Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 90
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Andersson, M.
    et al.
    Johansson, Börje
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS (closed 20110701). Jönköping International Business School, Sweden .
    Månsson, K.
    Dynamics of entry and exit of product varieties: What evolution dynamics can account for the empirical regularities?2011In: Nonlinear Economic Dynamics, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2011, p. 155-174Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Firm-level heterogeneity is substantial even in narrowly defined industries. This chapter focuses on formulating evolution dynamics which can account for the observed heterogeneity and its maintenance. Based on examination of data on Swedish firms' supply pattern across different markets over time, we present a parsimonious model that has the ambition to capture the picture of heterogeneous firms, while accommodating the simultaneous exit and entry of destination varieties in firms' supply pattern. The model assumes both scale economies of firms and path-dependence, where the latter is manifested in such a way that the arrival rate of innovation ideas to an individual firm is a function of each firm's stock of varieties at every given point in time. The path-dependence phenomenon is an "explosive" non-linearity, whereas conservation mechanisms include development of demand and exit of established varieties. The described path dependence explains the skewed distribution of varieties across firms. Exit of obsolete varieties and growth of demand keep the "equilibrium" away from competitive exclusion where only few large firms remain. We make use of simulations to depict and assess the innovation dynamics of the proposed model.

  • 2. Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Johannson, BörjeKTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics (Closed (20130101).Karlsson, CharlieLööf, HansKTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics (Closed (20130101).
    Innovation and Growth: From R&D strategies of innovating firms to economy-wide technological change2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume provides an understanding of firms' R&D and innovation strategies and their economy-wide consequences. It is based on the premise that differences in firm-level returns, as well as economy-wide outcomes, may be linked to the heterogeneous ways in which firms organize and undertake R&D and innovation activities. It emphasizes innovation strategies of innovating firms, and reflects that innovation efforts do not represent a uniform type of expenditure. Organized into three parts the volume moves from the micro to the macro-level. This structure highlights the notion that R&D and innovation and growth are two interdependent perspectives. The first of these is micro-oriented and focuses on innovation processes of firms, where R&D activities and other innovation efforts give rise to consequences such as a strengthening of resource bases, growth of sales and employment, patents, new products, increasing productivity and profits, and improved chances of survival. The second perspective comprises economy-wide effects in the form of overall technological change, growth in total factor productivity, and structural change processes, where certain sectors may benefit from new inputs from other sectors while others experience declining markets and reduced output.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS.
    Johansson, Börje
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics (Closed (20130101). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS.
    Heterogeneous Distributions of Firms Sustained by Innovation Dynamics-A Model with Empirical Illustrations and Analysis2012In: Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, ISSN 1566-1679, E-ISSN 1573-7012, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 239-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper develops a framework of innovation dynamics to appreciate observed heterogeneity of firm size distributions, in which dynamics refer to exit and entry of product varieties and variety markets of individual firms. The analysis is based on a model of variety-triplets where every such triplet in the economy is identified by a unique combination of a variety, destination and firm. New variety triplets are introduced by innovating firms in a quasi-temporal setting of monopolistic competition. Ideas for variety-triplets arrive to firms according to a firm-specific and state dependent Poisson process, whereas variety triplets exit according to a destination-specific Poisson process. The empirical analysis employs a detailed firm-level data base which provides information about all variety triplets. Firm size is measured by a firm's number of variety triplets. The empirical results are compatible with the model predictions of (i) a persistent distribution of firm sizes, (ii) frequent events of exit and entry, and (iii) state dependent entry, where a state may be given by each firm's composition of triplets and/or other firm attributes.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics (closed 20110301). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS.
    Johansson, Börje
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics (closed 20110301). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS.
    Innovation Ideas and Regional Characteristics: product innovations and export entrepreneurship by firms in Swedish regions2008In: Growth and Change, ISSN 0017-4815, E-ISSN 1468-2257, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 193-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses upon the ways in which characteristics of regions in regards to knowledge sources, communication opportunities, and absorptive capacity influence the development of innovation ideas among existing and potential entrepreneurs. We formulate a model where entrepreneurs or innovating firms introduce new products in a quasi-temporal setting. Market conditions are characterised by monopolistic competition between varieties belonging to the same product group, in which there is entry and exit of varieties. A stochastic process is assumed to generate new innovation ideas as time goes by, and a firm (entrepreneur) who receives such an idea has to transform the idea to an innovation, which in the model is specified as a particular variety combined with a specific destination market. The theoretical model is used as a reference when formulating two regression models, with which we estimate how a set of regional characteristics are associated with the likelihood of innovation ideas across Swedish local labour market regions. In one model, we examine the emergence of new export varieties, and in the second model, we investigate the appearance of new export firms. Results are consistent with the assumption that knowledge and information flows have a positive influence on the frequency of arrival of innovation ideas to firms.

  • 5. Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Johansson, Börje
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Lööf, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Multinationals in the Knowledge Economy: A case study of AstraZeneca in Sweden2010In: Repositioning  Europe and America for Growth: The Role of Governments and private Actors in Key Policy Areas / [ed] Eberhard Bohne and Charlie Karlsson, Berlin: LIT Verlag, 2010Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report presents a case study of the role of a large R&D intensive multinational company for a small open economy. The case study examines the role of AstraZeneca in the Swedish economy, i.e. an economy dominated by multinational companies. The purpose of the report is to analyze the interaction of AstraZeneca’s units in Sweden with the rest of the Swedish economy, and the Swedish innovation system in particular. We analyze the company’s role as an employer in the private sector, its transaction links with other Swedish firms and its role for Sweden’s exports. In a second perspective we focus on the company’s role in the Swedish knowledge economy and innovation system. The report analyses the company as a node for knowledge flows in the Swedish economy and innovation system, and its role as an employer of highly educated and skilled workers in Sweden.Our analysis of the Swedish units’ interaction with the rest of the Swedish economy shows that ’traditional’ couplings in the form of transactions with Swedish suppliers are limited. It is instead the company’s position in the ‘knowledge economy’ that makes its presence in Sweden important.

  • 6. Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Johansson, Börje
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS (closed 20110701).
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Lööf, Hans
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS (closed 20110701).
    Multinationals in the Knowledge Economy: A case study of AstraZeneca in Sweden2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Multinational companies play a large and growing role in the world economy. Theycontribute about 10 percent to world GDP and about two thirds to global exports. Inthe vast majority of the countries in the world, the presence of multinationals has alsobeen growing over time.

    This report presents a case study of the role of a large multinational company, activein one of the most R&D and knowledge intensive industries of the world, withestablishments in a small open economy. The case study examines the role ofAstraZeneca in the Swedish economy, i.e. an economy dominated by multinationalcompanies. They account for almost all of Sweden’s aggregate investments in privateR&D, over 90 percent of the country’s exports and imports as well as a significantshare of the total number of employees in the private sector. The analyses in the reportmake it possible to assess the importance of the local presence of such a largeknowledge-intensive multinational for Sweden.

  • 7. Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Johansson, Börje
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.). Jönköping International Business School (JIBS), Sweden .
    Karlsson, Charlie
    KTH. Jönköping International Business School (JIBS), Sweden .
    Lööf, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.). KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS.
    Reflections2013In: Innovation and Growth: From R&D Strategies of Innovating Firms to Economy-wide Technological Change, Oxford University Press, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8. Andersson, Martin
    et al.
    Johansson, Börje
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics (closed 20110301), Economics (closed 20110301). KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS (closed 20110701).
    Månsson, Kristofer
    Dynamics of Entry and Exit of Product Varieties: – what evolution dynamics can account for the empirical regularities?2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Firm-level heterogeneity is substantial even in narrowly defined industries. This paper focuses on formulating evolution dynamics which can account for the observed heterogeneity and its maintenance. Based on examination of data on Swedish firm’ supply pattern to different markets over time, we present a parsimonious model that has the ambition to capture the picture of heterogeneous firms, while accommodating the simultaneous exit and entry of destination varieties in firms’ supply pattern. The model assumes both scale economies of firms and pathdependence, where the latter is manifested in such a way that the arrival rate of innovation ideas to an individual firm is a function of each firm’s stock of varieties at every given point in time. The path-dependence phenomenon is an “explosive” non-linearity, whereas conservation mechanisms include development of demand and exit of established varieties. The described path dependence explains the skewed distribution of varieties across firms, but the question of what keeps the “equilibrium” away from competitive exclusion where only few large firms remain. We make use of simulations to depict and assess the innovation dynamics of the proposed model.

  • 9. Cook, Gary
    et al.
    Pandit, Naresh R.
    Lööf, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Johansson, Börje
    Jonkoping International Business School.
    Geographic Clustering and Outward Foreign Direct Investment2012In: International Business Review, ISSN 0969-5931, E-ISSN 1873-6149, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 1112-1121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study addresses an important neglected question: To what extent do geographic clusters promote outward foreign direct investment (ODI)? We find evidence that clusters do promote ODI and so support Porter’s argument that advantages gained in clusters can be the foundations of successful internationalisation. Digging deeper, we find that certain cluster incumbents promote more ODI than others, with more experienced firms and firms with stronger resource bases accounting for more ODI. We also find that firms located in clusters within major global nodes/cities engage in more ODI. Finally, we find that both localisation and urbanisation economies promote ODI. However, the former, within-industry effects, are more important. Overall, this study echoes Dunning’s call for more focus on the ‘L’ component of the OLI paradigm and particularly on the advantages that reside in clusters that make them not only attractive destinations for FDI but also fertile environments from which FDI can spring.

  • 10.
    Johansson, Börje
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS (closed 20110701). JIBS Jönköping International Business School, Sweden .
    Diversity and superiority in innovation processes2005In: MODSIM05: International Congress on Modelling and Simulation: Advances and Applications for Management and Decision Making, Proceedings, 2005, p. 1056-1062Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A product group consists of product varieties (phenotypes) that compete for the same customer budget. The paper introduces an approach to identifying separate markets by means of product group (genotype) delineation. The paper contrasts two basic ideas for analysing competition within a product group. The first idea relates to Lancaster's suggestion that every product variety can be identified by its attributes or characteristics (L-model). The second idea relates to the monopolistic-competition model as popularised by Krugman (DS-model). With this latter approach, a product group potentially contains a large set of varieties, where customers as a group have a taste for variety. For each of the two paradigms, the paper presents and compares the process by which novel product varieties are introduced. In the framework of Lancaster, evolution tends to reduce the number of varieties due to development of superior alternatives. The Krugman framework rather predicts an evolution where the number of varieties may increase without limits. The contribution of the paper is to contrast the two perspectives, by comparing the change processes and by assessing the adhering equilibrium solutions. A major question is how these two conflicting perspectives should be interpreted. The paper ends by suggesting a framework that can resolve the conflict between the two perspectives. The L-model provides a theoretical framework for how a separated market can be delineated, whereas the DS-model is more ad hoc in this sense. The prime demarcation aspect is however that in the DS-model diversity of products is generated by customers' taste for variety. This must not be interpreted as a case, in which each customer consumes of all varieties at each point in time. A more reasonable interpretation is that a customer during a time period exercises the taste for variety. In contrast, a customer in the L-model purchases two or several varieties only when there is no product available with the desired combination of attributes. Hence, in the L-model the tendency is towards a smaller set of superior varieties. However, heterogeneity among customers will counteract this tendency and generate product diversity in the L-model. The possibility of a superior product variety for each customer group is inherent in the L-model. One may also observe this phenomenon can associated with so-called technology lock-in effects (Arthur, 1989). In order to understand this, we may consider a product group for which an essential feature is mutual compatibility with other product variants. As some variant gets a large market share, the compatibility aspect will be an important attribute with a decisive role in customers' preference functions. This type of feature is completely absent in the DS-model. In the L-model scale economies explain the dynamics when a superior product increases its market share by replacing established products. Scale economies are the driving force behind competitive exclusion. In the DS-model scale economies provide incentives for firms to develop economies of scope and to continue to expand the number of varieties.

  • 11.
    Johansson, Börje
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS.
    Parsing the Menagerie of Agglomeration and Network Externalities2005In: Industrial Clusters and Inter-Firm Networks / [ed] B. Johansson, C. Karlsson and R. Stough, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar , 2005, p. 107-147Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Johansson, Börje
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Parsing the Menagerie of Agglomeration and Network Externalities2004Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Externalities have for a long time been perceived as awkward cases that are alien to wellstructured economic analyses. During recent decades ideas inherited from Marshall and others have regained interest in the analysis of specialisation and trade, urban formation and growth as well as innovation processes. A variety of contributions has brought about an equally varied set of externalities with labels such as localisation and urbanisation economies, industrial districts, innovative regions. This presentation attempts to bring order to the many ideas about externalities by classifying them with regard to the sources and consequences of the externalities, and to the externality mechanisms. A basic separation is made between those externalities that affect efficiency and those that generate development.

  • 13.
    Johansson, Börje
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS.
    Spatial Clusters of ICT Industries2006In: The Emerging Digital Economy / [ed] B. Johansson, C. Karlsson and R. Stough, Berlin: Springer-Verlag , 2006, p. 137-168Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Johansson, Börje
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS.
    Transport Infrastructure Inside and Across Urban Regions: Models and assessment methods2008In: The Wider Economic Benefits of Transport: Micro-, meso- and macro-economic transport planning and investment tools / [ed] Round Table 140 , Transport Research Centre, Paris: OECD Publishing, 2008Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Andersson, Martin
    HETEROGENEOUS DISTRIBUTIONS OF FIRMS SUSTAINED BY INNOVATION DYNAMICS - a model with empirical illustration2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper develops a framework to appreciate the observed heterogeneity of firm size distributions and the entry and exit of products and firms associated with it. It is based on a model where new products are introduced by innovating firms in a quasi-temporal setting of monopolistic competition. The rate at which a firm innovates, according to a firm-specific Poisson process, is assumed to be influenced by the firm’s past experience and cumulated knowledge assets. The model assigns a fundamental role to entrepreneurship of existing and potential firms. The empirical analysis is based on detailed firm-level export data, which describes firm size in terms of products and markets, and firm dynamics in terms of changes in the supply pattern (varieties and markets) of existing firms in combination with entry/exit of firms. The empirical results are consistent with the model. First, the modeled innovation process imply a persistent distribution of heterogeneous firms. Second, the invariant size distribution of firms is associated with significant micro-dynamics, where firms continuously add and subtract varieties from their product mix, and new firms may enter while some exit. Third, an econometric analysis where firms’ introduction of new varieties is explained by firm attributes provides support for the assumption of a firm-specific and state-dependent stochastic innovation process.

  • 16.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Andersson, Martin
    PRODUCT INNOVATION, EXPORT AND LOCATION OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP2006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces a model where new products are introduced by entrepreneurs or innovating firms in a quasi-temporal setting. Market conditions are characterized by monopolistic competition between varieties belonging to the same product group, where varieties can become obsolete over time and hence disappear from demand. Firms that innovate have to make an R&D investment, and a firm’s decision to export a variety to a given market is associated with a market channel investment. The model is used to predict export behavior by firms in different regional milieus, and these predictions are compared with observations from a rich data set describing export activities of Swedish firms. The data set contains firm level information about export flows, where the flow of each variety is associated with the exporting firm’s location, export value, price and destination. In the empirical analysis we examine how the arrival of innovation ideas varies across regions and how this variation depends on regional characteristics.

  • 17.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Andersson, Martin
    PRODUCT INNOVATION, EXPORT ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND REGIONAL CHARACTERISTICS: an analysis of innovation ideas in regions2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on how characteristics of regions pertaining to local information about product varieties and markets as well as networks for the transmission of information about innovation opportunities influence the arrival of innovation ideas to existing and potential entrepreneurs. We formulate a model where entrepreneurs or innovating firms introduce new products in a quasi-temporal setting. Market conditions are characterized by monopolistic competition between varieties belonging to the same product group, in which there is entry and exit of varieties. Firms innovate in response to the arrival of innovation ideas. To realize these ideas firms have to make an R&D investment and a firm’s decision to export a variety to a new market is associated with a market channel investment. The theoretical model is used as a reference when formulating two regression models, with which we estimate factors that can explain the introduction of new export varieties by firms in different regional milieus. In one model we examine the emergence of new export firms, and in the second model we investigate the appearance of new export varieties. Results are consistent with the assumption that knowledge and information flows have a positive influence on the frequency of arrival of innovation ideas to firms.

  • 18.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Andersson, Martin
    REGIONAL POLICY AS CHANGE MANAGEMENT: A theoretical discussion with empirical illustrations2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper focuses on challenges and potentials for policy in the presence of fundamental change processes that influence the long-term evolution of regions. The perspective in the paper implies that policy can be viewed as ‘management of change’. We present a conceptual model for understanding the nature of fundamental change processes, which emphasizes slowly changing regional characteristics and invariant self-organized response mechanisms. It is supported by empirical examples of the invariant character of regional development and innovation phenomena, such as long-term population growth, export dynamics and persistence in new firm formation across regions in Sweden. The examples are put in perspective by studying the behavior of dynamic systems. A discussion of how policy may support new trajectories are provided.

  • 19.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS.
    Andersson, Å. E.
    Mathematical Models in Spatial Economics2007In: Mathematical Models in Economics in the Encyclopedia of Mathematical Sciences, Paris: Unesco, 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS.
    Ebersberger, H.
    Lööf, Hans
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS.
    The Impact of Foreign Takeovers on Innovation and Productivity Performance2007In: Entrepreneurship and Development – Local Processes and Global Patterns / [ed] I. Johansson, George Mason University, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    EJERMO, OLOF
    Process Innovations in a Duopoly with Two regions2004Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Most models of duopolies with a spatial dimension refer to the ’linear’ or ’circular’ city. Moreover, in duopoly models with innovations, the spatial dimension is usually dropped. We bridge this gap by constructing a model with two regions, each hosting production of a differentiated quality (high and low quality). In addition, consumers are heterogenous with different willingness to pay for quality. The analysis focuses on the incentives for process innovations, which affect the unit cost of production. The model captures two common trends in the urbanization process, and their effects on the incentive for process innovations. The first is regional enlargement or reduced transport costs. We find that such changes raise the proportion of process R&D in the region producing the low-quality good relative to process R&D from the high-quality region. Second, we examine the effect on optimal process R&D of moving consumers from the low-quality to the high-quality region. This lowers the optimal amount of process R&D undertaken in the low-quality region, while it is raised in the high-quality region.

  • 22.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Forslund, Ulla
    The Analysis of Location, Co-Location and Urbanisation Economics2005Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Location analysis has two major perspectives. The first is concerned with where toplace a given economic activity or facility, defined as optimization problem, wherethe properties of the economic environment are taken as a given fact. The secondperspective motivates a different question: how can the entire landscape of activitylocations be understood and explained? Both approaches can be associated with anequilibrium framework. However, the second perspective also stimulates the studentto think about the evolution of location patterns. How do they emerge and which arethe adjustment processes?

  • 23.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics (closed 20110301).
    Forslund, Ulla
    The analysis of location, colocation and urbanization economies2008In: Handbook of Research on Cluster Theory, Cheltenham, U.K.: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2008, p. 39-66Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides an overview and critical assessment of co-location and clustering in space. Basic location conditions include accessibility to customers, input suppliers including knowledge providers, and regional endowments. A distinction is made between slow and fast location adjustments. In a basic model, it is shown how distance sensitivity and scale economies generate self-reinforcing location externalities. Variations of the same model are employed to illuminate how urbanisation economies can stimulate co-location and clustering. One model variant is designed to examine how innovation activities also can be influenced by urbanisation economies. The paper concludes that a set of basic principals form the basis for localisation and urbanisation economies. However, there remains a challenging gap between model predictions and empirical observations.

  • 24.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Forslund, Ulla
    THE ANALYSIS OF LOCATION, CO-LOCATION ANDURBANISATION ECONOMIES2006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides an overview and critical assessment of co-location and clusteringin space. Basic location conditions include accessibility to customers, input suppliersincluding knowledge providers, and regional endowments. A distinction is madebetween slow and fast location adjustments. In a basic model, it is shown howdistance sensitivity and scale economies generate self-reinforcing locationexternalities. Variations of the same model are employed to illuminate howurbanisation economies can stimulate co-location and clustering. One model variant isdesigned to examine how innovation activities also can be influenced by urbanisationeconomies. The paper concludes that a set of basic principals form the basis forlocalisation and urbanisation economies. However, there remains a challenging gapbetween model predictions and empirical observations.

  • 25.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Dynamics and Entrepreneurship in a Knowledge-Based Economy2006In: Entrepreneurship and Dynamics in a Knowledge Economy / [ed] B. Johansson, C. Karlsson and R. Stough, Routledge, 2006, p. 12-46Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Jönköping International Business School.
    Knowledge and Regional Development2009In: Handbook of Regional Growth and Development Theories / [ed] R. Capello and P. Nijkamp, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar , 2009, p. 239-255Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Knowledge, Creativity and Regional Development2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The understanding of economic development in regions in developed countries hasgone through a fundamental change during recent decades. Nowadays, regions areincreasingly looked upon as independent, dynamic market places that are connectedvia flows of interregional and international trade. Regional development is driven bychanges in the economic specialisation, which can be explained by two different, butcomplementary theoretical frameworks for analysing location and trade, one old andone new.

    In this chapter, we claim that knowledge infrastructure, human capital, talent, creativity,knowledge generation, knowledge protection, knowledge accumulation, knowledgeappropriation, knowledge flows, etc. as well as the creative use of knowledge arebasic drivers of the specialisation of regions and hence of regional development. Thepurpose is to discuss the role of knowledge and talent in regional development seen inboth a regional and a global context.

  • 28.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Regional Development and Knowledge2006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on the concept of knowledge and examines models depicting and explaining the role of knowledge in regional development and provides an assessment of empirical studies of how knowledge affects growth and development in functional regions. For this paper it is crucial to understand those factors that make knowledge spatially sticky and knowledge-production capacity trapped. It is equally important to explain the conditions for knowledge flows and diffusion. The presentation also widens the view by extending the analysis of knowledge creation to include aspects of creativity. Since location advantages and especially the knowledge-based advantages have the feature of moving in slowly path-dependent processes the regional policy needs to focus on structural adjustments of tangible and non-tangible infrastructure to succeed.

  • 29.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Towards a Dynamic Theory for the Spatial Knowledge Economy2004Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent decades the world has witnessed the emergence of a global knowledge economy. For example, the evolution in recent decades of the developed economies has been accompanied by a regional shift in economic activity away from traditional industrial regions to new agglomerations of high technology, creating an explosion of entrepreneurial activity and new firm formation. For the OECD countries in particular, we can observe a transfer from an industrial economy to a knowledge economy. The supporting evidences are overwhelming and indicate that the trend is global. The emerging knowledge economy have attracted much interest among economist and generated many important contributions during the last two decades. However, the literature does not provide a comprehensive picture and we are indeed lacking a “general theory” of the knowledge economy. Various aspects of the emerging knowledge economy has been thoroughly analysed both theoretically and empirically but the overall synthesis is not yet present. Something to ask for would be a coherent theoretical framework that can explain how growth-induced investments in knowledge production stimulate localised, entrepreneur-driven innovations, which generate structural change and economic growth in an integrated system of functional regions. An interesting observation is that many of the necessary building blocks already seem to exist but that they are still waiting for someone to integrate them. The current state-of-the-art also includes inconsistent components. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to such an integration of the existing pieces of knowledge.

  • 30.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics (closed 20110301).
    Karlsson, CharlieAnderson, William P.Kobayashi, KiyoshiKTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics (closed 20110301).
    The Management and Measurement of Infrastructure: Performance, Efficiency and Innovation2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Backman, Mikaela
    INNOVATION POLICY INSTRUMENTS2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Lisbon Agenda that was launched in 2000, and had a set time-period of ten years. The purpose of the Lisbon Agenda was to make the EU the most competitive, knowledge-based economy in the world, and at the same time preserving, or even improving social cohesion and maintain environmental sustainability. The Lisbon Agenda had a large number of goals, in both quantified and qualified measures, in different areas. The main instrument that was put forward was the open method of co-ordination (OMC) that includes indicators, benchmarking, peer pressure, and best practise demonstrations.

    The forthcoming Lisbon Agenda will certainly need new approaches, and new instruments. One of the areas of instruments that can be further explored is innovation policies where the use of R&D and human capital is enhanced. Human capital is a natural part of a knowledge-based economy, and has positive impacts on growth, and jobs in the economy. Innovation policy instruments are diversified and are integrated in many areas of an economy and on many levels, which make them ideal for the next Lisbon Agenda. The instruments can have a general or specific characteristics and some span over the two characteristics.

  • 32.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Backman, Mikaela
    Juusola, Pia
    THE LISBON AGENDA FROM 2000 TO 20102007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Lisbon Agenda was approved in mars 2000 and at that time, the European Union was facing economic prosperity. Even so, globalization and new knowledge economies were becoming an increasing threat and the EU was in need of a transformation in its economy and society. The Lisbon Agenda was set to make the EU the most competitive, knowledge-based economy in the world, and at the same time preserving, or even improving social cohesion and maintain environmental sustainability. Another important motivation for the Lisbon Agenda was the perception that the EU was lagging behind the US and other major economies.

    The main instrument that was put forward was open method of co-ordination (OMC) that includes indicators, benchmarking, peer pressure, and best practise. The time-period was set for ten years and the midterm evaluations found that the goals had not be reached. Due to the lacking results, the Lisbon Agenda was forced to change some of the implementation processes.

    The many quantitative goals were reduced, and only the goal to dedicate three percent of GDP to R&D stayed in its original shape. The main goals were now on growth, and jobs.

  • 33.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Hacker, R. S.
    Emerging Market Economies in an Integrating Europe: An Introduction2004In: Emerging Market Economies and European Economic Integration / [ed] R.S. Hacker, B. Johansson and C. Karlsson, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar , 2004Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Hacker, R.S.
    Emerging Market Economies and European Economic Integration 2004Book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Norman, Therese
    Innovation, Technology and Knowledge2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper outlines a set of fundamental changes in the global economy that have altered the nature of the innovation process, brought about global challenges, and stimulated cross border phenomena and network formation responses. These changes has brought about an increase of the demand for knowledge as well as changed the conditions for knowledge production and innovation. Against the background of a changing global economy, the purpose of the paper is to make an overview over the role and drivers of innovation, technology and knowledge. The role of absorptive capacity and knowledge flows between economic agents from different spatial units for economic growth is further emphasized. Furthermore, it is recognized in the paper that national innovative productivity depends upon the national innovation systems. Multinationals play an increasingly central role for the transfer of knowledge between different parts of the world. This paper thoroughly examines the way multinationals contribute to innovation, technology and knowledge dispersion. The distribution of knowledge investments is uneven across the globe and the occurrence of the “European paradox” highlights where Europe has failed in this context.

  • 36.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    R. Stough, Roger
    Entrepreneurship and Innovation in Functional Regions2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the role of entrepreneurship and innovations foreconomic development in functional regions and in doing that highlighting the differentconditions offered for entrepreneurship and innovations in functional regions of various sizes.In conclusion, the conditions for entrepreneurship and innovations vary substantially betweenfunctional regions, since the necessary knowledge resources tend to be local and to cluster incertain regions and not others. Functional regions with a high capacity to generate new ideas,create knowledge, organizational learning and innovations are characterized as learningregions. Large functional regions offer a large market potential and a superior accessibility toknowledge and knowledge resources and they will further develop their creative capabilitiesdue to an accumulation of innovative and entrepreneurial knowledge.

  • 37.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS.
    Karlsson, CharlieStough, R.
    Entrepreneurship and Dynamics in a Knowledge Economy2006Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Stough, R.
    Entrepreneurship, Clusters and Policy in the Emerging Digital Economy2006In: The Emerging Digital Economy / [ed] B. Johansson, C. Karlsson and R. Stough, Berlin: Springer-Verslag , 2006, p. 1-20Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Stough, R.
    Industrial Clusters and Inter-Firm Networks 2005Book (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Stough, R.
    Industrial Clusters and Inter-Firm Networks: An Introduction2005In: Industrial Clusters and Inter-Firm Networks / [ed] C. Karlsson, B. Johansson and R. Stough, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar , 2005, p. 1-28Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS.
    Karlsson, Charlie
    Stough, R.
    The Emerging Digital Economy: Conclusions2006In: The Emerging Digital Economy / [ed] B. Johansson, C. Karlsson and R. Stough, Berlin: Springer-Verlag , 2006, p. 331-340Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS.
    Karlsson, CharlieStough, R.
    The Emerging Digital Economy: Entrepreneurship, Clusters and Policy 2006Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport and Economics (closed 20110301), Economics (closed 20110301). KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS (closed 20110701).
    Karlsson, Charlie
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS (closed 20110701).
    Stough, Roger
    Entrepreneurship and Development - local processes and global patterns2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The general motivation for this paper is the current interest in globalization as a phenomenon that strongly affects the conditions of local economic development. Our purpose is to contribute to some of the current development aspects, in particular those that foster the evolution of entrepreneurs in local-global processes. We present four eras of globalization, in recent decades and which have been described as different aspects of globalization are not new at all. In conclusion, we stress that those global patterns of change that are observed, and reported in the media and by social scientists are the result of innumerable local processes driven by economic, political and social entrepreneurs in localities, regions, and nations all around the globe.

  • 44.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics (Closed (20130101).
    Klaesson, J.
    The creative city and its distributional consequences: The case of Wellington2011In: Handbook of Creative Cities, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2011, p. 456-481Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45. Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    Klaesson, J.
    Olsson, M.
    Time distances and labor market integration2002In: Papers in regional science (Print), ISSN 1056-8190, E-ISSN 1435-5957, Vol. 81, no 3, p. 305-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates how time distances within and between municipalities determine the spatial extent of local and regional labor markets. As time distances change, the extent of the labor market will also change. Diminishing time distances will bring about increases in labor market size by integrating formerly spatially separate markets. We analyze such processes using accessibility measures derived from a random choice preference function approach. Accessibility is measured in terms of number of jobs, labor supply and supply of service functions. The aim of the work is to illustrate the usefulness of the purpose-specific accessibility measure we introduce.

  • 46.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Klaesson, Johan
    Agglomeration Dynamics of Business Services2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A major characteristic of the economic development in European and North America duringthe past 10-15 years is a fast expansion of the producer-service sector. This paper considersthe location dynamics of two categories of firms: contact-intensive producer-service suppliersand other firms, where the latter form the rest of the economy. Urban regions are decomposedinto urban areas, and the latter into zones. In the theoretical framework firms have randomchoicepreferences and respond in a non-linear way to time distances in their contact efforts.They make their location decisions in response to local, intra-regional and extra-regionalaccess to market demand. This leads to a non-linear system that over time generatescumulative change processes of growth and decline. The econometric analysis makes use ofinformation about time distances between zones in urban areas as well as between urban areasin the same agglomeration and between urban areas in different agglomerations. Thisinformation is employed in an econometric model that depicts for each urban area how thenumber of jobs in different sectors change in response to the access to customers’ purchasingpower in the entire set of urban areas. The estimation results show that the cumulative changeprocesses feature non-linear behaviour.

  • 47.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS. KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Real Estate and Construction Management, Samhällsekonomi.
    Klaesson, Johan
    Agglomeration dynamics of business services2011In: The annals of regional science, ISSN 0570-1864, E-ISSN 1432-0592, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 373-391Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important characteristic of the economic development in Europe and North America during the last few decades is a fast expansion of the business-service sector. The present paper aims at modeling the location dynamics of three categories of firms: (i) knowledge-intensive business-service firms, (ii) ordinary business-service firms and other firms, where the latter form the rest of the economy. In the theoretical framework, business-service firms have random-choice preferences and respond in a non-linear way to time distances in their contact efforts to customer firms. Business-service firms make their location decisions in response to local, intra-regional and extra-regional access to market demand. The econometric analysis makes use of information about time distances between zones in urban areas as well as between urban areas in the same agglomeration and between urban areas in different agglomerations. The empirical analysis shows how the number of jobs in the different sectors change in response to accessibility to purchasing power. The estimation results show that the change processes feature non-linear dependencies with varying spatial reach.

  • 48.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS.
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping International Business School.
    CREATIVE MILIEUS IN THE STOCKHOLM REGION2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter intends to demonstrate that the Stockholm region is the key centre for knowledge development, innovations and intellectual creativity in Sweden. The region is an attractor for individuals with ambitions and talents in political, economic and cultural life. At the same time novel ideas and solutions diffuse from the Stockholm region to other regions of the country.

    A major effort in the study is to describe occupations with regard to (i) the skills of a job and (ii) the tasks associated with a job. Moreover, the knowledge intensity of an ur-ban region can be related to the absorption capacity of firms in the region, implying that firms can make use of all sorts of novelties in the world economy as stimuli for own imitations and innovations. Compared to other parts of Sweden, the Stockholm region has both a richer inflow of creative ideas and a larger absorptive capacity. This allows the Stockholm region to function as a source of innovation and business renewal for the rest of the country as novelties diffuse through the regional hierarchy.

  • 49.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics.
    Klaesson, Johan
    Jönköping International Business SchoolJönköping International Business School.
    Creative milieus in the Stockholm region2011In: HANDBOOK OF CREATIVE CITIES, CHELTENHAM: EDWARD ELGAR PUBLISHING LTD , 2011, p. 456-481Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Johansson, Börje
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.), Economics. KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, CESIS.
    Klaesson, John
    Infrastructure, Labour Market Accessibility and Economic Development2007In: The Management and Measurement of Infrastructure :  Performance, Efficiency and Innovation / [ed] C Karlsson, WP Anderson, B Johansson and K Kobayashi, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar , 2007Chapter in book (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 90
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf