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  • 1. Acciaro, Roberta
    et al.
    Aulin, Christian
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Lindström, Tom
    Claesson, Per M.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Varga, Imre
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Investigation of the formation, structure and release characteristics of self-assembled composite films of cellulose nanofibrils and temperature responsive microgels2011In: Soft Matter, ISSN 1744-683X, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 1369-1377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possibility of forming self-organized films using charge-stabilized dispersions of cellulose I nanofibrils and microgel beads of poly-(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) copolymer is presented. The build-up behavior and the properties of the layer-by-layer (LbL)-constructed films were studied using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and ellipsometry. The morphology of the formed films was also characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging. The applied methods clearly demonstrated the successful LbL-assembly of the monodisperse microgels and nanofibrils. The in situ QCM-D measurements also revealed that contrary to the polyelectrolyte bound microgel particles, the nanofibrils-bound gel beads preserve their highly swollen state and do not suffer a partial collapse due to the lack of interdigitation of the oppositely charged components. To probe the accessibility of the gel beads in the formed films, the room temperature (similar to 25 degrees C) loading and release of a fluorescent dye (FITC) was also investigated. The incorporation of the cellulose nanofibrils into the multilayer resulted in an open structure that was found easily penetrable for the dye molecules even at constant room temperature, which is in sharp contrast with previously reported systems based on synthetic polyelectrolytes. The amount of dye released from the multilayer films could be fine-tuned with the number of bilayers. Finally, the thermoresponsivity of the films was also shown by triggering the burst release of the loaded dye when the film was collapsed.

  • 2.
    Aulin, Christian
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Novel oil resistant cellulosic materials2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study has been to prepare and characterise oil resistant cellulosic materials, ranging from model surfaces to papers and aerogels. The cellulosic materials were made oil resistant by chemical and topographic modifications, based on surface energy, surface roughness and barrier approaches. Detailed wetting studies of the prepared cellulosic materials were made using contact angle measurements and standardised penetration tests with different alkanes and oil mixtures.

    A significant part of the activities were devoted to the development of model cellulosic surfaces with different degrees of crystalline ordering for the wetting studies. Crystalline cellulose I, II and amorphous cellulose surfaces were prepared by spin-coating of cellulose nanocrystal or microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) dispersions, with Langmuir-Schaefer (LS) films or by a layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition technique. The formation of multilayers consisting of polyethyleneimine (PEI)/anionic MFC or cationic MFC/anionic MFC was further studied and optimized in terms of total layer thickness and adsorbed amount by combining Dual Polarization Interferometry (DPI) or Stagnation Point Adsorption Reflectrometry (SPAR) with a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D).

    The smooth cellulosic surfaces prepared had different molecular and mesostructure properties and different surface energies as shown by X-ray diffraction, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) imaging, ellipsometry measurements and contact angle measurements.

    The cellulose model surfaces were found to be ideal for detailed wetting studies, and after the surface has been coated or covalently modified with various amounts of fluorosurfactants, the fluorinated cellulose films were used to follow the spreading mechanisms of different oil mixtures. The viscosity and surface tension of the oil mixtures, as well as the dispersive surface energy of the cellulose surfaces, were found to be essential parameters governing the spreading kinetics. A strong correlation was found between the surface concentration of fluorine, the dispersive surface energy and the measured contact angle of the oil mixtures.

    Silicon surfaces possessing structural porous characteristics were fabricated by a plasma etching process. The structured silicon surfaces were coated with sulfate-stabilized cellulose I nanocrystals using the LbL technique. These artificial intrinsically oleophilic cellulose surfaces were made highly oleophobic when coated with a thin layer of fluorinated silanes. By comparison with flat cellulose surfaces, which are oleophilic, it is demonstrated that the surface energy and the surface texture are essential factors preventing oil from spreading on the surface and, thus, inducing the observed macroscopic oleophobic properties.

    The use of the MFC for surface coating on base papers demonstrated very promising characteristics as packaging materials. Environmental-Scanning Electron Microscopy (E-SEM) micrographs indicated that the MFC layer reduced the sheet porosity, i.e. the dense structure formed by the nanofibers resulted in superior oil barrier properties. Attempts were made to link the procedure for preparation of the MFC dispersions to the resulting microstructure of the coatings, and film porosity and the film moisture content to the resulting permeability properties.

    Finally, MFC aerogels were successfully prepared by freeze-drying. The surface texture of the porous aerogels was carefully controlled by adjusting the concentration of the MFC dispersion used for the freeze-drying. The different scales of roughness of the MFC aerogels were utilised, together with the very low surface energy created by fluorination of the aerogel, to induce highly oleophobic properties.

  • 3.
    Aulin, Christian
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Preparation, characterisation and wetting of fluorinated cellulose surfaces2007Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis deals with the wetting by oil mixtures of two different model cellulose surfaces. The surfaces studied were a regenerated cellulose (RG) surface prepared by spin-coating, and a film consisting of polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) of Poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) and a carboxymethylated Microfibrillated Cellulose (MFC). After coating or covalently modifying the cellulose surfaces with various amounts of fluorosurfactants, the fluorinated cellulose films were used to follow the spreading mechanisms of the different oil mixtures. The viscosity and surface tension of the oil, as well as the dispersive surface energy of the cellulose surface, are essential parameters governing the spreading kinetics. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and dispersive surface energy measurements were made on the cellulose films treated with fluorosurfactants. A strong correlation between the surface coverage of fluorine, the dispersive surface energy and the measured contact angle of the oil mixtures was found. For example, a dispersive surface energy less than 18 mN/m was required in order for the cellulose surface to be non-wetting (θe > 90º) by castor oil.

    Significant parts of this work were devoted to the development of cellulose surfaces for the wetting studies. The formation of a PEM consisting of PEI and MFC was studied and the total layer thickness and adsorbed amount were optimized by combining Dual Polarization Interferometry (DPI) with a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D). The adsorption behaviour as well as the influence of the charge density, pH and electrolyte concentration of PEI, and electrolyte concentration of the MFC dispersion on the adsorbed amount of MFC were investigated. Results indicate that a combination of a high pH, a fairly high electrolyte concentration for PEI solution together with low or zero electrolyte concentration for the MFC resulted in the largest possible adsorbed amounts of the individual PEI and MFC layers.

    The structures of the two cellulose surfaces were characterised with atomic force microscopy measurements and a difference in terms of surface structure and roughness were observed. Both surfaces were however very smooth with calculated RMS roughness values in the range of a few nanometers.

    The adsorption behaviour of water-dispersible fluorosurfactants physically adsorbed at various concentrations onto the two model cellulose surfaces was investigated using DPI. The aggregate structure of an anionic fluorosurfactant, perfluorooctadecanoic acid, dispersed in water was studied by Cryo Transmission Electron Microscopy (Cryo-TEM). The fluorosurfactants had an adsorption and desorption behaviour in water which was dependent on the fluorinated chain length and the aggregation form of the fluorosurfactant. Perfluorooctanoic acid and a commercial cationic fluorosurfactant with a formal composition of CF3 (CF2)nSO2NH(CH2)3-4N(CH3)3+I- was found to desorb from the MFC and RG surfaces upon rinsing with water, whereas perfluorooctadecanoic acid was strongly adsorbed to the surfaces. It is essential for a fluorosurfacatant to be strongly adsorbed to the cellulose surface even after rinsing to yield hydrophobic and lipophobic (oleophobic) properties with a large contact angle for oils and water.

  • 4.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Gallstedt, Mikael
    Lindström, Tom
    Oxygen and oil barrier properties of microfibrillated cellulose films and coatings2010In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 559-574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The preparation of carboxymethylated microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) films by dispersion-casting from aqueous dispersions and by surface coating on base papers is described. The oxygen permeability of MFC films were studied at different relative humidity (RH). At low RH (0%), the MFC films showed very low oxygen permeability as compared with films prepared from plasticized starch, whey protein and arabinoxylan and values in the same range as that of conventional synthetic films, e.g., ethylene vinyl alcohol. At higher RH's, the oxygen permeability increased exponentially, presumably due to the plasticizing and swelling of the carboxymethylated nanofibers by water molecules. The effect of moisture on the barrier and mechanical properties of the films was further studied using water vapor sorption isotherms and by humidity scans in dynamic mechanical analysis. The influences of the degree of nanofibrillation/dispersion on the microstructure and optical properties of the films were evaluated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and light transmittance measurements, respectively. FE-SEM micrographs showed that the MFC films consisted of randomly assembled nanofibers with a thickness of 5-10 nm, although some larger aggregates were also formed. The use of MFC as surface coating on various base papers considerably reduced the air permeability. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (E-SEM) micrographs indicated that the MFC layer reduced sheet porosity, i.e., the dense structure formed by the nanofibers resulted in superior oil barrier properties.

  • 5.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Johansson, E.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindström, T.
    Adsorption behaviour, structural and adhesive properties of microfibrillated cellulose-based multilayersArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Innventia AB, Sweden.
    Johansson, Erik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Structure and Properties of Layer-by-Layer Films from Combinations of Cellulose Nanofibers, Polyelectrolytes and Colloids2014In: HANDBOOK OF GREEN MATERIALS, VOL 3: SELF - AND DIRECT - ASSEMBLING OF BIONANOMATERIALS, World Scientific, 2014, p. 57-77Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation of nanometer-thin films of cellulose nanofibers (CNFs), polyelectrolytes, and/or nanoparticles has opened up new possibilities of manufacturing interactive devices with controlled mechanical properties. By controlling the charge of the CNF and the charge and 3D structure of the polyelectrolytes, it is possible to control the buildup, i.e., the thickness, the adsorbed amount, and the immobilized water of layer-by-layer (LbL) films of these materials. The charge balance between the components is not the only factor controlling the LbL formation. The structure of these adsorbed layers in combination with the properties of the constituent components will in turn control how these layers interact with, for example moist air. The mechanical properties of the LbLs can be tuned by combining the high-modulus CNF with different components. This has been shown by using a microbuckling technique where the mechanical properties of ultra-thin films can be measured. In combination with, for example, moisture-sensitive poly(ethylene imine) (PEI), the Young's modulus of CNF/PEI films can be changed by one order of magnitude when the humidity is increased from 0% RH to 50% RH. The incorporation of high-modulus nanoparticles such as SiO2 particles can also be used to prepare LbLs with a higher modulus. Examples are also given where it is shown that the color of an LbL film can be used as a non-contact moisture sensor since the thickness is related to the amount of adsorbed moisture. By chemical modification of the CNF, it is also possible to tailor the interaction between the CNF and multivalent metal ions, enabling a specific interaction between multivalent for example metal surfaces in water and modified CNF.

  • 7.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Johansson, Erik
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Lindström, Tom
    Self-Organized Films from Cellulose I Nanofibrils Using the Layer-by-Layer Technique2010In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 872-882Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possibility of forming self-organized films using only charge-stabilized dispersions of cellulose I nanofibrils with opposite charges is presented, that is, the multilayers were composed solely of anionically and cationically modified microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) with a low degree of substitution. The build-up behavior and the properties of the layer-by-layer (LbL)-constructed films were studied using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and stagnation point adsorption reflectometry (SPAR). The adsorption behavior of cationic/anionic MFC was compared with that of polyethyleneimine (PEI)/anionic MFC. The water contents of five bilayers of cationic/anionic MFC and PEI/anionic MFC were approximately 70 and 50%, respectively. The MFC surface coverage was studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements, which clearly showed a more dense fibrillar structure in the five bilayer PEI/anionic MFC than in the five bilayer cationic/anionic MFC. The forces between the cellulose-based multilayers were examined using the AFM colloidal probe technique. The forces on approach were characterized by a combination of electrostatic and steric repulsion. The wet adhesive forces were very long-range and were characterized by multiple adhesive events. Surfaces covered by PEU/anionic MFC multilayers required more energy to be separated than surfaces covered by cationic/anionic MFC multilayers.

  • 8.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Josefsson, Peter
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nanoscale Cellulose Films with Different Crystallinities and Mesostructures: Their Surface Properties and Interaction with Water2009In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 25, no 13, p. 7675-7685Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A systematic study of the degree of molecular ordering and swelling of different nanocellulose model films has been conducted. Crystalline cellulose II surfaces were prepared by spin-coating of the precursor cellulose solutions onto oxidized silicon wafers before regeneration in water or by using the Langmuir-Schaefer (LS) technique. Amorphous cellulose films were also prepared by spin-coating of a precursor cellulose solution onto oxidized silicon wafers. Crystalline cellulose I surfaces were prepared by spin-coating wafers with aqueous suspensions of sulfate-stabilized cellulose nanocrystals and low-charged microfibrillated cellulose (LC-MFC). In addition, a dispersion of high-charged MFC was used for the buildup of polyelectrolyte multilayers with polyetheyleneimine on silica with the aid of the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. These preparation methods produced smooth thin films on the nanometer scale Suitable for X-ray diffraction and swelling measurements. The surface morphology and thickness of the cellulose films were characterized in detail by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and ellipsometry measurements, respectively. To determine the surface energy of the cellulose surfaces, that Is, their ability to engage in different interactions with different materials, they were characterized through contact angle measurements against water, glycerol, and methylene iodide. Small incidence angle X-ray diffraction revealed that the nanocrystal and MFC films exhibited a cellulose I crystal structure and that the films prepared from N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide (NMMO), LiCl/DMAc solutions, using the LS technique, possessed a cellulose II structure. The degree of crystalline ordering was highest in the nanocrystal films (similar to 87%), whereas the MFC, NMMO, and LS films exhibited a degree of crystallinity of about 60%. The N,N-dimethylacetamide(DMAc)/LiCl film possessed very low crystalline ordering (<15%). It was also established that the films ha different mesostructures, that is, structures around 10 nm, depending on the preparation conditions. The LS and LiCl/DMAc films are smooth without any clear mesostructure, whereas the other films have a clear mesostructure in which the dimensions are dependent oil the size of the nanocrystals, fibrillar cellulose, and electrostatic charge of the MFC. The swelling of the films was studied using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation. To understand the swelling properties of the films, it was necessary to consider both the difference in crystalline ordering and the difference in mesostructure of the films.

  • 9.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Karabulut, Erdem
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Tran, Amy
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Tom
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Transparent Nanocellulosic Multilayer Thin Films on Polylactic Acid with Tunable Gas Barrier Properties2013In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 5, no 15, p. 7352-7359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition method was used for the build-up of alternating layers of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) or carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) with a branched, cationic polyelectrolyte, polyethyleneimine (PEI) on flexible poly (lactic acid) (PLA) substrates. With this procedure, optically transparent nanocellulosic films with tunable gas barrier properties were formed. 50 layer pairs of PEI/NFC and PEI/CMC deposited on PLA have oxygen permeabilities of 0.34 and 0.71 cm(3).mu m/m(2).day.kPa at 23 degrees C and 50% relative humidity, respectively, which is in the same range as polyvinyl alcohol and ethylene vinyl alcohol. The oxygen permeability of these multilayer nanocomposites outperforms those of pure NFC films prepared by solvent-casting. The nanocellulosic LbL assemblies on PLA substrates was in detailed characterized using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveals large structural differences between the PEI/NFC and the PEI/CMC assemblies, with the PEI/NFC assembly showing a highly entangled network of nanofibrils, whereas the PEI/CMC surfaces lacked structural features. Scanning electron microscopy images showed a nearly perfect uniformity of the nanocellulosic coatings on PLA, and light transmittance results revealed remarkable transparency of the LbL-coated PLA films. The present work demonstrates the first ever LbL films based on high aspect ratio, water-dispersible nanofibrillated cellulose, and water-soluble carboxymethyl cellulose polymers that can be used as multifunctional films and coatings with tailorable properties, such as gas barriers and transparency. Owing to its flexibility, transparency and high-performance gas barrier properties, these thin film assemblies are promising candidates for several large-scale applications, including flexible electronics and renewable packaging.

  • 10.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindqvist, Josefina
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Malmström, Eva
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Shchukarev, Andrei
    Umeå Universitet.
    Lindström, Tom
    Wetting kinetics of oil mixtures on fluorinated model cellulose surfaces2008In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 317, p. 556-567Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The wetting of two different model cellulose surfaces has been studied; a regenerated cellulose (RG) surface prepared by spin-coating, and a novel multilayer film of poly(ethyleneimine) and a carboxymethylated microtibrillated cellulose (MFC). The cellulose films were characterized in detail using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). AFM indicates smooth and continuous films on a nanometer scale and the RMS roughness of the RG cellulose and MFC surfaces was determined to be 3 and 6 nm, respectively. The cellulose films were modified by coating with various amounts of an anionic fluorosurfactant, perfluorooctadecanoic acid, or covalently modified with pentadecafluorooctanyl chloride. The fluorinated cellulose films were used to follow the spreading mechanisms of three different oil mixtures. The viscosity and surface tension of the oils were found to be essential parameters governing the spreading kinetics on these surfaces. XPS and dispersive surface energy measurements were made on the cellulose films coated with perfluorooctadecanoic acid. A strong correlation was found between the surface concentration of fluorine, the dispersive surface energy and the contact angle of castor oil on the surface. A dispersive surface energy less than 18 mN/m was required in order for the cellulose surface to be non-wetting (theta(e) > 90 degrees) by castor oil.

  • 11.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Tom
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Biopolymer Coatings for Paper and Paperboard2011In: Biopolymers: New Materials for Sustainable Films and Coatings / [ed] David Plackett, Chichester: John Wiley & Sons, 2011, p. 255-276Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Netrval, Julia
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Lindström, Tom
    Aerogels from nanofibrillated cellulose with tunable oleophobicity2010In: SOFT MATTER, ISSN 1744-683X, Vol. 6, no 14, p. 3298-3305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation of structured porous aerogels of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) by freeze-drying has been demonstrated. The aerogels have a high porosity, as shown by FE-SEM and nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements, and a very low density ( < 0.03 g cm(-3)). The density and surface texture of the aerogels can be tuned by selecting the concentration of the NFC dispersions before freeze-drying. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane (PFOTS) was used to uniformly coat the aerogel to tune their wetting properties towards non-polar liquids. An XPS analysis of the chemical composition of the PFOTS-modified aerogels demonstrated the reproducibility of the PFOTS-coating and the high atomic fluorine concentration (ca. 51%) in the surfaces. The modified aerogels formed a robust composite interface with high apparent contact angles (theta* >> 90 degrees) for castor oil (gamma(1v) = 35.8 mN m(-1)) and hexadecane (gamma(1v) = 27.5 mN m(-1)).

  • 13.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Netrval, Julia
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindström, Tom
    Ultra light-weight microfibrillated cellulose aerogels with tunable oleophobicityArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Salazar-Alvarez, German
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lindström, Tom
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    High strength, flexible and transparent nanofibrillated cellulose-nanoclay biohybrid films with tunable oxygen and water vapor permeability2012In: Nanoscale, ISSN 2040-3364, Vol. 4, no 20, p. 6622-6628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel, technically and economically benign procedure to combine vermiculite nanoplatelets with nanocellulose fibre dispersions into functional biohybrid films is presented. Nanocellulose fibres of 20 nm diameters and several micrometers in length are mixed with high aspect ratio exfoliated vermiculite nanoplatelets through high-pressure homogenization. The resulting hybrid films obtained after solvent evaporation are stiff (tensile modulus of 17.3 GPa), strong (strength up to 257 MPa), and transparent. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that the hybrid films consist of stratified nacre-like layers with a homogenous distribution of nanoplatelets within the nanocellulose matrix. The oxygen barrier properties of the biohybrid films outperform commercial packaging materials and pure nanocellulose films showing an oxygen permeability of 0.07 cm(3) mu m m(-2) d(-1) kPa(-1) at 50% relative humidity. The oxygen permeability of the hybrid films can be tuned by adjusting the composition of the films. Furthermore, the water vapor barrier properties of the biohybrid films were also significantly improved by the addition of nanoclay. The unique combination of excellent oxygen barrier behavior and optical transparency suggests the potential of these biohybrid materials as an alternative in flexible packaging of oxygen sensitive devices such as thin-film transistors or organic light-emitting diode displays, gas storage applications and as barrier coatings/laminations in large volume packaging applications.

  • 15.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ström, Göran
    Multilayered Alkyd Resin/Nanocellulose Coatings for Use in Renewable Packaging Solutions with a High Level of Moisture Resistance2013In: Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, ISSN 0888-5885, E-ISSN 1520-5045, Vol. 52, no 7, p. 2582-2589Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A surprisingly simple and rapid methodology for large-area, lightweight, and thin laminate coatings with remarkable moisture barrier properties is introduced. Commercially available paperboards are coated with thin layers of nanocellulose. The nanocellulose coating induces a surface smoothening effect on the coated sheets as characterized by environmental scanning electron microscopy and white light interferometry. A moisture-protective layer of renewable alkyd resins is deposited on the nanocellulose precoated sheets using a water-borne dispersion coating process or lithographic printing. Through an auto-oxidation process, the applied alkyd resins are transformed into moisture sealant layers. The moisture barrier properties are characterized in detail by water vapor permeability measurements at different levels of relative humidity. The water vapor barrier properties of the nanocellulose precoated substrates were significantly improved by thin layers of renewable alkyd resins. The effect of the alkyd resin properties, coating technologies, and base paper substrates on the final barrier performance of the sheets were studied. It was found that the nanocellulose coating had a notable effect on the homogeneity and barrier performance of the alkyd resin layers and in particular those alkyd resin layers that were applied by printing. The concept is environmentally friendly, energy-efficient, and economic and is ready for scaling-up via continuous roll-to-roll processes. Large-scale renewable coatings applicable for sustainable packaging solutions are foreseen.

  • 16.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Varga, Imre
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Claesson, Per
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Surface and Corrosion Science.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Lindström, Tom
    STFI-Packforsk AB.
    Buildup of Polyelectrolyte Multilayers of Polyethyleneimine and Microfibrillated Cellulose Studied by in situ Dual Polarization Interferometry and Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation2008In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 2509-2518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyethyleneimine (PEI) and Microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) have been used to buildup polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) on silicone oxide and silicone oxynitride surfaces at different pH values and with different electrolyte and polyelectrolyte/colloid concns. of the components.  Consecutive adsorption on these surfaces was studied by in situ dual-polarization interferometry (DPI) and quartz crystal microbalance measurements.  The adsorption data obtained from both the techniques showed a steady buildup of multilayers.  High pH and electrolyte concn. of the PEI soln. was found to be beneficial for achieving a high adsorbed amt. of PEI, and hence of MFC, during the buildup of the multilayer.  On the other hand, an increase in the electrolyte concn. of the MFC dispersion was found to inhibit the adsorption of MFC onto PEI.  The adsorbed amt. of MFC was independent of the bulk MFC concn. in the investigated concn. range (15-250 mg/L).  At. force microscopy measurements were used to image a MFC-treated silicone oxynitride chip from DPI measurements.  The surface was found to be almost fully covered by randomly oriented microfibrils after the adsorption of only one bilayer of PEI/MFC.  The surface roughness expressed as the rms-roughness over 1 μm2 was calcd. to be 4.6 nm (1 bilayer).  The adsorbed amt. of PEI and MFC and the amt. of water entrapped by the individual layers in the multilayer structures were estd. by combining results from the two anal. techniques using the de Feijter formula.  These results indicate a total water content of ca. 41% in the PEM.

  • 17.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, Superseded Departments (pre-2005), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindstrom, Tom
    STFI Packforsk, KTH STFI, SE-11486 Stockholm, Sweden..
    CELL 206-Preparation, characterization and wetting of fluorinated cellulose surfaces2008In: Abstract of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 235Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Aulin, Christian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Yun, Sang Ho
    KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Microelectronics and Applied Physics, MAP.
    Lindström, Tom
    Design of Highly Oleophobic Cellulose Surfaces from Structured Silicon Templates2009In: Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, Vol. 1, no 11, p. 2443-2452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Structured silicon surfaces, possessing hierarchical porous characteristics consisting of micrometer-sized cavities superimposed upon a network of nanometer-sized pillars or wires, have been fabricated by a plasma-etching process. These surfaces have superoleophobic properties, after being coated with fluorinated organic trichlorosilanes, on intrinsically oleophilic surfaces. By comparison with flat silicon surfaces, which are oleophilic, it has been demonstrated that a combination of low surface energy and the structured features of the plasma-etched surface is essential to prevent oil from penetrating the surface cavities and thus induce the observed macroscopic superoleophobic phenomena with very low contact-angle hysteresis and low roll-off angles. The structured silicon surfaces were coated with cellulose nanocrystals using the polyelectrolyte multilayer technique. The cellulose surfaces prepared in this way were then coated with a monolayer of fluorinated trichlorosilanes. These porous cellulose films displayed highly nonwetting properties against a number of liquids with low surface tension, including alkanes such as hexadecane and decane. The wettability and chemical composition of the cellulose/silicon surfaces were characterized with contact-angle goniometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The nano/microtexture features of the cellulose/silicon surfaces were also studied with field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The highly oleophobic structured cellulose surfaces are very interesting model surfaces for the development of biomimetic self-cleaning surfaces in a vast array of products, including green constructions, packaging materials, protection against environmental fouling, sports, and outdoor clothing, and microfluidic systems.

  • 19.
    Cervin, Nicholas Tchang
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Aulin, Christian
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Ultra porous nanocellulose aerogels as separation medium for mixtures of oil/water liquids2012In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 401-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel type of sponge-like material for the separation of mixed oil and water liquids has been prepared by the vapour deposition of hydrophobic silanes on ultra-porous nanocellulose aerogels. To achieve this, a highly porous (> 99%) nanocellulose aerogel with high structural flexibility and robustness is first formed by freeze-drying an aqueous dispersion of the nanocellulose. The density, pore size distribution and wetting properties of the aerogel can be tuned by selecting the concentration of the nanocellulose dispersion before freeze-drying. The hydrophobic light- weight aerogels are almost instantly filled with the oil phase when selectively absorbing oil from water, with a capacity to absorb up to 45 times their own weight in oil. The oil can also be drained from the aerogel and the aerogel can then be reused for a second absorption cycle.

1 - 19 of 19
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