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  • 1.
    Baalsrud Hauge, J. M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Engström, Alexander
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Stefan, I. A.
    Strömgren, Johanna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Bridging educational and working environments through pervasive approaches2017In: 3rd International Joint Conference on Serious Games, JCSG 2017, Springer Verlag , 2017, p. 296-307Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the education of mechanical engineers alternative learning methods like serious games, simulations etc. have been used in past decades to better the learning outcomes. However, a main concern is still the amount of resources used on adapting and modding games as well as the challenges related to the implementation in the class room setting. Typically a positive learning experience does not only rely on the game as such, but how good the facilitator or teacher is to change game mechanics and the narratives so that players with different learning curves, past experience and cognitive abilities all stay in flow and feel immersed. Physical simulation games played in a workshop setting often have this ability, whereas this still seems to be a challenge in digitalized games. The main purpose of this article is to identify mechanics that need to be adapted differently for different user groups in order to keep them in flow, motivated and engaged in order to have a high learning experience and how we can take advantage of technologies like VR to reduce the costs and the resources.

  • 2.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Judd, N.
    United Kingdom.
    Stefan, I. A.
    Romania.
    Stefan, A.
    Romania.
    Perspectives on Accessibility in Digital Games2018In: 17th IFIP TC 14 International Conference on Entertainment Computing, ICEC 2018 Held at the 24th IFIP World Computer Congress, WCC 2018, Springer Verlag , 2018, p. 402-406Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gaming technologies provides new ways of learning, but even though the new technologies have unique opportunities to support different individual needs, most games are not designed for people with impairments. This is specifically a problem in a learning context in mixed groups as well as for teachers with impairments who have to use the technology for preparing their classes. This paper focuses on how to make games for learning more accessible for students and teachers with different impairments.

  • 3. Cerinšek, G.
    et al.
    Oliveira, M.
    Duin, H.
    Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). BIBA-Bremer Institut für Produktion und Logistik GmbH, Germany.
    Margoudi, M.
    Perini, S.
    Taisch, M.
    Recommendations to leverage game-based learning to attract young talent to manufacturing education2017In: 3rd International Joint Conference on Serious Games, JCSG 2017, Springer, 2017, Vol. 10622, p. 187-202Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the problem of under-representation of young people in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) education in general, and manufacturing education in particular, as European and global phenomenon. The main objective is to analyse characteristics and different limitations of so called conventional initiatives to attract young talents to STEM and manufacturing and to furthermore propose how ICT and game-based learning approaches can address respective challenges. The paper presents an online serious game EcoFactory aimed at raising the awareness of sustainable manufacturing targeting young children in late primary and middle school. It furthermore provides lessons learnt from the evaluation of the EcoFactory and proposes recommendations for designing game-based initiatives in order to attract young talent to STEM and manufacturing education. They are aligned to the requirements of four target groups, i.e. game designers, STEM initiative designers, decision makers and teachers. In summary, game design should be based on pedagogical scenarios and co-creation processes; should focus on particular STEM subjects without causing major changes to school curricula and content; and should create and/or involve wider community with feedback and experience sharing mechanisms.

  • 4. Daudi, M.
    et al.
    Hauge, Jannicke B.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Systems Safety and Management.
    Thoben, K. -D
    Behavioral factors influencing partner trust in logistics collaboration: a review2016In: Logistics Research, ISSN 1865-035X, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Logistics collaboration has emerged a prevalent strategy to mitigate challenge individuals and organizations encounter. A successful collaboration, however, depends on certain trustworthy behaviors partner exhibit. To that end, understanding aspects constituting behavioral uncertainty and mechanisms by which such aspects affect partner trust is a necessary. This necessity counts on emergent behavioral trust uncertainties, constituted by partner’s actions and interactions occurring during collaboration. While this is a necessary requirement, most of the studies in the literature lack to take into account the influence of behavioral uncertainty on collaboration and partner trust. To that effect, this paper uncovers outlined limitation by establishing behavioral factors influencing partner trust in operational stage of logistics collaboration. To accomplish this objective, a systematic literature review (SLR) is deployed to consolidate research domains of logistics, supply chain, collaboration, and trust. SLR proceeds by defining a review protocol, followed by a search process conducted in 5 databases using 20 search terms on articles published between 2001 and 2015 inclusively. Among findings this SLR has revealed are four behavioral factors and thirteen criteria proposed to affect partner trust. Additionally, these factors constitute success and measurable criteria needed for empirical investigation which may employ experimental and/or case-study methods. Moreover, synthesized factors extend further an understanding of behavioral trust in ad hoc collaborative networks, a large part of which being supported by networks of humans and computers.

  • 5. Daudi, M.
    et al.
    Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH). University of Bremen, Germany.
    Thoben, K. -D
    Effects of decision synchronization on trust in collaborative networks2016In: 17th IFIP WG 5.5 Working Conference on Virtual Enterprises, PRO-VE 2016, Springer-Verlag New York, 2016, p. 215-227Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In collaborative networks, individual and organizational entities encounter many disagreements over many decisions rights. These disagreements procreate conflicting preferences, which in turn, affect trustworthy amongst partners. To that end, it becomes necessary that partners assume a degree of fairness on decision rights by calibrating positions which they initially consider a final. This calibration involves synchronizing partners’ conflicting preferences to a compromise. The objective of this paper, therefore, is to analyze and evaluate the effect of both, compromised and uncompromised preferences on trust. To achieve this, a corresponding behavioral trust model is proposed and evaluated empirically using a logistics collaboration scenario. This evaluation applies a multi-agent systems simulation method. The simulation involves 360 observations with three preferences set as predictor variables. Results show that irrespective of a degree to which conflicting preferences are synchronized, a magnitude of the generated effect on trust, depends as well on other factors like transport cost and extent to which vehicles are loaded. Additionally, if other factors are kept constant, compromised preferences affects trust more positively than uncompromised ones.

  • 6. Daudi, M.
    et al.
    Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Thoben, K. -D
    Influence of information sharing behavior on trust in collaborative logistics2017In: 18th IFIP WG 5.5 Working Conference on Virtual Enterprises, PRO-VE 2017, Springer-Verlag New York, 2017, Vol. 506, p. 493-506Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborations are based on mutual trust to strengthen confidence in the sharing of various resources such as information. Particularly in logistics, collaborations benefit emerged rich-data environments to successfully manage demand fluctuation and visibility of in-store logistics; as well as the sharing of physical assets. Shared information is gathered from various sources and manipulated by specific partner to match or maximize individual payoff. Such information may become vulnerable to information sharing behavior of the partner to henceforth affect trust. This paper investigates the influence of the information sharing behavior on trust. It focuses on a dimension of information accuracy to answer a research question: how do information sharing behaviors of partner affect trust in logistics collaboration? A framework of information behavior is established, and subsequently a trust model specified. Afterwards, simulation experiments are conducted to observe resulting impacts. Results unveil that both, the positively and negatively manipulated information influence trust in similar magnitudes. It is further argued that partner’s deceitful behavior underlying information sharing can be reduced although it might be difficult to eliminate.

  • 7. Daudi, M.
    et al.
    Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH). University of Bremen, Germany.
    Thoben, K. -D
    On analysis of trust dynamics in supply chain collaboration2016In: ILS 2016 - 6th International Conference on Information Systems, Logistics and Supply Chain, International Conference on Information Systems, Logistics and Supply Chain , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trust is an essential asset to support Supply Chain Collaboration (SCC), and it is a complex construct of dynamic nature. This dynamic behavior stems from trust ability of changing forms or states over time. Due to this dynamicity, SCC requires that the partners have a clear understanding of how trust changes throughout the lifetime of their alliances. This understanding is necessary in building and maintaining trustworthy relationships in dynamic environments. However, the authors have found no framework that sufficiently describes trust dynamics in SCC. Thus, this research presents the first approach toward a holistic framework describing trust dynamics by considering distinct dimensions, forms, states and roles of trust. The trust framework describing aspects attributing to trust dynamics is applied in an industrial case involving change events accruing to trust dynamics.

  • 8. Daudi, M.
    et al.
    Thoben, K. -D
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH). Bremer Institut für Produktion und Logistik at the University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany.
    An Approach for Surfacing Hidden Intentions and Trustworthiness in Logistics Resource Sharing Networks2018In: 19th IFIP WG 5.5 Working Conference on Virtual Enterprises, PRO-VE 2018, Springer-Verlag New York, 2018, Vol. 534, p. 524-536Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaboration on sharing logistics resources aims to balance supply and demand of the idle, inefficiently, and underutilized resources. Although sharing is beneficial, many issues such as privacy, security, time, regulations, safety, biased reviews, and ratings hinder the sharing. Such problems procreate many uncertainties, which as a consequence, lead to low trust in sharing resources. Meanwhile, existing solutions such as trust and reputation mechanism, and online reviews and ratings incorporate the least consideration to monitor hidden intentions and behaviors of partners. Therefore, this paper proposes an approach to surface hidden intentions and trustworthiness of partners involved in sharing resources. The approach stands on cognitive principles to explore intentions and trustworthiness of suppliers and consumers of logistics resources. Application of the proposed approach is illustrated using industrial case extracted from ridesharing platform.

  • 9. Daudi, Morice
    et al.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering.
    Thoben, Klaus-Dieter
    A Trust Framework for Agents' Interactions in Collaborative Logistics2017In: DYNAMICS IN LOGISTICS, LDIC 2016, Springer, 2017, p. 53-63Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trust is an essential factor for successful resource sharing in logistics. To build and sustain trust among collaborating partners in logistics requires, amongst others, conceptualizing on various aspects constituting underlying mistrusts. The conception is achieved by setting up a framework describing trust-based collaborative interactions of these partnering entities, referred to as agents. This research establishes a trust framework addressing agents' trustworthy interactions and thus aims at overcoming a knowledge gap identified in the literature. The framework depicts trust-based interactions concentrating to sharing of vehicle capacities. The trust framework is conceived on a foundation of theoretical body of knowledge in the literature. It engages knowledge on collaborative networks, logistics and transportation, agent behavior as well as trust. This research contributes by identifying key agents together with their roles, characteristics, tasks, information exchange as well as perceptions; all of which linked to agent trust. The framework is reusable in many ways, including formal conception of models aspiring to empirically investigate trust amongst agents sharing logistics resources. It also provides more understanding to practitioners, especially on issues relating to compromising differences resulting from agent's perspectives.

  • 10. Gomez, J.
    et al.
    Jaccheri, L.
    Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Entertainment Computing - A Key for Improving Inclusion and Reducing Gender Gap?2018In: 17th IFIP TC 14 International Conference on Entertainment Computing, ICEC 2018 Held at the 24th IFIP World Computer Congress, WCC 2018, Springer, 2018, p. 388-391Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entertainment Computing application areas are increasing day after day. The same way serious games become part of the teaching materials as schools, they can be useful tools to improve inclusion of people with special needs and reduce the gender gap. With this workshop we want to set a discussion space for researchers, designers and practitioners on Entertainment Computing interesting in its application to solve social issues, such as reducing the gender gap, preventing social exclusion of people in risk and promoting the inclusion of people with special needs. .

  • 11.
    Hauge, J. M. Baalsrud
    et al.
    KTH. Univ Bremen, Germany.
    Lim, T.
    Louchart, S.
    Stanescu, I. A.
    Ma, M.
    Marsh, T.
    Game Mechanics Supporting Pervasive Learning and Experience in Games, Serious Games, and Interactive & Social Media2015In: ENTERTAINMENT COMPUTING (ICEC 2015), Springer, 2015, p. 560-565Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This workshop investigates the mechanisms for behaviour change and influence, focusing on the definition of requirements for pervasive gameplay and interaction mechanics, procedures, actions, mechanisms, systems, story, etc.) with the purpose of informing, educating, reflecting and raising awareness. By connecting various experts such as designers, educators, developers, evaluators and researchers from both industry and academia, this workshop aims to enable participants share, discuss and learn about existing relevant mechanisms for pervasive learning in a Serious Game (SG) context. Research in SG, as a whole, faces two main challenges in understanding: the transition between the instructional design and actual game design implementation [1] and documenting an evidence-based mapping of game design patterns onto relevant pedagogical patterns [2]. From a practical perspective, this transition lacks methodology and requires a leap of faith from a prospective customer to the ability of a SG developer to deliver a game that will achieve the desired learning outcomes. This workshop aims to present and apply a preliminary exposition though a purpose-processing methodology to probe, from various SG design aspects, how SG design patterns map with pedagogical practices

  • 12.
    Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Guest Editorial2017In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SERIOUS GAMES, E-ISSN 2384-8766, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 17-18Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Hauge, Jannicke B.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering.
    Wiesner, S.
    Stefan, I. A.
    Stefan, A.
    Thoben, K. -D
    Applying gamification for developing formal knowledge models: Challenges and requirements2016In: IFIP WG 5.7 International Conference on Advances in Production Management Systems, APMS 2016, Springer-Verlag New York, 2016, Vol. 488, p. 713-720Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A main challenge in developing formal knowledge models is to efficiently elicit knowledge from various resources and form a coherent body of knowledge that can be validated and extended by user communities. The higher the complexity of a system, the more challenging it is to establish these models, specifically if there are several stakeholders involved, with various level of knowledge and needs. The usage of participatory design approaches in combination with Serious Games (SG) could ensure that all stakeholders are active, as well as that each perspective can be considered. So far manufacturing concepts have not reached their full potential due to the fact that gamification efforts are costly, time consuming to develop, and require the constant involvement of developers even for small changes. The authors discuss the use of a gamification tool to support knowledge processes, respectively knowledge experiencing, conceptualizing, analyzing and applying in engineering environments. To support this approach, especially in terms of costs, the paper presents an approach that makes customization accessible for non-SG professionals.

  • 14.
    Hauge, Jannicke
    et al.
    KTH. BIBA, Bremer Institut für Produktion und Logistik an der Universität Bremen, Germany.
    Carretero, Ramos Miguel
    KTH.
    Kodjabachian, J.
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Duqueroie, B.
    Protoworld: a simulation based gaming environment to model and plan urban mobility2016In: 4th International Conference on Games and Learning Alliance, GALA 2015, Springer, 2016, p. 393-400Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This workshop will offer the participants the opportunity to explore and test a gaming environment integrating simulation data from different sources. The participants will model and play different mobility options for five European cities. The ProtoWorld solution integrates different simulations and street maps in Unity and allows a playful experience in urban mobility planning. The software will be available for the participants also after the workshop for further experimentation.

  • 15.
    Hauge, Jannicke
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Lim, Theodore
    Kalverkamp, Matthias
    Haase, Florian
    Bellotti, Francesco
    ANALYSIS ON EDUCATING MECHANICAL ENGINEERS THROUGH SERIOUS GAMES USING PERVASIVE TECHNOLOGIES2016In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE ASME INTERNATIONAL DESIGN ENGINEERING TECHNICAL CONFERENCES AND COMPUTERS AND INFORMATION IN ENGINEERING CONFERENCE, 2016, VOL 1B, AMER SOC MECHANICAL ENGINEERS , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the education of mechanical engineers alternative learning methods like serious games, simulations etc. have been used in past decades to better the learning outcomes. However, as digital technologies advance, so too does the quality of commercial game-based learning. This brings the expectation that while serious games are still considered as an experimental pedagogic vehicle, the learning experience among students and their experience of using serious games become heightened. This is a challenge for several educational games that though fully able to progress a learning goal, is deemed detached due to its dated user interface and inability to host the latest ICTs. This creates an unappealing aspect to the student and can also affect their motivation. This paper reports on the early efforts to analyze serious games from the perspective of learning and gaming mechanics and the virtual environment and systems that can be made pervasive. The intention is to re-furbish dated serious games that are highly relevant to. educating mechanical engineers. The proposed concepts lie in the adoption of new pervasive technologies enabled by cyber-physical systems (CPS) and Internet of things (IoT) to modernize dated engineering serious games.

  • 16.
    Hauge, Jannicke M. Baalsrud
    et al.
    KTH. Universität Bremen, Germany.
    Stanescu, Ioana Andreea
    Carvalho, Maira B.
    Stefan, Antoniu
    Banica, Marian
    Lim, Theodore
    INTEGRATING GAMIFICATION IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SYSTEMS TO SUPPORT KNOWLEDGE PROCESSES2016In: INTERNATIONAL DESIGN ENGINEERING TECHNICAL CONFERENCES AND COMPUTERS AND INFORMATION IN ENGINEERING CONFERENCE, 2015, VOL 1B, AMER SOC MECHANICAL ENGINEERS , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid technological changes have a large influence in the field of engineering systems. However, just being fast is not sufficient; additionally, the system has to be user-friendly, flexible and cost effective. Serious Games (SG), as fast-paced, immersive, interactive media, have not only become popular in various learning and training environments, including engineering, but there are also several examples on how game based mechanisms can be used to enhance User Experience (UX) and performance. So far, gamification of Mechanical Engineering Systems (MES) have not reached their full potential, due to the fact that gamification efforts are costly, time consuming to develop, and require the constant involvement of MES developers even for small changes. Furthermore, its adaption to IVIES requires specific knowledge in game design and development. Thus, as demand for user friendlier, intuitive interfaces increases, there is also a need for support tools that enable access to design and development of gamification mechanisms for non-SG professionals. In this context, the authors discuss the creation of a library of User Interface (UI) automation tools that enables gamification and through which tutors can create interactive learning scenarios to guide users through the functionalities of engineering systems. Such tools have the potential to support knowledge processes, respectively knowledge experiencing, conceptualizing, analyzing and applying, in engineering environments.

  • 17.
    Hauge, Jannicke
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). University of Bremen, Germany.
    Stefan, I. A.
    Stefan, A.
    Exploring pervasive entertainment games to construct learning paths2017In: Entertainment Computing – ICEC 2017: 16th IFIP TC 14 International Conference, Tsukuba City, Japan, September 18-21, 2017, Proceedings, Springer, 2017, Vol. 10507, p. 196-201Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital Educational Games (DEGs) aim to provide motivating, personalized play experiences that blend learning and engagement, while addressing pedagogical requirements. The ultimate challenge is to enable and stimulate knowledge acquisition by creating rich environments that employ Entertainment Games (EGs) mechanics in order to accommodate learning objectives and support skills’ development. In recent years, the gap between EGs and DEGs has started to close, with studies looking not only into lessons learnt from EGs, but also into how EGs can be used in learning settings. This research analyses the possibility to integrate EGs mechanics into the pedagogical flows, in order to potentate learning. The paper further outline the design of a learning path that will be used as a unit on logistics and production means. The unit will be used for letting high school students explore functions of logistics and production (as a recruitment tool during the Open University days), as well as for the first introductionary course on production logistics.

  • 18.
    Hauge, Jannicke
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Stefan, I. A.
    Stefan, A.
    Cazzaniga, M.
    Yanez, P.
    Skupinski, T.
    Mohier, F.
    Exploring context-aware activities to enhance the learning experience2017In: 6th International Conference on Games and Learning Alliance, GALA 2017, Springer Verlag , 2017, p. 238-247Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile geolocation applications have been growing in popularity in the last decade. The ability to run a service on a mobile device that provides facts or recreational information to users opens up new opportunities to create engaging learning contexts. However, the potential of such services has not been fully exploited within educational settings, as compiling functional, student-friendly, context-aware learning journeys required advanced programming skills. The authors discuss this challenge and present tools that facilitate the construction of gamified learning paths, which integrate context-aware activities and minigames as motivational drivers for learning. The paper reports on the user testing feedback obtained in workshop settings.

  • 19.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Ind Engn & Management, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Gamification of a Procurement Process for Professional Training of Public Servants2019In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SERIOUS GAMES, E-ISSN 2384-8766, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 23-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Implementation and training about changes in a procurement process are complex due to the complexity of the procurement process characterised by the adaptive stakeholder network and continuously changing market rules. Traditional training approaches for procurement split the process into separate steps; however, to be able to assess all training aspects, it is important to have a holistic look at procurement. This work explores how well gamification can address the complexity of the procurement process for training specialists in the road construction sector. A case study is carried out to train new business models for both experienced specialists and new employees. The steps for the development of gamification for training in procurement are shown. A comparison of results from experienced and less experienced participants is presented. The results show the relationships amongst the complexity of the real system, the gamification design and the results of gamification.

  • 20.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Gamifying Project Procurement to Incorporate Better Goals of Organizations in the Public Sector: A participatory simulation approach on a Swedish road construction use case2019In: Operations Research PerspectivesArticle in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Governmental institutions need to ensure work of infrastructures, and in most cases, it is done using project procurement process. Such processes have highly complex and dynamic interaction. It leads to issues, such as information asymmetry, over-specified tenders, not efficient feedback loops, etc. As result, projects can rarely match objectives of organizations. This paper explores the use of participatory simulation to help holistically investigate a project procurement process. Based on case studies from the Swedish road construction field, it can be concluded, that a participatory simulation is an effective approach to experiment with the effects of project procurement.

  • 21.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Gaming Simulation Validation: Matching Participants’ Worldviews with Their Decisions2019In: ISAGA 2018, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gaming simulation is a successful approach to many issues where a holistic view is important. However, to use results from gaming simulations, the game has to be validated. This paper proposes a two-step approach for process validation of behavior for the gaming simulation by comparing decisions that players make in a game with the perceptions that affect their real-life decisions. Two case studies, where this approach was applied, are presented and the results are analyzed and discussed. A strong correlation between behavior during the games and in the real world was observed. This correlation indicates that gaming simulations in these cases are validated and represent the real system in an accu-rate manner. Thus, these cases show that the proposed approach works and can be used for validation of gaming simulations.

  • 22.
    Kornevs, Maksims
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems.
    Hauge, Jannicke Baalsrud
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems.
    Perceptions of stakeholders in project procurement for road construction2018In: Cogent Business and Management, ISSN 2331-1975, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 1520447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Planning transport system, building, operating and maintaining public roads and railways is typically performed by public institutions in collaboration with other stakeholders, such as manufacturers, suppliers and distributors. In many cases, this collaboration is done with a procurement process. Despite the formal nature of such process, stakeholders can have different worldviews or perceptions leading to adverse effects on the final procurement result. This article is focused on how to find perceptions of stakeholders related to roadwork-related procurement processes using Q methodology. This methodology uses data from the stakeholders and searches for factors or groups within the data of participants who have similar opinions. A specific case of road procurement in Sweden is used to test the methodology. As a result, three clusters of perceptions are found. These clusters and their interpretation can be applied to many tasks that are related to complex adaptive systems such as policy-making, strategy generation, solution testing, training and others.

  • 23.
    Nima, Ugyen
    et al.
    Coll Sci & Technol, Phuentsholing, Bhutan.;Druk Green Power Corp Ltd, Thimphu, Bhutan.;Univ Bremen, Bremer Inst Prod & Logist, Bremen, Germany..
    Wangdi, Rinzin
    Coll Sci & Technol, Phuentsholing, Bhutan.;Univ Bremen, Bremer Inst Prod & Logist, Bremen, Germany..
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    A Serious Game for Competence Development in Internet of Things and Knowledge Sharing2018In: 2018 IEEE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING AND ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT (IEEE IEEM), IEEE , 2018, p. 1786-1790Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Internet of Things provides an ability to interact with, share the data, and expand the capabilities of the physical world in terms of computation, communication, and key control with humans through many new modalities devices in the connected network. Though the availability of the information and performance are higher at lower cost, the usage of such system becomes more complex with the advancement of technologies. The traditional ways like lecture-based and role-playing learning has developed onesided learning and also expensive for the low-income people to acquire such knowledge. On the other hand, serious gaming has helped the users in acquiring new experiences and complex knowledge which are acquired through solving presented challenges whereby the user applies competency to solve these problems. This paper proposes serious gaming as a learning environment for gaining competence, knowledge, and experiences in IoT and knowledge sharing for the users. Moreover, the design of a serious game, effectiveness of ATMSG framework and evaluation results are also discussed.

  • 24.
    Raghothama, Jayanth
    et al.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Health Systems Engineering, Health Care Logistics.
    Evaluating City Operations Design using Interactive SimulationsIn: Journal Simulation & Gaming, ISSN 1046-8781, E-ISSN 1552-826XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Games and simulations are evaluated for serving different functions, such as learning, design, communication and collaboration. Research on the relationship between the constructs of games and their outcomes can provide insights on the design of future games, to steer towards particular outcomes.

     

    Aim. The article aims to relate the constructs of two high fidelity, high tech and free form games to a conceptual evaluation framework, to better understand the relationships between constructs such as fidelity, validity and the functions a game is meant to serve.

     

    Method. The games are built for designing operational procedures for city management. The games are built using the ProtoWorld framework, and simulate the cities of Rome and Haifa through the integration of simulations. The framework enables run time interaction and intervention within the simulated city, such that players can manage and design procedures for their cities through a large scale, realistic simulation system. Controllers from both cities play the games for their respective cities, and attempt to design and manage their simulated cities. As experts on the system, their reflections on the use of such tools in their planning practice and the outcomes of the game sessions are analyzed to evaluate the games and game sessions.

     

    Results. Results point to the free form nature of the game enabling the design of tangible outcomes, which can be immediately validated and implemented in practice. The high fidelity nature of the simulation restricts facilitation, but enhances the players’ ability to comprehend complexity. The agency of the players enables their identification with the simulation, but restricts their creativity in the game. 

  • 25. Soebke, Heinrich
    et al.
    Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Stefan, Ioana A.
    Prime Example Ingress Reframing the Pervasive Game Design Framework (PGDF)2017In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SERIOUS GAMES, E-ISSN 2384-8766, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 39-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The growing availability of mobile communication infrastructure over the last decade has contributed significantly to the maturity of Pervasive Gaming. The massive success of games such as Ingress and Pokemon Go made pervasive gaming a viable option for transforming learning. By its adaptability to location and context, pervasive technology is a valuable support for the design of engaging learning experiences. Despite profound examples of pervasive gaming as learning tool, there is still a lack of reliable methodologies to construct purposeful pervasive learning experiences. The Pervasive Game Design Framework (PGDF) is intended to fill this gap. In this article, we present the PGDF using the example of Ingress. Ingress is a prominent pervasive game, as it has received huge attention since its appearance in 2012. A large community of players and third-party-tool suppliers has created a rich set of experiences since then. In this research, we examine Ingress according to PGDF's categories based on a survey among long-term Ingress players (N= 133). Founded on this analysis we identify three main benefits for Ingress players. Furthermore, we discuss the consequences of these findings on the PGDF. Summarizing, this work strengthens the applicability of the PGDF, in order to enable the construction of enriched pervasive learning experiences.

  • 26. Stanescu, I. A.
    et al.
    Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH. Bremer Institut für Produktion und Logistik GmbH, Germany.
    Stefan, A.
    Lim, T.
    Towards modding and reengineering digital games for education2016In: 4th International Conference on Games and Learning Alliance, GALA 2015, Springer, 2016, p. 550-559Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has highlighted the positive qualities of Digital Games for Education (DGE), such as their persuasiveness and motivational appeal, which can support immersive, situated and learner-centered learning experiences. Designing, Developing and Developing (DDD) games for education remain a challenge, especially in terms of costs and of the advanced, multi-disciplinary expertise required to DDD a game. This paper highlights the challenges associated with the implementation of pedagogical requisites and analyzes opportunities for enabling modular, scalable and more elastic DDD processes. To support the approach, the authors present the Reusability Serious Games Reusability Point of Reference (SGREF), a tool that aims to facilitate game modding and reengineering by capturing and structuring information on DDD processes. Two case studies are presented to reflect the particularities teachers are confronted with when attempting to alter or extend a DEG and how SGREF is used to collect information to support DEG modding and reengineering.

  • 27. Stanescu, I. A.
    et al.
    Stefan, A.
    Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH. BIBA-Bremer Institut für Produktion und Logistik GmbH, Germany; University of Bremen, Germany.
    Using gamification mechanisms and digital games in structured and unstructured learning contexts2016In: 15th IFIP TC 14 International Conference on Entertainment Computing, ICEC 2016, Springer, 2016, p. 3-14Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transition from the pre-defined and often inflexible tools and practices of institutionalized mass-education towards dynamic and flexible learning contexts remains a challenge. Enabling rich and engaging learning experiences that consider the different progression rates and routes of each student require new approaches in education. This paper analyzes opportunities for employing gamification and digital games to construct navigable dynamic learning channels and enable pathways towards turning users into adaptive learners able to reach learning goals both in structured and unstructured contexts.

  • 28. Stefan, Antoniu
    et al.
    Stanescu, Ioana Andreea
    Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    APPROACHES TO REENGINEERING DIGITAL GAMES2016In: PROCEEDINGS OF THE ASME INTERNATIONAL DESIGN ENGINEERING TECHNICAL CONFERENCES AND COMPUTERS AND INFORMATION IN ENGINEERING CONFERENCE, 2016, VOL 1B, AMER SOC MECHANICAL ENGINEERS , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has highlighted Digital Games (DG)' capacity to enhance skill and abilities through their persuasiveness and motivational appeal, which can support immersive, situated and user-centered experiences. DG development remains a challenge both in terms of costs and of the diverse range of advanced, multi-disciplinary expertise required to develop a DG. Developing DGs for such a complex domain as Mechanical Engineering (ME) to better equip engineering students to practice at the intersection of complex systems increases this challenge. An alternative to decrease costs is to capitalize on existing DGs. The paper analyzes opportunities for DG adaptation, in order to enable the reengineer of existing games to fit specific purposes and support knowledge transfer. The authors build upon current research and practices to construct an approach for adapting DG content. Two case studies are presented as a proof of concept to exemplify the different levels of the digital game reengineering process.

  • 29.
    Stefan, Antoniu
    et al.
    Adv Technol Syst, Str Tineretului 1, Targoviste, Romania..
    Stefan, Ioana Andreea
    Adv Technol Syst, Str Tineretului 1, Targoviste, Romania..
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). BIBA Bremer Inst Prod & Logist GmbH, Hsch Ring 20, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.;Royal Inst Technol, Mariekallgatan 3, S-15181 Sodertalje, Sweden.;Univ Bremen, Bibliothek Str 1, D-28359 Bremen, Germany..
    Calderwood, Jackie
    Coventry Univ, Disrupt Media Learning Lab, Gosford St, Coventry, W Midlands, England..
    Beaufoy, Jayne
    Coventry Univ, Disrupt Media Learning Lab, Gosford St, Coventry, W Midlands, England..
    Arnab, Sylvester
    Coventry Univ, Disrupt Media Learning Lab, Gosford St, Coventry, W Midlands, England..
    Loizou, Michael
    Coventry Univ, Disrupt Media Learning Lab, Gosford St, Coventry, W Midlands, England..
    Story-Oriented Learning2019In: NEW TECHNOLOGIES AND REDESIGNING LEARNING SPACES, VOL I / [ed] Roceanu, I Belgian, D Stefan, IA Moldoveanu, A Matu, ST, CAROL I NATL DEFENCE UNIV PUBLISHING HOUSE , 2019, p. 30-38Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a game environment, narrative design is considered the art of combining gameplay and multimedia assets to create novel experiences that can entertain players and motivate them for longer periods. The use of narrative design in game-driven education has the potential to add an extra entertainment value to make learning more engaging. Narratives can give players insights into the game's world by providing helpful information to reinforce a certain gameplay feature. However, the development of interactive learning experiences necessitates a consistent effort that carefully blends content, gameplay and quality graphics. An easy-to-play game does not equate with an easy-to-create design and development process. Storytelling necessitates the ability to place the right data in a given learning context, meeting specific learning objectives, to tell a story in a compelling, and convincing way, in order to drive engagement. It is also important to take into account the positive impact of the involvement of the end-users in major decisions that affect consistently the structure of the game story or the communication with non-playing characters. Currently, the level of end-user involvement in the narrative flow remain limited. In this context, the Authoring Tools developed within the BEACONING project address these challenges and explore the positive impact that an end-user can have within a game-based learning setting by enabling them to become learning designers. This paper discusses the challenges associated with the creation of meaningful game narratives that can be implemented in learning settings and explores the roles of teachers and students as learning designers and the added-value generated.

  • 30.
    Stefan, Ioana Andreea
    et al.
    Adv Technol Syst, Str Tineretului, Targoviste, Romania..
    Gheorghe, Ancuta Florentina
    Adv Technol Syst, Str Tineretului, Targoviste, Romania..
    Stefan, Antoniu
    Adv Technol Syst, Str Tineretului, Targoviste, Romania..
    Arnab, Sylvester
    Coventry Univ, Disrupt Media Learning Lab, Gosford St, Coventry, W Midlands, England..
    Loizou, Michael
    Coventry Univ, Disrupt Media Learning Lab, Gosford St, Coventry, W Midlands, England..
    Morini, Luca
    Coventry Univ, Disrupt Media Learning Lab, Gosford St, Coventry, W Midlands, England..
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). BIBA Bremer Inst Prod & Logist GmbH, Hsch Ring 20, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.;Univ Bremen, Bibliothek Str 1, D-28359 Bremen, Germany..
    Location-Based Metagames for Learning2018In: Elearning Challenges and New Horizons, Vol 1 / [ed] Roceanu, I Beligan, D Ciolan, L Stefan, I, Carol I National Defence University Publishing House , 2018, Vol. 1, p. 234-241Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research argues that digital educational games have the potential to make learning more interesting and more effective, creating unmatched learner engagement. However, creating captivating game-based learning experiences remains challenging. Designing and developing games to support learning is still a costly and time-consuming experience that require a multitude of skills. An easy-to-play game does not equate with an easy-to-create design and development process. Creating game-based experiences is more complex than designing a linear lecture or a static online learning module. Moreover, game customization remains limited, making it difficult for teachers to adapt a game to specific learner needs and subjects. To address these challenges, the authors present the game authoring pipeline of the Beaconing Platform that enables the construction of location-based metagames by non-programmers. In the context of this work, a metagame is defined as the component that provides the overarching narrative experience for players. The paper describes the construction and implementation of two such metagames for two different cities - Targoviste, Romania and Coventry, UK. The location of the device is used to enhance the user experience and to customize the content that is made available to the learners. The metagames integrate quizzes into location-based challenges to create more flexible and more engaging learning experiences that blend virtual and real worlds. In these metagames, participants have to find a real world Point of Interest (POI), defined through GPS coordinates, or a series of them, through indirect clues and complete an activity (e.g. Minigame) there to further the narrative (or unlock the next clue/POI).

  • 31. Takegawa, Y.
    et al.
    Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). Bremer Institut für Produktion und Logistik, Germany.
    Kuramoto, I.
    Sugiura, Y.
    Hoshino, J.
    Preface2017In: 16th IFIP TC 14 International Conference on Entertainment Computing, ICEC 2017, Springer, 2017, Vol. 10507Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32. Wiesner, S.
    et al.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.). BIBA – Bremer Institut für Produktion und Logistik GmbH, Bremen, Germany.
    Haase, F.
    Thoben, K. -D
    Supporting the requirements elicitation process for cyber-physical product-service systems through a gamified approach2016In: IFIP WG 5.7 International Conference on Advances in Production Management Systems, APMS 2016, Springer New York LLC , 2016, p. 687-694Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Solutions are offered more and more in the form of Product- Service Systems (PSS), which combine tangible and intangible components into a comprehensive package for the customer. The rise of Internet of Things technology enables new ways of integrating products and services. So-called Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) include the necessary sensors, actuators and software to provide reconfigurable functionalities for changing demands. However, engineering complexity is increased by the evolutionary aspect, as well as the increased number of stakeholders and system components involved over the whole life cycle. Understanding the underlying requirements is fundamental to establish a common perception of the targeted system among the manufacturer, service providers and the other stakeholders. This paper presents a gamified approach to elicit stakeholder requirements for the development of these complex systems. Four industrial users will use the gamified environment for refining their existing requirements. 

  • 33. Wiesner, S.
    et al.
    Seregni, M.
    Freitag, M.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH. University of Bremen, Germany.
    Silvestro, A.
    Thoben, K. -D
    Effects of environmental dynamicity on requirements engineering for complex systems2017In: IFIP WG 5.7 International Conference on Advances in Production Management Systems, APMS 2017, Springer, 2017, Vol. 513, p. 255-262Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With customers demanding more and more holistic answers to their problems, solution providers respond with complex systems, integrating product, service and ICT elements into their offer. These solutions need to be aligned to a high number of requirements, coming not only from the individual customer but also from an environment of network partners, technology providers and other stakeholders. Especially for Product-Service Systems, where the solution provider takes responsibility in the operational phase, this environment is dynamic over the system life cycle. Stakeholders may enter or leave, as well as changing needs and technological capabilities. This makes the requirements towards the solution volatile, demanding a suitable Requirements Engineering approach. In this paper, it is discussed how environmental dynamicity can be monitored for its effect on requirements, with a special focus on organizational issues. Through a literature review and industrial case studies it is analysed, how it can be ensured that environmental changes can be taken into account in Requirements Engineering, leading to an optimal system configuration to address the customer problem.

  • 34.
    Zafarzadeh, Masoud
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Sustainable production development.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Sustainable production development.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Sustainable production development.
    Real-time data gathering in production logistics: A research review on applications and technologies affecting environmental and social sustainability2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to identify the challenges and issues concerning environmental or social sustainability in Production Logistics that are affected by implementing real-time data collection concepts, technologies and applications. A systematic literature review has been conducted to shed a light on sustainability aspect of real-time technologies and applications. According to the findings, few researches directly investigated how real-time data collection affect the environmental and social aspects of sustainability. Besides, the indirect effects are discussed in order to find a better picture about the relation between these technologies and sustainability.

  • 35.
    Zafarzadeh, Masoud
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Sustainable production development.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Sustainable production development.
    Wiktorsson, Magnus
    Hedman, Ida
    Bahtijarevic, Jasmin
    Real-Time Data Sharing in Production Logistics: Exploring Use Cases by an Industrial Study2019In: Advances in Production Management Systems. Towards Smart Production Management Systems: IFIP WG 5.7 International Conference, APMS 2019, Austin, TX, USA, September 1–5, 2019, Proceedings, Part II / [ed] F. Ameri et al. (Eds.):, New York: Springer, 2019, Vol. 567, p. 285-293Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Production logistics systems consist often of a number of low value-added activities combined with a high degree of manual work. Therefore, increasing effectivity and responsiveness has always been a target for production logistics systems. Sharing data in real-time may have a considerable potential to increase effectivity and responsiveness. The first step to realise real-time data sharing is to have a clear understanding of current state of PL systems and their requirements. This work is performed an ‘as-is’ situation analysis of an industrial case aiming at identifying which areas and applications would benefit most from real-time data sharing. The findings take a step closer to have a better understanding of CPS and Industry 4.0.

  • 36.
    Zhang, Cevin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Baalsrud Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Sustainable production development. Bremer Institut fuer Produktion und Logistik Bremen Germany.
    Pukk Härenstam, Karin
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    A Serious Logistical Game of Paediatric Emergency Medicine: Proposed Scoring Mechanism and Pilot Test2019In: Games and Learning Alliance / [ed] Antonios Liapis; Georgios N. Yannakakis; Manuel Gentile; Manuel Ninaus, Springer Publishing Company, 2019, p. 468-478Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Outcomes of care for various diseases and urgent conditions in an emergency department are dependent on balancing the patient’s need and available resources through management and coordination under often rapidly changing preconditions. However, although it is central to resilient operations, decision-making in dynamic resource management is rarely visible to managers. Sometimes the identification of successful strategies is apparent only through adverse event reports. A simulation game could be helpful for the acquisition of non-technical skills in addressing operational conundrums that could threaten the defence ability of a paediatric emergency department under care production pressures. This contribution presents a Sandtable serious logistical game of the care production system and, in particular, proposes its scoring mechanism, which was tested in a set of logistical experiments. The results show that through gamification, participants were challenged in terms of their intrinsic self-interest when it came to approaching the work. More importantly, the proposed extrinsic reward system allows all parallel functional roles to be equally rewarded as the game evolves. Anticipatory human resource management is identified as a successful strategy for achieving a sustainable working environment if the organizational resilience is confronted with patient inflow surges during the busiest hours of the busiest day.

  • 37.
    Zhang, Chen
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    Grandits, Thomas
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH).
    Härenstam, Karin
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Meijer, Sebastiaan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Health Informatics and Logistics.
    A systematic literature review of simulation models for non-technical skill training in healthcare logistics2018In: Advances in Simulation, ISSN 2059-0628, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resource allocation in patient care relies heavily on individual judgements of healthcare professionals. Such professionals perform coordinating functions by managing the timing and execution of a multitude of care processes for multiple patients. Based on advances in simulation, new technologies that could be used for establishing realistic representations have been developed. These simulations can be used to facilitate understanding of various situations, coordination training and education in logistics, decision-making processes, and design aspects of the healthcare system. However, no study in the literature has synthesized the types of simulations models available for non-technical skills training and coordination of care. A systematic literature review, following the PRISMA guidelines, was performed to identify simulation models that could be used for training individuals in operative logistical coordination that occurs on a daily basis. This article reviewed papers of simulation in healthcare logistics presented in the Web of Science Core Collections, ACM digital library, and JSTOR databases. We conducted a screening process to gather relevant papers as the knowledge foundation of our literature study. The screening process involved a query-based identification of papers and an assessment of relevance and quality. Two hundred ninety-four papers met the inclusion criteria. The review showed that different types of simulation models can be used for constructing scenarios for addressing different types of problems, primarily for training and education sessions. The papers identified were classified according to their utilized paradigm and focus areas. (1) Discrete-event simulation in single-category and single-unit scenarios formed the most dominant approach to developing healthcare simulations and dominated all other categories by a large margin. (2) As we approached a systems perspective (cross-departmental and cross-institutional), discrete-event simulation became less popular and is complemented by system dynamics or hybrid modeling. (3) Agent-based simulations and participatory simulations have increased in absolute terms, but the share of these modeling techniques among all simulations in this field remains low. An extensive study analyzing the literature on simulation in healthcare logistics indicates a growth in the number of examples demonstrating how simulation can be used in healthcare settings. Results show that the majority of studies create situations in which non-technical skills of managers, coordinators, and decision makers can be trained. However, more system-level and complex system-based approaches are limited and use methods other than discrete-event simulation.

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