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  • 1. Cleveland-Innes, M.
    et al.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Faculty change in engineering education: Case study of a blended course about blended and online learning2015In: ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings, 2015, no 122nd ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Making Value for SocietyConference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports results from a case study of teaching development in engineering education at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden, in answer to the research question "what impact, if any, does participation in a blended course about teaching in blended face-to-face and online formats have on faculty views about teaching in engineering education?" Early results indicate that 1) faculty can assess the value of online and blended learning through this experience, 2) faculty engaged actively in online and face-to-face discussions of pedagogy, 3) disciplinary differences in the application of online and blended learning are a concern to STEM faculty, and 4) the evaluation and implementation, if any, of online and blended learning in engineering education has to include discussions beyond the use of applicable technologies.

  • 2.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Athabasca University.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Teaching blended learning through a blended community of inquiry: A course for faculty in Sweden2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Athabasca University.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    The Influence of Emotion on Cognitive Presence in a Case of Online Math Coaching2014In: Challenges for Research into Open & Distance Learning: Doing Things Better – Doing Better Things. Proceedings of the European Distance and E-Learning Network 2014 Research Workshop , Oxford, 2014, p. 87-94Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Math Coach program provides help with mathematics instruction using online coaching. Instructive communication using text-based CMC with additional whiteboard capacity is used. Coachees range from sixth to ninth year of compulsory school, and upper secondary school (aged 12–19). Coaches are enrolled from students at teacher training colleges. Stenbom, Cleveland-Innes, & Hrastinski (2012) introduced a framework for analyzing online coaching called the Relationship of Inquiry. That framework is a modification of the well-researched and verified theoretical framework the online Community of Inquiry (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer ( 2000, 2001). Transcript analysis of Math Coach conversations indicates that emotional expression is a natural part of the practical inquiry process that constitutes cognitive presence.

  • 4.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Tutoring online tutors: Using digital badges to encourage the development of online tutoring skills2018In: British Journal of Educational Technology, ISSN 0007-1013, E-ISSN 1467-8535, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 127-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Online tutors play a critical role in e-learning and need to have an appropriate set of skills in addition to subject matter expertise. This paper explores how digital badges can be used to encourage the development of online tutoring skills. Based on previous research, we defined three digital badges, which are examples of essential tutoring skills.These skills were self-assessed during two weeks by online tutors in K-12 mathematics, who also wrote a self-reflection based on their experience. The digital badges motivated tutors to reflect on online tutoring practices. The tutors described that they gained a more detailed understanding of the tutoring process when continuously analyzing ongoing conversations. However, it was a challenge for the tutors to balance the private activity, reflection on tutoring skills, and the social activity, communication with the K-12 students. It is essential to take into account when tutors will have time to reflect, for example, by scheduling time for reflection or enabling opportunities for reflection that is flexible in time. A challenge for further research is to better understand the potential benefits of different types of badges

  • 5.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Student-student online coaching: Conceptualizing an emerging learning activity2013In: The Internet and higher education, ISSN 1096-7516, E-ISSN 1873-5525, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 66-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to describe student-student online coaching, defined as "an online service where a student gets support on a specific subject matter from a more experienced student". Student-student online coaching emphasizes learning a subject matter by giving a student the opportunity to get coached by a coach, i.e. a more experienced student. Online coaching is encouraged by an organization, but the control of learning is primarily in the hands of the student. An example of online coaching is described, i.e. math coaching by instant messaging. A key challenge for coaches is to interpret the students' competence level, despite that they often do not know the students beforehand, in order to coach on a level that is within their zone of proximal development.

  • 6.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Graphic Arts, Media (closed 20111231).
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Student-student online coaching: The case of math coaching2011In: Proceedings of the 17th Sloan-Consortium International Conference on Online Learning: The case of math coaching, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most learning takes place outside the classroom in our everyday lives. The aim of this presentation is to describe student-student online coaching, defined as "an online service where students get help with their schoolwork from more capable students". We will present an example of math coaching by using instant messaging.

  • 7.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Benjaminsson, Simon
    Smartera AB.
    Jansson, Malin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Identifying and exploring the effects of different types of tutor questions in individual online synchronous tutoring in mathematics2019In: Interactive Learning Environments, ISSN 1049-4820, E-ISSN 1744-5191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although we know that asking questions is an essential aspect of onlinetutoring, there is limited research on this topic. The aim of this paperwas to identify commonly used direct question types and explore theeffects of using these question types on conversation intensity, approachto tutoring, perceived satisfaction and perceived learning. The researchsetting was individual online synchronous tutoring in mathematics. Theempirical data was based on 13,317 logged conversations and aquestionnaire. The tutors used a mix of open, more student-centredquestions, and closed, more teacher-centred questions. In contrast toprevious research, this study provides a more positive account indicatingthat it is indeed possible to train tutors to focus on asking questions,rather than delivering content. Frequent use of many of the questiontypes contributed to increased conversation intensity. However, therewere few question types that were associated with statisticallysignificant effects on perceived satisfaction or learning. There are nosilver bullet question types that by themselves led to positive effects onperceived satisfaction and learning. The question types could be used byteachers and teacher students when reflecting on what types ofquestions they are asking, and what kind of questions they could be asking.

  • 8.
    Jansson, Malin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Enoksson, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Students’ engagement in their own and other students’ process of inquiry2019In: Proceedings of the ICDE World Conference on Online Learning, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    A systematic review of the Community of Inquiry survey2018In: The Internet and higher education, ISSN 1096-7516, E-ISSN 1873-5525, Vol. 39, p. 22-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to gain knowledge about the implementation and development of the Community of Inquiry survey. This paper describes a systematic review of peer-reviewed journal papers where the survey has been used to collect and analyze empirical data about a learning experience. A total of 103 journal papers published between 2008 and 2017 were reviewed to reveal the context, research design, and results obtained using the survey. These results specify that the Community of Inquiry survey provide results that are valid and reliable. The instrument has been used effectively to examine learning experiences and to compare different premises in many contexts. It is, however, necessary to expand the settings in order to make more general claims about the nature of online and blended learning.

  • 10.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Mattecoach på nätet2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Mattecoach på nätet är en satsning där elever på Stockholmsskolor på kvällstid kan få hjälp av lärarstudenter med matematik via direktmeddelandeprogrammet Windows Live Messenger. Stefan Stenbom som är projektledare berättar om projektet och hur de praktiskt arbetar i lärarrollen när de möter ungdomar på MSN.Mattecoach på nätet är en satsning där elever på Stockholmsskolor på kvällstid kan få hjälp av lärarstudenter med matematik via direktmeddelandeprogrammet Windows Live Messenger. Tjänsten är öppen för alla elever från åk 6 till och med gymnasiet och komvux i Stockholm. Syftet med projektet är att bidra till ökad måluppfyllnad i matematik bland Stockholms elever, utveckla den digitala kompetensen bland lärarstudenter och ta fram metoder för lärarhandledning via Internet.Coacherna är alla lärarstudenter på KTH och Stockholms universitet och genomgår en coachutbildning där de får lära sig handledning på nätet. Genom att använda lärarstudenter lär vi oss samtidigt hur en lärares roll på Internet kan se ut, något som vi tror är viktigt inför framtiden. Vi sparar alla konversationer vilka analyseras och sammanställs. Till exempel var under hösten 2009 medelkonversationslängden 26,8 minuter och 23 % av frågorna handlade om algebra. Stefan Stenbom som har byggt upp verksamheten och leder projektet håller presentationen, berättar om projektet och hur de praktiskt arbetar i lärarrollen när de möter ungdomar på MSN.

  • 11.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Online coaching as a Relationship of Inquiry: Exploring one-to-one online education2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In educational development, much focus is put on the use of computers and other digital tools to enhance teaching and learning. One of the most used digital communication forms is one-to-one communication using text, images, and video. One-to-one communication for educational purposes has, however, so far received only modest attention in research.

    The purpose of this thesis is to explore inquiry-based one-to-one online education. An additional purpose is to explore opportunities and limitations with the Community of Inquiry framework, one of the most used models for analysis of online learning, when analyzing one-to-one online education. A particular interest is put on the role of emotions in the analyses. The empirical case used in the thesis is the Math Coach program who employs one-to-one education for k-12 students in mathematics via chat and a shared digital whiteboard.

    The thesis consists of an introduction and four papers. First, in Paper I online coaching is defined, explained, and discussed through a review of previous research and a study of the establishment and operation of the Math Coach program. Secondly, the Community of Inquiry framework is adapted for use in one-to-one settings forming the Relationship of Inquiry framework. Paper II initiates the adaption using a survey study, Paper III evaluates the role of emotions in the framework, and Paper IV consolidates the Relationship of Inquiry framework with a comprehensive description of its components and a transcript coding procedure.

    The findings indicate that inquiry-based one-to-one online education can be explored utilizing Online coaching as a Relationship of Inquiry. Online coaching is theoretically grounded in collaborative constructivism, critical thinking, and proximal development. It is defined as an inquiry-based learning activity where a person gets support on a specific subject matter from a more knowledgeable person using the Internet. The Relationship of Inquiry is a conceptual connection that is built between two persons that engage in a critical discourse in order resolve an educational issue. Central for the framework is the elements of cognitive presence, teaching presence, social presence, and emotional presence. Emotional presence is especially examined and confirmed as a critical interdependent element of the framework.

  • 12.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Online Coaching as Teacher Training: Using a Relationship of Inquiry Framework2016In: Optimizing K-12 Education through Online and Blended Learning / [ed] Ostashewski, N.; Cleveland-Innes, M.; Howell, J., Hershey, PA: IGI Global, 2016Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Using the Internet for educational purposes is now commonly accepted. More challenging is the realizationof this potential, particularly in the K-12 education environment. According to the growing literatureon this topic, using Internet technology during K-12 teacher training will provide more knowledge andskills for teachers wishing to use Internet technology in their own classrooms. In an adaption of theonline Community of Inquiry, a revised framework for one-to-one online teaching was developed. In theRelationship of Inquiry framework, the elements of cognitive, teaching, social, and emotional presenceoutline the educational experience of one student receiving learning support from one teacher. Theframework was tested with pre-service teachers using the Math Coach program which offers help withmathematics just-in-time via instant messaging.

  • 13.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Online learning support using a Relationship of Inquiry framework2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Benjaminsson, Simon
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Digital badges for in-service training of online tutors2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this presentation, an application where digital badges are used for continuing training of online tutors is reviewed. First, we present how digital badges are used in a math tutoring service for K–12 students. Then, we discuss benefits and challenges of digital badges for development of in-service online tutors.

  • 15.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. Athabasca University, Canada.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Emotional presence in a relationship of inquiry: The case of one-to-one online math coaching2016In: Online Learning, ISSN 1092-8235, Vol. 20, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emotions have been confirmed to be a critical component of the process of learning. In the online Community of Inquiry theoretical framework, and the recently suggested online Relationship of Inquiry framework, emotions are considered a subsection of social presence. In this study, the concept of emotional presence is examined. This examination occurs within the Relationship of Inquiry framework, developed to analyze one-to-one online coaching. A survey of online coaches and a transcript coding procedure from the online coaching service Math Coach provide the data for the study. The results indicate that a Relationship of Inquiry framework consisting of cognitive, social, teaching, and emotional presence enhances the exploration of one-to-one online coaching settings. The interpretation of these results identifies emotional presence as an essential and distinct part of one-to-one online math coaching.

  • 16.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Examining a learning-driven relationship of inquiry: Discerning emotional presence in online math coaching2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores emotional presence in a student-student online coaching setting. In this learner-driven, online exchange, students enrolled in a teaching program assist K-12 math students using an online relationship of inquiry model. Adapted from the online community of inquiry model, one-to-one online interaction is studied for multiple types of online presence and, in particular, the existence and possible effect of emotional presence. Preliminary findings identify that emotional presence exists as a separate experience in the online coaching exchange, but scores lower than other types of presence.

  • 17.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik. Athabasca University.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Online Coaching as a Relationship of Inquiry: Mathematics, online help, and emotional presence2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Math Coach program provides help with mathematics using online coaching. In the program, communication using text-based CMC with additional whiteboard capacity is used. Students range from sixth to ninth year of compulsory school, and upper secondary school (aged 12–19). Coaches are enrolled from students at teacher training colleges. Stenbom et al. (2012) introduced a framework for analyzing online coaching, the Relationship of Inquiry. That framework is a modification of the well-researched and verified theoretical framework the online Community of Inquiry (Garrison et al., 2000, 2001). Survey data and transcript analysis indicates that emotional presence is a natural part of a four-element framework for analysis of one-to-one online coaching. Abbreviations, special words and symbols, such as emoticons, are used regularly as an instrument to enhance the visibility between the coach and coachee. It serves as a replacement for face-to-face non-verbal communication. Also, sharing of emotions and moods between two individuals as people and about the coaching activity are common.

    This presentation will review the proposed framework for online coaching consisting of cognitive, social, teaching and emotional presence. A special focus will be on the role emotion may play in such environments. Beyond discussion of theory, implications for practice and training of online coaches will be discussed in an interactive session with guided dialogue. 

  • 18.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    How to setup a student-student online coaching project at teacher education in Sweden2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mathcoach (www.mattecoach.se) and Swedishcoach (www.svenskacoach.se) offers K-12 students help with their homework in Swedish for immigrants and mathematics online. The coaches are all students at teacher education. We will present how we work with the projects at four Swedish universities and inspire you to start your own netcoach project.

  • 19.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media technology and interaction design, MID.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Lärande. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media technology and interaction design, MID.
    Student-Student Online Coaching as a Relationship of Inquiry: An Exploratory Study from the Coach Perspective2012In: Journal of asynchronous learning networks, ISSN 1939-5256, E-ISSN 1092-8235, Vol. 16, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are comparatively few studies on one-to-one tutoring in online settings, even though it has been found to be an effective model. This paper explores student-student online coaching from the coach perspective. The empirical case is the project Math Coach, where K-12 students are coached by teacher students using instant messaging. This research is an adaptation of the community of inquiry model to an online coaching setting, which we refer to as a relationship of inquiry. The adapted model was used to gain a better understanding of the practice of online coaching by exploring the extent to which cognitive, social, and teaching presence exist in this case of online coaching. A relationship of inquiry survey was distributed to and answered by all active coaches (n=41). The adapted cognitive, social and teaching presence measures achieved an acceptable level of reliability. Differences between three presences, and their respective sub-categories, demonstrate a unique pattern of interaction between coaches and coachees in the online coaching environment. Findings suggest the online inquiry model fits as well for a relationship of inquiry as it does for a community of inquiry. The model provides valuable information for better understanding of online coaching.

  • 20.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik.
    Cleveland-Innes, Martha
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Teknikdidaktik. Athabasca University.
    The relationship of Inquiry – a framework for design and analysis of online coaching2014In: NGL 2014: Next Generation Learning Conference, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation introduces the Relationship of Inquiry framework. It is a theoretical framework for design and analysis of online coaching, a one-to-one inquiry-based online learning activity. The video introduces the framework. During the seminar we will discuss this framework with data from an online coaching program called Math Coach.

  • 21.
    Stenbom, Stefan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Technology for learning.
    Jansson, Malin
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning, Technology for learning.
    Hulkko, Annelie
    KTH.
    Revising the Community of Inquiry framework for the analysis of one-to-one online learning relationships2016In: International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, ISSN 1492-3831, E-ISSN 1492-3831, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 36-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In online learning research, the theoretical Community of Inquiry framework has been used extensively to analyze processes of inquiry among learners and instructors within a community. This paper examines a special case of community of inquiry consisting of only one learner and one instructor. Together they engage in an online coaching discourse to form a relationship of inquiry. Within these relationships, coachees pass through processes of practical inquiry process while a coach supports the process. In this study, a framework and coding scheme were developed for use in a transcript coding procedure including 3,109 messages from an online coaching case in math for k‑12 students. It is found that the elements of cognitive, teaching, and social presence, as well as the newly proposed emotional presence, which outlines a community of inquiry, comprise an effective structure for the analysis of one-to-one online coaching environments. The findings of this exploratory study suggest that a Relationship of Inquiry framework has the potential to support development of one-to-one online learning.

  • 22. Vaughan, Norm
    et al.
    Armatas, Christine
    Jing Zhou, Laura
    Jansen Van Vuuren, Marieta
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Brown, Mark
    MacDonald, David
    Blended Learning From Design To Evaluation: International Case Studies Of Evidence-Based Practice2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Laumakis, Graham and Dziuban (2009) suggest “the impact of blended learning is potentially monumental – permanently changing how students interact with higher education” (p.23). This panel presentation will highlight the rationale, benefits, challenges, strategies, and “lessons learned” from five international faculty development initiatives for blended learning.

  • 23. Vaughan, Norman
    et al.
    Reali, Aline
    Stenbom, Stefan
    KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Science (ECE), Learning.
    Jansen Van Vuuren, Marieta
    MacDonald, David
    Blended Learning from Design to Evaluation: International Case Studies of Evidence-Based Practice2017In: Online Learning, ISSN 2472-5730, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 103-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study compares and contrasts four international faculty development programs for blended learning in order to understand the benefits, challenges, lessons learned, and recommendations from such initiatives. The benefits identified for faculty members, who participated in these programs, were that they became more reflective of their teaching practice and began to make a role adjustment from being a content provider to a designer and facilitator of learning for students. The biggest challenge appeared to be a lack of common institutional definition and understanding of blended learning as well as a lack of time and resources to support faculty in the redesign of their courses. With regards to lessons learned, each program emphasized the need for all institutional stakeholders to be involved in supporting the initiative and that blended learning does not simply imply adding digital technologies to an existing face-to-face course. The key recommendation from this study is that a faculty development program for blended learning needs to be clearly aligned with the institution’s vision and mission.

1 - 23 of 23
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