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  • 1.
    Azcarate, Juan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Balfors, Berit
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Destouni, Georgia
    Stockholm University.
    Bring, Arvid
    Stockholm University.
    Transboundary approach proposal for sustainable and climate change adaptation strategies in the Arctic2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Decisions on the development of the Arctic should be given increased attention as its environmental, socio-economic and political circumstances are being significantly influenced by major trends that reinforce and support each other and together are causing long lasting transformations in the region.

    Increased strategic interest in the Arctic combined with rapid technological advances and climate change are leading to growing economic activities and natural resource extraction that challenge regional sustainable management and governance practices and international collaboration.

    Furthermore, environmental transformations risk being insufficiently accounted for in adaptation planning as environmental assessment application in the Arctic has been limited and monitoring of key environmental parameters has declined or is poorly optimized just when better information is a strong need. 

    In an effort to better understand the forces behind rapid Arctic transformations and to support key development decisions, a collaborative research project between the Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University has been established.1

    The aim of the project is to combine recent frontline research on strategic governance with quantitative analysis of environmental monitoring to develop decision making tools and assessment processes and explore and improve the preconditions for and links between environmental management, policy-relevant monitoring and climate change adaptation strategies in the Arctic.

    Methods

    A context analysis of Arctic institutional and governance frameworks is being carried out, where policies, sustainability objectives, environmental assessment practice, actors, and the effects of climate change are compiled, systematized and synthesized.

    Furthermore, a transboundary and participative strategic environmental assessment for information and skill exchange is being developed. Focus is placed on identifying conflicts of interest, gaps of knowledge and uncertainties, and on developing inclusive scenarios of future development possibilities that could be used by different stakeholders to discuss and arrive at shared development visions and objectives for the Arctic.

    Results and Discussion

    The collaborative research will enable Arctic actors to interact, increase and share information, skills and knowledge, build networks and, by this, develop their capacities. Moreover, experience will be gained in developing transboundary and participative assessment approaches that can be used to arrive at accepted and inclusive scenarios, visions and objectives for the Arctic, facilitating an improved understanding of climate change impacts on sensitive and unique Arctic ecosystems. Most importantly, it is thought that the research project will support decision makers to consider sustainability issues when deciding upon the measures and choices that will shape the future development of the Arctic.2

    Conclusion

    The proposed collaborative research project serves to develop transboundary and participative assessment approaches and tools to identify strategies towards sustainable development in the Arctic. This is done by creating platforms for stakeholder participation and dialogue where inclusive and accepted development objectives are formulated to address the rapid and profound changes that confront the Arctic. Depending on the results of the Arctic case study, similar transboundary approaches can be applied in other regions where there is a need to involve a plurality of stakeholders to take fair, legitimate and sustainable decisions.    

    1(http://www.kth.se/abe/inst/lwr/grupper/ema/research/shaping-a-sustainability-strategy-for-the-arctic-1.82268).

    2(http://iaia.org/conferences/iaia11/uploadedpapers/final%20drafts/Shaping%20a%20Sustainability%20Strategy%20for%20the%20Arctic.pdf).

  • 2.
    Baresel, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Destouni, Georgia
    Diffuse subsurface zinc loads from mining areas in the Dalälven River Basin, Sweden2009In: Hydrology Research, ISSN 1998-9563, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 445-453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The zinc load from the Dalalven River to the Baltic Sea is greater than for any other watercourse in Sweden. This paper investigates zinc mass flows into and through the Dalalven River from major mining areas within its drainage basin. Reported zinc mass flow data for this river are re-analyzed using an input-output flow analysis approach. Results show major inconsistencies in previous data interpretations which totally neglected possible zinc mass load contributions from the groundwater system to the river. This paper quantifies significant subsurface zinc load contributions that are consistent with all independently available data. Furthermore, a possible explanation for why these subsurface contributions may have been missed in previous studies and by the prevailing Swedish environmental monitoring system is provided. The study indicates that the input-output flow analysis approach may be generally useful for identifying and quantifying diffuse, unmonitored and uncertain pollutant load contributions from ground- to surface water systems.

  • 3.
    Baresel, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Destouni, Georgia
    Estimating subsurface nitrogen accumulation–depletion in catchments by input–output flow analysis2006In: Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, ISSN 1474-7065, E-ISSN 1873-5193, Vol. 31, no 17, p. 1030-1037Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use input-output analysis of nitrogen flows between various sources-sectors and natural waters in the Swedish Norrstrom drainage basin for investigating and bounding the implication range of some uncertainty sources for results of subsurface nitrogen accumulation-depletion in this basin. We quantify different possible base and extreme assumptions of nitrogen discharges and transport pathways from agriculture to surface and groundwater in the basin. The results are robust in showing considerable nitrogen accumulation-depletion flow interactions taking place between the basin's mobile water and accumulated nitrogen pools in soils, sediments and/or relatively immobile subsurface water zones for all different scenario assumptions. Similar scenario robustness is also found in resulting relative contributions of different active nitrogen source-sectors to nitrogen flows in natural water systems. In the Norrstrom basin, and possibly more generally, nitrogen accumulation-depletion flows to and from accumulated legacies for the future or from the past appear therefore to be more important for water quality than current nitrogen discharges from active source-sectors.

  • 4.
    Baresel, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Destouni, Georgia
    Novel Quantification of Coupled Natural and Cross-Sectoral Water and Nutrient/Pollutant Flows for Environmental Management.2005In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 39, no 16, p. 6182-6190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human water use and anthropogenic water pollution and ecosystem deterioration have increased so much that it is now a strategic challenge to maximize benefits from various possible water uses, while ensuring that basic human needs are met and the environment is protected. We propose and develop a novel use of input-output flow analysis as a relatively simple, compact and powerful tool for quantification of coupled natural and cross-sectoral flows of water, nutrients, and pollutants in catchments. The tool quantifies implications of various environmental regulation and management scenarios for both natural water systems and engineered-economic systems and sectors that use and impact natural waters for meeting human needs. Specific case study application to water and nitrogen flows in the Swedish Norrstrom drainage basin indicates considerable nitrogen load contributions to surface and coastal waters from slow groundwater flow paths and legacies of accumulated nitrogen in subsurface and immobile water pools. This implies that effective nitrogen load abatement cannot focus only on active sources but must also include downstream measures, which can capture and abate nitrogen/pollutant loading from different types of known and yet unknown point and diffuse sources within associated catchments.

  • 5.
    Baresel, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Destouni, Georgia
    Subsurface Water System Contributions to Surface Water Zinc Loads in Mining AreasManuscript (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Baresel, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Destouni, Georgia
    Uncertainty-Accounting Environmental Policy and Management of Water Systems2007In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 41, no 10, p. 3635-3659Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental policies for water quality and ecosystem management do not commonly require explicit stochastic accounts of uncertainty and risk associated with the quantification and prediction of waterborne pollutant loads and abatement effects. In this study, we formulate and investigate a possible environmental policy that does require an explicit stochastic uncertainty account. We compare both the environmental and economic resource allocation performance of such an uncertainty-accounting environmental policy with that of deterministic, risk-prone and risk-averse environmental policies under a range of different hypothetical, yet still possible, scenarios. The comparison indicates that a stochastic uncertainty-accounting policy may perform better than deterministic policies over a range of different scenarios. Even in the absence of reliable site-specific data, reported literature values appear to be useful for such a stochastic account of uncertainty.

  • 7.
    Baresel, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Destouni, Georgia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Gren, Ing-Marie
    The influence of metal source uncertainty on cost-effective allocation of mine water pollution abatement in catchments2006In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 78, no 2, p. 138-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In mine water pollution abatement, it is commonly assumed that known mine waste sites are the major pollution sources, thus neglecting the possibility of significant contribution from other old and diffuse sources within a catchment. We investigate the influence of different types of pollution source uncertainty on cost-effective allocation of abatement measures for mine water pollution. A catchment-scale cost-minimization model is developed and applied to the catchment of the river Dalalven, Sweden, in order to exemplify important effects of such source uncertainty. Results indicate that, if the pollution distribution between point and diffuse sources is partly unknown, downstream abatement measures, such as constructed wetlands, at given compliance boundaries are often cost-effective. If downstream abatement measures are not practically feasible, the pollution source distribution between point and diffuse mine water sources is critical for cost-effective solutions to abatement measure allocation in catchments. In contrast, cost-effective solutions are relatively insensitive to uncertainty in total pollutant discharge from mine water sources.

  • 8.
    Darracq, Amélie
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Lindgren, Georg
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Cvetkovic, Vladimir
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Destouni, Georgia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Effects of neglecting travel time variability on modeled nitrogen attenuation rates in streamsManuscript (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Destouni, Georgia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Hannerz, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
    Jarsjö, Jerker
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Prieto, Carmen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Shibuo, Y.
    Resolving the diverse pathways of freshwater and pollutant inputs to coastal waters2005Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Destouni, Georgia
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Prieto, Carmen
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    On the possibility for generic modeling of submarine groundwater discharge2003In: Biogeochemistry, ISSN 0168-2563, E-ISSN 1573-515X, Vol. 66, no 1-2, p. 171-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We simulate large-scale dynamics of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) in three different coastal aquifers on the Mediterranean Sea. We subject these aquifers to a wide range of different groundwater management conditions, leading to widely different net groundwater drainage from land to sea. The resulting SGD at steady-state is quantifiable and predictable by simple linearity in the net land-determined groundwater drainage, defined as total fresh water drainage minus groundwater extraction in the coastal aquifer system. This linearity appears to be general and independent of site-specific, variable and complex details of hydrogeology, aquifer hydraulics, streamlines and salinity transition zones in different coastal systems. Also independently of site-specifics, low SGD implies high seawater content due to seawater intruding into the aquifer and mixing with fresh groundwater within a wide salinity transition zone in the aquifer. Increasing SGD implies decreasing seawater content, decreased mixing between seawater and fresh groundwater and narrowing of the salinity transition zone of brackish groundwater in the aquifer.

  • 11.
    Destouni, Georgia
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Prieto, Carmen
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Quantifying hydrological and tidal influences on groundwater discharges into coastal waters2005In: Water resources research, ISSN 0043-1397, E-ISSN 1944-7973, Vol. 41, no 12, p. W12427-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [1] In coastal aquifers the dynamic mixing zone between intruding seawater and fresh groundwater constitutes a zone of salinity transition that may supply brackish groundwater along with chemical tracers and nutrients to coastal waters. Tidal influence has been proposed as a possible mechanism for enhancement of recirculated seawater, total submarine groundwater discharge (SGD), and associated tracer loading through salinity transition zones into coastal waters. We show that tidal oscillation may, for relatively low SGD cases, considerably increase the average recirculated seawater component of total SGD relative to nontidal conditions. High SGD cases, however, are dominated by and require large fresh groundwater flow components also under tidal conditions; this result is obtained from a wide range of different groundwater simulation scenarios and is supported by direct comparison with field data from different reported high-SGD sites in the world. For cases with hydrologically limited fresh groundwater flow directly into the sea we propose that observed excessive coastal loading of groundwater-derived tracers may be the result of large groundwater flow and transport into unmonitored coastal stream reaches, in addition to SGD.

  • 12.
    Lindgren, Georg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Darracq, Amélie
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Destouni, Georgia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    The dynamics of coastal load responses to inland nitrogen source abatementManuscript (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Lindgren, Georg
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Destouni, Georgia
    Nitrogen loss rates in streams: Scale-dependence and up-scaling methodology2004In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 31, no 13, p. L13501-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We show that the large spatial aggregation of model parameters in common catchment scale nitrogen budget modeling leads to artifacts that may, for instance, be a factor in explaining reported decreases of calibrated instream nitrogen loss rates, lambda(s)(*), with increasing stream size. In general, the common assumption of a single representative solute travel time for an entire stream reach may lead to considerable underestimation of the actual underlying local biogeochemical loss rate lambda(s) by lambda(s)(*), which increases with actual lambda(s) value and/ or increasing mean solute travel time and travel time variability in the stream. We propose an up-scaling methodology to overcome such model artifacts, in form of closed-form expressions of catchment-scale, in-stream nitrogen delivery factors for diffuse and point sources, as functions of local-scale nitrogen loss rates, lambda(s).

  • 14.
    Lindgren, Georg
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Destouni, Georgia
    Miller, Adrienne
    Solute transport through the integrated groundwater-stream system of a catchment2004In: Water resources research, ISSN 0043-1397, E-ISSN 1944-7973, Vol. 40, no 3, p. W03511-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a coupled groundwater-stream model of catchment-scale solute transport, using a Lagrangian stochastic advective-sorptive travel time approach. We consider distributed solute input over an entire catchment and investigate the resulting stream solute breakthrough, subject to the possible solute spreading mechanisms: (1) variable groundwater advection and solute mass transfer between mobile and immobile groundwater zones and (2) in-stream advection, mixing, and solute mass transfer between stream water and hyporheic zone. Among these mechanisms we show that fractal solute spreading over a wide timescale range is, for realistic parameter values, obtained in the stream only for the condition combination of both variable solute advection and solute mass transfer in the groundwater, with mean groundwater advection to mass transfer rate ratio that falls within a certain value range and with only a small fraction of solute input mass following fast overland and/or storm soil water flow to the stream

  • 15.
    Lindgren, Georg
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Gren, Ing-Marie
    Destouni, Georgia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630).
    Effects of Inland Nitrogen Transport and Attenuation Modeling on Coastal Nitrogen Load Abatement2006In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 40, p. 6208-6214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modeling of the spatial distribution of nitrogen transport and attenuation from various inland sources and along different hydrological pathways to coastal waters is needed for relevant decisions on effective allocation of measures for coastal nitrogen load abatement. We identify, classify, and quantify uncertainties associated with main discrepancies between spatial process representations in different catchment-scale nitrogen transport-attenuation models. The results show important model differences, indicating scientific disagreement on the realistic spatial process understanding, representation, and quantification in nitrogen transport-attenuation modeling. By further developing solutions for economic optimization of spatially differentiated nitrogen source abatement in coastal catchments, we find this disagreement to considerably affect the economic efficiency of coastal nitrogen load reduction. It may also lead to stakeholder mistrust and conflict and needs to be recognized and handled in environmental policy.

  • 16.
    Prieto, Carmen
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Destouni, Georgia
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Kotronarou, A.
    Koussis, A.D.
    Intensive groundwater development in coastal zones and small islands2003In: Intensive Use of Groundwater: Challenges and Opportunities, Lisse: Balkema , 2003Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Prieto, Carmen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Destouni, Georgia
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Kotronarou, Anastasia
    The influence of temporal hydrological randomness on seawater intrusion in coastal aquifers2006In: Journal of Hydrology, ISSN 0022-1694, E-ISSN 1879-2707, Vol. 330, no 1-2, p. 285-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate general effects of temporal hydrological randomness on seawater intrusion in coastal aquifers, using a 2D conceptuatization and model parameterization of three coastal aquifer zones on the Mediterranean Sea. These three aquifer cases represent quite different examples of hydrogeological conditions and temporal hydrological and groundwater management variability and statistics. A general result for all aquifer cases is that the effects of temporal randomness on expected salinity in pumped groundwater are greater for spatially homogeneous than for spatially heterogeneous aquifer representations. We quantify also prediction uncertainty around expected groundwater salinity, in terms of the salinity standard deviation and coefficient of variation (CV) in the different aquifer cases. In general, the salinity CV appears to depend much more on the aquifer depth than on the input temporal fluctuation statistics of each aquifer case. Aquifer depth may thus be a main indicator for resulting prediction uncertainty in salinity of pumped groundwater due to temporal hydrological randomness.

  • 18.
    Prieto, Carmen
    et al.
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Destouni, Georgia
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
    Schwartz, J.
    Seawater intrusion in coastal aquifers: Effects of seasonal variations in extraction and recharge rates2001In: SWICA M3 Cyber Proceedings of First International Conference on Saltwater Intrusion and Coastal Aquifers - Monitoring, Modeling and Management / [ed] Ouazar, D. and Cheng, A.H.-D., 2001, p. 1-11Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over-exploitation of coastal aquifers causes seawater intrusion and eventuallycontamination of groundwater wells in many parts of the world. Artificial recharge oftreated wastewater can be used to avoid or control seawater intrusion. A commoncharacteristic of many coastal areas in Southern Europe is that most of the annualwater demand, and hence the amount of water that can be used for artificial recharge,is concentrated to a few summer months, whereas natural groundwater recharge takesplace during the winter months. This paper addresses the effects of seasonal variationsin pumping, as well as in artificial and natural recharge rates on the dynamics ofsaltwater intrusion and especially on the evolution of salinity in extractedgroundwater. Specifically, numerical simulations are performed to examine theseasonal variability effects for a given set of extraction and recharge locations, but forscenarios with different artificial recharge rates. Parameter values for describing theaquifer and its hydraulic-hydrological properties are taken from a coastal aquifer inIsrael. We show that predicted salinity in extracted groundwater under assumedtemporally constant pumping and recharge conditions differs from the mean value ofsalinity under seasonally variable conditions. For long-term predictions, theassumption of temporally constant conditions may yield relatively small (less than10%) over- or underestimation of average salinity during the periodic steady-statestage that results from seasonally variable conditions. For short-term predictions, upto the common planning period of 25 years after starting a new groundwatermanagement practice, the same assumption may lead to considerable (50-55%)underestimation of maximum salinity values under seasonally variable conditions.

1 - 18 of 18
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