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  • 1.
    Bendl, Regine
    et al.
    Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Höök, Pia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Meriläinen, Susan
    University of Lapland.
    Tienari, Janne
    Aalto University.
    ‘Doing’ Gender in Executive Search: A Cross-Cultural Comparison2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Bendl, Regine
    et al.
    Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Meriäinen, Susan
    University of Lapland.
    Tienari, Janne
    Aalto University.
    No issue: Executive Search Consultants Reproducing White Male Dominance in Management2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Bleijenbergh, Inge
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    Ryan, Irene
    Diversity, diversity management and identity in organizations2016In: Equality, Diversity and Inclusion, ISSN 2040-7149, E-ISSN 2040-7157, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 2-4Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Calás, Marta B.
    et al.
    University of Massachusetts Amherst.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Smircich, Linda
    University of Massachusetts Amherst.
    "Diversity Management"? Translation? Travel?2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 349-351Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Ekman, Marianne
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Wahl, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Gendered recognition practices and the perpetuation of vulnerability: A study in Swedish universities2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In current critical research on work life in the higher education sector, analyses often revolve around neoliberal managerialism as contrasted to traditional professional academic values (cf. Henkel, 1997; Deem, 2004; Ekman et al, 2017). Academics are both faced with expectations to uphold the integrity of academic values in their research and teaching, whilst at the same time performing and ’careering’ in accordance with managerialist reforms (Clarke & Knights, 2015).

    Knights & Clarke (2014) analyse insecurity as a central aspect of identity in academics, conceptualizing academic life as a ‘bittersweet symphony’ populated by imposters (self- doubt and low self-esteem despite adequate performance), aspirants (under-recognised in relation to their inner sense of excellence) and existentialists (questioning the meaning of work and maintaining a sense of anxiety over their contributions to wider society). Another example is provided by Bristow et al (2017) who identify how early career-academics within CMS play on three narratives – diplomatic, combative and idealistic – by which they both resist and reproduce the ethos of business school neoliberalism in which they are embedded. Academics’ identity construction thus in different ways tend to position them as vulnerable selves (Cicmil et al, 2016), that is, as existentially exposed to the risks associated with projectified careers, macho-style management and a high degree of self-responsibility (Loveday, 2018).

    In addition, a number of earlier studies has also pointed out the highly gendered nature of how academic work is organized, how recruitment and promotion processes unfold etc. (cf. (cf. Hush, 2001; Mählck, 2003; van den Brink & Benschop, 2012).

    In this study we will focus on recognition practices (how recognition repeatedly tend to happen or not happen in local/cultural contexts, and thus also become the expectation on what may happen in future interactions) and their consequences for identity construction

    1

    and sense of vulnerability thus seem central to advance the above insights. Recognition practices thus involve not only what and whom is recognized or not for something, but also in what settings certain practices are legitimate or not, and how they are publicly displayed in social interaction.

    We suggest that

    • recognition practices are an important yet under-researched aspect of academic

      identity construction processes

    • recognition practices are gendered, i.e. we perform gender in our ways of

      - conferring and receiving recognition,- constructing what recognition may mean in different local/cultural contexts, - constructing when it is to be conferred/received or not,- constructing how it is appropriately played out how in social interaction.

    • recognition practices tend to sustain vulnerability among academics, but in different ways for men and women.

  • 6.
    Fegin, Elin
    et al.
    Ratio.
    Stern, Charlotta
    Stockholms universitet.
    Wennberg, Karl
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Kompetensförsörjningen i svenska företag: Rätt kompetens, verktyg, tid, stöd och strategier för att finna kompetensen?2013Report (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Gillberg, Nanna
    et al.
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Hvenmark, Johan
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Höök, Pia
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Lindgren, Monica
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Tempered radicals under attack: Faculty's experiences of encouraging critical reflection in business school education2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8. Hearn, J.
    et al.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Jyrkinen, M.
    Sexualities and/in 'Critical' management studies2015In: The Routledge Companion to Critical Management Studies, Taylor & Francis, 2015, p. 124-139Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Ap-politik2002In: Hjärnsläpp: Bang om biologism / [ed] Ekman, Karin, Hermele, Vanja & Westerlund, Ulrika, Stockholm: Bang , 2002Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Ap-politik1999In: Bang, ISSN 1102-4593, no 4, p. 39-43Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Damage control and tempered change: Reflections on working with gender issues in the business school classroom2008In: Teaching and Learning at Business Schools - : transforming business education / [ed] Mårtensson, Pär, Bild, Magnus & Nilsson, Kristina, Aldershot: Gower Publishing Ltd., 2008, 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Det säkra kortet: så väljs höga chefer2008In: Loop : tidskriften om ledarskap, organisation och personal, ISSN 1653-073XArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Företagsledare och chefer2003In: Utredningen om kvinnor på ledande poster i näringslivet, Mansdominans i förändring: om ledningsgrupper och styrelser, Stockholm: Fritzes, 2003Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Homosocialitet som könsordnande process2006In: Norma, Nordic journal for masculinity studies, ISSN 1890-2138, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 24-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on the concept of homosociality and how it can be used in order to understand how gender is (re)produced in organisations and society. Within the field of organisation and gender, the concept of homosociality has been used to explain the gender segregation and male dominance on management levels in organisations. The concept describes processes in which men orient and identify themselves with other men. Studies show that men’s position and identity are affirmed through homosocial processes, which are often infused by desire and seduction. These processes reduce and somewhat paradoxically also generate uncertainty. Furthermore, studies show that the jargon among men is centred on distancing the group from women and men who do not conform with the ideal the group has collectively created, thus confirming the group’s superiority. Homosocial processes are therefore seen as contributing to the creation of certain groups that include some men and exclude women and other men, resulting in gender segregated organisations and the creation of dominant groups of men. In light of this research, the article discusses homosociality as a gendered process and argues for contextualized analyses that take other social power relations in organisations and society into account.

  • 15.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Jeff Hearn and Wendy Parkin: On organization sexuality2011In: On The Shoulders of Giants / [ed] Jensen, Tommy & Timothy L. Wilson, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2011, 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Making Inclusion Work. Experiences from Academia Around the World2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 151-152Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Responding to growing international political interest in the potential of carbon capture and storage (CCS) to contribute to climate change mitigation, multiple CCS demonstration projects of various scales are emerging globally. A fully integrated power-plant with CCS has not yet been demonstrated at scale, and acknowledgement of the scale of learning that still must occur for the technology to advance toward deployment has resulted in calls from multiple constituents for more CCS demonstration projects. Among these demonstration projects, expectations for learning and knowledge-sharing structures vary considerably and attention to different approaches to facilitate learning has been minimal. Through a comparison of the structure, framing and socio-political context of three different CCS demonstration projects, this paper explores the complexity of social learning associated with demonstration projects. Variety in expectations of the demonstration projects’ objectives, learning processes, information sharing mechanisms, public engagement initiatives, financing and collaborative partnerships are highlighted. The comparison shows that multiple factors influence the learning in CCS demonstration projects, including the process of building support for the project, the governance context and the framing of the project justification. This comparative analysis highlights the importance of integrating careful consideration of framing and social learning into CCS demonstration project planning.

  • 17.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Man får välja: Om rekrytering, ledarskap och kön2008In: Bonnier Ledarskapshandbok: Projektledning / [ed] Johnny Tedenfors, Stockholm: Bonnier Ledarskapshandböcker , 2008Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    On Codes of Conduct and Commercial Sex2011In: Gender Renewals, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Recruiting Managing Directors: Doing Homosociality2013In: Gender, Work and Organization, ISSN 0968-6673, E-ISSN 1468-0432, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 454-466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines homosociality in the context of top management recruitment in Sweden, drawing on interviews with chairmen of the board and three recruitments of managing directors. The analysis suggests that homosociality is done through two main practices: (re)defining competence and doing hierarchy, resulting in a preference for certain men and the exclusion of women. It is argued that the preference of men can be understood as an unreflexive practice, which can explain why many Swedish male managers are aware of the adverse conditions women face and claim to be pro-equality but continue to recruit men for management positions. In light of this, it is also argued that homosociality and gender discrimination can be seen as two sides of the same coin.

  • 20.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Recruitment of Managing Directors as a Gendered Process2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Rekrytering som konstruktion av företagsledare1999In: Osynlig företagsledning / [ed] Sven-Erik Sjöstrand, Jörgen Sandberg, Mats Tyrstrup, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 1999, 1, p. 113-130Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Strippklubbar och bordeller i arbetssammanhang2010In: Tvärsnitt, ISSN 0348-7997Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    The social construction of top executives2001In: Invisible management: The social construction of leadership / [ed] Sven-Erik Sjöstrand, Jörgen Sandberg & Mats Tyrstrup, London: Thomson Learning , 2001, 1, p. 105-125Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    “When in Rome…”?: On Multinational Corporations, Codes of Conduct and Commercial Sex2011In: Men and Masculinities Moving On Again! Transnationalising Flows, Technologies, Institutions, Theory, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Höök, Pia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Linghag, Sophie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management. Karlstads universitet.
    Regnö, Klara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Wahl, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Könsmärkta villkor styr synen på kvinnligt och manligt chefskap2013In: Leda mot det nya: En forskningsantologi om chefskap och innovation / [ed] Martin Kreuger, Lucia Crevani, Kristina Larsen, Stockholm: Vinnova , 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    et al.
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm, HHS.
    Höök, Pia
    Wahl, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Women as power resources: Putting theory into practice2014In: Women in STEM careers: International perspectives on increasing workforce participation, advancement and leadership / [ed] Diana Bilimoria and Linley Lord, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014, 1, p. 126-145Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this chapter is to contribute to our knowledge of working for gender equality in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) organizations by describing the design and perspective of a specific women only change project involving women engineers in a manufacturing company and in a technical university. The results of the project will be analyzed and discussed in relation to implications for work for change. Although most individuals in Sweden are positive towards gender equality on a rhetorical level, men and women face different conditions in the labor market. For example, the labor market is gender segregated with women and men mainly working in women and male dominated professions respectively. Men also dominate in higher positions in organizations and there continues to exist a wage gap between men and women (Hagberg et al., 1995; SOU, 1994, p._3; SOU, 2003, p._16; Statistics Sweden, 2012). Women engineers do not face the same conditions as men when pursuing a career in industry nor in academia. Among engineering students starting 2011, 28 percent were women, 72 percent were men (Statistics Sweden, 2011). The proportion of women PhDs in engineering, manufacturing and construction was 29 percent in 2006 and the proportion of women professors in engineering and technology was 8.3 percent in 2007. The proportion of women with an engineering background among researchers in industry was 25 percent in 2006 (Husu and Koskinen, 2010) and only six out of 146 engineers in executive teams among large listed technical companies (42 in total) are women (Ahlbom, 2010).

  • 27.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    et al.
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm, HHS.
    Linghag, Sophie
    Karlstad universitet.
    Regnö, Klara
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Wahl, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Ökad medvetenhet men långsam förändring: om kvinnor och män på ledande  positioner i svenskt näringsliv2014 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Tienari, J.
    ’This is just the way it is’: Executive search and gendered careers2015In: Handbook of Gendered Careers in Management: Getting In, Getting On, Getting Out, Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd. , 2015, p. 123-139Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Tienari, J.
    Meriläinen, S.
    Bendl, R.
    Executive search as ethnosociality: A cross-cultural comparison2016In: International Journal of Cross Cultural Management, ISSN 1470-5958, E-ISSN 1741-2838, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 153-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we explore how executive search consultants in Austria, Finland and Sweden address ethnicity. Our findings suggest that while consultants working in these different sociocultural settings may attribute different meanings to ethnicity, they share a tendency to evade questions of ethnicity with regard to the search process. We specify three discursive practices that serve to eliminate questions of ethnicity from executive search: constructing whiteness as self-evident, constructing varieties of whiteness (articulating deficiency and lack for those not belonging to Us), and distancing responsibility for the current situation to clients and society. In view of these findings, we argue that executive search can be understood as an arena for ethnosociality that stops cultural diversity at the door of management suites and serves to undermine efforts to promote cross-cultural understanding in organizations. Our study indicates that sustaining whiteness as a privileged ethnicity takes multiple forms. While executive search consultants play an important role in these processes, it is suggested that they inherit a more fundamental problem in society and they have few opportunities to change the ethnic status quo at the top.

  • 30.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    et al.
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm, HHS.
    Wahl, Anna
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Identifiering av nyckelpersoner och rekrytering av chefer inom Bonnierkoncernen: en studie ur ett könsperspektiv2001Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Höök, Pia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Wahl, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Women as a Power Resource: Putting Theory into Practice2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Höök, Pia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Wahl, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Women as Power Resources: Putting Theory into Practice2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Lokatt, Erika
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Lindgren, Monica
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Packendorff, Johann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Physicians, nurses and leadership work: A study of managerialism and leaderism in the reconstruction of professionalism in Swedish health care2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Pilhofer, Katharina
    et al.
    Stockholm Sch Econ, S-11383 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management. Stockholm Sch Econ, S-11383 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Diversity at work: The practice of inclusion2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 453-454Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 35. Pilhofer, Katharina
    et al.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Diversity at Work-The Practice of Inclusion2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 195-197Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Regnö, Klara
    et al.
    Stockholm School of Economics, Center for Management and Organization.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    Stockholm School of Economics, Center for Management and Organization.
    Höök, Pia
    Stockholm School of Economics, Center for Management and Organization.
    Linghag, Sophie
    Stockholm School of Economics, .
    Wahl, Anna
    Stockholm School of Economics, Center for Management and Organization.
    Male Dominance in Positions of Power2004Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, as in many other countries, most managers are men. In 1993 the Swedish government commissioned an inquiry[1]in order to find out to what extent men dominated management positions in Swedish business life at the time. The study also focused on measures taken in order to increase the proportion of women at the top. The empirical material consisted of an extensive survey among organizations and interviews with people that worked with the issue of increasing women at executive levels (in the study referred to as change agents) (Höök 1995, Wahl 1995). Descriptions given by these agents supplemented the statistics from the survey and enhanced the picture of the work for change, which despite, or because of, men’s dominance at management level, still went on in many organizations. Nine years later a follow up inquiry[2]was commissioned in order to once again measure the distribution of women and men at different organizational levels and the existence of work for change (see Regnö 2003a, 2003b). Once again, the change agents were interviewed (see Höök & Wahl 2003) in order to receive up-to-date descriptions of the work for change carried out by them, and their reflections on how the work has developed since the previous inquiry was carried through. In both government inquiries, the empirical findings were interpreted and discussed in relation to existing research on organization and gender.

    [1]SOU 1994:3 “Mäns föreställningar om kvinnor och chefskap” (published in English with the title “Men’s perceptions of women and management” (Wahl 1995)) included contributions by Anna Wahl and Pia Höök.

    [2]SOU 2003:16 “Mansdominans i förändring” (Male dominance in transition)

  • 37.
    Regnö, Klara
    et al.
    Stockholm School of Economics, Center for Management and Organization.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    Stockholm School of Economics, Center for Management and Organization.
    Höök, Pia
    Stockholm School of Economics, Center for Management and Organization.
    Linghag, Sophie
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Wahl, Anna
    Stockholm School of Economics, Center for Management and Organization.
    The Intersection of Feminist Research, Media, Politics, and Business in Sweden2004Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, as in many other countries, most managers are men. In 1993 the Swedish government commissioned an inquiry[1]in order to find out to what extent men dominated management positions in Swedish business life at the time. Nine years later a follow up inquiry[2]was commissioned in order to once again measure the distribution of women and men at different organizational levels and the existence of work for change (see Regnö 2003a, 2003b). This paper is based both on the findings from the 2003 inquiry “Male Dominance in Transition. On Management Teams and Boards” (SOU 2003:16) and also on the work process, namely the support and resistance which faced the research team in their work with the inquiry. In the first section of the paper, the empirical findings from the survey (Regnö 2003a, 2003b) and interviews with change agents (Höök & Wahl 2003) will be presented. Then, the more theoretical discussions following the themes of women executives in a historical perspective (Svanström 2003), women and corporate boards (Karlsson Stider 2003), management and gender (Holgersson 2003a), young managers (Linghag 2003), and work for change (Höök 2003) will be summarized. The paper ends with a discussion on the work process and how actors from different areas of society, media, politics and business, intervened.

    [1]SOU 1994:3 “Mäns föreställningar om kvinnor och chefskap” (published in English with the title “Men’s perceptions of women and management” (Wahl 1995)) included contributions by Anna Wahl and Pia Höök.

    [2]SOU 2003:16 “Mansdominans i förändring” (Male dominance in transition)

  • 38.
    Regnö, Klara
    et al.
    Stockholm School of Economics, Center for Management and Organization.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    Stockholm School of Economics, Center for Management and Organization.
    Höök, Pia
    Stockholm School of Economics, Center for Management and Organization.
    Linghag, Sophie
    Stockholm School of Economics.
    Wahl, Anna
    Stockholm School of Economics, Center for Management and Organization.
    The Reproduction and Change of Male Dominance in Positions of Power2003Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, as in many other countries, most managers are men. In 1993 the Swedish government commissioned an inquiry2in order to find out to what extent men dominated management positions in Swedish business life at the time. The study also focused on measures taken in order to increase the proportion of women at the top. The empirical material consisted of an extensive survey among organizations and interviews with people that worked with the issue of increasing women at executive levels (in the study referred to as change agents) (Höök 1995, Wahl 1995). Descriptions given by these agents supplemented the statistics from the survey and enhanced the picture of the work for change, which despite, or because of, men’s dominance at management level, still went on in many organizations. Nine years later a follow up inquiry3was commissioned in order to once again measure the distribution of women and men at different organizational levels and the existence of work for change (see Regnö 2003a, 2003b). Once again, the change agents were interviewed (see Höök & Wahl 2003) in order to receive up-to-date descriptions of the work for change carried out by them, and their reflections on how the work has developed since the previous inquiry was carried through. In both government inquiries, the empirical findings were interpreted and discussed in relation to existing research on organization and gender. This paper is based on the findings from the 2003 inquiry “Male Dominance in Transition. On Management Teams and Boards” (SOU 2003:16). In the first section of the paper, the empirical findings from the survey (Regnö 2003a, 2003b) and interviews with change agents (Höök & Wahl 2003) will be presented. Then, the more theoretical discussions following the themes of women executives in a historical perspective (Svanström 2003), women and corporate boards (Karlsson Stider 2003), management and gender (Holgersson 2003a), young managers (Linghag 2003), and work for change (Höök 2003) will be summarized. The paper ends with a discussion drawing on the results of the different chapters.  

  • 39. Romani, Laurence
    et al.
    Holck, Lotte
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Muhr, Sara Louise
    Diversity Management and The Scandinavian Model: Illustrations From Denmark And Sweden2017In: Management And Diversity: Perspectives From Different National Contexts / [ed] Ozbilgin, MF Chanlat, JF, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2017, Vol. 3, p. 261-280Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents the principal interpretations that took place in Denmark and Sweden regarding the discourse on 'Diversity Management'. We organise our presentation around three major themes that are central to the local Scandinavian context: gender equality, migration and moral grounds. This chapter shows the important role of gender equality work practices and how these practices now tend to be progressively incorporated in a broad Diversity Management construct, possibly leading to a less radical stance. Moreover, the comparison between Denmark and Sweden reveals the political associations with Diversity Management and migration in Denmark, but not in Sweden. Our third contribution unveils the tensions between the value of equality, which remains strong in the Scandinavian welfare state model, and the actual practices of Diversity Management.

  • 40.
    Romani, Laurence
    et al.
    Handelshögskolan i Stockholm.
    Höök, Pia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Exploring the Diversity Management patchwork and its implications for management2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Rönnblom, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Vad tänker jag som forskare och lärare om att förmedla feministisk forskning?2007In: Att baka en katedral: Genusperspektiv i avhandlingsskrivande / [ed] Lena Eskilsson & Hildur Kalman, Umeå: Kvinnovetenskapligt forum, Umeå universitet , 2007, 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42. Tienari, J.
    et al.
    Meriläinen, S.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Bendl, R.
    And then there are none: On the exclusion of women in processes of executive search2013In: Gender in Management, ISSN 1754-2413, E-ISSN 1754-2421, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 43-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the ways in which gender is "done" in executive search. The authors uncover how the ideal candidate for top management is defined in and through search practices, and discuss how and why women are excluded in the process. Design/methodology/approach: The study is based on in-depth interviews with male and female Austrian, Finnish and Swedish executive search consultants. The authors study the ways in which consultants talk about their work, assignments, clients, and candidates, and discern from their talk descriptions of practices where male dominance in top management is reinforced. Findings: The ways in which gender is "done" and women are excluded from top management are similar across socio-cultural contexts. In different societal conditions and culturally laden forms, search consultants, candidates and clients engage in similar practices that produce a similar outcome. Core practices of executive search constrain consultants in their efforts to introduce female candidates to the process and to increase the number of women in top management. Research limitations/implications: The study is exploratory in that it paves the way for more refined understandings of the ways in which gender plays a role in professional services in general and in practices of executive search in particular. Practical implications: Unmasking how gender is woven into the executive search process may provide openings for "doing" gender differently, both for consultants and their clients. It may serve as a catalyst for change in widening the talent pool for top management. Originality/value: Research on gendered practices in executive search is extremely rare. The study provides new insights into this influential professional practice and its outcomes.

  • 43.
    Tienari, Janne
    et al.
    Helsinki School of Economics.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Meriläinen, Susanne
    University of Lapland.
    Höök, Pia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Gender, Management and Market Discourse: The Case of Gender Quotas in the Swedish and Finnish Media2009In: Gender, Work and Organization, ISSN 0968-6673, E-ISSN 1468-0432, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 501-521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we present a comparative study of media texts in Sweden and Finland, two societies traditionally viewed as Nordic welfare states. Focusing on the controversial question of introducing gender-based quotas on the boards of companies, we analyse how representations of gender and management are affected in Sweden and Finland by contemporary market discourse. We argue that market discourse takes different forms in the two societal contexts and that the space for questioning and criticizing it from a gender equality perspective remains different. Our analysis thus complements recent contributions stressing that both societal particularities and transnational processes must be considered in studies of gender and management (Calas and Smircich, 2006).

  • 44.
    Tienari, Janne
    et al.
    Aalto University.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Søderberg, Anne-Marie
    Copenhagen Business School.
    Vaara, Eero
    Hanken School of Economics.
    An Uneasy Coupling: Reflections on Women and Management in a Merging Organization2003In: Merging Across Borders: People, Cultures and Politics / [ed] Anne-Marie Søderberg & Eero Vaara, Copenhagen: Copenhagen Business School Press, 2003, 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Tienari, Janne
    et al.
    Aalto University.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management.
    Søderberg, Anne-Marie
    Copenhagen Business School.
    Vaara, Eero
    Hanken School of Economics.
    'We Need More Women in Managerial Jobs'-Gender Equality and Management in the Nordic Context: Deconstruction and Critical Perspectives2003In: Comportamento Organizacional e Gestao, ISSN 0872-9662, Vol. 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Tienari, Janne
    et al.
    Aalto University.
    Søderberg, Anne-Marie
    Copenhagen Business School.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Vaara, Eero
    Hanken School of Economics.
    Gender and national identity constructions in the cross-border merger context2005In: Gender, Work and Organization, ISSN 0968-6673, E-ISSN 1468-0432, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 217-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we explore ways in which vertical gender inequality is accomplished in discourse in the context of a recent chain of cross-border mergers and acquisitions that resulted in the formation of a multinational Nordic company. We analyse social interactions of 'doing' gender in interviews with male senior executives from Denmark, Finland and Sweden. We argue that their explanations for the absence of women in the top echelons of the company serve to distance vertical gender inequality. The main contribution of the article is an analysis of how national identities are discursively (re)constructed in such distancing. New insights are offered to studying gender in multinationals with a cross-cultural team of researchers. Our study sheds light on how gender intersects with nationality in shaping the multinational organization and the identities of male executives in globalizing business.

  • 47.
    van den Brink, Marieke
    et al.
    Radboud University Nijmegen.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Linghag, Sophie
    Karlstad universitet.
    Inflating and down playing strengths and weaknesses: Gendered competence frameworks in Sweden and the Netherlands2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    van den Brink, Marieke
    et al.
    Radboud University Nijmegen.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Linghag, Sophie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Inflating and downplaying strengths and weaknesses: Gendered competence frameworks in Sweden and the Netherlands2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49. van den Brink, Marieke
    et al.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Organization and management.
    Linghag, Sophie
    Dee, Sharon
    Inflating and down playing strengths and weaknesses-Practicing gender in the evaluation of potential managers and partners2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 20-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we contribute to the debate on gender in evaluation decisions and the male norm in management by examining how the skills and experience of women and men are described and interpreted in the evaluation of candidates' potential for future positions in a Swedish bank and a Dutch professional services firm. By drawing on Martin's concept of practicing gender, we show how strengths and weaknesses are discursively constructed in real time and space. We identify four different and subtle patterns of practicing gender in the evaluation of men and women in which men's strengths are inflated and their weaknesses downplayed, while women's strengths are downplayed and weaknesses inflated. Although women are included in the process and seen as competent, their potential is - in general limited to lower managerial levels. Moreover, we examine the entanglement of gender and age. We discuss how these patterns of practicing gender can help us understand how gender and other inequalities are reproduced in seemingly gender egalitarian contexts where women and men are considered for higher positions.

  • 50.
    Wahl, Anna
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Eduards, Maud
    Stockholms universitet.
    Holgersson, Charlotte
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Höök, Pia
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Linghag, Sophie
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Gender, Organisation and Management (closed (20130101).
    Rönnblom, Malin
    Umeå universitet.
    Motstånd och fantasi: Historien om F2008 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
12 1 - 50 of 65
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