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  • 1.
    Cheng, Ming
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Li, Yuanyuan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Liu, Peng
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Zhang, Fuguo
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Hajian, Alireza
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wang, Haoxin
    State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Institute of Artificial Photosynthesis, DUT–KTH Joint Education and Research Centre on Molecular Devices, Dalian University of Technology (DUT), Dalian, China.
    Li, Jiajia
    State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Institute of Artificial Photosynthesis, DUT–KTH Joint Education and Research Centre on Molecular Devices, Dalian University of Technology (DUT), Dalian, China.
    Wang, Linqin
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
    Kloo, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Yang, Xichuan
    State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Institute of Artificial Photosynthesis, DUT–KTH Joint Education and Research Centre on Molecular Devices, Dalian University of Technology (DUT), Dalian, China.
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry. State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Institute of Artificial Photosynthesis, DUT–KTH Joint Education and Research Centre on Molecular Devices, Dalian University of Technology (DUT), Dalian, China.
    A Perylenediimide Tetramer-Based 3D Electron Transport Material for Efficient Planar Perovskite Solar Cell2017In: Solar RRL, ISSN 2367-198X, Vol. 1, no 5, article id 1700046Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A perylenediimide (PDI) tetramer-based three dimensional (3D) molecular material, termed SFX-PDI4, has been designed, synthesized, and characterized. The low-lying HOMO and LUMO energy levels, high electron mobility and good film-formation property make it a promising electron transport material (ETM) in inverted planar perovskite solar cells (PSCs). The device exhibits a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 15.3% with negligible hysteresis, which can rival that of device based on PC61BM. These results demonstrate that three dimensional PDI-based molecular materials could serve as high performance ETMs in PSCs.

  • 2.
    Fu, Qiliang
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Medina, Lilian
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Li, Yuanyuan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Carosio, Federico
    Hajian, Alireza
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Nanostructured Wood Hybrids for Fire-Retardancy Prepared by Clay Impregnation into the Cell Wall2017In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 9, no 41, p. 36154-36163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eco-friendly materials need "green" fire-retardancy treatments, which offer opportunity for new wood nanotechnologies. Balsa wood (Ochroma pyramidale) was delignified to form a hierarchically structured and nanoporous scaffold mainly composed of cellulose nanofibrils. This nanocellulosic wood scaffold was impregnated with colloidal montmorillonite clay to form a nanostructured wood hybrid with high flame-retardancy. The nanoporous scaffold was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and gas adsorption. Flame-retardancy was evaluated by cone calorimetry, whereas thermal and thermo-oxidative stabilities were assessed by thermogravimetry. The location of well-distributed clay nanoplatelets inside the cell walls was confirmed by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. This unique nanostructure dramatically increased the thermal stability because of thermal insulation, oxygen depletion, and catalytic charring effects. A coherent organic/inorganic charred residue was formed during combustion, leading to a strongly reduced heat release rate peak and reduced smoke generation.

  • 3.
    Hajian, Alireza
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Cellulose–Assisted Dispersion of Carbon Nanotubes: From Colloids to Composites2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It is a challenge to disperse nanoparticles to obtain a nanostructured composite. This thesis aims at providing a new route to fabricate carbon nanotube (CNT) composites and suggests mechanisms for nanocellulose–CNT interactions. This route is based on unmodified CNT dispersed in water with the help of nanocellulose. Chemical functionalization of the CNTs and the addition of surfactants are avoided. Thus, the mechanical and electrical properties of such nanotube composites can be improved.

    Cellulose derivatives can disperse and stabilize carbon nanotubes in water. Nanocellulose particles, such as cellulose nanofibrils (CNF), are a new form of cellulose derivatives that are able to disperse and stabilize untreated carbon nanotubes in water. The utilization of the hybrid CNF–CNT dispersions are shown to lead to strong nanostructured composites with high nanotube content and conductivity. The mechanism behind the dispersive action of nanocellulose for nanotubes is explored and studied in detail. The dispersive ability of the nanocellulose leads to improved properties of CNF–CNT composites.

    Apart from studies of structure and properties of composite fibers and films, two different functional materials are studied in detail. One is to form conductive patterns on cellulose nanopaper for the stable function of printed electronics in various environmental conditions and during handling. The second is to use a water-soluble cellulosic polymer–nanotube dispersion to fabricate superelastic aerogels without any chemical crosslinking or the addition of another component. This makes the aerogels easily recyclable (redispersible in water) and opens a new route for recyclable superelastic CNT composite aerogels.

  • 4.
    Hajian, Alireza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Conductive and strong nanocomposites based on cellulose nanofibrils and carbon nanotubes2015In: ICCM International Conferences on Composite Materials, International Committee on Composite Materials , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be dispersed with the aid of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) in aqueous medium. The dispersions have high stability and quality that can be utilized into self-assembly of functional composites having high electrical conductivity and strength. The composites were then carefully analyzed in terms of their mechanical and electrical properties as well as dispersion quality. 

  • 5.
    Hajian, Alireza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Fu, Qiliang
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Recyclable and superelastic aerogels based on carbon nanotubes and carboxymethyl cellulose2018In: Composites Science And Technology, ISSN 0266-3538, E-ISSN 1879-1050, Vol. 159, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deformation mechanisms are largely unknown for superelastic carbon nanotube (CNT) aerogels, and this hampers materials design efforts. The CNT network in the cell walls is typically crosslinked or connected by a thermoset polymer phase. In order to create a recyclable superelastic aerogel, unmodified single or multi-walled CNTs were dispersed in water by adding to aqueous carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) solution. Directional freeze-drying was used to form honeycombs with cell walls of random-in-the-plane CNTs in CMC matrix. Cell wall morphology and porosity were studied and related to CNT type and content, as well as elastic or plastic buckling of the cell walls under deformation. CMC acts as a physical crosslinker for the CNTs in a porous cell wall. Aerogel structure and properties were characterized before and after recycling. The conductivity of the composite aerogel with a density of 10 kg/m3, 99% porosity and 50 wt % single-walled CNT exceeds 0.5 S/cm. The potential of these superelastic and conductive aerogels for applications such as mechanoresponsive materials was examined in cyclic conductivity tests at different strains. This opens a new route for recyclable superelastic CNT composite aerogels, avoiding material loss, chemical treatment or addition of other components.

  • 6.
    Hajian, Alireza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH.
    Lindström, Stefan B.
    Linköping University.
    Pettersson, Torbjörn
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH.
    Hamedi, Mahiar M.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH.
    Understanding the Dispersive Action of Nanocellulose for Carbon Nanomaterials2017In: Nano letters (Print), ISSN 1530-6984, E-ISSN 1530-6992, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 1439-1447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work aims at understanding the excellent ability of nanocelluloses to disperse carbon nanomaterials (CNs) in aqueous media to form long-term stable colloidal dispersions without the need for chemical functionalization of the CNs or the use of surfactant. These dispersions are useful for composites with high CN content when seeking water-based, efficient, and green pathways for their preparation. To establish a comprehensive understanding of such dispersion mechanism, colloidal characterization of the dispersions has been combined with surface adhesion measurements using colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (AFM) in aqueous media. AFM results based on model surfaces of graphene and nanocellulose further suggest that there is an association between the nanocellulose and the CN. This association is caused by fluctuations of the counterions on the surface of the nanocellulose inducing dipoles in the sp2carbon lattice surface of the CNs. Furthermore, the charges on the nanocellulose will induce an electrostatic stabilization of the nanocellulose–CN complexes that prevents aggregation. On the basis of this understanding, nanocelluloses with high surface charge density were used to disperse and stabilize carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and reduced graphene oxide particles in water, so that further increases in the dispersion limit of CNTs could be obtained. The dispersion limit reached the value of 75 wt % CNTs and resulted in high electrical conductivity (515 S/cm) and high modulus (14 GPa) of the CNT composite nanopapers.

  • 7.
    Hajian, Alireza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Lindstrom, Stefan
    Linkoping Univ, Div Solid Mech, Dept Management & Engn, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Nanocellulose as dispersant for carbon nanotube suspensions2016In: Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0065-7727, Vol. 251Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Hajian, Alireza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wang, Zhen
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
    Berglund, Lars. A
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hamedi, Mahiar M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Cellulose Nanopaper with Monolithically Integrated Conductive Micropatterns2019In: Advanced Electronic Materials, ISSN 2199-160X, Vol. 5, no 3, article id 1800924Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work presents a route to fabricate micropatterned conductive structures where the conductors are monolithically integrated with nanocellulose-based paper. To fabricate conductive features, microstructures are patterned on filter papers using wax-printing, followed by vacuum filtration of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) or silver nanowires (AgNWs) dispersed in aqueous cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs). These patterns are then laminated onto a pure CNF substrate (both in gel-state) and dried to form cellulose nanopapers with integrated conductive micropatterns. Resolutions of the conductive features are shown down to 400 µm wide, 250 nm thick, and with conductivity values of 115 ± 5 S cm −1 for the CNF–CNT and 3770 ± 230 S cm −1 for the CNF–AgNW micropatterns. The nanopaper and the conductive patterns both constitute random fibrous networks, and they display similar ductility and swelling behavior in water. Thus, the integrated conductive micropatterns can withstand folding, as well as wetting cycles. This stability of the micropatterns makes them useful in various devices based on nanocellulose substrates. As an example, an electroanalytical nanopaper device that operates in wet conditions is demonstrated.

  • 9.
    Hamedi, Mahiar M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology.
    Hajian, Alireza
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Fall, Andreas B.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Håkansson, Karl
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Salajkova, Michaela
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lundell, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Mechanics.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Biocomposites. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Highly Conducting, Strong Nanocomposites Based on Nanocellulose-Assisted Aqueous Dispersions of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes2014In: ACS Nano, ISSN 1936-0851, E-ISSN 1936-086X, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 2467-2476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is challenging to obtain high-quality dispersions of single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) in composite matrix materials, in order to reach the full potential of mechanical and electronic properties. The most widely used matrix materials are polymers, and the route to achieving high quality dispersions of SWNT is mainly chemical functionalization of the SWNT. This leads to increased cost, a loss of strength and lower conductivity. In addition full potential of colloidal self-assembly cannot be fully exploited in a polymer matrix. This may limit the possibilities for assembly of highly ordered structural nanocomposites. Here we show that nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) can act as an excellent aqueous dispersion agent for as-prepared SWNTs, making possible low-cost exfoliation and purification of SWNTs with dispersion limits exceeding 40 wt %. The NFC:SWNT dispersion may also offer a cheap and sustainable alternative for molecular self-assembly of advanced composites. We demonstrate semitransparent conductive films, aerogels and anisotropic microscale fibers with nanoscale composite structure. The NFC:SWNT nanopaper shows increased strength at 3 wt % SWNT, reaching a modulus of 133 GPa, and a strength of 307 MPa. The anisotropic microfiber composites have maximum conductivities above 200 S cm(-1) and current densities reaching 1400 A cm(-2).

  • 10.
    Li, Yuanyuan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Yu, Shun
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Chen, Pan
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Rojas, Ramiro
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Hajian, Alireza
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Berglund, Lars
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Cellulose nanofibers enable paraffin encapsulation and the formation of stable thermal regulation nanocomposites2017In: Nano Energy, ISSN 2211-2855, Vol. 34, p. 541-548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-leaking, green materials with high content of phase change materials (PCM) can conserve solar energy and contribute to a sustainable society. Here, paraffin was encapsulated by nanocellulose (CNF) through a pickering emulsion method, while simultaneously forming a composite material. The thermodynamic drive for phase separation was confirmed by molecular modeling. Particle formation was characterized by dynamic light scattering and they were processed into stable PCM/CNF composites in the form of PCM paper structures with favorable mechanical properties. The PCM composite was lightweight and showed a solid content of paraffin of more than 72 wt%. Morphology was characterized using FE-SEM. The thermal regulation function of the PCM composite was demonstrated in the form of a model roof under simulated sunlight. No obvious leakage was observed during heating/cooling cycles, as supported by DSC and SAXS data. The PCM composite can be extended to panels used in energy-efficient smart buildings with thermal regulation integrated in load-bearing structures.

  • 11. Trovatti, E.
    et al.
    Tang, Hu
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Hajian, Alireza
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Meng, Qijun
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO).
    Gandini, A.
    Berglund, Lars A.
    KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Zhou, Qi
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Glycoscience. KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Enhancing strength and toughness of cellulose nanofibril network structures with an adhesive peptide2018In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 181, p. 256-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanical properties of cellulose nanofibrils network structure are essential for their applications in functional materials. In this work, an adhesive peptide consisting of just 11 amino acid residues with a hydrophobic core sequence of FLIVI (F – phenylalanine, L – leucine, I – isoleucine, V – valine) flanked by three lysine (K) residues was adsorbed to 2,2,6,6-Tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy radical (TEMPO) oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (TO-CNF). Composite films were prepared by solution casting from water suspensions of TO-CNF adsorbed with the adhesive peptide. The nanofibrils network structure of the composite was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The structure of the peptide in the composites and the interactions between TO-CNF and the peptide were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The mechanical properties of the composites were characterized by tensile tests and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). With 6.3 wt.% adhesive peptide adsorbed onto TO-CNF, the composite showed a modulus of 12.5 ± 1.4 GPa, a tensile strength of 344.5 ± (15.3) MPa, and a strain to failure of 7.8 ± 0.4%, which are 34.4%, 48.8%, and 23.8% higher than those for neat TO-CNF, respectively. This resulted in significantly improved toughness (work to fracture) for the composite, 77% higher than that for the neat TO-CNF.

  • 12.
    Zhang, Fuguo
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Cong, Jiayan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Li, Yuanyuan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Bergstrand, Jan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Liu, Haichun
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics.
    Cai, Bin
    State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology (DUT).
    Hajian, Alireza
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Yao, Zhaoyang
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Wang, Linqin
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Organic chemistry.
    Hao, Yan
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Yang, Xichuan
    State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology (DUT).
    Gardner, James M.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Ågren, Hans
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Widengren, Jerker
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Kloo, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry, Applied Physical Chemistry.
    Sun, Licheng
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Chemistry. State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology (DUT).
    A facile route to grain morphology controllable perovskite thin films towards highly efficient perovskite solar cells2018In: Nano Energy, ISSN 2211-2855, E-ISSN 2211-3282, Vol. 53, p. 405-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perovskite photovoltaics have recently attracted extensive attention due to their unprecedented high power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) in combination with primitive manufacturing conditions. However, the inherent polycrystalline nature of perovskite films renders an exceptional density of structural defects, especially at the grain boundaries (GBs) and film surfaces, representing a key challenge that impedes the further performance improvement of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) and large solar module ambitions towards commercialization. Here, a novel strategy is presented utilizing a simple ethylammonium chloride (EACl) additive in combination with a facile solvent bathing approach to achieve high quality methyammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) films. Well-oriented, micron-sized grains were observed, which contribute to an extended carrier lifetime and reduced trap density. Further investigations unraveled the distinctively prominent effects of EACl in modulating the perovskite film quality. The EACl was found to promote the perovskite grain growing without undergoing the formation of intermediate phases. Moreover, the EACl was also revealed to deplete at relative low temperature to enhance the film quality without compromising the beneficial bandgap for solar cell applications. This new strategy boosts the power conversion efficiency (PCE) to 20.9% and 19.0% for devices with effective areas of 0.126 cm2 and 1.020 cm2, respectively, with negligible current hysteresis and enhanced stability. Besides, perovskite films with a size of 10 × 10 cm2, and an assembled 16 cm2(5 × 5 cm2 module) perovskite solar module with a PCE of over 11% were constructed.

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