Change search
Refine search result
1 - 17 of 17
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Eder, Jonas
    et al.
    University of Trier.
    Mutsaerts, Christopher
    BearingPoint.
    Sriwannawit, Pranpreya
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Mini-grids and renewable energy in rural Africa: How diffusion theory explains adoption of electricity in Uganda2015In: Energy Research and Social Science, ISSN 2214-6296, Vol. 5, p. 45-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With diffusion theory as the point of departure, this study analyses the factors that influence the adoption of renewable electricity from individual households’ perspectives. The analysis is based on a case study provided by a Swedish energy service company operating in rural Uganda. The company distributes electricity to rural households via a mini-grid powered by a biomass gasification system. Three critical dimensions are identified to be crucial for adoption: technical, economic, and social. First, there is an emphasis on the relative advantages of the new technology. Second, there are economic requirements regarding a viable financial system for adopters, especially in such a low-income market. Third, the social dimension is critical, particularly the importance of foreign firms collaborating with local actors. We further suggest that a lack of understanding of local communities can lead foreign companies to fail in diffusion attempts. While we focus on Uganda, the results of our research are highly relevant for foreign actors who attempt to penetrate rural markets in developing countries in general.

  • 2.
    Karakaya, Emrah
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Sriwannawit, Pranpreya
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Barriers to the adoption of photovoltaic systems: The state of the art2015In: Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, ISSN 1364-0321, E-ISSN 1879-0690, Vol. 49, p. 60-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although photovoltaic (PV) systems have become much more competitive, the diffusion of PV systems still remains low in comparison to conventional energy sources. What are the current barriers hindering the diffusion of PV systems? In order to address this, we conducted an extensive and systematic literature review based on the Web of Science database. Our state-of-the-art review shows that, despite the rapid development and maturity of the technology during the past few years, the adoption of PV systems still faces several barriers. The wide adoption of PV systems—either as a substitute for other electricity power generation systems in urban areas or for rural electrification—is a challenging process. Our results show that the barriers are evident for both low- and high-income economies, encompassing four dimensions: sociotechnical, management, economic, and policy. Although the barriers vary across context, the lessons learned from one study can be valuable to others. The involvement of all stakeholders—adopters, local communities, firms, international organizations, financial institutions, and government—is crucial to foster the adoption.

  • 3.
    Sriwannawit, Pranpreya
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Diffusion of photovoltaic systems in rural Thailand2011In: DIME-DRUID Academy Winter Conference, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Sriwannawit, Pranpreya
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Dissemination of renewable energies in developing countries2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Sriwannawit, Pranpreya
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Managing the diffusion of electrification in Bangladesh2012In: International Conference for the International Association of Management of Technology (IAMOT), 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Sriwannawit, Pranpreya
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Power to the people: Diffusion of renewable electricity in rural areas of developing countries2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Nearly all the 1.3 billion people in the world with no electricity access live in developing countries. On the one hand, electricity is a basic need. On the other hand, the environment should not be further damaged. Thus, sustainable electricity in developing countries is clearly needed. The aim of this dissertation is to analyse the mechanism of the diffusion and adoption of renewable electricity with particular focus on rural electrification among low-income inhabitants in developing countries. The dissertation is comprised of a cover essay and six appended papers with a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods based on several means of data collection.

    The first paper describes diffusion theory through a novel bibliometric tool. This novel method provides an overview, structure, and explanation of a large research area; complements a traditional literature review; and can be applied to any knowledge field. Here, the structure of the recent development of diffusion research, together with its application, are presented. With a specific focus on rural electrification among low-income inhabitants in developing countries, the diffusion framework is empirically applied with complementary concepts in the second, third, and fourth papers, based on three different cases. One case study investigates the adoption of electricity among rural inhabitants in Uganda and shows that a foreign company can be an important player in the rural electrification effort. Another case study addresses a large dissemination of photovoltaic systems provided by a local firm in Bangladesh and reveals that the diffusion of renewable energy can be effectively undertaken by a private local firm, rather than waiting for full government support or large multi-national corporations. The other case study discusses a small-scale diffusion of photovoltaic systems in a remote region in Thailand and presents an extreme case where full government support is necessary. In addition, through a systematic literature review, the barriers to adoption of photovoltaic systems are identified in the fifth paper, highlighting several remaining challenges. In the last paper, issues related to the transition to using photovoltaic systems in off-grid communities are discussed.

    The diffusion mechanism of renewable electricity has been shown to be a highly complicated process, having several unforeseeable and context-specific factors. A technology with superior qualities does not diffuse by itself but requires tremendous effort and close collaboration on the part of stakeholders. There are complex relations, on the one hand, between technology and society and, on the other hand, between technology providers and adopters. No single, fast, or straightforward remedy can address the complex nature of diffusion of renewable electricity in rural communities. Therefore, understanding the local context is highly important, indicating the need for empirical investigation. This dissertation offers several contributions concerning methodological, theoretical, empirical, managerial and policy. It also provides implications that may be relevant for actors who attempt to introduce, disseminate, and manage new energy technologies in rural communities.

  • 7.
    Sriwannawit, Pranpreya
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Success factors in the diffusion of innovation in rural areas: Study of the management of photovoltaic project in Thailand2011In: International Conference for the International Association of Management of Technology (IAMOT), 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Sriwannawit, Pranpreya
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Transition towards off-grid photovoltaic systems: Is price the final answer?2014In: Energy Procedia, ISSN 1876-6102, E-ISSN 1876-6102, Vol. 57, p. 1546-1554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are 1.3 billion people living without electricity, a large portion of which is in the bottom of the economic pyramid. Rural electrification via photovoltaic systems is one possible solution to alleviate their poverty. The aim of this article is to qualitatively investigate the potential for the transition towards off-grid photovoltaic systems. Two interrelated aspects are specifically investigated: photovoltaic system price and relative advantages for rural adopters. It has been shown that apart from the price, there are other advantages that can motivate rural inhabitants to adopt photovoltaic systems.

  • 9.
    Sriwannawit, Pranpreya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Anisa, P. A.
    Rony, Ashack Miah
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Policy impact on economic viability of biomass gasification systems in Indonesia2016In: Journal of Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems, ISSN 1848-9257, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 56-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Indonesia is facing challenges on the lack of electricity access in rural areas and the management of agricultural waste. The utilization of waste-to-energy technology can help in mitigating these issues. The aim of this paper is to assess the economic viability of a biomass gasification system for rural electrification by investigating its competitiveness in relation to various government supports. Financial modelling is applied to calculate Net Present Value (NPV), Internal Rate of Return (IRR), and Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE). NPV and IRR results indicate that biomass gasification is an economically viable option when appropriate financial government supports exist. LCOE result indicates that biomass gasification system is already more economically competitive compared to diesel generator even without additional support but it is less competitive compared to the national electricity grid tariff. In conclusion, the biomass gasification system is an economically viable option for rural electrification in Indonesian context.

  • 10.
    Sriwannawit, Pranpreya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Anisa, Prashanti Amelia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Rony, Ashack Miah
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Economic viability assessment: The impact of policy on biomass gasification for rural electrification in Indonesia2014In: 9th Conference on Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Sriwannawit, Pranpreya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Claise, Gregoire
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Phdungsilp, Aumnad
    Department of Industrial Engineering, Dhurakij Pundit University.
    Howells, Mark
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Energy Systems Analysis.
    The effect of policy on photovoltaic competitiveness: Analysis on household on-grid application in rural Thailand2014In: 9th Conference on Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The needs for increasing energy access, the depletion of fossil fuels, and the urgency of climate change mitigation push the technology shift towards renewable energy sources. In Thailand, fossil fuels account for more than 90% of the energy mix in power generation. The government has established an incentive program to encourage the transition from fossil fuels to solar energy. However, there has been very little interest among household adopters to utilize this incentive. The aim of this study is to assess the economic viability of small-scale PV systems for on-grid household electricity generation in rural Thailand. The results reveal that the profitability varies greatly depending on system sizes, geographical areas, electricity consumption, and loan levels. Unfortunately, the current policy yields an economic loss for household adopters in various scenarios especially when the consumed electricity is deducted from the electricity generated from PV systems. Nevertheless, the competitiveness of PV systems can be increased with the provision of additional subsidy of which we recommend regressive subsidy rate. Our study emphasizes the importance of government intervention on the technology shift towards sustainable sources.

  • 12.
    Sriwannawit, Pranpreya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Laestadius, Staffan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Determinants of the diffusion of solar home systems: Case study among low-income inhabitants in Bangladesh2015In: Energy and Environment, ISSN 0958-305X, E-ISSN 2048-4070, Vol. 26, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the determinants of technology diffusion among the low-income adopters, i.e. those belonging to the bottom of the pyramid market. Our aim is to analyse the variables that determine the adoption rate of Solar Home Systems. The analysis is drawn from a qualitative case study in Bangladesh based on interviews, observation and documents. We re-conceptualize diffusion process into three basic components: source, innovation and adopter. In particular, we focus on the characteristics of the source that are specific to the low-income market. In our case, the source is a social entrepreneur who seeks social wealth rather than economic wealth. Our empirical study may help to illuminate diffusion processes conducted by social entrepreneurs at the bottom of the pyramid because it contributes to a more comprehensive list of variables that affect the innovation adoption rate.

  • 13.
    Sriwannawit, Pranpreya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Laestadius, Staffan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Diffusion of photovoltaic systems for rural electrification in Thailand2013In: International Journal of Energy and Environment, ISSN 2076-2895, E-ISSN 2076-2909, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 49-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies a pilot project in which photovoltaic systems were installed in thirty-six places in the remote areas of Thailand with no access to electricity. One sub-project out of thirty-six was chosen for in-depth investigation. We discuss the appropriateness of solar energy for Thailand context. The diffusion process of PV systems is analyzed on four elements: innovation, communication channel, time and social system. This project is an extreme case as the PV systems and services were provided for free of charge. Even so, there are still some challenges to get acceptance for this sustainable form of energy.

  • 14.
    Sriwannawit, Pranpreya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Ngernmaneerat, Poonlarp
    Synthesis of charge-labelled peptide nucleic acids as a probe for determination of gene sequences2006In: Development and Promotion of Science and Technology Talents Project 50th Anniversary Conference, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, three PNA nonamers labeled with two charge tags were synthesized. These consisted of N-terminal N-methylmorpholinum-labeled, N-terminal arginine-labeled and C-terminal arginine-labeled PNAs. The PNAs consisted of alternate sequences of pyrrolidinyl thymine monomer and trans-(1S,2S)-2-aminocyclopentane carboxylic acid pentafluorophenyl ester spacer. Synthesis of the homothymine PNA nonamer (T9) was achieved by solid phase peptide synthesis methodology. Charge tags were attached to the PNA nonamers through amide bond.

    MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry revealed that Ac-Arg-T9-NH2, which has permanent positively charge tag, and Ac-Lys-T9-NH2, which has none, could be detected at amounts down to 6.1×10-2 fmol and 4.9 fmol respectively. This means that the sensitivity difference of both PNAs is 80 times since Ac-Arg-T9-NH2 can be protonated much easier than Ac-Lys-T9-NH2. The positive charge increases amount of ions which can be detected by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

  • 15.
    Sriwannawit, Pranpreya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Sandström, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.). Orebro University, Sweden.
    Large-scale bibliometric review of diffusion research2015In: Scientometrics, ISSN 0138-9130, E-ISSN 1588-2861, Vol. 102, no 2, p. 1615-1645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the fact that diffusion research has existed for more than a century, a quantitative review covering this subject in a broad and general context is still lacking. This article reviews diffusion research by providing an extensive bibliometric and clustering analysis. In total, we identified thirteen clusters comprising 6,811 publications over the period of 2002–2011, and thereby describe the characteristics of diffusion research in an extensive and general way based on quantitative bibliometric methods. The analysis reveals that diffusion research is highly interdisciplinary in character, involving several disciplines from ethnology to economics, with many overlapping research trails. The concluding section indicates that diffusion research seems to be data driven and relies heavily on solely empirical studies. Consequently, influential publications rely on empirical data that support and change theories in modest ways only. In this contribution, we propose a review method that produces a fairly good overview of the research area and which can be applied to any knowledge field to replace or complement the traditional literature review.

  • 16.
    Sriwannawit, Pranpreya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Sandström, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Patterns of diffusion research in emerging and advanced economies2013In: International Conference on Management of Technology (IAMOT), 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Sriwannawit, Pranpreya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Sandström, Ulf
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics.
    Review of Diffusion Research2013Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the fact that diffusion research has existed for more than one century, there is no quantitative review study that covers this subject in a broad and general context. This article reviews diffusion research by providing an extensive bibliometric and clustering analysis. We identify research trails and explain the characteristics of diffusion research using new methods. We contribute a methodology for the use of advanced mapping and clustering techniques in order to describe the research areas. This method produces a fairly good overview of diffusion research and can be applied to any knowledge field to replace or complement the traditional literature review.

1 - 17 of 17
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf