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  • 1.
    Burroughs, Brady
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Bonnevier, Katarina
    KTH.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Grillner, Katja
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Between Delft and Stockholm2017In: Footprint, ISSN 1875-1504, E-ISSN 1875-1490, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 119-128Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the years, colleagues at the Architecture School of Stockholm have developed a most remarkable and inspiring approach to architecture and writing in terms of performances and the performative while integrating feminist and queer theory. Of particular interest are the Critical Studies in Architecture group, the group Fatale for feminist architecture theory and practice, and the Mycket collaboration. By way of an interview between Footprint editors Dirk van den Heuvel and Robert Gorny, and the Stockholm colleagues Brady Burroughs, Katarina Bonnevier, Katja Grillner, and Hélène Frichot questions of pedagogy, research and methodology are further investigated, how to ‘stay with the trouble’ and where to situate newly emerging knowledge models.

  • 2.
    Frichot, H.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Affective encounters amidst feminist futures in architecture?2016In: This Thing Called Theory, Taylor and Francis Inc. , 2016, Vol. 12, p. 79-88Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Frichot, Helene
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Matthew Barney's cremaster cycle revisited: Towards post-human becomings of man2015In: Angelaki, ISSN 0969-725X, E-ISSN 1469-2899, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 55-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is now well over a decade since the artist Matthew Barney's epic work the Cremaster Cycle was completed. This essay returns to the post-human becomings of man that populate Barney's elaborately cross-referenced, aesthetic pluriverse, in particular addressing how the man-form labours amidst and on his environment-worlds, inclusive of the architectural augmentations that assist in the production of such worlds. Revisiting Barney's Cremaster Cycle now offers the opportunity to ask what becomes of the exclusionary and exhaustive world-making performances of the Anthrop once he has placed extreme stress on himself and his mental, social and environmental ecologies, so that any mutual support system is brought to the threshold of exhaustion.

  • 4.
    Frichot, Helene
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Part-Architecture: The Maison de Verre, Duchamp, Domesticity and Desire in 1930s Paris2017In: arq Architecture research quarterly, ISSN 1359-1355, E-ISSN 1474-0516, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 81-83Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Frichot, Helene
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture. RMIT Univ, Sch Architecture & Design, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Persephone's margin call: Off the Page Toward Life in Space2013In: Architectural Theory Review, ISSN 1326-4826, E-ISSN 1755-0475, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 175-188Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    5 Codes: Architecture, Paranoia and Risk in Times of Terror2007In: Monument, ISSN 1320-1115, Vol. 77, p. 78-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    A House for Hermes #012007In: Landscape Architecture Australia, ISSN 1833-4814, Vol. 116, p. 64-67Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    A Postscript From Bartlebess: How to Perform Creative Resistance in the Workplace2016In: Poetic Biopolitics: Practices of Relation in Architecture and the Arts / [ed] Peg Rawes,Timothy Mathews, Stephen Loo, I. B. Tauris , 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9. Frichot, Hélène
    A Work in Ten Parts: Gathering and its Forms2009Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A Work in Ten Parts: Gathering and its Forms, was a set of 'philosophical' instructions that I wrote and provided to Elizabeth Presa, Centre for Ideas, VCA, University of Melbourne as part of a collaborative work participating in Hans Ulrich Obrist's ongoing Do It project. The instructions were followed by a number of VCA art students as part of a studio project, and the work was exhibited at  George Paton Gallery, Union House The University of Melbourne, Parkville (6-16 October, 2009). A catalogue published by The Centre for Ideas, VCA, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne was produced called Do It, which likewise contributes to the ongoing collaborative series curated by Hans Ulrich Obrist.

  • 10.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Affective Encounters Amidst Feminist Futures in Architecture?2016In: This Thing Called Theory / [ed] Teresa Stoppani, Giorgio Ponzo, George Themistokleous, London: Routledge , 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    All in the Production: Conversation with Nicolas Bourriaud, Somewhere in Paris2009In: Design Reporter, no 1, p. 12-13Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12. Frichot, Hélène
    An Apprenticeship in Thinking Architecture2005In: Drawing Together: Convergent Practices in Architectural Education, AASA / [ed] Kathi Holt-Damant, Theodor G. Wyeld, Brisbane: QUT , 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The relevance and use of theory when approaching the discipline of architecture would appear to have become eclipsed by the excitement associated with emerging digital technologies, and a renewed fascination in nature, appropriated from biological science in the form of genetic algorithmic models. What’s more, if we are to believe Michael Speaks’s Assemblage essay, “Which Way Avant-Garde?” (2000), we are by now obliged to admit the death of theory (a watered down version of philosophy), and contend instead with the fierce world of globalisation, organised by a new brand of intellectual, the entrepreneur or manager.[1] The name, Gilles Deleuze, for instance, cited by Speaks himself, no longer carries its authoritative weight, and folded architecture has become decidedly outmoded. And yet architecture must still find some means of talking about itself, and conceptually enabling its activities. There is, in addition, the mounting institutional pressure for the architectural academic to publish their research. With this paper I will argue that theory constitutes a crucial part of an apprenticeship in the discipline of architecture in both pedagogical and professional contexts. I will return to the work of Deleuze with the claim that the legacy of his particular practice of thought, which we can name, creative philosophy, maintains an influence on the discourse surrounding digital architecture. Through Deleuze’s Spinozist lens I will also speculate on the possibility of imagining an ethics for architecture in what we can call a post-digital age. Here an ethics can also be taken on as an apprenticeship, rather than a predetermined moral code, wherein practice and theory enter into a relationship of ongoing and, at the same time, responsible experimentation in the arena of design.

    [1]Michael Speaks, “Which Way Avant-garde?”, Assemblage, no. 41 (April, 2000), p. 78.

  • 13.
    Frichot, Hélène
    RMIT University, Melbourne Australia.
    An Apprenticeship in Thinking Architecture2006In: Stadtbauwelt, ISSN 0585-0096, Vol. 24Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14. Frichot, Hélène
    An Ethico-Aesthetics for Wet Architecture2007In: Ideology Of The Imaginary in the 21st Century, Adelaide, Australia: Experimental Arts Foundation , 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Frichot, Hélène
    RMIT University, Melbourne Australia.
    Bartleby the Scribe’s Formula: I Would Prefer Not To…(Design Creativity as a Mode of Resistance)2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Once upon a time, prior to the development of mechanical and then electronic copying devices and their ubiquitous colonisation of the corporate world, the figure of the scrivener or copyist would have been a regular fixture in the office. The great American writer Herman Melville tells the story of such a scrivener, a law copyist called Bartleby who perplexes his employer, an attorney, with a singular phrase of resistance: I would prefer not to. Bartleby responds to an advertisement for the position of scrivener and arrives one day in the open doorway of the attorney’s offices, “pallidly neat, pitiably respectable, incurably forlorn!” The attorney explains that his chambers at that time were located up the stairs of what is presumably an office block at an undisclosed address on Wall Street, New York. He describes the outlook of his rooms as follows: “At one end, they looked upon the white wall of the interior of a spacious sky-light shaft…from the other end of my chambers…my windows commanded an unobstructed view of a lofty brick wall, black by age and everlasting shade.” The premises are further divided into two halves, one for the employees, and one for the attorney, separated by ground glass folding doors, which the attorney opens and closes depending on his temper. Bartleby will be further cordoned off behind a high green folding screen that not only separates him out from the three other employees, but places him in the closest proximity to his employer, specifically on the attorney’s side of the office. Melville, as can be seen, composes the spatial arrangement of the office and its outlook with specific care. It is within this circumscribed space that Bartleby’s phrase, I would prefer not to, will come to infect the collective enunciation of the employees as well as the attorney himself. Each will unwittingly find themselves using variations of Bartleby’s phrase. This is a phrase that is taken up as an object of study by a number of philosophers, including Gilles Deleuze, Isabelle Stengers, and Giorgio Agamben. What interests all of these thinkers is how the figure of Bartleby troubles the outline of what constitutes a collective voice of enunciation or expression and the cohesive identity of some community of shared practices and beliefs. The passive resistance of Bartleby’s phrase, which Deleuze names a formula, offers a protest that cannot be explicitly named, and at the same time it calls upon a potential creativity the realisation of which may be indefinitely forestalled.

  • 16. Frichot, Hélène
    Becoming Woman, Old Man2008In: Bureau, Melbourne: VCA Margaret Lawrence Gallery, Faculty of the Victorian College of the Arts, The University of Melbourne , 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Frichot, Hélène
    RMIT University, Melbourne Australia.
    CAE, Flinders Lane Melbourne: An Invitational Architecture2010In: Artichoke, ISSN 1442-0953, Vol. 35, p. 118-120Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Frichot, Hélène
    RMIT University, Melbourne Australia.
    Charles Anderson: Touch This2010In: Landscape Architecture Australia, ISSN 1833-4814, Vol. 127, p. 31-32Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Nearly one hundred years ago now, a man walked into a room and dropped three pieces of string, each measuring a meter long, from the height of one meter onto a stretched horizontal canvas so that they fell in three curved lengths, twisting as they pleased. He called his experiment the Three Standard Stoppages. How long is a piece of string? One meter subsequently reconfigured to create a new unit of length depending on how it falls.

    Some ten years ago now a man walks into his studio and discovers that effluent from his leaky roof has been seeping unnoticed through a stack of papers. As the paper thirstily absorbs the liquid, discoloured blotches descend through the layers forming an inverted pyramid. The peak of the pyramid marks the point of exhaustion of the liquid. Sheets of time have been captured as though in stop motion, and from this happy accident the exigency of creation emerges. He knows that stochastic or chance-based procedures demand patience and a great amount of exactitude: don’t leave them up to blind chance. The man attempts to repeat the accident using medical as well as bodily fluids. He also collects other stains, for instance, captured photographically from discarded mattresses. How big is a landscape? As big as the stain on a discarded bed mattress.

  • 19. Frichot, Hélène
    Chelle Macnaughtan: (De)Bordering Indeterminacy between Architecture and Music2009Other (Other academic)
  • 20. Frichot, Hélène
    Code Breaker: Interview with Parisian Architect, Christian Girard2004In: Monument: where creative conversation begin, ISSN 1320-1115, Vol. 58, p. 102-103Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Conexa, Conjuncta, Disjuncta: What can a monument do?2012In: Future Anterior, ISSN 1549-9715, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 74-86Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22. Frichot, Hélène
    Creating an Ethico-Aesthetics for Digital Architecture2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A practical philosophy requires that one install oneself in the midst of things such that abstract propositions can lead toward the concrete manner in which one pursues a life. By living out propositions, and, we could add, by creating concepts, Gilles Deleuze suggests that one finds oneself to be Spinozist without having understood why. The question of a way of life concerns affects, the capacity to be affected, and to affect others. Architecture is a practical discipline apt to create blocs of sensations through the circulation of affects, concepts and percepts. Though the role of architecture should be considered distinct from that of philosophy, a vibrant traffic in ideas continues to pass between the disciplines. At least since the nineteen-eighties, architectural thinkers have shown a pronounced interest in the work of Deleuze. Though this fascination would appear to have diminished somewhat, the conceptual assemblage constructed between Deleuze and Félix Guattari toward the practice of a creative philosophy continues to inform the emergence of what has been nominated digital architecture. The deceptively liberating promise of digital architecture, which suggests to the designer a plethora of formal permutations, even deformations, and novel techniques, obfuscates the embeddedness of the architectural artefact (whether material or imagined) in a socio-cultural and political milieu. The very same architectural form can create effects of power that are, from one point of view, affirmative of existence, and from another, repressive. With this paper I will speculate on the possibility of engaging with an ethico-aesthetic practice for digital architecture. Ethics, Deleuze argues, constitutes “a typology of immanent modes of existence”, and displaces morality, “which always refers existence to transcendent values”.[1]How might an ethico-aesthetic, creative practice of architecture be inaugurated for a discipline that remains, for the most part, formalist in its preoccupations?

    [1]Gilles Deleuze, Spinoza Practical Philosophy, trans. Trans. Robert Hurley (San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1988), p. 23.

  • 23.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Daddy, Why do things have outlines? Constructing the Architectural Body2013In: Inflection Journal, ISSN 2199-8094, no 6, p. 112-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arakawa and Madeline Gins’s book The Architectural Body performs a radical relation of indiscernibility between the embodied performance of the inhabitant and their architectural or built surrounds. This paper will explore the conceptual and architectural composition of the architectural body and suggest, after Gilles Deleuze and Benedict de Spinoza, that we do not yet know what this (architectural) body can do! In particular, I will focus on the dialogue that Arakawa and Gins employ in The Architectural Body to demonstrate how the performing body-being and the transforming architectural surround cleave to one another to create another kind of atmospheric individual, a bioscleave, and by extension, a resituated concept of ecology. To explore the atmospheric ecologies at work in the concept of the architectural body, I will place two further conceptual scenes alongside that offered in Arakawa and Gins’ book: The first scene is another dialogue, Metalogue: Why do Things have outlines? from Gregory Bateson’s Steps to an Ecology of Mind, and the second scene is that in which Deleuze describes the active procedure of the diagram in Francis Bacon: The Logic of Sensation. I will conclude with a discussion of the way ethical know-how can be practiced at the threshold between organism and environment. ? 

  • 24. Frichot, Hélène
    David Ralph: In Captivity2008In: Landscape Architecture Australia, ISSN 1833-4814, Vol. 118, p. 31-32Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Deleuze and Memorial Culture: Desire, Singular Memory, and the Politics of Trauma2012In: Future anterior: journal of historic preservation - history, theory & criticism, ISSN 1549-9715, E-ISSN 1934-6026, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 74-86Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Deleuze and the story of the superfold2013In: Deleuze and Architecture / [ed] Hélène Frichot, Stephen Loo, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2013, 1, p. 79-95Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gilles Deleuze’s concept of the fold has inspired much architectural experimentation in terms of novel form-making, or fold-making writ large at the scale of buildings and even urban environments. With what can be called the rise of a new biological paradigm in architecture, the concept of the fold, while less explicitly evident, continues to promise novel approaches to form-making, and is also suggestive of a way in which architecture can conjoin with a life within the folds. Contemporary avant-garde architects now claim that one day soon buildings will respond to life criteria, by becoming something akin to building-organisms. A definition of life is broadly appropriated from the life sciences, and the models that it uses to map life in process range from the scale of the cells that cluster as organisms to the organization of ecological systems. The resulting focus on generative digital models, which borrow from genetics, evolutionary theory, and so forth, continues to draw on the aesthetics of Deleuze and Félix Guattari. I will argue that an emphasis on an aesthetics of life that is directed toward architectural formal ends, and which calls upon an array of interdisciplinary sources including biology, computer science and philosophy, risks forgetting the ethical and political importance of simultaneously pursuing an ethics of immanence, or else what Guattari has called an ecosophy. The drawing of the diagram of the fold also designates a tremulous site of battle that pertains to life, how it is defined and how it is transforming, especially in societies of control. In the Appendix of his book Foucault, Deleuze describes what he calls the Superfold, a concept by which he speculates on a life within the folds that goes beyond the human organism as well as beyond the silicon-based machine: A life within the folds in profound contact with the outside of thought is not all that it seems. I will conclude the essay with a discussion of this marginal concept of the superfold and its implications for the ground that is shared between architecture and philosophy.

  • 27. Frichot, Hélène
    Design and Attention2009In: Artichoke, ISSN 1442-0953, Vol. 29, p. 6-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Frichot, Hélène
    RMIT University, Melbourne Australia.
    Design and Loneliness2009In: Artichoke, ISSN 1442-0953, Vol. 28, p. 88-89Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Design Thinking in the Beehive2011In: Artichoke, ISSN 1442-0953, Vol. 36, p. 97-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Desire and Identity: The Architecture of Chancellor and Patrick2011In: Architecture Australia, ISSN 0003-8725, Vol. May/June, no 3, p. 17-18Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The scene that is set describes a serene Victoria enjoying her post-war prosperity together with the pleasures of a bay-side leisure lifestyle. This is an age in which the Victorian citizen, the everyman, can feel sure of his place in the work-a-day world, and then return home to large helpings of meat and three veg prepared by the wife. There persists, more or less imperceptibly, the quiet murmur of a fading indigenous race, whose children and land have been stolen, but little matter, this is now a resolutely white Australia. Whiteness has been so thoroughly internalised into the nation’s psyche that the white Australia policy has been allowed to cautiously ease. Even with the considerable post-war push for immigration – populate or perish – the newcomers are mostly European, and the newsreels show images of smiling blond women, and smart, healthy young men in stylish sunglasses alighting from large ocean liners. There are dams to be built, and primary and secondary industry to consider. This is also an era within which mainstream television is just being introduced, and all the living room picture windows, one by one, up and down the block, begin to flicker and glow after dinner time as families gather around the televisual hearth to hear news from elsewhere.

    It is during this period, from the early to the mid-1950’s, that experimental young Australian practices such as Chancellor and Patrick look with great admiration toward the new architecture emerging out of Europe, and the international flowering of modernism. 

  • 31. Frichot, Hélène
    Disjunctive Syntheses of (Post)digital Architecture and Life2007In: AASA: Techniques and Technologies, Tranfser and Transformation / [ed] Sandra Kaji-O'Grady, Charles Rice, Anthony Burke, Kirsten Orr, School of Architecture, University of Technology: Sydney , 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In her recent book, Architecture, Animal, Human: The Asymmetrical Condition, Catherine Ingraham maintains a stalwart asymmetry between, on the one hand, human, animal and other life, and on the other hand, the material constraints or framed enclosures of architecture. When we turn to the recent, speculative work of the Emergence and Design Group (Michael Hensel, Michael Weinstock, and Achim Menges) we find a practice that deploys the software of computer technologies as a medium that has become increasingly life-like in its operational capacities and engagements. Rather than an asymmetrical condition, digital architects, such as the Emergence and Design Group, appear to be dismantling the distinction between architectural form and human, animal and other life forms. What we are asked to imagine is a continuum that unfolds in both directions, one infecting the other, organic interpenetrating inorganic, technology intertwined with biological life. What’s more, the resulting hybrid of architecture-cum-life in (de)formation, should be apprehended as animated and ever-responsive to the field from which it emerges. The formal complexity that supposedly results erupts unexpectedly from a plane of continuous variation where the emphasis lies in the surface effect. This paper will trace the legacy of the work of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari with respect to key conceptual moves, implicit and explicit, being made by so-called digital architects. Following what can be identified as Deleuze and Guattari’s ethics of immanence, this paper will also consider whether an appropriate ethico-aesthetic practice can be engaged to address what appears to be a new architectural paradigm with its attendant desire for an intimate proximity with life. 

  • 32.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture, Critical Studies in Architecture.
    Drawing, Thinking, Doing: From Diagram Work to the Superfold2011In: Access: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies, ISSN 0111-8889, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1998, when the names Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari still exuded a seductive attraction for architectural thinkers and practitioners, Any Magazine, edited by Cynthia C. Davidson, published an edition entitled Diagram Work, which was guest edited by architects Ben van Berkal and Caroline Bos. The diagram work in question drew predominantly on the philosophical thought of Deleuze and Guattari, especially their version of the diagram, or ‘diagrammatic’, as mobilised in their book A Thousand Plateaus where the diagram is also referred to as an ‘abstract machine’. This essay will present a series of different ways in which the concept of the diagram can be argued to be at work in Deleuze, and Deleuze and Guattari’s ethico-aesthetics. Their speculative, projective and radically creative employment of the diagram will also allow me to present a discussion of Deleuze’s concept of the ‘Superfold’, which he introduces briefly in the Appendix of his book Foucault. I will conclude by discussing the relevance of the concept of the Superfold with regard to computational architectures and (post)digital diagrammatic processes, and also as a concept that alerts us to the risk of assuming too much about our relationship with diagrammatic forces. 

  • 33.
    Frichot, Hélène
    RMIT University, Melbourne Australia.
    Elizabeth Grosz, Chaos Territory, Art: Deleuze and the Framing of the Earth2009In: Architectural Theory Review, ISSN 1326-4826, E-ISSN 1755-0475, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 193-196Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 34. Frichot, Hélène
    Ethics, Aesthetics, Architecture2007In: Architecture Australia, ISSN 0003-8725, Vol. 96, no 8, p. 61-62Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Exhausting (Architectural) Theory, Noopolitics and the Image of Thought2016In: SITE MagazineArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It is exactly the space and pace, the local and global extent of exhaustion that I wish to explore again in this essay. In the introduction to Deleuze and Architecture, and in other of my writings,[1] I have extracted a methodology of exhaustion from Deleuze’s brief and dense essay “The Exhausted”, so removing and abstracting it, without some attendant risks, from the specific application he has tested in his reading of Samuel Beckett’s novels, plays and television plays.[2] Below I will address the way Deleuze enumerates four ways of exhausting the possible, accepting that this list should not be taken as exhaustive. I should also admit that I have wilfully extracted these four approaches from what Deleuze identifies as three ‘Languages’: Language I, II, and III respectively. It is important to note, as I will elaborate, that the results of the methodology of exhaustion can proceed toward a more powerful composition of forces, as well as toward a decomposition of our relations and encounters amidst our local environment-worlds. That is to say, the methodology produces what could be judged as both ‘failures’ and ‘successes’, but this very much depends on point of view and situation. Although in Deleuze’s argument the methodology seems to progress from exhaustive series or ‘combinatorials’ (of concepts, things, images,) toward the dissipation of the power of an ‘image of thought’, I will argue that it is more useful to see what happens when the methodology is followed in both directions.  The four approaches to a methodology of exhaustion include: 1) the composition of combinatorials arranged through the formation of exhaustive series (of concepts, images, things, any such thing that can be named); 2) the drying up or exhausting of the flow of weak and strong voices; 3) the extenuation of the potentialities of space by way of the any-space-whatever, as well as exhaustion via images; 4) and finally, the dissipation of the power of the ‘image of thought’, which as an iconoclastic moment leads either to a new more positive image of thought or else to a more dogmatic one. It is also worth mentioning that there is a mathematical and geometrical definition of a method of exhaustion that allows the area beneath a curve to be calculated by approaching the problem of exactly measuring curvature without, strictly speaking, arriving at anything more than a sufficient answer, creating what might be called a working method. To be exhaustive, in the sense of a search party, is to search an area as completely as possible, but there is always the suspicion that some thing still remains to be unearthed, or that we missed some crucial detail. And so the search may well be taken up at a later date. Crucially, and as will hopefully become clearer, the methodology of exhaustion as well as confronting the dissipation of sense, also leads to the breakdown of the organic or inorganic body, defined in the broadest way to include, for instance, a human body, a body politic, a built environment-body, an ecological body, and so forth.

    [1] Hélène Frichot, “Michelle Hamer: One Stitch at a Time” in Louis Mannie Leoni, ed. 05401, 01 (2012) pp. 17-19, 25-26; Hélène Frichot and Stephen Loo “Introduction: The Exhaustive and the Exhausted – Deleuze AND Architecture” in Deleuze and Architecture, op. cit.; Hélène Frichot, “Gentri-Fiction and our (E)States of Reality: On the Exhaustion of the Image of Thought and the Fatigued Image of Architecture”, in Nadir Lahiji, ed. The Missed Encounter of Radical Philosophy with Architecture (London: Bloomsbury, 2014).

    [2] “The Exhausted” was first published not in the collected essays of Critique et Clinique, translated by Daniel W. Smith as Essays Critical and Clinical, where it now appears in English, but first appeared in Samuel Becket’s Quad et autres pieces pour la television. Samuel Beckett, Quad et autres pieces pour la television (Paris: les éditions de minuit, 1992); Gilles Deleuze, Critique et Clinique, Paris: Éditions de Minuit, 1993); Gilles Deleuze, Essays Critical and Clinical , Daniel W. Smith and Michael A. Greco, trans. (London: Verso, 1998).

     

     

  • 36. Frichot, Hélène
    Experimentations on the Surface of Home2004In: Inside: interior design review, ISSN 1326-9631, Vol. 32Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Five Lessons in a Ficto-Critical Approach to Design Practice Research2015In: Drawing-On: Journal of Architectural Research By Design, ISSN 2059-9978, Vol. 1Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the following text I propose to offer the outline of five preliminary lessons in a ficto-critical approach to creative research practices in architecture, or more precisely, between architecture and philosophy; a transversal relay I pursue through my own research. I will identify these creative and critical practices as operating amidst what can be called an ‘ecology of practices’, a formulation I appropriate from the philosopher of science Isabelle Stengers (who also stresses the power of fiction with respect to explorative practices in the sciences) although I will ask whether it might be helpful to refer instead to ecologies, placing the stress on the plural, in order to allow for more diverse trans-disciplinary encounters. I propose ecologies of practices as surely every ecology jostles alongside another ecology; as one ecology brims over the threshold into another it either wreaks havoc and brings about the decline of a neighbouring less resilient ecology, or else enjoins a more powerful composition, an allegiance. At these thresholds a certain ethics is called for, and the possibility of experiencing-experimenting with an ethico-aesthetics.[i] With respect to much of what I will discuss here I am indebted to the researchers I have had the opportunity to work with in the School of Architecture and Design, RMIT University and within ResArc, the research institute that conjoins the four schools of architecture in Sweden. In many instances I have guided these researchers through their PhD projects, as they, in turn, have guided me into an understanding of the very difficult domain of research by or through design. In particular I thank Michael Spooner, Julieanna Preston, and Margit Brünner for kindly allowing me permission to reproduce their images.

    [i] Guattari, Félix. 1995. Chaosmosis: An Ethico-Aesthetic Paradigm, trans. Paul Bains and Julian Pefanis. Sydney: Power Publications.

  • 38.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Foaming Relations: The Ethico-Aesthetics of Relationality2009In: Occupations: Negotiations with Constructed Space / [ed] Terry Meade, Luis Diaz, Susannah Hagan, Brighton: University of Brighton , 2009, p. 1-11Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The German philosopher Peter Sloterdijk uses the analogy of foam to describe the relations that cohere between one individual and the next, each co-isolated in the context of the modern city. Our habits, in co-production with the framing of our urban habitus, determine that we are arranged as networks of isolated, bubble-like, monadic cells. By effervescent means we nevertheless find ways of communicating across the cell walls that we share, and which divide us, or do we? I will enlist a series of concepts to consider the foaming relations that go toward forming the life of the urban habitus. These will include, relational aesthetics (Nicolas Bourriaud); ethico-aesthetics (Félix Guattari); human and nonhuman relations (Bruno Latour) all of which will help toward articulating a foaming, bubbling mass of relations that are external to their terms. The use of Sloterdijk’s concept of ‘foam city’ will be employed to consider contemporary modes of occupation of the city and how occupation is a processual activity that requires innovative responses to ever-transforming spatio-temporal networks. Following Guattari, this paper will venture an ethico-aesthetic approach to the way problems can be framed by architects and designers toward new modes of occupation of urban fields enlivened by the circulation of human and non-human actors. Practices of occupation accompanied by relations of affect and percept require an ethico-aesthetic rethinking of the design process and its modes of conceptualisation. This paper will address the manner in which the contemporary urban scene is inhabited as a live medium and ask to what extent the public sphere has been rendered redundant in exchange for a multiplicity of co-habiting as well as agonistic private spheres, or what Sloterdijk has called, ‘ego-spheres’. 

  • 39.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Foaming Relations: Urban Habitus of Affect2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40. Frichot, Hélène
    Folds for Marion Manifold2010Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Deep Mapping for the Stony Rises is an assemblage of the topographies and topologies encountered in the making of a cross-landscape environment for six particular places in the Stony Rises of Victoria and the Flinders Ranges of South Australia. It is an experiment in the superpositioning of gathered and invited material interleaved with a stratigraphy of text – as a kind of writing over writing over writing where points once separated in time are made adjacent2 – through the medium of the gridded mat. The ten elements for a deep map are guides for peripatetic travelling through stony terrains shaped by curatorial fine-tuning further informed by instructions from collaborators, when such advice exists. Arrangements of collected, invited and offered fragments of impressions gathered across these landscapes are ordered and layered onto conceptual ground – the deep mapping mat to be laid out, reorganised, folded up and carried about as necessary. At the invitation of Gini Lee, who was one of the cited artists of 'The Stony Rises Project', I submitted a set of drawings to be used and composed at her discretion as part of her curated contribution, 'Deep Mapping.'

  • 41.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Following Hélène Cixous’s Ladder of Writing: Perth Prague Return2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Frichot, Hélène
    RMIT University, Melbourne Australia.
    Following Hélène Cixous’s Steps Towards a Writing Architecture2010In: Architectural Theory Review, ISSN 1755-0475, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 312-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In her book Coming to Writing, He ́le`ne Cixous suggests that the woman writer must always struggle to establish her right to write. Within the field of architecture the act of writing is often assumed to be a passive after- effect of the built form and not an active force that might substantially participate in the process of design and its material out- come in a world. Using Cixous as a guide, I will argue that a creative and critical practice of writing can materially contribute to the thinking and doing of architecture, especially with regard to the woman architect. 

  • 43.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Gentri-Fiction and our (E)States of Reality: On the Exhaustion of the Image of Thought and the Fatigued Image of Architecture2014In: The Missed Encounter of Radical Philosophy with Architecture / [ed] Nadir Lahiji, London: Bloomsbury , 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 44. Frichot, Hélène
    Holey Space and the Smooth and Striated Body of the Refugee2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An everyday evasion is at work in the socio-cultural geography and imaginary of the Australian Community. This evasion circulates about the figure of the refugee, or, more specifically, the asylum seeker. The setting for this everyday evasion (which is frequently mistaken for an invasion) incorporates the leaky boat, the displaced and denationalised body, the smooth space of the sea, and ‘our’ antipodean shores. In chapter 14, ‘1440: The Smooth and the Striated’ of A Thousand Plateaus, Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari invent two concepts concerning space, which they name the smooth and the striated. Of the several models they develop to extrapolate their conceptual investigation, the maritime model tells us the most about difficult journeys undertaken. Not only is the sea given as a smooth space par excellence, alongside the desert and the steppes, but, simultaneously, the space most easily subjugated to striation. Consider, for instance, the lines of longitude and latitude, so crucial to navigation and the colonisation of such territories as Australia. Importantly, it is in the midst of this maritime milieu that we discover a site of contest between smooth and striated space, as we also discover this contest taking place in the Australian desert. A contest cannot be figured as a straightforward and symmetrical opposition, but an agonistic to and fro in which power relations become more or less coagulated and bare life comes to be manipulated. What interests Deleuze and Guattari in operations of striation and smoothing “are precisely the passages or combinations: how the forces at work within space continually striate it, and how in the course of this striation it develops other forces and emits new smooth spaces”.[1] In addition to the concepts of the smooth and the striated, Deleuze and Guattari add a further concept, which they name, holey space. With this paper I will ask how the scarcely formulated notion of holey space might offer a way of welcoming, and not evading, what Deleuze calls a life, and the Italian theorist, Giorgio Agamben, bare life, through the figure of the refugee, or asylum seeker.

    [1]Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, A Thousand Plateaus, trans. Brian Massumi (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1987), p. 500.

  • 45. Frichot, Hélène
    Holey Space and the Smooth and Striated Body of the Refugee2007In: Deleuzian Encounters: Studies in Contemporary Social Issues / [ed] Anna Hickey-Moody & Peta Malins (eds.), Palgrave Macmillan, 2007, p. 169-180Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46. Frichot, Hélène
    Intimus: Interior Design Theory Reader2007In: Artichoke, ISSN 1442-0953, Vol. 18, p. 61-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Introduction: Following the Material, or Materially Situated Learning2014In: Performing Matter: Interior Surface and Feminist Actions / [ed] Julieanna Preston, Baunach Germany: Art Architecture Design Research Spurbuch verlag , 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Introduction to Part Three: A New Biological Paradigm for Design2015In: De-Signing Design: Cartographies of Theory and Practice / [ed] Elizabeth Grierson, Harriet Edquist, Hélène Frichot, Lexington Books , 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Frichot, Hélène
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    LAB Architecture: Draw the Line2009In: Architecture Australia, ISSN 0003-8725, Vol. 98, no 6, p. 33-34Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 50. Frichot, Hélène
    Log Lady: Cynthia C. Davidson, profile2004In: Monument: Architecture and Design, ISSN 1320-1115, Vol. 62, p. 18-19Article in journal (Other academic)
123 1 - 50 of 120
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