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  • 1.
    Aganovic, Dario
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Production Engineering.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Production Engineering.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Production Engineering.
    Applicability of Engineering Design Theory on Manufacturing System Design in the Context of Concurrent Engineering2004In: Methods and Tools for Co-operative and Integrated Design, Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers , 2004, p. 145-158Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

     

    The relationship between a product and a manufacturing system is addressed in various engineering design theories. The different approaches in the engineering design field are mainly focused on product design. The purpose of this paper is to review theories in the area of engineering design, in order to discuss applicability of engineering design theories on the concurrent product and manufacturing system development. The reviewed theories are: Axiomatic Design, Robust Design, Theory of Domains, and Theory of Technical Systems.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Oscar
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Semere, Daniel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Melander, Arne
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering. Swerea KIMAB, Sweden.
    Arvidsson, M.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Digitalization of Process Planning of Spot Welding in Body-in-white2016In: Procedia CIRP, Elsevier, 2016, p. 618-623Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Process planning of spot welding for body-in-white automobile structures involves several experimental (physical) welding trials to set the process parameters. These experimental trials are crucial in ensuring the quality and efficiency of the process. However, due to the iterative nature of the work, running several experiments is costly and time consuming prolonging the overall development cost and time significantly. To minimize the cost and time, replacing the physical tests by digital (virtual) tests is an established approach although not often applied for spot welding. However, for a long chain of development process with several iterative loops, this is not a trivial task considering the availability of information and continuity of the work flow. This paper reports the work and results of an industrial case study conducted on spot welding of a body-in-white car pillar in a Swedish auto manufacturer. The aim of the study is to investigate and propose the necessary conditions required to replace a physical test by virtual tests in terms of validity and expedited execution of the process. Information sharing, knowledge reuse and streamlining the work flow have found to be critical condition for valid and rapid virtual tests.

  • 3.
    Bagge, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering. Scania CV AB.
    Hedlind, Mikael
    Scania CV AB.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Process chain based workpiece variation simulation for performance utilisation analysis2014In: Proceedings of The 6th International Swedish Production Symposium 2014, Chalmers university , 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Propagation of shape variations in multi-step manufacturing processes, constrained by tolerance chains, is the consequence of sequenced operations defined in process planning. A key task in process planning is to define in-process workpiece (IPW) tolerances for efficient production ensuring conformance to the product design specification and good utilisation of the manufacturing resources. A dimension dependency chart has been developed for analysis of linked IPW tolerance chains and simulation of shape variation propagation caused by systematic and random errors. The results show how the traditional process capability index, used as an acceptance criterion for IPW tolerancing, limits the process performance utilisation.

  • 4.
    Bagge, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering. Scania CV AB.
    Hedlind, Mikael
    Scania CV AB.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Tolerance chain design and analysis of in-process workpiece2013In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Advanced Manufacturing Engineering and Technologies: Vol. 2 / [ed] Andreas Archenti and Antonio Maffei, 2013, p. 305-315Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Process planning comprises a broad range of activities to define a complete process chain for the manufacturing of a product. Beside the definition of proper operations and operation sequence, the definition of in-process tolerances for multi-step machining is decisive for the possibilities to achieve a well running and economical production. This paper introduces the dimension dependency chart (DDC) as a methodology based on tolerance charting technique where the complete manufacturing process chain can be efficiently represented, analysed and developed. The DDC uses mapping matrices for the transformation of operation element behaviour to the process steps defined by the process planner and further on to the dimensions and tolerances for the final part. Two important comparisons can be done by using the DDC; the expected behaviour of the in-process steps versus the tolerances defined by the process planner and the allowed variations of the final part dimensions versus the designed product specification.

  • 5.
    Bagge, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Analysis of process parameters during press quenching of bevel gear parts2012In: The 5th International Swedish Production Symposium: 6th-8th of November 2012 Linköping, Sweden / [ed] Mats Björkman, 2012, p. 251-259Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Defining manufacturing tolerances is an important task for a process planner before starting production of a new product or introducing new processes. One of the more complex processes to handle is the heat treatment of gears. Press quenching is a heat treatment method where the gear is mechanically forced to keep or attain the desired geometry, with less geometrical distortions in comparison to oil bath quenching. The objective of this paper is to discover how design of experiments can be used to scrutinize press quenching of bevel gears. The first part of this investigation shows how different process parameter settings influence geometry of the bevel gear. Based on the results of the experiments, predictions and statistical simulations, the outcome of the press quenching process can be estimated. Estimations for the number of defect parts then form the basis for evaluating whether the proposed tolerances meet the quality requirements. The work is based on an industrial case where 55 bevel gear crown wheels for heavy trucks are carburized and then case hardened in a Gleason press quenching machine.

  • 6.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Human Limitations as a Source of Generic System of Systems Properties2007In: International Conference on Complex Systems (ICCS '07), 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Production Engineering.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Production Engineering.
    On complexity and uncertainty in a manufacturing system design process2004In: International Conference on Axiomatic Design, ICAD, 2004, Vol. 4Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    The Effects of Limits to Human Abilities on System of Systems Properties2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Semere, Daniel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    An engineering systems perspective on system of systems methodology2007In: 2007 1st Annual IEEE Systems Conference, 2007, p. 185-191Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional methodologies for system design and development have proven insufficient when it comes to very large and distributed systems. As a consequence, research on complex socio-technical systems i.e. System-of-Systems [SoS], has evolved, At the same time, researchers of complex systems that are not SoS have started to pay attention to the tools and methods developed within the area of SoS. The purpose of this paper is therefore twofold: (1) to improve the understanding of SoS and SoS methods from a non-SoS point of view, by presenting SoS definitions, properties and behavior of SoS, and (2) to analyze current non-SoS development methodologies to test their applicability in a SoS environment. Finally a metric for the well-being of a SoS is introduced.

  • 10.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Semere, Daniel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Definition, classification, and Methodological Issues of System of Systems2008In: System of Systems Engineering: Principles and Applications, Boca Raton: CRC Press , 2008Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Gerth, Robert
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Boqvist, Albert
    Lund University.
    Bjelkemyr, Marcus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Design for construction: Utilizing production experiences in development2013In: Construction Management and Economics, ISSN 0144-6193, E-ISSN 1466-433X, Vol. 31, p. 135-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design process has a significant impact on the performance and profitability of a housing project. Therefore, decisions made during the design process should take into consideration knowledge and experience from other processes in previously accomplished projects, specifically from the production phase. How to capture and use production experience in housing has not gained enough interest, possibly leading to sub-optimal improvements during the construction process. This motivates research on how onsite production experience from similar previous projects can be captured and used to improve constructability without risking customer values. Based on the concept of constructability, ’design for manufacturing and assembly’ and the theory of waste, the method ’design for construction’ (DFC) has been developed. The four-step model complements the conventional construction process, and consists of the following steps: (1) specify customer values and similar previous projects; (2) identify onsite waste and cost drivers in previous projects; (3) develop criteria to evaluate constructability; and (4) evaluate constructability of the design. The DFC method is exemplified and tested through a case study, in which it was shown that the method facilitated identification of all problems that were considered in the investigated project. The method also highlighted other project obstacles that potentially could have been solved to improve constructability.

  • 12.
    Lindberg, B
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Onori, Mauro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Semere, D
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Evolvable Production System: a position paper2007In: Proceedings of the Swedish Production Symposium 2007, Gothenburg, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Research initiative in production engineering2011In: Public Service Review. European Union, ISSN 1472-3395, Vol. 22, p. 620-621Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Semere, Daniel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Onori, Mauro
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Kjellberg, Ann
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Enablers for reconfiguration of machine tools in a changeable manufacturingIn: CIRP Annals Manufacturing TechnologyArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Mikler, Jerzy
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Frangoudis, Constantinos
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    On a Systematic Approach to Development of Maintenance Plans for Production Equipment2011In: Journal of Machine Engineering, ISSN 1895-7595, Vol. 11, no 1-2, p. 87-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reliability is a collective term covering several abilities of the technical system: to deliver required functions, to uphold quality of products and services, to assure that the safety requirements associated with the system are properly fulfilled with regards both to the users and the environment and finally to uphold the durability of the technical system during its whole life cycle. All this has to be performed at acceptable risks, optimal cost, and correspond to operational needs of the business. Even though there is an advanced, well thought-out concept for this purpose - reliability centred maintenance (RCM) - that correctly applied might result in very good quality maintenance programs, it is not broadly used in the industry due to the vast efforts required for its implementation. An appropriate methodology supporting systematic functional break down of a studied systems, and guidelines how to couple functional failures to failure modes, integrated with RCM, would greatly speed up generating of effective maintenance programs. In this paper we present our research towards development of such a methodology, and show a pilot implementation to analysis of machine tool spindle. The methodology is based on Hubka's theory of design and AFD/TRIZ.

  • 16.
    Mikler, Jerzy
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Shariat Zadeh, Navid
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Computer Systems for Design and Manufacturing.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Design and Development of Maintenance Knowledge Base System Using Common KADS Methodology2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Onori, Mauro
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Semere, Daniel
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Evolvable systems: an approach to self-X production2011In: International journal of computer integrated manufacturing (Print), ISSN 0951-192X, E-ISSN 1362-3052, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 506-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current major road mapping efforts, such as ManuFuture, FutMan and EUPASS, have all clearly underlined that true industrial sustainability will require far higher levels of systems' autonomy and adaptability. In accordance with these recommendations, the Evolvable Production Systems (EPS) has aimed at developing such technological solutions and support mechanisms. Since its inception in 2002 (Onori, M., 2002. In: ISR2002 - 33rd International Symposium on Robotics, Stockholm, 617-621) as a next generation of production systems, the concept is being further developed and tested to emerge as a production system paradigm. The essence of evolvability resides not only in the ability of system components to adapt to the changing conditions of operation but also to assist in the evolution of these components in time such that processes may become self-X, X standing for one or more desirable properties of a system subjected to a variable operation condition such as self-evolvable, self-reconfigurable, self-tuning, self-diagnosing, and so on. Characteristically, evolvable systems have distributed control and are composed of integrated intelligent modules. To assist the development and life cycle issues, comprehensive methodological framework is being developed. A concerted effort is being exerted through European research projects in collaboration with European manufacturers, technology/equipment suppliers and universities. After briefly stating the fundamental concepts of EPS, this article presents current developments and applications.

  • 18.
    Onori, Mauro
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Semere, Daniel T.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Production Systems.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Evolvable Systems: An Approach to Self-X Production2010In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 6TH CIRP-SPONSORED INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON DIGITAL ENTERPRISE TECHNOLOGY / [ed] Huang GQ, Mak KL, Maropoulos PG, 2010, Vol. 66, p. 789-802Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current major road mapping efforts, such as ManuFuture, Fut Man and EUPASS, have all clearly underlined that true industrial sustainability will require far higher levels of systems' autonomy and adaptability. In accordance with these recommendations, the Evolvable Production Systems (EPS) has aimed at developing such technological solutions and support mechanisms. Since its inception in 2002 as a next generation of production systems, the concept is being further developed and tested to emerge as a production system paradigm. The essence of evolvability resides not only in the ability of system components to adapt to the changing conditions of operation, but also to assist in the evolution of these components in time such that processes may become self-X, x standing for one more desirable properties of a system subjected to a variable operation condition such as self-evolvable, self-reconfigurable, self-tuning, self-diagnosing, etc. Characteristically, Evolvable systems have distributed control, and are composed of intelligent modules integrated. To assist the development and life cycle issues, comprehensive methodological framework is being developed. A concerted effort is being exerted through European research projects in collaboration with European manufacturers, technology/equipment suppliers, and universities. After briefly stating the fundamental concepts of EPS, this paper presents current developments and applications.

  • 19. Storck, Joakim
    et al.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    A cost model for the effect of setup time reduction in stainless steel strip production2007In: 1st Swedish Production Symposium, 2007, p. 1-8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Setup time reductions facilitate the flexibility needed for just-in-time production. An integrated steel mill with meltshop, continuous caster and hot rolling mill is often operated as decoupled processes. Setup time reduction provides the flexibility needed to reduce buffering, shorten lead times and create an integrated process flow. The interdependency of setup times, process flexibility and integration were analysed through system dynamics simulation. The results showed significant reductions of energy consumption and tied capital. It was concluded that setup time reduction in the hot strip mill can aid process integration and hence improve production economy while reducing environmental impact

  • 20. Storck, Joakim
    et al.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    A dynamic cost model forthe effect of improved process flexibility in steel plants2008In: The 41st CIRP Conference on Manufacturing Systems, 2008, p. 45-50Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reduced setup times in the rolling mill generate flexibility which allows shorter leadtimes through continuous casting and hot rolling. Traditionally known as schedule-free rolling, this flexibility allows the rolling mill to handle variations without the need for buffering. Cost models based on system dynamics methodology are used to assess the economic potential. Effects on inventory, energy and work roll consumptions are analysed. The simulation results show that investments in flexible processes can be evaluated with dynamic cost models. There is an opportunity for significant cost reduction, but also lowered environmental impact due to reduced energy consumption.

  • 21.
    Storck, Joakim
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Assessment of Best Scheduling Practice in Continuous Casting and Hot Rolling of Stainless Steel Strip by System Dynamics Simulation2007In: Sheet Metal 2007, Trans Tech Publications Inc., 2007, Vol. 344, p. 897-904Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A rapid flow of materials with little intermediate buffering between steel mill and hot strip mill has many benefits. One is energy savings due to raised charging temperature in the reheat furnaces of the hot strip mill. Another is that tied capital is freed up, thereby improving mill economy. Still, it is not unusual that average lead-time is in the order of days, or even weeks.

    The aim of the present work was to show how lead-times from casting to rolling could be improved by changes in the scheduling function. A System Dynamics model of a stainless steel strip production facility with continuous caster and hot rolling mill was created. The model was used to study the dynamics of the system in response to changes in parameters that defined the scheduling configuration.

    More frequent schedule updating generally resulted in less work in process (WIP) and shorter lead times from casting to rolling, with resulting higher charging temperatures. The amount of oscillation in the system was also reduced. More frequent work roll changes were required when scheduling frequency increased, resulting in an increased fraction of setup time in relation to total processing time. Therefore, a development towards increased scheduling frequency may have to be complemented by efforts to reduce changeover times.

    The conclusion was that dynamic scheduling routines with frequent schedule updating result in better overall performance of the system due to lower WIP and better heat utilization. Dynamic scheduling routines with frequent updates make the system respond better to changes in the system and give better overall performance. The result is lower WIP, increased energy efficiency and less oscillation in the system.

  • 22. Storck, Joakim
    et al.
    Lindberg, Bengt Å
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    A lean production strategy for hot charge operation of a steel mill2007In: IET International Conferene on Agile Manufacturing, 2007, p. 158-167Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to show how a strategy based on lean production can aid the implementation of hot-charge operation in steel strip production. Key parameters in a lean strategy for steel manufacturing are identified, and it is shown that lean production targets the difficulties that are traditionally associated with hot charging. Hot charging amounts to a closer level of integration of the continuous casting and hot rolling processes. The conclusions are that implementation of hot charging can be seen as a waste-reduction process within a lean production strategy, and that there are substantial cost savings to be made once the full benefits of a lean production strategy are considered.

  • 23.
    Tesfamariam Semere, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Aggregate analysis of manufacturing systems using system2005In: Computers & Industrial Engineering, ISSN 0360-8352, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 98-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aggregate analysis in manufacturing system design is a useful approach to relegate the non-feasible alternatives at earlier stages. A reusable System Dynamics model and the Analytic Network Process is proposed for a rapid and strategically consistent decision-making. The SD model captures the causal relationships and interdependence of the factors that can be simulated while the ANP provides the preferences towards the performance objectives consistent to the strategic objectives. The basis for the SD and ANP is the Causal Loop Diagram (CLD) that shows the relevant relationships and feedbacks among the model parameters. The approach is exemplified via a case to select the best among competing system configurations.

  • 24.
    Tesfamariam Semere, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Production Engineering.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Production Engineering.
    An Integrated Approach To Evaluate Alternative System Configurations2004In: Proceedings of The EUROMA 2004: Operations Management as a Change Agent INSEAD, Fontainebleau, 27 : 29 June 2004, 2004, p. 589-598Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Tesfamariam Semere, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Production Engineering.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Production Engineering.
    Comparison of Manufacturing System Configurations Using Simulation Cycle2004In: Proceedings of the Fifteenth IASTED International Conference on Modelling and Simulation, 2004, p. 379-382Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Given the requirements and the design space, multiple alternative system configurations may be generated that have to be evaluated to select the best. Simulation based performance analysis is an indispensable method to accomplish such tasks particularly to complex systems as manufacturing systems which may not be analyzed appropriately by other methods. For systems with significant variability within or operating in a variable condition, their performance is non-linearly and adversely affected. Performance plots such as cycle time and throughput plots are convenient way of capturing and summarizing the system dynamic performance and hence is a suitable way to systematically compare. In this paper, a simulation-based experiment is presented to compare systems with variability using their steady state cycle time and throughput.

  • 26.
    Tesfamariam Semere, Daniel
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Production Engineering.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Production Engineering.
    Manufacturing Strategy and System Configuration: a Systematic Analysis of a Decision Making Process2004In: Proceedings of the International IMSForum 2004. May 17:19, 2004. Villa Erba, Como, Italy, 2004, p. 682-690Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Werke, Mats
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Bagge, Mats
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Nicolescu, Mihai
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Lindberg, Bengt
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Process modelling using upstream analysis of manufacturing sequences2015In: The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, ISSN 0268-3768, E-ISSN 1433-3015, Vol. 81, no 9-12, p. 1999-2016Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The manufacturing of components requires several manufacturing process steps that are performed in a sequence, during which the raw material is progressively converted into finished parts. The aim with simulation of manufacturing sequences is to replicate the aggregate effects of the process steps on key features of the finished product and manufacturing features. With the support of a successful simulation methodology, it will thereby be possible for process planners to evaluate virtually and select process steps to be included in the manufacturing sequence and to optimize process parameters. The motivation to implement sequential simulation in industry is therefore strong and will reduce time and cost in process planning. The modelling and simulation of complete manufacturing sequences is, however, a challenge which may lead to unrealistic and time-consuming modelling efforts and extensive computational requirements. This is due to the often complex material transformations through several consecutive process steps. In order to adapt sequential simulation into an industrial environment, simplifications are therefore necessary. This paper proposes a method for simplified metamodelling of manufacturing sequences, using upstream selection of process steps and definition of interconnected models. The method is presented as an algorithm and will improve the efficiency in the modelling of manufacturing sequences. The usability of the algorithm is demonstrated with two industrial cases: a bevel gear pinion and a steering arm.

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