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  • 1.
    Ahmadian, Afshin
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Russom, Aman
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Andersson, Helene
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    SNP analysis by allele-specific extension in a micromachined filter chamber2002In: BioTechniques, ISSN 0736-6205, Vol. 32, no 4, 748-754 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Bernander, R.
    Department of Molecular Evolution, Evolutionary Biology Center, Uppsala University.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Dual-genome primer design for construction of DNA microarrays2005In: Bioinformatics, ISSN 1367-4803, E-ISSN 1460-2059, Vol. 21, no 3, 325-332 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Motivation: Microarray experiments using probes covering a whole transcriptome are expensive to initiate, and a major part of the costs derives from synthesizing gene-specific PCR primers or hybridization probes. The high costs may force researchers to limit their studies to a single organism, although comparing gene expression in different species would yield valuable information. Results: We have developed a method, implemented in the software DualPrime, that reduces the number of primers required to amplify the genes of two different genomes. The software identifies regions of high sequence similarity, and from these regions selects PCR primers shared between the genomes, such that either one or, preferentially, both primers in a given PCR can be used for amplification from both genomes. To assure high microarray probe specificity, the software selects primer pairs that generate products of low sequence similarity to other genes within the same genome. We used the software to design PCR primers for 2182 and 1960 genes from the hyperthermophilic archaea Sulfolobus solfataricus and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, respectively. Primer pairs were shared among 705 pairs of genes, and single primers were shared among 1184 pairs of genes, resulting in a saving of 31% compared to using only unique primers. We also present an alternative primer design method, in which each gene shares primers with two different genes of the other genome, enabling further savings.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Keskitalo, J.
    Sjödin, A.
    Bhalerao, Rupali
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Sterky, Fredrik
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Wissel, K.
    Tandre, K.
    Aspeborg, Henrik
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Moyle, R.
    Ohmiya, Y.
    Brunner, A.
    Gustafsson, P.
    Karlsson, J.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Nilsson, O.
    Sandberg, G.
    Strauss, S.
    Sundberg, B.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Jansson, S.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    A transcriptional timetable of autumn senescence2004In: Genome Biology, ISSN 1465-6906, E-ISSN 1465-6914, Vol. 5, no 4, R24- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: We have developed genomic tools to allow the genus Populus ( aspens and cottonwoods) to be exploited as a full-featured model for investigating fundamental aspects of tree biology. We have undertaken large-scale expressed sequence tag ( EST) sequencing programs and created Populus microarrays with significant gene coverage. One of the important aspects of plant biology that cannot be studied in annual plants is the gene activity involved in the induction of autumn leaf senescence. Results: On the basis of 36,354 Populus ESTs, obtained from seven cDNA libraries, we have created a DNA microarray consisting of 13,490 clones, spotted in duplicate. Of these clones, 12,376 (92%) were confirmed by resequencing and all sequences were annotated and functionally classified. Here we have used the microarray to study transcript abundance in leaves of a free-growing aspen tree ( Populus tremula) in northern Sweden during natural autumn senescence. Of the 13,490 spotted clones, 3,792 represented genes with significant expression in all leaf samples from the seven studied dates. Conclusions: We observed a major shift in gene expression, coinciding with massive chlorophyll degradation, that reflected a shift from photosynthetic competence to energy generation by mitochondrial respiration, oxidation of fatty acids and nutrient mobilization. Autumn senescence had much in common with senescence in annual plants; for example many proteases were induced. We also found evidence for increased transcriptional activity before the appearance of visible signs of senescence, presumably preparing the leaf for degradation of its components.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Lundgren, Magnus
    Department of Molecular Evolution, Evolutionary Biology Center, Uppsala University.
    Eriksson, Stefan
    Department of Molecular Evolution, Evolutionary Biology Center, Uppsala University.
    Rosenlund, Magnus
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mathematics (Dept.).
    Bernander, Rolf
    Department of Molecular Evolution, Evolutionary Biology Center, Uppsala University.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Global analysis of mRNA stability in the archaeon Sulfolobus2006In: Genome Biology, ISSN 1465-6906, E-ISSN 1465-6914, Vol. 7, no 10, R99- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Transcript half-lives differ between organisms, and between groups of genes within the same organism. The mechanisms underlying these differences are not clear, nor are the biochemical properties that determine the stability of a transcript. To address these issues, genome-wide mRNA decay studies have been conducted in eukaryotes and bacteria. In contrast, relatively little is known about RNA stability in the third domain of life, Archaea. Here, we present a microarray-based analysis of mRNA half-lives in the hyperthermophilic crenarchaea Sulfolobus solfataricus and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, constituting the first genome-wide study of RNA decay in archaea. Results: The two transcriptomes displayed similar half-life distributions, with medians of about five minutes. Growth-related genes, such as those involved in transcription, translation and energy production, were over-represented among unstable transcripts, whereas uncharacterized genes were over-represented among the most stable. Half-life was negatively correlated with transcript abundance and, unlike the situation in other organisms, also negatively correlated with transcript length. Conclusion: The mRNA half-life distribution of Sulfolobus species is similar to those of much faster growing bacteria, contrasting with the earlier observation that median mRNA half-life is proportional to the minimal length of the cell cycle. Instead, short half-lives may be a general feature of prokaryotic transcriptomes, possibly related to the absence of a nucleus and/or more limited post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. The pattern of growth-related transcripts being among the least stable in Sulfolobus may also indicate that the short half-lives reflect a necessity to rapidly reprogram gene expression upon sudden changes in environmental conditions.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Anders
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Pelve, Erik A.
    Lindeberg, Stefan
    Lundgren, Magnus
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Bernander, Rolf
    Replication-biased genome organisation in the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus2010In: BMC Genomics, ISSN 1471-2164, Vol. 11, 454- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Species of the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus harbour three replication origins in their single circular chromosome that are synchronously initiated during replication. Results: We demonstrate that global gene expression in two Sulfolobus species is highly biased, such that early replicating genome regions are more highly expressed at all three origins. The bias by far exceeds what would be anticipated by gene dosage effects alone. In addition, early replicating regions are denser in archaeal core genes (enriched in essential functions), display lower intergenic distances, and are devoid of mobile genetic elements. Conclusion: The strong replication-biased structuring of the Sulfolobus chromosome implies that the multiple replication origins serve purposes other than simply shortening the time required for replication. The higher-level chromosomal organisation could be of importance for minimizing the impact of DNA damage, and may also be linked to transcriptional regulation.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Helene
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    van der Wijngaart, Wouter
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Enoksson, P.
    Stemme, Göran
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Signals, Sensors and Systems.
    A valve-less diffuser micropump for microfluidic analytical systems2001In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, Vol. 72, no 3, 259-265 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The suitability of valve-less micropumps in biochemistry has been shown. Fluids encountered in various biochemical methods that are problematic for other micropumps have been pumped with good performance. The pump is fabricated as a silicon-glass stack with a new process involving three subsequent deep reactive ion etching steps. Some of the main advantages of the valve-less diffuser pump are the absence of moving parts (excluding the pump diaphragm), the uncomplicated planar design, and high pump performance in terms of pressure head and flow rare. In addition, the micropump is self-priming and insensitive to particles and bubbles present in the pumped media. The results show that the valve-less micropump successfully pumps fluids within the viscosity range of 0.001-0.9 N s/m(2). The micropump is not sensitive to the density, ionic strength, or pH of the pumped media. Effective pumping of solutions containing beads of different sizes was also demonstrated. Living cells were pumped without inducing cell damage and no cell adhesion within the pump chamber was found. No valve-less micropump has previously been reported to pump such a wide variety of fluids.

  • 7. Andersson, T.
    et al.
    Unneberg, P.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Odeberg, Jacob
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Quackenbush, J.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Monitoring of representational difference analysis subtraction procedures by global microarrays2002In: BioTechniques, ISSN 0736-6205, Vol. 32, no 6, 1348-+ p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Various approaches to the study of differential gene expression are applied to compare cell lines and tissue samples in a wide range of biological contexts. The compromise between focusing on only the important genes in certain cellular processes and achieving a complete picture is critical for the selection of strategy. We demonstrate how global microarray technology can be used for the exploration of the differentially expressed genes extracted through representational difference analysis (RDA). The subtraction of ubiquitous gene fragments from the two samples was demonstrated using cDNA microarrays including more than 32 000 spotted, PCR-amplified human clones. Hybridizations indicated the expression of 9100 of the microarray elements in a macrophage/foam cell atherosclerosis model system, of which many were removed during the RDA process. The stepwise subtraction procedure was demonstrated to yield an efficient enrichment of gene fragments overrepresented in either sample (18% in the representations, 86% after the first subtraction, and 88% after the second subtraction), many of which were impossible to detect in the starting material. Interestingly, the method allowed for the observation of the differential expression of several members of the low-abundant nuclear receptor gene family. We also observed a certain background level in the difference products of nondifferentially expressed gene fragments, warranting a verification strategy for selected candidate genes. The differential expression of several genes was verified by real-time PCR.

  • 8. Andersson-Gunneras, S.
    et al.
    Mellerowicz, E. J.
    Love, J.
    Segerman, B.
    Ohmiya, Y.
    Coutinho, P. M.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Henrissat, B.
    Moritz, T.
    Sundberg, B.
    Biosynthesis of cellulose-enriched tension wood in Populus: global analysis of transcripts and metabolites identifies biochemical and developmental regulators in secondary wall biosynthesis2006In: The Plant Journal, ISSN 0960-7412, E-ISSN 1365-313X, Vol. 45, no 2, 144-165 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stems and branches of angiosperm trees form tension wood (TW) when exposed to a gravitational stimulus. One of the main characteristics of TW, which distinguishes it from normal wood, is the formation of fibers with a thick inner gelatinous cell wall layer mainly composed of crystalline cellulose. Hence TW is enriched in cellulose, and deficient in lignin and hemicelluloses. An expressed sequence tag library made from TW-forming tissues in Populus tremula (L.) x tremuloides (Michx.) and data from transcript profiling using microarray and metabolite analysis were obtained during TW formation in Populus tremula (L.) in two growing seasons. The data were examined with the aim of identifying the genes responsible for the change in carbon

  • 9. Arabi, A.
    et al.
    Ullah, K.
    Branca, R. M. M.
    Johansson, J.
    Bandarra, D.
    Haneklaus, M.
    Fu, J.
    Ariës, I.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Den Boer, M. L.
    Pokrovskaja, K.
    Grandér, D.
    Xiao, G.
    Rocha, S.
    Lehtiö, J.
    Sangfelt, O.
    Proteomic screen reveals Fbw7 as a modulator of the NF-kappa B pathway2012In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 3, 976- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fbw7 is a ubiquitin-ligase that targets several oncoproteins for proteolysis, but the full range of Fbw7 substrates is not known. Here we show that by performing quantitative proteomics combined with degron motif searches, we effectively screened for a more complete set of Fbw7 targets. We identify 89 putative Fbw7 substrates, including several disease-associated proteins. The transcription factor NF-κB2 (p100/p52) is one of the candidate Fbw7 substrates. We show that Fbw7 interacts with p100 via a conserved degron and that it promotes degradation of p100 in a GSK3 2 phosphorylation-dependent manner. Fbw7 inactivation increases p100 levels, which in the presence of NF-κB pathway stimuli, leads to increased p52 levels and activity. Accordingly, the apoptotic threshold can be increased by loss of Fbw7 in a p100-dependent manner. In conclusion, Fbw7-mediated destruction of p100 is a regulatory component restricting the response to NF-κB2 pathway stimulation.

  • 10. Arner, P.
    et al.
    Henjes, Frauke
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Darmanis, Spyros N.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Dahlman, I.
    Iresjö, B. -M
    Naredi, P.
    Agustsson, T.
    Lundholm, K.
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Rydén, M.
    Circulating Carnosine Dipeptidase 1 associates with weight loss and poor prognosis in gastrointestinal cancer2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 4, e0123566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cancer cachexia (CC) is linked to poor prognosis. Although the mechanisms promoting this condition are not known, several circulating proteins have been proposed to contribute. We analyzed the plasma proteome in cancer subjects in order to identify factors associated with cachexia. Design/Subjects: Plasma was obtained from a screening cohort of 59 patients, newly diagnosed with suspected gastrointestinal cancer, with (n = 32) or without (n = 27) cachexia. Samples were subjected to proteomic profiling using 760 antibodies (targeting 698 individual proteins) from the Human Protein Atlas project. The main findings were validated in a cohort of 93 patients with verified and advanced pancreas cancer. Results: Only six proteins displayed differential plasma levels in the screening cohort. Among these, Carnosine Dipeptidase 1 (CNDP1) was confirmed by sandwich immunoassay to be lower in CC (p = 0.008). In both cohorts, low CNDP1 levels were associated with markers of poor prognosis including weight loss, malnutrition, lipid breakdown, low circulating albumin/IGF1 levels and poor quality of life. Eleven of the subjects in the discovery cohort were finally diagnosed with non-malignant disease but omitting these subjects from the analyses did not have any major influence on the results. Conclusions: In gastrointestinal cancer, reduced plasma levels of CNDP1 associate with signs of catabolism and poor outcome. These results, together with recently published data demonstrating lower circulating CNDP1 in subjects with glioblastoma and metastatic prostate cancer, suggest that CNDP1 may constitute a marker of aggressive cancer and CC.

  • 11.
    Aspeborg, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Schrader, J.
    Coutinho, P. M.
    Stam, M.
    Kallas, A.
    Djerbi, S.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Denman, S.
    Amini, B.
    Sterky, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Master, E.
    Sandberg, G.
    Mellerowicz, E.
    Sundberg, B.
    Henrissat, B.
    Teeri, Tuula T.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience.
    Carbohydrate-active enzymes involved in the secondary cell wall biogenesis in hybrid aspen2005In: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 137, no 3, 983-997 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wood formation is a fundamental biological process with significant economic interest. While lignin biosynthesis is currently relatively well understood, the pathways leading to the synthesis of the key structural carbohydrates in wood fibers remain obscure. We have used a functional genomics approach to identify enzymes involved in carbohydrate biosynthesis and remodeling during xylem development in the hybrid aspen Populus tremula x tremuloides. Microarrays containing cDNA clones from different tissue-specific libraries were hybridized with probes obtained from narrow tissue sections prepared by cryosectioning of the developing xylem. Bioinformatic analyses using the sensitive tools developed for carbohydrate-active enzymes allowed the identification of 25 xylem-specific glycosyltransferases belonging to the Carbohydrate-Active EnZYme families GT2, GT8, GT14, GT31, GT43, GT47, and GT61 and nine glycosidases (or transglycosidases) belonging to the Carbohydrate-Active EnZYme families GH9, GH10, GH16, GH17, GH19, GH28, GH35, and GH51. While no genes encoding either polysaccharide lyases or carbohydrate esterases were found among the secondary wall-specific genes, one putative O-acetyltransferase was identified. These wood-specific enzyme genes constitute a valuable resource for future development of engineered fibers with improved performance in different applications.

  • 12. Asplund, A.
    et al.
    Bjorklund, M. Gry
    Sundquist, C.
    Stromberg, S.
    Edlund, K.
    Oestman, A.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Ponten, F.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Expression profiling of microdissected cell populations selected from basal cells in normal epidermis and basal cell carcinoma2008In: British Journal of Dermatology, ISSN 0007-0963, E-ISSN 1365-2133, Vol. 158, no 3, 527-538 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) are prevalent tumours with uniform histology that develop without any known precursor lesion. Alterations in the sonic hedgehog-patched1 signalling pathway are accepted as necessary events for tumorigenesis, and mutations in the patched1 gene are frequently present in tumours. Objectives To analyse transcript profiles in BCC. Methods We used laser-assisted microdissection to isolate and collect cell populations defined under the microscope. Peripheral cells from nests of BCC were selected to represent tumour cells, and normal keratinocytes from epidermis basal layer were used as control. Extracted RNA was amplified and hybridized on to a cDNA microarray. Results Our results show that BCC cells express a transcript signature that is significantly different from that of normal keratinocytes, and over 350 genes with various functions were identified as differentially expressed. The compiled data suggest an upregulation of the Wnt signalling pathway as a major event in BCC cells. Furthermore, tumour cells appear to have an increased sensitivity to oxygen radicals and dysregulated genes involved in antigen presentation. Results were validated at both the transcriptional level using real-time polymerase chain reaction and at the protein level using immunohistochemistry. Conclusions We show that microdissection in combination with robust strategies for RNA extraction, amplification and cDNA microarray analysis allow for reliable transcript profiling and that antibody-based proteomics provides an advantageous strategy for the analysis of corresponding differentially expressed proteins. We found that expression patterns were significantly altered in BCC cells compared with basal keratinocytes and that the Wnt signalling pathway was upregulated in tumour cells.

  • 13.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Birgersson, Elin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mezger, Anja
    Nilsson, Mats
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Multiplexed protein profiling by sequential affinity capture2016In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 16, no 8, 1251-1256 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibody microarrays enable parallelized and miniaturized analysis of clinical samples, and have proven to provide novel insights for the analysis of different proteomes. However, there are concerns that the performance of such direct labeling and single antibody assays are prone to off-target binding due to the sample context. To improve selectivity and sensitivity while maintaining the possibility to conduct multiplexed protein profiling, we developed a multiplexed and semi-automated sequential capture assay. This novel bead-based procedure encompasses a first antigen capture, labeling of captured protein targets on magnetic particles, combinatorial target elution and a read-out by a secondary capture bead array. We demonstrate in a proof-of-concept setting that target detection via two sequential affinity interactions reduced off-target contribution, while lowered background and noise levels, improved correlation to clinical values compared to single binder assays. We also compared sensitivity levels with single binder and classical sandwich assays, explored the possibility for DNA-based signal amplification, and demonstrate the applicability of the dual capture bead-based antibody microarray for biomarker analysis. Hence, the described concept enhances the possibilities for antibody array assays to be utilized for protein profiling in body fluids and beyond.

  • 14.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Chaouch, Amina
    Lochmüller, Hanns
    Politano, Luisa
    Bertini, Enrico
    Spitali, Pietro
    Hiller, Monika
    Niks, Eric H.
    Gualandi, Francesca
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Bushby, Kate
    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke
    Schwartz, Elena
    Le Priol, Yannick
    Straub, Volker
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Cirak, Sebahattin
    't Hoen, Peter A. C.
    Muntoni, Francesco
    Ferlini, Alessandra
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Szigyarto, Cristina Al-Khalili
    Affinity proteomics within rare diseases: a BIO-NMD study for blood biomarkers of muscular dystrophies2014In: EMBO Molecular Medicine, ISSN 1757-4676, E-ISSN 1757-4684, Vol. 6, no 7, 918-936 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the recent progress in the broad-scaled analysis of proteins in body fluids, there is still a lack in protein profiling approaches for biomarkers of rare diseases. Scarcity of samples is the main obstacle hindering attempts to apply discovery driven protein profiling in rare diseases. We addressed this challenge by combining samples collected within the BIO-NMD consortium from four geographically dispersed clinical sites to identify protein markers associated with muscular dystrophy using an antibody bead array platform with 384 antibodies. Based on concordance in statistical significance and confirmatory results obtained from analysis of both serum and plasma, we identified eleven proteins associated with muscular dystrophy, among which four proteins were elevated in blood from muscular dystrophy patients: carbonic anhydrase III (CA3) and myosin light chain 3 (MYL3), both specifically expressed in slow-twitch muscle fibers and mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase 2 (MDH2) and electron transfer flavo-protein A (ETFA). Using age-matched sub-cohorts, 9 protein profiles correlating with disease progression and severity were identified, which hold promise for the development of new clinical tools for management of dystrophinopathies.

  • 15.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Häggmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Khademi, M.
    Olsson, T.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Autoantibody profiling in multiple sclerosis using arrays of human protein fragments2013In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 12, no 9, 2657-2672 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Profiling the autoantibody repertoire with large antigen collections is emerging as a powerful tool for the identification of biomarkers for autoimmune diseases. Here, a systematic and undirected approach was taken to screen for profiles of IgG in human plasma from 90 individuals with multiple sclerosis related diagnoses. Reactivity pattern of 11,520 protein fragments (representing ̃38% of all human protein encoding genes) were generated on planar protein microarrays built within the Human Protein Atlas. For more than 2,000 antigens IgG reactivity was observed, among which 64% were found only in single individuals. We used reactivity distributions among multiple sclerosis subgroups to select 384 antigens, which were then reevaluated on planar microarrays, corroborated with suspension bead arrays in a larger cohort (n = 376) and confirmed for specificity in inhibition assays. Among the heterogeneous pattern within and across multiple sclerosis subtypes, differences in recognition frequencies were found for 51 antigens, which were enriched for proteins of transcriptional regulation. In conclusion, using protein fragments and complementary high-throughput protein array platforms facilitated an alternative route to discovery and verification of potentially disease-associated autoimmunity signatures, that are now proposed as additional antigens for large-scale validation studies across multiple sclerosis biobanks.

  • 16.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Häggmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Neiman, Maja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Igel, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Schwenk, Jochen
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Systematic antibody and antigen-based proteomic profiling with microarrays2011In: EXPERT REVIEW OF MOLECULAR DIAGNOSTICS, ISSN 1473-7159, Vol. 11, no 2, 219-234 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current approaches within affinity-based proteomics are driven both by the accessibility and availability of antigens and capture reagents, and by suitable multiplexed technologies onto which these are implemented. By combining planar microarrays and other multiparallel systems with sets of reagents, possibilities to discover new and unpredicted protein disease associations, either via directed hypothesis-driven or via undirected hypothesis-generating target selection, can be created. In the following stages, the discoveries made during these screening phases have to be verified for potential clinical relevance based on both technical and biological aspects. The use of affinity tools throughout discovery and verification has the potential to streamline the introduction of new markers, as transition into clinically required assay formats appears straightforward. In this article, we summarize some of the current building blocks within array-and affinity-based proteomic profiling with a focus on body fluids, by giving a perspective on how current and upcoming developments in this bioscience could enable a path of pursuit for biomarker discovery.

  • 17.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Kockum, Ingrid
    Olsson, Tomas
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Anoctamin 2 identified as an autoimmune target in multiple sclerosis2016In: Multiple Sclerosis, ISSN 1352-4585, E-ISSN 1477-0970, Vol. 22, 10-10 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mitsios, N.
    Khademi, M.
    Alfredsson, L.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mulder, J.
    Olsson, T.
    Schwenk, Jochen
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Anoctamin 2, a novel autoimmune target candidate in multiple sclerosis2014In: Multiple Sclerosis, ISSN 1352-4585, E-ISSN 1477-0970, Vol. 20, 49-50 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Antigen arrays for profiling autoantibody repertoires2016In: Bioanalysis, ISSN 1757-6180, E-ISSN 1757-6199, Vol. 8, no 10, 1105-1126 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autoantibodies are a key component for the diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of various diseases. In order to discover novel autoantibody targets, highly multiplexed assays based on antigen arrays hold a great potential and provide possibilities to analyze hundreds of body fluid samples for their reactivity pattern against thousands of antigens in parallel. Here, we provide an overview of the available technologies for producing antigen arrays, highlight some of the technical and methodological considerations and discuss their applications as discovery tools. Together with recent studies utilizing antigen arrays, we give an overview on how the different types of antigen arrays have and will continue to deliver novel insights into autoimmune diseases among several others.

  • 20.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sjöberg, Ronald
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    et al.,
    The calcium-activated chloride channel anoctamine 2 as an autoimmune component of multiple sclerosisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Bachmann, Julie
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Burte, Florence
    Pramana, Setia
    Conte, Ianina
    Brown, Biobele J.
    Orimadegun, Adebola E.
    Ajetunmobi, Wasiu A.
    Afolabi, Nathaniel K.
    Akinkunmi, Francis
    Omokhodion, Samuel
    Akinbami, Felix O.
    Shokunbi, Wuraola A.
    Kampf, Caroline
    Pawitan, Yudi
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sodeinde, Olugbemiro
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wahlgren, Mats
    Fernandez-Reyes, Delmiro
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Affinity Proteomics Reveals Elevated Muscle Proteins in Plasma of Children with Cerebral Malaria2014In: PLoS Pathogens, ISSN 1553-7366, E-ISSN 1553-7374, Vol. 10, no 4, e1004038- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic inflammation and sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes are central processes in the pathophysiology of severe Plasmodium falciparum childhood malaria. However, it is still not understood why some children are more at risks to develop malaria complications than others. To identify human proteins in plasma related to childhood malaria syndromes, multiplex antibody suspension bead arrays were employed. Out of the 1,015 proteins analyzed in plasma from more than 700 children, 41 differed between malaria infected children and community controls, whereas 13 discriminated uncomplicated malaria from severe malaria syndromes. Markers of oxidative stress were found related to severe malaria anemia while markers of endothelial activation, platelet adhesion and muscular damage were identified in relation to children with cerebral malaria. These findings suggest the presence of generalized vascular inflammation, vascular wall modulations, activation of endothelium and unbalanced glucose metabolism in severe malaria. The increased levels of specific muscle proteins in plasma implicate potential muscle damage and microvasculature lesions during the course of cerebral malaria.

  • 22.
    Berglund, Lisa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Björling, Erik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Gry, Marcus
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Asplund, Anna
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck laboratory.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Persson, Anja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Ottoson, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Wernérus, Henrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Sivertsson, Åsa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Wester, Kenneth
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck laboratory.
    Kampf, Caroline
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck laboratory.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Uppsala Univ, Rudbeck laboratory.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Generation of validated antibodies towards the human proteomeArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we show the results from a large effort to generate antibodies towards the human proteome. A high-throughput strategy was developed based on cloning and expression of antigens as recombitant protein epitope signature tags (PrESTs) Affinity purified polyclonal antibodies were generated, followed by validation by protein microarrays, Western blotting and microarray-based immunohistochemistry. PrESTs were selected based on sequence uniqueness relative the proteome and a bioinformatics analysis showed that unique antigens can be found for at least 85% of the proteome using this general strategy. The success rate from antigen selection to validated antibodies was 31%, and from protein to antibody 55%. Interestingly, membrane-bound and soluble proteins performed equally and PrEST lengths between 75 and 125 amino acids were found to give the highest yield of validated antibodies. Multiple antigens were selected for many genes and the results suggest that specific antibodies can be systematically generated to most human proteibs.

  • 23.
    Berglund, Lisa
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Björling, Erik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Oksvold, Per
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Fagerberg, Linn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, Cristina
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Persson, Anja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Ottosson, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Wernérus, Henrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Sivertsson, Åsa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    et al.,
    A genecentric human protein atlas for expression profiles based on antibodies2008In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, Vol. 7, no 10, 2019-2027 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An attractive path forward in proteomics is to experimentally annotate the human protein complement of the genome in a genecentric manner. Using antibodies, it might be possible to design protein-specific probes for a representative protein from every protein-coding gene and to subsequently use the antibodies for systematical analysis of cellular distribution and subcellular localization of proteins in normal and disease tissues. A new version (4.0) of the Human Protein Atlas has been developed in a genecentric manner with the inclusion of all human genes and splice variants predicted from genome efforts together with a visualization of each protein with characteristics such as predicted membrane regions, signal peptide, and protein domains and new plots showing the uniqueness (sequence similarity) of every fraction of each protein toward all other human proteins. The new version is based on tissue profiles generated from 6120 antibodies with more than five million immunohistochemistry-based images covering 5067 human genes, corresponding to similar to 25% of the human genome. Version 4.0 includes a putative list of members in various protein classes, both functional classes, such as kinases, transcription factors, G-protein-coupled receptors, etc., and project-related classes, such as candidate genes for cancer or cardiovascular diseases. The exact antigen sequence for the internally generated antibodies has also been released together with a visualization of the application-specific validation performed for each antibody, including a protein array assay, Western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry, and, for a large fraction, immunofluorescence-based confocal microscopy. New search functionalities have been added to allow complex queries regarding protein expression profiles, protein classes, and chromosome location. The new version of the protein atlas thus is a resource for many areas of biomedical research, including protein science and biomarker discovery.

  • 24. Bergström, Jonas P.
    et al.
    Gry, Marcus
    Lengqvist, Johan
    Lindberg, Johan
    Schwenk, Jochen
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Drobin, Kimi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Watkins, Paul B.
    Schuppe Koistinen, Ina
    Novel DILI biomarkers for prediction of acetaminophen-induced human hepatotoxicity2012In: Toxicology Letters, ISSN 0378-4274, E-ISSN 1879-3169, Vol. 211, S76-S76 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25. Birse, Kenzie D.
    et al.
    Romas, Laura M.
    Guthrie, Brandon L.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Bosire, Rose
    Kiarie, James
    Farquhar, Carey
    Broliden, Kristina
    Burgener, Adam D.
    Genital Injury Signatures and Microbiome Alterations Associated With Depot Medroxyprogesterone Acetate Usage and Intravaginal Drying Practices2017In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0022-1899, E-ISSN 1537-6613, Vol. 215, no 4, 590-598 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Increasing evidence suggests depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and intravaginal practices may be associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection risk; however, the mechanisms are not fully understood. This study evaluated the effect of DMPA and intravaginal practices on the genital proteome and microbiome to gain mechanistic insights. Methods. Cervicovaginal secretions from 86 Kenyan women, including self-reported DMPA users (n = 23), nonhormonal contraceptive users (n = 63), and women who practice vaginal drying (n = 46), were analyzed using tandem-mass spectrometry. Results. We identified 473 human and 486 bacterial proteins from 18 different genera. Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate use associated with increased hemoglobin and immune activation (HBD, HBB, IL36G), and decreased epithelial repair proteins (TFF3, F11R). Vaginal drying associated with increased hemoglobin and decreased phagocytosis factors (AZU1, MYH9, PLAUR). Injury signatures were exacerbated in DMPA users who also practiced vaginal drying. More diverse (H index: 0.71 vs 0.45; P =.009) bacterial communities containing Gardnerella vaginalis associated with vaginal drying, whereas DMPA showed no significant association with community composition or diversity. Conclusions. These findings provide new insights into the impact of DMPA and vaginal drying on mucosal barriers. Future investigations are needed to confirm their relationship with HIV risk in women.

  • 26. Brouns, Stan J. J.
    et al.
    Walther, Jasper
    Snijders, Ambrosius P. L.
    de Werken, Harmen J. G. van
    Willemen, Hanneke L. D. M.
    Worm, Petra
    de Vos, Marjon G. J.
    Andersson, Anders
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
    Lundgren, Magnus
    Mazon, Hortense F. M.
    van den Heuvel, Robert H. H.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Salmon, Laurent
    de Vos, Willem M.
    Wright, Phillip C.
    Bernander, Rolf
    van der Oost, John
    Identification of the missing links in prokaryotic pentose oxidation pathways - Evidence for enzyme recruitment2006In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 281, no 37, 27378-27388 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pentose metabolism of Archaea is largely unknown. Here, we have employed an integrated genomics approach including DNA microarray and proteomics analyses to elucidate the catabolic pathway for D-arabinose in Sulfolobus solfataricus. During growth on this sugar, a small set of genes appeared to be differentially expressed compared with growth on D-glucose. These genes were heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant proteins were purified and biochemically studied. This showed that D-arabinose is oxidized to 2-oxoglutarate by the consecutive action of a number of previously uncharacterized enzymes, including a D-arabinose dehydrogenase, a D-arabinonate dehydratase, a novel 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-arabinonate dehydratase, and a 2,5-dioxopentanoate dehydrogenase. Promoter analysis of these genes revealed a palindromic sequence upstream of the TATA box, which is likely to be involved in their concerted transcriptional control. Integration of the obtained biochemical data with genomic context analysis strongly suggests the occurrence of pentose oxidation pathways in both Archaea and Bacteria, and predicts the involvement of additional enzyme components. Moreover, it revealed striking genetic similarities between the catabolic pathways for pentoses, hexaric acids, and hydroxyproline degradation, which support the theory of metabolic pathway genesis by enzyme recruitment.

  • 27. Buus, S.
    et al.
    Rockberg, Johan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Forsström, Björn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schafer-Nielsen, C.
    High-resolution mapping of linear antibody epitopes using ultrahigh-density peptide microarrays2012In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 11, no 12, 1790-1800 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibodies empower numerous important scientific, clinical, diagnostic, and industrial applications. Ideally, the epitope(s) targeted by an antibody should be identified and characterized, thereby establishing antibody reactivity, highlighting possible cross-reactivities, and perhaps even warning against unwanted (e.g. autoimmune) reactivities. Antibodies target proteins as either conformational or linear epitopes. The latter are typically probed with peptides, but the cost of peptide screening programs tends to prohibit comprehensive specificity analysis. To perform high-throughput, high-resolution mapping of linear antibody epitopes, we have used ultrahigh-density peptide microarrays generating several hundred thousand different peptides per array. Using exhaustive length and substitution analysis, we have successfully examined the specificity of a panel of polyclonal antibodies raised against linear epitopes of the human proteome and obtained very detailed descriptions of the involved specificities. The epitopes identified ranged from 4 to 12 amino acids in size. In general, the antibodies were of exquisite specificity, frequently disallowing even single conservative substitutions. In several cases, multiple distinct epitopes could be identified for the same target protein, suggesting an efficient approach to the generation of paired antibodies. Two alternative epitope mapping approaches identified similar, although not necessarily identical, epitopes. These results show that ultrahigh-density peptide microarrays can be used for linear epitope mapping. With an upper theoretical limit of 2,000,000 individual peptides per array, these peptide microarrays may even be used for a systematic validation of antibodies at the proteomic level.

  • 28.
    Byström, Sanna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Häggmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hong, Mun-Gwan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Drobin, Kim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Forsström, Björn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fredolini, Claudia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    et al.,
    Affinity Proteomic Profiling of Plasma, Cerebrospinal Fluid, and Brain Tissue within Multiple Sclerosis2014In: Journal of Proteome Research, ISSN 1535-3893, E-ISSN 1535-3907, Vol. 13, no 11, 4607-4619 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The brain is a vital organ and because it is well shielded from the outside environment, possibilities for noninvasive analysis are often limited. Instead, fluids taken from the spinal cord or circulatory system are preferred sources for the discovery of candidate markers within neurological diseases. In the context of multiple sclerosis (MS), we applied an affinity proteomic strategy and screened 22 plasma samples with 4595 antibodies (3450 genes) on bead arrays, then defined 375 antibodies (334 genes) for targeted analysis in a set of 172 samples and finally used 101 antibodies (43 genes) on 443 plasma as well as 573 cerebrospinal spinal fluid (CSF) samples. This revealed alteration of protein profiles in relation to MS subtypes for IRF8, IL7, METTL14, SLC30A7, and GAP43. Respective antibodies were subsequently used for immunofluorescence on human post-mortem brain tissue with MS pathology for expression and association analysis. There, antibodies for IRF8, IL7, and METTL14 stained neurons in proximity of lesions, which highlighted these candidate protein targets for further studies within MS and brain tissue. The affinity proteomic translation of profiles discovered by profiling human body fluids and tissue provides a powerful strategy to suggest additional candidates to studies of neurological disorders.

  • 29. Catharina, Johansson
    et al.
    Maria, Mikus
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Nathalie, Acevedo
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Annika, Scheynius
    Profiling the autoantibody repertoire in atopic dermatitis identifies four associated autoantigens2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 86, no 4, 322-322 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30. Checa, A.
    et al.
    Idborg, H.
    Zandian, Arash
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Sar, D. Garcia
    Surowiec, I.
    Trygg, J.
    Svenungsson, E.
    Jakobsson, P-J
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Gunnarsson, I.
    Wheelock, C. E.
    Dysregulations in circulating sphingolipids associate with disease activity indices in female patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a cross-sectional study2017In: Lupus, ISSN 0961-2033, E-ISSN 1477-0962, Vol. 26, no 10, 1023-1033 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the association of clinical and renal disease activity with circulating sphingolipids in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods We used liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to measure the levels of 27 sphingolipids in plasma from 107 female systemic lupus erythematosus patients and 23 controls selected using a design of experiment approach. We investigated the associations between sphingolipids and two disease activity indices, the Systemic Lupus Activity Measurement and the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index. Damage was scored according to the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics damage index. Renal activity was evaluated with the British Island Lupus Activity Group index. The effects of immunosuppressive treatment on sphingolipid levels were evaluated before and after treatment in 22 female systemic lupus erythematosus patients with active disease. Results Circulating sphingolipids from the ceramide and hexosylceramide families were increased, and sphingoid bases were decreased, in systemic lupus erythematosus patients compared to controls. The ratio of C-16:0-ceramide to sphingosine-1-phosphate was the best discriminator between patients and controls, with an area under the receiver-operating curve of 0.77. The C-16:0-ceramide to sphingosine-1-phosphate ratio was associated with ongoing disease activity according to the Systemic Lupus Activity Measurement and the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index, but not with accumulated damage according to the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics Damage Index. Levels of C-16:0- and C-24:1-hexosylceramides were able to discriminate patients with current versus inactive/no renal involvement. All dysregulated sphingolipids were normalized after immunosuppressive treatment. Conclusion We provide evidence that sphingolipids are dysregulated in systemic lupus erythematosus and associated with disease activity. This study demonstrates the utility of simultaneously targeting multiple components of a pathway to establish disease associations.

  • 31. Ch'ng, Jun-Hong
    et al.
    Sirel, Madle
    Zandian, Arash
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Quintana, Maria del Pilar
    Chan, Sherwin Chun Leung
    Moll, Kirsten
    Tellgren-Roth, Asa
    Nilsson, IngMarie
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Qundos, Ulrika
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Wahlgren, Mats
    Epitopes of anti-RIFIN antibodies and characterization of rif-expressing Plasmodium falciparum parasites by RNA sequencing2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, 43190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Variable surface antigens of Plasmodium falciparum have been a major research focus since they facilitate parasite sequestration and give rise to deadly malaria complications. Coupled with its potential use as a vaccine candidate, the recent suggestion that the repetitive interspersed families of polypeptides (RIFINs) mediate blood group A rosetting and influence blood group distribution has raised the research profile of these adhesins. Nevertheless, detailed investigations into the functions of this highly diverse multigene family remain hampered by the limited number of validated reagents. In this study, we assess the specificities of three promising polyclonal anti-RIFIN antibodies that were IgG-purified from sera of immunized animals. Their epitope regions were mapped using a 175,000-peptide microarray holding overlapping peptides of the P. falciparum variable surface antigens. Through immunoblotting and immunofluorescence imaging, we show that different antibodies give varying results in different applications/assays. Finally, we authenticate the antibody-based detection of RIFINs in two previously uncharacterized non-rosetting parasite lines by identifying the dominant rif transcripts using RNA sequencing.

  • 32. Colwill, Karen
    et al.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Sundberg, Mårten
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Sjöberg, Ronald
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Sivertsson, Åsa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Schwenk, Jochen M
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Ottosson Takanen, Jenny
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Gräslund, Susanne
    et, al.
    A roadmap to generate renewable protein binders to the human proteome2011In: Nature Methods, ISSN 1548-7091, E-ISSN 1548-7105, Vol. 8, no 7, 551-8 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the wealth of commercially available antibodies to human proteins, research is often hindered by their inconsistent validation, their poor performance and the inadequate coverage of the proteome. These issues could be addressed by systematic, genome-wide efforts to generate and validate renewable protein binders. We report a multicenter study to assess the potential of hybridoma and phage-display technologies in a coordinated large-scale antibody generation and validation effort. We produced over 1,000 antibodies targeting 20 SH2 domain proteins and evaluated them for potency and specificity by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), protein microarray and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). We also tested selected antibodies in immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays. Our results show that high-affinity, high-specificity renewable antibodies generated by different technologies can be produced quickly and efficiently. We believe that this work serves as a foundation and template for future larger-scale studies to create renewable protein binders.

  • 33. Darmanis, Spyros
    et al.
    Cui, Tao
    Drobin, Kimi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Li, Su-Chen
    Öberg, Kjell
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Giandomenico, Valeria
    Identification of Candidate Serum Proteins for Classifying Well-Differentiated Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 11, e81712- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients with well-differentiated small intestine neuroendocrine tumors (WD-SI-NETs) are most often diagnosed at a metastatic stage of disease, which reduces possibilities for a curative treatment. Thus new approaches for earlier detection and improved monitoring of the disease are required. Materials and Methods: Suspension bead arrays targeting 124 unique proteins with antibodies from the Human Protein Atlas were used to profile biotinylated serum samples. Discoveries from a cohort of 77 individuals were followed up in a cohort of 132 individuals both including healthy controls as well as patients with untreated primary WD-SI-NETs, lymph node metastases and liver metastases. Results: A set of 20 antibodies suggested promising proteins for further verification based on technically verified statistical significance. Proceeding, we assessed the classification performance in an independent cohort of patient serum, achieving, classification accuracy of up to 85% with different subsets of antibodies in respective pairwise group comparisons. The protein profiles of nine targets, namely IGFBP2, IGF1, SHKBP1, ETS1, IL1 alpha, STX2, MAML3, EGR3 and XIAP were verified as significant contributors to tumor classification. Conclusions: We propose new potential protein biomarker candidates for classifying WD-SI-NETs at different stage of disease. Further evaluation of these proteins in larger sample sets and with alternative approaches is needed in order to further improve our understanding of their functional relation to WD-SI-NETs and their eventual use in diagnostics.

  • 34.
    Dezfouli, Mahya
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Vickovic, Sanja
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Iglesias, Maria Jesus
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ahmadian, Afshin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Magnetic bead assisted labeling of antibodies at nanogram scale2014In: Proteomics, ISSN 1615-9853, E-ISSN 1615-9861, Vol. 14, no 1, 14-18 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are currently several initiatives that aim to produce binding reagents for proteome-wide analysis. To enable protein detection, visualization, and target quantification, covalent coupling of reporter molecules to antibodies is essential. However, current labeling protocols recommend considerable amount of antibodies, require antibody purity and are not designed for automation. Given that small amounts of antibodies are often sufficient for downstream analysis, we developed a labeling protocol that combines purification and modification of antibodies at submicrogram quantities. With the support of magnetic microspheres, automated labeling of antibodies in parallel using biotin or fluorescent dyes was achieved.

  • 35.
    Djerbi, Soraya
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Aspeborg, Henrik
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Blomqvist, Kristina
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Teeri, Tuula
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Identification and expression analysis of genes encoding putative cellulose synthases (CesA) in the hybrid aspen, Populus tremula (L.) × P. tremuloides (Michx.)2004In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 11, no 3-4, 301-312 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose is synthesized in plant cell walls by large membrane-bound protein complexes proposed to contain several copies of the catalytic subunit of the cellulose synthase, CesA. Here we report identification of 10 distinct CesA genes within a database of 100,000 ESTs of the hybrid aspen, Populus tremula (L.) x P. tremuloides (Michx.). Expression analyses in normal wood undergoing xylogenesis and in tension wood indicate xylem specific expression of four putative CesA isoenzymes, PttCesA1, PttCesA3-1, PttCesA3-2 and PttCesA9. Both the protein sequences and the expression profiles of PttCesA3-1 and PttCesA3-2 are very similar, and they may thus represent redundant copies of an enzyme with essentially the same function. Further, one of the generally more constitutively expressed CesA genes, PttCesA2, seems to be activated on the opposite side of a tension wood induced stem, while PttCesA6 appears to be more specific for leaf tissues. The rest of the hybrid aspen CesA genes were found to be relatively evenly expressed over the poplar tissues hereby studied.

  • 36.
    Drobin, Kimi
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Highly multiplexed antibody suspension bead arrays for plasma protein profiling2013In: Methods in Molecular Biology, ISSN 1064-3745, E-ISSN 1940-6029, Vol. 1023, 137-145 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alongside the increasing availability of affinity reagents, antibody microarrays have become a powerful tool to screen for target proteins in complex samples. Applying directly labeled samples onto arrays instead of using sandwich assays offers an approach to facilitate a systematic, high-throughput, and flexible exploration of protein profiles in body fluids such as serum or plasma. As an alternative to planar arrays, a system based on color-coded beads for the creation of antibody arrays in suspension has become available to offer a microtiter plate-based option for screening larger number of samples with variable sets of capture reagents. A procedure was established for analyzing biotinylated samples without the necessity to remove excess labeling substance. We have shown that this assay system allows detecting proteins down into lower pico-molar and higher pg/ml levels with dynamic ranges over three orders of magnitude. Presently, this workflow enables the profiling of 384 samples for up to 384 proteins per assay.

  • 37.
    Edfors, Fredrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Forsström, Björn
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fredolini, Claudia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Boström, Tove
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. Atlas Antibodies AB.
    Maddalo, Gianluca
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Svensson, Anne-Sophie
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Tegel, Hanna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Jochen, Schwenk
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Centres, Albanova VinnExcellence Center for Protein Technology, ProNova. Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    A recombinant protein standard resource for targeted proteomicsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Here, we have used a resource of 26,000 recombinant protein fragments to create custom libraries of standards for targeted proteomics based on parallel reaction monitoring (PRM). The recombinant fragments can be produced in a bacterial cell factory to generate heavy isotope labeled standards for absolute quantification of the corresponding protein targets and be used to produce high- quality spectral libraries. Altogether, coordinates for 25,684 unique proteotypic peptide assays have been experimentally defined covering 10,163 human proteins. The protocol allows for precise monitoring of digestion kinetics and thus enables to select peptides that behave quantitative during the sample preparation process. We show that the quantification tag of each recombinant protein fragment can be used for accurate retention time prediction and allows for assay standardization across different method parameters. The use of this resource was illustrated by determining the absolute concentrations of selected protein targets using multiplex targeted proteomics assays for determination of quantitative assessment of 49 protein targets in serum samples. 

  • 38.
    Edlundh-Rose, Esther
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Kupershmidt, Ilya
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Gustafsson, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Gene expression analysis of human epidermal keratinocytes after N-acetyl L-cysteine treatment demonstrates cell cycle arrest and increased differentiation2005In: Pathobiology (Basel), ISSN 1015-2008, E-ISSN 1423-0291, Vol. 72, no 4, 203-212 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Several cancer prevention programmes have previously been executed using treatment of antioxidant compounds. The antioxidant N-acetyl L-cysteine (NAC), a membrane-permeable aminothiol, is a sulfhydryl reductant reducing oxidised glutathione, as well as being a precursor of intracellular cysteine and glutathione. A previous report based on the cellular response to NAC treatment showed that NAC induced a 10-fold more rapid differentiation in normal primary keratinocytes as well as a reversion of a colon carcinoma cell line from neoplastic proliferation to apical-basolateral differentiation. In order to investigate molecular events underlying the changes in proliferation and differentiation induced by NAC treatment, we performed global gene expression analysis of normal human epidermal keratinocytes in a time series. Methods: Treated samples were compared to untreated samples through a reference design using a spotted cDNA array comprising approximately 30,000 features. B statistics was used to identify differentially expressed genes, and RT-PCR of a selected set of genes was performed to verify differential expression. Results: The number of differentially expressed genes increased over time, starting with 0 at 30 min, 73 at 3 h and increasing to 952 genes at 48 h. Results of the expression analysis showed arrest of the cell cycle and an upregulation of cytoskeletal reorganisation, implicating increased differentiation. A comparison to gene ontology groups indicated downregulation of a large number of genes involved in cell proliferation and regulation of the cell cycle. Conclusions: A significant fraction of the differentially expressed genes could be classified according to their role in the differentiation process, demonstrating that NAC regulates the conversion from proliferation to differentiation at a transcriptional level.

  • 39. Ehn, M.
    et al.
    Ahmadian, Afshin
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA-binding a molecular tool for improved sequence protein quality in pyrosequencing2002In: Electrophoresis, ISSN 0173-0835, E-ISSN 1522-2683, Vol. 23, no 19, 3289-3299 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pyrosequencing is a four-enzyme bioluminometric DNA sequencing technique based on a DNA sequencing by synthesis principle. Currently, the technique is limited to analysis of short DNA sequences exemplified by single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis. In order to expand the field for pyrosequencing, the read length needs to be improved and efforts have been made to purify reaction components as well as add single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB) to the pyrosequencing reaction. In this study, we have performed a systematic effort to analyze the effects of SSB by comparing the pyrosequencing result of 103 independent complementary DNA (cDNA) clones. More detailed information about the cause of low quality sequences on templates with different characteristics was achieved by thorough analysis of the pyrograms. Also, real-time biosensor analysis was performed on individual cDNA clones for investigation of primer annealing and SSB binding on these templates. Results from these studies indicate that templates with high performance in pyrosequencing without SSB possess efficient primer annealing and low SSB affinity. Alternative strategies to improve the performance in pyrosequencing by increasing the primer-annealing efficiency have also been evaluated.

  • 40. Ehn, M.
    et al.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Biotechnology.
    Overexpression, rapid isolation, and biochemical characterization of Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA-binding protein2001In: Protein Expression and Purification, ISSN 1046-5928, E-ISSN 1096-0279, Vol. 22, no 1, 120-127 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) single-stranded binding protein (SSB) is a valuable protein for various biotechnical applications, such as PCR and DNA sequencing, Here we describe an efficient expression and purification scheme where the tendency of SSB to aggregate at low salt concentration and high protein concentration is avoided. The method contains fewer steps of purification and results in high protein yield, compared to previous published protocols. In our protocol, cells are harvested after cultivation overnight and SSB is isolated by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by anion-exchange chromatography. The yield from a 2-liter fed-batch fermenter is 2 g protein, which is higher than all production methods for SSB earlier reported, Moreover, the two classical isolation steps combined in the purification scheme are robust, cost-efficient, and suitable for scaling up. The resulting SSB is pure and a correctly folded tetramer with an apparent binding to single-stranded DNA with a K-D of 10(-8) M, as determined by surface plasmon resonance.

  • 41.
    Eriksson, Cecilia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Agaton, Charlotta
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Kånge, Rikard
    Sundberg, Marten
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Ek, Bo
    Uhlen, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Gustafsson, Magnus
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Microfluidic analysis of antibody specificity in a compact disk format2006In: Journal of Proteome Research, ISSN 1535-3893, E-ISSN 1535-3907, Vol. 5, no 7, 1568-1574 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new and flexible technology for high throughput analysis of antibody specificity and affinity is presented. The method is based on microfluidics and takes advantage of compact disks (CDs) in which the centrifugal force moves fluids through microstructures containing immobilized metal affinity chromatography columns. Analyses are performed as a sandwich assay, where antigen is captured to the column via a genetically attached His(6)-tag. The antibodies to be analyzed are applied onto the columns. Thereafter, fluorescently labeled secondary antibodies recognize the bound primary antibodies, and detection is carried out by laser-induced fluorescence. The CDs contain 104 microstructures enabling analysis of antibodies against more than 100 different proteins using a single CD. Importantly, through the three- dimensional visualization of the binding patterns in a column it is possible to separate high affinity from low affinity binding. The method presented here is shown to be very sensitive, flexible and reproducible.

  • 42.
    Fagerberg, Linn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hallström, Björn M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Oksvold, Per
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kampf, C.
    Djureinovic, D.
    Odeberg, Jacob
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Habuka, Masato
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tahmasebpoor, S.
    Danielsson, A.
    Edlund, K.
    Asplund, A.
    Sjöstedt, E.
    Lundberg, E.
    Szigyarto, Cristina Al-Khalili
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Skogs, Marie
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Ottosson Takanen, J.
    Berling, H.
    Tegel, Hanna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Mulder, J.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Lindskog, C.
    Danielsson, Frida
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Mardinoglu, A.
    Sivertsson, Åsa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Von Feilitzen, Kalle
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Forsberg, Mattias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zwahlen, Martin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Olsson, I.
    Navani, S.
    Huss, Mikael
    Nielsen, Jens
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pontén, F.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Analysis of the human tissue-specific expression by genome-wide integration of transcriptomics and antibody-based proteomics2014In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 13, no 2, 397-406 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global classification of the human proteins with regards to spatial expression patterns across organs and tissues is important for studies of human biology and disease. Here, we used a quantitative transcriptomics analysis (RNA-Seq) to classify the tissue-specific expression of genes across a representative set of all major human organs and tissues and combined this analysis with antibody- based profiling of the same tissues. To present the data, we launch a new version of the Human Protein Atlas that integrates RNA and protein expression data corresponding to 80% of the human protein-coding genes with access to the primary data for both the RNA and the protein analysis on an individual gene level. We present a classification of all human protein-coding genes with regards to tissue-specificity and spatial expression pattern. The integrative human expression map can be used as a starting point to explore the molecular constituents of the human body.

  • 43.
    Fagerberg, Linn
    et al.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Oksvold, Per
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Skogs, Marie
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Älgenäs, C.
    Lundberg, Emma
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pontén, F.
    Sivertsson, Åsa
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Odeberg, Jacob
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Klevebring, Daniel
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kampf, C.
    Asplund, A.
    Sjöstedt, E.
    Al-Khalili Szigyarto, C.
    Edqvist, P. -H
    Olsson, I.
    Rydberg, U.
    Hudson, P.
    Ottosson Takanen, J.
    Berling, H.
    Björling, Lisa
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tegel, Hanna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Rockberg, J.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Navani, S.
    Jirström, K.
    Mulder, J.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Zwahlen, Martin
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hober, Sophia
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Forsberg, Mattias
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Von Feilitzen, Kalle
    KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Contribution of antibody-based protein profiling to the human chromosome-centric proteome project (C-HPP)2013In: Journal of Proteome Research, ISSN 1535-3893, E-ISSN 1535-3907, Vol. 12, no 6, 2439-2448 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A gene-centric Human Proteome Project has been proposed to characterize the human protein-coding genes in a chromosome-centered manner to understand human biology and disease. Here, we report on the protein evidence for all genes predicted from the genome sequence based on manual annotation from literature (UniProt), antibody-based profiling in cells, tissues and organs and analysis of the transcript profiles using next generation sequencing in human cell lines of different origins. We estimate that there is good evidence for protein existence for 69% (n = 13985) of the human protein-coding genes, while 23% have only evidence on the RNA level and 7% still lack experimental evidence. Analysis of the expression patterns shows few tissue-specific proteins and approximately half of the genes expressed in all the analyzed cells. The status for each gene with regards to protein evidence is visualized in a chromosome-centric manner as part of a new version of the Human Protein Atlas (www.proteinatlas.org).

  • 44.
    Forsström, Bjorn
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Axnäs, Barbara Bislawska
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Stengele, Klaus-Peter
    Buehler, Jochen
    Albert, Thomas J.
    Richmond, Todd A.
    Hu, Francis Jingxin
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hudson, Elton Paul
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Rockberg, Johan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Proteome-wide Epitope Mapping of Antibodies Using Ultra-dense Peptide Arrays2014In: Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, ISSN 1535-9476, E-ISSN 1535-9484, Vol. 13, no 6, 1585-1597 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antibodies are of importance for the field of proteomics, both as reagents for imaging cells, tissues, and organs and as capturing agents for affinity enrichment in mass-spectrometry-based techniques. It is important to gain basic insights regarding the binding sites (epitopes) of antibodies and potential cross-reactivity to nontarget proteins. Knowledge about an antibody's linear epitopes is also useful in, for instance, developing assays involving the capture of peptides obtained from trypsin cleavage of samples prior to mass spectrometry analysis. Here, we describe, for the first time, the design and use of peptide arrays covering all human proteins for the analysis of antibody specificity, based on parallel in situ photolithic synthesis of a total of 2.1 million overlapping peptides. This has allowed analysis of on-and off-target binding of both monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, complemented with precise mapping of epitopes based on full amino acid substitution scans. The analysis suggests that linear epitopes are relatively short, confined to five to seven residues, resulting in apparent off-target binding to peptides corresponding to a large number of unrelated human proteins. However, subsequent analysis using recombinant proteins suggests that these linear epitopes have a strict conformational component, thus giving us new insights regarding how antibodies bind to their antigens.

  • 45.
    Fredolini, Claudia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Byström, Sanna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Pin, Elisa
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Edfors, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Tamburro, Davide
    Iglesias, Maria Jesus
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Häggmark, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Hong, Mun-Gwan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Schwenk, Jochen M.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Immunocapture strategies in translational proteomics2016In: Expert Review of Proteomics, ISSN 1478-9450, E-ISSN 1744-8387, Vol. 13, no 1, 83-98 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aiming at clinical studies of human diseases, antibody-assisted assays have been applied to biomarker discovery and toward a streamlined translation from patient profiling to assays supporting personalized treatments. In recent years, integrated strategies to couple and combine antibodies with mass spectrometry-based proteomic efforts have emerged, allowing for novel possibilities in basic and clinical research. Described in this review are some of the field's current and emerging immunocapture approaches from an affinity proteomics perspective. Discussed are some of their advantages, pitfalls and opportunities for the next phase in clinical and translational proteomics.

  • 46.
    Gantelius, Jesper
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Nano Biotechnology (closed 20130101).
    Bass, Tarek
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Molecular Biotechnology (closed 20130101).
    Gundberg, Anna
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Sundberg, Mårten
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Sjöberg, Ronald
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101).
    Andersson-Svahn, Helene
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Nano Biotechnology (closed 20130101).
    A ten-minute high density lateral flow protein microarray assay2011In: 15th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences 2011: (MicroTAS 2011), 2011, 1176-1178 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Protein microarrays are useful tools for highly multiplexed determination of presence or levels of clinically relevant biomarkers in human tissues and biofluids. However, such tools have thus far been restricted to laboratory environments. Here, we present a novel 384-plexed easy to use lateral flow protein microarray device capable of sensitive (<50ng/ml) determination of antigen specific antibodies in less than ten minutes total assay time. Results were developed with gold nanobeads and could be recorded by a cell-phone camera or table top scanner. Excellent accuracy (AUC=99.4%) was achieved in comparison with an established glass microarray assay for 26 antigen-specific antibodies.

  • 47.
    Gantelius, Jesper
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Nano Biotechnology (closed 20130101).
    Bass, Tarek
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Molecular Biotechnology (closed 20130101).
    Sjöberg, Ronald
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics (closed 20130101). KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Andersson-Svahn, Helene
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Nano Biotechnology (closed 20130101).
    A Lateral Flow Protein Microarray for Rapid and Sensitive Antibody Assays2011In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1661-6596, Vol. 12, no 11, 7748-7759 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Protein microarrays are useful tools for highly multiplexed determination of presence or levels of clinically relevant biomarkers in human tissues and biofluids. However, such tools have thus far been restricted to laboratory environments. Here, we present a novel 384-plexed easy to use lateral flow protein microarray device capable of sensitive (<30 ng/mL) determination of antigen-specific antibodies in ten minutes of total assay time. Results were developed with gold nanobeads and could be recorded by a cell-phone camera or table top scanner. Excellent accuracy with an area under curve (AUC of 98% was achieved in comparison with an established glass microarray assay for 26 antigen-specific antibodies. We propose that the presented framework could find use in convenient and cost-efficient quality control of antibody production, as well as in providing a platform for multiplexed affinity-based assays in low-resource or mobile settings.

  • 48. Ge, Changrong P
    et al.
    Tong, Dongmei R
    Liang, Bibo T
    Lonnblom, Erik S
    Schneider, Nadine K
    Hagert, Cecilia U
    Viljanen, Johan V
    Ayoglu, Burcu
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Stawikowska, Roma T
    Nilsson, Peter C.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics and Nanobiotechnology. KTH, Centres, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Fields, Gregg B
    Skogh, Thomas A
    Kastbom, Alf R
    Kihlberg, Jan T
    Burkhardt, Harald T
    Dobritzsch, Doreen C
    Holmdahl, Rikard K
    Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies cause arthritis by cross-reactivity to joint cartilage2017In: JCI INSIGHT, ISSN 2379-3708, Vol. 2, no 13, e93688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, it is known that autoimmune diseases start a long time before clinical symptoms appear. Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) appear many years before the clinical onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, it is still unclear if and how ACPAs are arthritogenic. To better understand the molecular basis of pathogenicity of ACPAs, we investigated autoantibodies reactive against the C1 epitope of collagen type II (CII) and its citrullinated variants. We found that these antibodies are commonly occurring in RA. A mAb (ACC1) against citrullinated C1 was found to cross-react with several noncitrullinated epitopes on native CII, causing proteoglycan depletion of cartilage and severe arthritis in mice. Structural studies by X-ray crystallography showed that such recognition is governed by a shared structural motif "RG-TG" within all the epitopes, including electrostatic potential-controlled citrulline specificity. Overall, we have demonstrated a molecular mechanism that explains how ACPAs trigger arthritis.

  • 49. Grans, H.
    et al.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Evengard, B.
    Gene expression profiling in the chronic fatigue syndrome2005In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 258, no 4, 388-390 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Gry, Marcus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Rimini, Rebecca
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Strömberg, Sara
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University Hospital.
    Asplund, Anna
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University Hospital.
    Pontén, Fredrik
    Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University Hospital.
    Uhlén, Mathias
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Nilsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Proteomics.
    Correlations between RNA and protein expression profiles in 23 human cell lines2009In: BMC Genomics, ISSN 1471-2164, Vol. 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Central Dogma of biology holds, in famously simplified terms, that DNA makes RNA makes proteins, but there is considerable uncertainty regarding the general, genome-wide correlation between levels of RNA and corresponding proteins. Therefore, to assess degrees of this correlation we compared the RNA profiles (determined using both cDNA- and oligo-based microarrays) and protein profiles (determined immunohistochemically in tissue microarrays) of 1066 gene products in 23 human cell lines. Results: A high mean correlation coefficient (0.52) was obtained from the pairwise comparison of RNA levels determined by the two platforms. Significant correlations, with correlation coefficients exceeding 0.445, between protein and RNA levels were also obtained for a third of the specific gene products. However, the correlation coefficients between levels of RNA and protein products of specific genes varied widely, and the mean correlations between the protein and corresponding RNA levels determined using the cDNA- and oligo-based microarrays were 0.25 and 0.20, respectively. Conclusion: Significant correlations were found in one third of the examined RNA species and corresponding proteins. These results suggest that RNA profiling might provide indirect support to antibodies’ specificity, since whenever a evident correlation between the RNA and protein profiles exists, this can sustain that the antibodies used in the immunoassay recognized their cognate antigens.

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