i samverkan med aktörer som universitet och företag. En studie av ett svensk institut, Ytkemiska institutet (YKI), visar hur forskningsinstitut i vår tid strategiskt utvecklar nya roller i ett föränderligt forskningslandskap. Publicering och samarbeten i projekt är ett av de strategiska redskapen för att höja synlighet och attraktivitet och för att positionera institutet bland kunder och hos finansiärer.

  • 37.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Calero, Clara
    Leiden University.
    Citation networks over time: distributed innovation and dyes in solar cell technology2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Calero Medina, Clara
    CWTS Leiden University.
    Discoveries and citations over time in solar cell technology2013In: Translational Twists and Turns: Science as a Socio-Economic Endeavor: STI Berlin 2013, 18th International conference on Science and Technology Indicators / [ed] Sybille Hinze and André Lottman, Berlin, 2013, p. 199-204Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Costas, Rodrigo
    CWTS, Leiden University.
    Calero, Clara
    CWTS, Leiden University.
    van Leeuwen, Thed
    CWTS, Leiden University.
    How Nobel Prize winners influence and shape their scientific landscape: a methodological development for the analysis of Nobel laureates in Physics2011In: Proceedings 16th Nordic Bibliometric Workshop, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Fjæstad, Maja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Science laboratories and geographies of technology: A study of measurement techniques and international citation of Nobel laureates2011In: The 4th Norwegian Conference of History of Science: Book of abstracts, Oslo: University of Oslo , 2011, p. 30-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Climate change scenarios and citizen-participation: Mitigation and adaptation perspectives in constructing sustainable futures2009In: Habitat International, ISSN 0197-3975, E-ISSN 1873-5428, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 260-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses adaptation and mitigation strategies as outlined in climate change scenarios. The adaptive perspective is closely connected to the concept of resilience understood as different views on nature's capacity to absorb shocks, renewal and re-organization. In constructing normative scenarios images of the future are generated illustrating potential ways of living, travelling and consuming products and services where certain goals such as a reduced climate impact are fulfilled. This paper argues that tension arising from climate strategies relying on either adaptation or mitigation strategies, or combining the two strategies, warrant further examination. In this paper the inter-relationships between adaptation and mitigation are discussed by examining processes of citizen-participation in constructing scenarios and applying the concepts of resilience, vulnerability and adaptive capacity. We discuss this using the concept of deliberative planning processes as a means to achieve legitimate, effective and sustainable futures. As a part of this approach, we argue that methods for citizen-participation applied in exploring different science and technology options also provide useful insight for this type of planning processes. The theoretical arguments are combined with examples from environmental scenario construction in practice. The paper brings attention to tensions between sustainability content values, such as reduced climate impact, and more process-oriented values such as legitimacy, learning and participatory scenario construction. Moreover, the concept of open innovation processes is introduced to the context of participatory scenario construction comparing shared ground in terms of user-involvement in search of novel solutions and also increasing robustness of action plans implemented to reduce climate change.

  • 42.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology (name changed 20120201).
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Working with citizens to help develop climate change plans2009In: EC News Alert. Science for Environment Policy, Vol. 170, no OctoberArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Environmental Strategies Research (fms).
    Sjögårde, Peter
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Department for Library services, Language and ARC, Publication Infrastructure.
    Sustainability as a topic at a technical university: A bibliometric analysis2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
    Westholm, Erik
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, The Department of Urban and Rural Development.
    Environmental scenarios and local-global level of communityengagement: Environmental justice, jams, institutions and innovation2011In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 413-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    National climate change policy currently operates on a continuum from the local community to the supra-national level. These initiatives include local deliberative processes of low-carbon futures as well as local-global interactions in ‘eco-innovation jam’ dialogues carried out in a virtual space, but founded on communicating with local stakeholder groups. Experiences from national processes and international examples of these structured dialogues of community engagement raise important questions of environmental justice and deliberative processes that facilitate participation by some groups, but perhaps also neglect others. This is particularly relevant since the environmental justice discourse traditionally frames environmental concerns in a place-bound manner that includes local responses to environmental questions. In this paper we argue the importance of local and global forums and deliberative processes for community engagement in order to incorporate stakeholders’ perceptions of future options for low-carbon living, travelling and consuming services and products. Important policy transformations in planning for low-carbon societies are outlined and results from cases are discussed. We conclude with three remarks about the importance of citizen participation for understanding local conditions for change, processes of localized internationalization, and new roles for nation states facing the climate change challenge. We also recognise the importance of the local and global level of deliberative processes targeting sustainable urban futures.

  • 45.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Gärdebo, Johan
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Retooling Engineering for Social Justice: The use of explicit models for analytical thinking, critical reflection, and peer-review in Swedish engineering education2017In: International Journal of Engineering, Social Justice, and Peace, ISSN 1927-9434, Vol. 5, no 1-2, p. 13-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper engages with how engineering education in Sweden have been retooled towards literacy in social justice. To achieve this, the authors used a set of pedagogical tools aimed at analytical thinking, critical reflection, and peer-review by students. The students were asked to use the tools in the course to critically analyze social justice in the city planning of twentieth century Stockholm, Sweden. This included, for example, national identities, social engineering, and politics that shaped Swedish society. The authors conducted a textual analysis of student essays on social justice that indicate increased social justice literacy and a shift towards the practices of engineers’ work with city planning. The study concludes by discussing conditions for engineering students to gain familiarity with formats used for critical reflection within the humanities.

  • 46.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment.
    Höjer, Mattias
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies (moved 20130630).
    Technological innovation and transformation perspectives in environmental futures studies for transport and mobility2007In: International Journal of Foresight and Innovation Policy, ISSN 1740-2816, E-ISSN 1740-2824, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 95-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Futures studies such as technology foresight and backcasting are concerned with changes in society and technological transformation in a long-term perspective, but are also recognising the importance of today's choices in technology on future modes of production and consumption. Strategic planning and Technology Assessment (TA) are two areas where futures studies are used to explore alternative future scenarios in order to support decision-making processes. Hence, it is of importance to get a thorough understanding of assumptions made about environmental effects from new technology and drivers for change in futures studies. In this paper technological innovation and transformation perspectives in environmental futures studies are analysed. The aim is to explore the different roles of technology change in the development towards more environmentally sustainable transport in the future.

  • 47.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Johan, Gärdebo
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Tools for Transformation: How engineering education benefits from interactive E-learning and the Humanities2015In: ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings, American Society for Engineering Education , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper engages with how to construct means for student activation, using analytical models, e-learning and web tools in engineering education. Learning requires different levels of understanding and means to appropriate and formulate knowledge. However, peer instruction and student participation require a degree of facilitation, which is a role the teacher needs to analyse and develop before students can be demanded to demonstrate increased participation in course content, feedback and design. The specific context of student learning discussed here is based on experiences from a course for international engineering students at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden. The course aim is to train students in critically analyzing the role of national identities, social- and technological engineering and politics in shaping Swedish society. One challenge is to enable engineering students to develop skills in critical thinking by engaging with texts from social sciences and humanities dealing with topics formulated in the course aim. Reading, writing and discussing texts on historical and contemporary examples are used to attain learning outcomes, relating to both course content as well as practical skills of critical reflection, reasoning and developing arguments in writing. This study draws on experiences from changing a course previously relying on attendance towards encouraging and explicitly rewarding student contribution to each other’s learning. The broader aim have been for students to learn to think, read, discuss and write analytically, while using web-tools in combination with seminar exercises to increase student interaction in these processes and time on task. While these skills are instrumental, we argue that they are valuable for students to engage in interactive learning of a more transformative character where students benefit from learning through reciprocal questioning, joint learning and peer-instruction. Source material is gathered using course evaluations and feedback from students at lectures and seminars. Some early results based on experiences from the seminar activities, where students wrote a text relating to an analytical question and thereafter made commentson a fellow classmate’s text, showed that the students gained enough in-depth understanding to present an argument when commenting on a classmates’ text in the same topic. Students experienced working with analytical questions and peers as supportive for engaging with topics previously perceived to be challenging. Other students were exposed to texts with some basic components missing (defining key concepts etc.) providing challenges in formulating constructive comments and suggestions for improvements. To conclude, the implication of using analytical models, e-learning and web tools in engineering education is instrumental for student activation in the sense that students acquire skills for active reading and writing. However the use of analytical questions and reciprocal questioning in seminar activities and web forums prompts new channels for interactive learning between students and a more transformative prospect of relating skills from social sciences and humanities with engineering practices in society.

  • 48.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
    Medina, Clara Calero
    Emerging technology and distributed innovation in solar cell technology: a study of topical islands,citation networks and the path most travelled2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The methodology development in this the study contributes with an interesting new empirical settingfor using citation network analysis applied to solar cell technology that challenged prevailing regimeof understanding „how you make‟ solar cells. The preliminary results points to the usefulness ofcombining main path analysis with analysis of the topical islands of the citation network. Thecomplexity of the field of dye-sensitized solar cells itself can contribute to that new areas of inquirycan be shown, such as the example of the “organic dyes” discussed in the paper. Combiningquantitative data with a storyline of key events aims to provide a richer story of the history ofscientific discovery of nanostructured solar cell technology building on skills and knowledge that spandisciplinary boundaries. This particular type of solar cells is in the crossroads of chemistry, physicsand material sciences and can thereby also provide further insight into the dynamics ofinterdisciplinary technology.

  • 49.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    Back to basics – revisiting rhetoric of competitive research funding allocation and impact agenda in Sweden2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Science policy studies have traditionally been concerned with analysis of research programs, national science policy and their motivation for investments in science and in basic research in particular. As Keith Pavitt (1991) pointed out, the “market failure” line of argument has been in the limelight with less attention paid to other questions such as the following: “How does science contribute to technology?” In the Swedish context, this is a relevant question given that it is a nation with high share of investments in science and historically high level of industry investments in R&D. The aim of the current study is to analyse the rhetoric of science policy about how investments in scientific excellence contributes to industrially relevant output. We examine this by taking a closer look at different strands of arguments and assessment criteria used to support competitive funding allocation to university-based research. Particular attention is paid to examining centres of excellence (CoE) as a form of science policy of promoting both scientific excellence and interaction between academia and industry. Moreover the study examines consequences of interim evaluations and the policy advice given  in assessments of centre activities. One conclusion is that the research funding agency assessment criteria have a strong influence on the direction on future centre activities but also that the range of present and future activities are determined by areas where the centre have internationally high quality research and the impact agenda defined by the centre in interaction with industry partners of ongoing research projects. 

  • 50.
    Larsen, Katarina
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment.
    Nilsson, Susanne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Integrated Product Development.
    Blaus, Johan
    KTH.
    Snickars, Folke
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
    Impact and beyond in research centres: university-industry collaboration in material sciences2015In: Proceedings XIII Triple Helix conference, Beijing, August 2015. Panel session: University-Industry relationships, Beijing, China, 2015, Vol. Panel 5, p. 158-177Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is concerned with the role of research centres in realising universities‟ impact strategy. From the university management‟s perspective, this raises questions about how a university more systematically can organize and manage effective environments to stimulate both academic excellence and societal impact. The analysis draws on experiences from a centre in the area of material sciences with an explicit ambition to generate impact through engaging in research and education activities together with industry. The study aims to build knowledge on what type of impact goals these centres are targeting and what impact mechanisms that are considered important in order to achieve these goals. The results show that the centre has established mechanisms for close-knitted collaborative research, which also create an in-depth understanding among collaborators about areas of application of new materials and the diverse range of research work in the centre. This facilitates translation activities to form more fundamental research questions from industry‟s practical needs. Four areas of impact are identified: 1) tools and methods saving time, money and materials 2) skilled people 3) solutions of theoretical problems; and 4) development of absorptive capacity and science-signalling trough co-publications between industry partners and centre researchers. Conclusions about scope of impact, in the Swedish case, are presented in relation to recent university policy in UK, also discussing key themes of centres as impact creators.

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