kth.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 10 of 27
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Östmans, Rebecca
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Sellman, Farhiya Alex
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Benselfelt, Tobias
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fiberprocesser. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Wågberg, Lars
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Rosén, Tomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fiberprocesser. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Advanced characterization of nanocelluloses and their dispersions - linked to final material properties2024Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Xiao, Tianxiao
    et al.
    Chair for Functional Materials, Department of Physics, TUM School of Natural Sciences, Technical University of Munich, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching, Germany, James-Franck-Str. 1.
    Tu, Suo
    Chair for Functional Materials, Department of Physics, TUM School of Natural Sciences, Technical University of Munich, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching, Germany, James-Franck-Str. 1.
    Tian, Ting
    Chair for Functional Materials, Department of Physics, TUM School of Natural Sciences, Technical University of Munich, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching, Germany, James-Franck-Str. 1.
    Chen, Wei
    Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Ultraintense Laser and Advanced Material Technology, Center for Intense Laser Application Technology, and College of Engineering Physics, Shenzhen Technology University, 518118 Shenzhen, China.
    Cao, Wei
    Chair for Functional Materials, Department of Physics, TUM School of Natural Sciences, Technical University of Munich, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching, Germany, James-Franck-Str. 1; State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Department of Macromolecular Science, Fudan University, 200433 Shanghai, China.
    Liang, Suzhe
    Chair for Functional Materials, Department of Physics, TUM School of Natural Sciences, Technical University of Munich, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching, Germany, James-Franck-Str. 1.
    Guo, Renjun
    Chair for Functional Materials, Department of Physics, TUM School of Natural Sciences, Technical University of Munich, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching, Germany, James-Franck-Str. 1.
    Liu, Liangzhen
    Chair of Inorganic and Metal-Organic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry and Catalysis Research Center (CRC), TUM School of Natural Sciences, Technical University of Munich, 85748 Garching, Germany.
    Li, Yanan
    Chair for Functional Materials, Department of Physics, TUM School of Natural Sciences, Technical University of Munich, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching, Germany, James-Franck-Str. 1.
    Guan, Tianfu
    Chair for Functional Materials, Department of Physics, TUM School of Natural Sciences, Technical University of Munich, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching, Germany, James-Franck-Str. 1.
    Liu, Haochen
    Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, 1088 Xueyuan Avenue, 518055 Shenzhen, China, 1088 Xueyuan Avenue.
    Wang, Kai
    Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, 1088 Xueyuan Avenue, 518055 Shenzhen, China, 1088 Xueyuan Avenue.
    Schwartzkopf, Matthias
    Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany, Notkestraße 85.
    Fischer, Roland A.
    Chair of Inorganic and Metal-Organic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry and Catalysis Research Center (CRC), TUM School of Natural Sciences, Technical University of Munich, 85748 Garching, Germany.
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fiberprocesser. Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany, Notkestraße 85.
    Müller-Buschbaum, Peter
    Chair for Functional Materials, Department of Physics, TUM School of Natural Sciences, Technical University of Munich, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching, Germany, James-Franck-Str. 1.
    Autonomous self-healing hybrid energy harvester based on the combination of triboelectric nanogenerator and quantum dot solar cell2024In: Nano Energy, ISSN 2211-2855, E-ISSN 2211-3282, Vol. 125, article id 109555Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Realization of multi-source energy harvesting with one single device would maximize power output. Thus, it is emerging as a promising strategy towards renewable energy generation and has attracted worldwide attention in the past decades. Capable of capturing mechanical energy that is ubiquitous in the ambient environment, triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) has been considered a novel yet effective source towards next-generation energy harvesting. In this work, a flexible hybrid energy harvester (HEH) is developed via the rational integration of autonomous self-healing TENG and high bending-stable lead sulfide quantum dot (PbS QD) solar cell, enabling independent electricity generation by two different mechanisms. The single-electrode mode TENG component with self-healing is realized by a polydimethylsiloxane/Triton X-100 (PDMS/TX100) mixture as the dielectric layer and the shared gold (Au) electrode, which generates 0.39 µA of output current (Iout), 24.6 V of output voltages (Vout), 15.4 nC of transfer charges (Qsc), and 7.80 mW m−2 of output power peak density. The thin-film solar cell component is based on a PbS QD layer as the light absorber with a planar structure fabricated under low-cost and compatible conditions, achieving 22.8 mA cm−2 of short-circuit current density (Jsc) and 4.92% of power conversion efficiency (PCE). As a proof of concept, an electronic watch is successfully powered by harnessing ambient mechanical and solar energy with a hybridized energy cell. This approach will offer more opportunities to construct a versatile platform towards remote monitoring and smart home systems.

  • 3.
    Nygård, K.
    et al.
    MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Rosén, Tomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Gordeyeva, Korneliya
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fiberprocesser.
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fiberprocesser.
    Cerenius, Y.
    MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    et al.,
    ForMAX – a beamline for multiscale and multimodal structural characterization of hierarchical materials2024In: Journal of Synchrotron Radiation, ISSN 0909-0495, E-ISSN 1600-5775, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 363-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ForMAX beamline at the MAX IV Laboratory provides multiscale and multimodal structural characterization of hierarchical materials in the nanometre to millimetre range by combining small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering with full-field microtomography. The modular design of the beamline is optimized for easy switching between different experimental modalities. The beamline has a special focus on the development of novel fibrous materials from forest resources, but it is also well suited for studies within, for example, food science and biomedical research.

  • 4.
    Reus, Manuel A.
    et al.
    Department of Physics, TUM School of Natural Sciences, Technical University of Munich, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching, Germany, James-Franck-Straße 1.
    Reb, Lennart K.
    Department of Physics, TUM School of Natural Sciences, Technical University of Munich, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching, Germany, James-Franck-Straße 1.
    Kosbahn, David P.
    Department of Physics, TUM School of Natural Sciences, Technical University of Munich, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching, Germany, James-Franck-Straße 1.
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fiberprocesser. Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany, Notkestraße 85.
    Müller-Buschbaum, Peter
    Department of Physics, TUM School of Natural Sciences, Technical University of Munich, James-Franck-Straße 1, 85748 Garching, Germany, James-Franck-Straße 1; Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), Technical University of Munich, Lichtenbergstraße 1, 85748 Garching, Germany, Lichtenbergstraße 1.
    INSIGHT: in situ heuristic tool for the efficient reduction of grazing-incidence X-ray scattering data2024In: Journal of applied crystallography, ISSN 0021-8898, E-ISSN 1600-5767, Vol. 57, p. 509-528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INSIGHT is a Python-based software tool for processing and reducing 2D grazing-incidence wide- and small-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS/GISAXS) data. It offers the geometric transformation of the 2D GIWAXS/GISAXS detector image to reciprocal space, including vectorized and parallelized pixelwise intensity correction calculations. An explicit focus on efficient data management and batch processing enables full control of large time-resolved synchrotron and laboratory data sets for a detailed analysis of kinetic GIWAXS/ GISAXS studies of thin films. It processes data acquired with arbitrarily rotated detectors and performs vertical, horizontal, azimuthal and radial cuts in reciprocal space. It further allows crystallographic indexing and GIWAXS pattern simulation, and provides various plotting and export functionalities. Customized scripting offers a one-step solution to reduce, process, analyze and export findings of large in situ and operando data sets.

  • 5.
    Reus, Manuel A.
    et al.
    Tech Univ Munich, Chair Funct Mat, TUM Sch Nat Sci, Dept Phys, James Franck Str 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Baier, Thomas
    Tech Univ Munich, Chair Funct Mat, TUM Sch Nat Sci, Dept Phys, James Franck Str 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Lindenmeir, Christoph G.
    Tech Univ Munich, Chair Funct Mat, TUM Sch Nat Sci, Dept Phys, James Franck Str 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Weinzierl, Alexander F.
    Tech Univ Munich, Chair Funct Mat, TUM Sch Nat Sci, Dept Phys, James Franck Str 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Buyan-Arivjikh, Altantulga
    Tech Univ Munich, Chair Funct Mat, TUM Sch Nat Sci, Dept Phys, James Franck Str 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Wegener, Simon A.
    Tech Univ Munich, Chair Funct Mat, TUM Sch Nat Sci, Dept Phys, James Franck Str 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Kosbahn, David P.
    Tech Univ Munich, Chair Funct Mat, TUM Sch Nat Sci, Dept Phys, James Franck Str 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Reb, Lennart K.
    Tech Univ Munich, Chair Funct Mat, TUM Sch Nat Sci, Dept Phys, James Franck Str 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Rubeck, Jan
    Deutsch Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Schwartzkopf, Matthias
    Deutsch Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fiberprocesser. Deutsch Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, Notkestr 85, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany.
    Mueller-Buschbaum, Peter
    Tech Univ Munich, Chair Funct Mat, TUM Sch Nat Sci, Dept Phys, James Franck Str 1, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Modular slot-die coater for in situ grazing-incidence x-ray scattering experiments on thin films2024In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 95, no 4, article id 043907Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Multimodal in situ experiments during slot-die coating of thin films pioneer the way to kinetic studies on thin-film formation. They establish a powerful tool to understand and optimize the formation and properties of thin-film devices, e.g., solar cells, sensors, or LED films. Thin-film research benefits from time-resolved grazing-incidence wide- and small-angle x-ray scattering (GIWAXS/GISAXS) with a sub-second resolution to reveal the evolution of crystal structure, texture, and morphology during the deposition process. Simultaneously investigating optical properties by in situ photoluminescence measurements complements in-depth kinetic studies focusing on a comprehensive understanding of the triangular interdependency of processing, structure, and function for a roll-to-roll compatible, scalable thin-film deposition process. Here, we introduce a modular slot-die coater specially designed for in situ GIWAXS/GISAXS measurements and applicable to various ink systems. With a design for quick assembly, the slot-die coater permits the reproducible and comparable fabrication of thin films in the lab and at the synchrotron using the very same hardware components, as demonstrated in this work by experiments performed at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY). Simultaneous to GIWAXS/GISAXS, photoluminescence measurements probe optoelectronic properties in situ during thin-film formation. An environmental chamber allows to control the atmosphere inside the coater. Modular construction and lightweight design make the coater mobile, easy to transport, quickly extendable, and adaptable to new beamline environments.

  • 6.
    Fijoł, Natalia
    et al.
    Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Frescativägen 8, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden; Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Teknikringen 56-58, 100 44, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Aguilar-Sánchez, Andrea
    Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Frescativägen 8, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ruiz-Caldas, Maria Ximena
    Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Frescativägen 8, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Redlinger-Pohn, Jakob D.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fiberprocesser.
    Mautner, Andreas
    Polymer and Composite Engineering (PaCE) Group, Institute of Materials Chemistry and Research, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Vienna, Währinger Str. 42, 1090 Wien, Austria.
    Mathew, Aji P.
    Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Frescativägen 8, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden; Wallenberg Wood Science Center, Teknikringen 56-58, 100 44, Stockholm, Sweden.
    3D printed polylactic acid (PLA) filters reinforced with polysaccharide nanofibers for metal ions capture and microplastics separation from water2023In: Chemical Engineering Journal, ISSN 1385-8947, E-ISSN 1873-3212, Vol. 457, article id 141153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for multifunctional, robust, reusable, and high-flux filters is a constant challenge for sustainable water treatment. In this work, fully biobased and biodegradable water purification filters were developed and processed by the means of three-dimensional (3D) printing, more specifically by fused deposition modelling (FDM). The polylactic acid (PLA) – based composites reinforced with homogenously dispersed TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers (TCNF) or chitin nanofibers (ChNF) were prepared within a four-step process; i. melt blending, ii. thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) pelletization method, iii. freeze drying and iv. single-screw extrusion to 3D printing filaments. The monolithic, biocomposite filters were 3D printed in cylindrical as well as hourglass geometries with varying, multiscale pore architectures. The filters were designed to control the contact time between filter's active surfaces and contaminants, tailoring their permeance. All printed filters exhibited high print quality and high water throughput as well as enhanced mechanical properties, compared to pristine PLA filters. The improved toughness values of the biocomposite filters clearly indicate the reinforcing effect of the homogenously dispersed nanofibers (NFs). The homogenous dispersion is attributed to the TIPS method. The NFs effect is also reflected in the adsorption capacity of the filters towards copper ions, which was shown to be as high as 234 and 208 mg/gNF for TCNF and ChNF reinforced filters, respectively, compared to just 4 mg/g for the pure PLA filters. Moreover, the biocomposite-based filters showed higher potential for removal of microplastics from laundry effluent water when compared to pure PLA filters with maximum separation efficiency of 54 % and 35 % for TCNF/PLA and ChNF/PLA filters, respectively compared to 26 % for pure PLA filters, all that while maintaining their high permeance. The combination of environmentally friendly materials with a cost and time-effective technology such as FDM allows the development of customized water filtration systems, which can be easily adapted in the areas most affected by the inaccessibility of clean water.

  • 7.
    Guan, Tianfu
    et al.
    Tech Univ Munich, TUM Sch Nat Sci, Dept Phys, Chair Funct Mat, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Chen, Wei
    Tech Univ Munich, TUM Sch Nat Sci, Dept Phys, Chair Funct Mat, D-85748 Garching, Germany.;Shenzhen Technol Univ, Ctr Adv Mat Diagnost Technol, Shenzhen Key Lab Ultraintense Laser & Adv Mat Tech, Shenzhen 518118, Peoples R China.;Shenzhen Technol Univ, Coll Engn Phys, Shenzhen 518118, Peoples R China..
    Tang, Haodong
    Shenzhen Technol Univ, Coll Integrated Circuits & Optoelect Chips, Shenzhen 518118, Peoples R China..
    Li, Dong
    Soochow Univ, Inst Funct Nano & Soft Mat FUNSOM, Jiangsu Key Lab Carbon Based Funct Mat & Devices, Suzhou 215123, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Xiao
    Shenzhen Technol Univ, Ctr Adv Mat Diagnost Technol, Shenzhen Key Lab Ultraintense Laser & Adv Mat Tech, Shenzhen 518118, Peoples R China.;Shenzhen Technol Univ, Coll Engn Phys, Shenzhen 518118, Peoples R China..
    Weindl, Christian L.
    Tech Univ Munich, TUM Sch Nat Sci, Dept Phys, Chair Funct Mat, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Wang, Yawen
    Soochow Univ, Inst Funct Nano & Soft Mat FUNSOM, Jiangsu Key Lab Carbon Based Funct Mat & Devices, Suzhou 215123, Peoples R China..
    Liang, Zhiqiang
    Soochow Univ, Inst Funct Nano & Soft Mat FUNSOM, Jiangsu Key Lab Carbon Based Funct Mat & Devices, Suzhou 215123, Peoples R China..
    Liang, Suzhe
    Tech Univ Munich, TUM Sch Nat Sci, Dept Phys, Chair Funct Mat, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Xiao, Tianxiao
    Tech Univ Munich, TUM Sch Nat Sci, Dept Phys, Chair Funct Mat, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Tu, Suo
    Tech Univ Munich, TUM Sch Nat Sci, Dept Phys, Chair Funct Mat, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Roth, Stephan V.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fiberprocesser. Deutsch Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-22607 Hamburg, Germany..
    Jiang, Lin
    Soochow Univ, Inst Funct Nano & Soft Mat FUNSOM, Jiangsu Key Lab Carbon Based Funct Mat & Devices, Suzhou 215123, Peoples R China..
    Mueller-Buschbaum, Peter
    Tech Univ Munich, TUM Sch Nat Sci, Dept Phys, Chair Funct Mat, D-85748 Garching, Germany.;Tech Univ Munich, Heinz Maier Leibnitz Zent MLZ, D-85748 Garching, Germany..
    Decoding the Self-Assembly Plasmonic Interface Structure in a PbS Colloidal Quantum Dot Solid for a Photodetector2023In: ACS Nano, ISSN 1936-0851, E-ISSN 1936-086X, Vol. 17, no 22, p. 23010-23019Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hybrid plasmonic nanostructures have gained enormous attention in a variety of optoelectronic devices due to their surface plasmon resonance properties. Self-assembled hybrid metal/quantum dot (QD) architectures offer a means of coupling the properties of plasmonics and QDs to photodetectors, thereby modifying their functionality. The arrangement and localization of hybrid nanostructures have an impact on exciton trapping and light harvesting. Here, we present a hybrid structure consisting of self-assembled gold nanospheres (Au NSs) embedded in a solid matrix of PbS QDs for mapping the interface structures and the motion of charge carriers. Grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering is utilized to analyze the localization and spacing of the Au NSs within the hybrid structure. Furthermore, by correlating the morphology of the Au NSs in the hybrid structure with the corresponding differences observed in the performance of photodetectors, we are able to determine the impact of interface charge carrier dynamics in the coupling structure. From the perspective of architecture, our study provides insights into the performance improvement of optoelectronic devices.

  • 8.
    Motezakker, Ahmad Reza
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Córdoba, Andrés
    Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States.
    Rosén, Tomas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Lundell, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics.
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fiberprocesser.
    Effect of Stiffness on the Dynamics of Entangled Nanofiber Networks at Low Concentrations2023In: Macromolecules, ISSN 0024-9297, E-ISSN 1520-5835, Vol. 56, no 23, p. 9595-9603Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biopolymer network dynamics play a significant role in both biological and materials science. This study focuses on the dynamics of cellulose nanofibers as a model system given their relevance to biology and nanotechnology applications. Using large-scale coarse-grained simulations with a lattice Boltzmann fluid coupling, we investigated the reptation behavior of individual nanofibers within entangled networks. Our analysis yields essential insights, proposing a scaling law for rotational diffusion, quantifying effective tube diameter, and revealing release mechanisms during reptation, spanning from rigid to semiflexible nanofibers. Additionally, we examine the onset of entanglement in relation to the nanofiber flexibility within the network. Microrheology analysis is conducted to assess macroscopic viscoelastic behavior. Importantly, our results align closely with previous experiments, validating the proposed scaling laws, effective tube diameters, and onset of entanglement. The findings provide an improved fundamental understanding of biopolymer network dynamics and guide the design of processes for advanced biobased materials. 

  • 9.
    Kulkarni, Rohan Ajit
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Apazidis, Nicholas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW.
    Larsson, Per Tomas
    Wallenberg Wood Sci Ctr, S-11428 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lundell, Fredrik
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics.
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fiberprocesser.
    Experimental studies of dynamic compression of cellulose pulp fibers2023In: Sustainable Materials and Technologies, ISSN 2214-9937, Vol. 38, article id e00774Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to control the structure of the wood-pulp fiber cell wall is an attractive means to obtain increased accessibility to the fiber interior, providing routes for functionalization of the fibers that support further processing and novel material concepts, e.g. improved degree of polymerization, nanofiltration as demonstrated in previous studies. It has been proposed that dynamic compression and decompression of the cellulose pulp fibers in the wet state make it possible to modify the cell wall significantly. We hypothesize that hydrostatic pressure exerted on fibers fully submerged in water will increase the accessibility of the fiber wall by penetrating the fiber through weak spots in the cell wall. To pursue this, we have developed an experimental facility that can subject wet cellulose pulp samples to a pressure pulse -10 ms long and with a peak pressure of -300 MPa. The experiment is thus specifically designed to elucidate the effect of a rapid high-pressure pulse passing through the cellulose sample and enables studies of changes in structural properties over different size ranges. Different characterization techniques, including Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and wide- and small-angle X-ray scattering, have been used to evaluate the material exposed to pulsed pressure. The mechanism of pressure build-up is estimated computationally to complement the results. Key findings from the experiments consider a decrease in crystallinity and changes in the surface morphology of the cellulose sample.

  • 10.
    Rosén, Tomas
    et al.
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fiberprocesser. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center. Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, 11794-3400, NY, United States.
    He, HongRui
    Wang, Ruifu
    Gordeyeva, Korneliya
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology.
    Motezakker, Ahmad Reza
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Engineering Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics and Engineering Acoustics. KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Centres, Wallenberg Wood Science Center.
    Fluerasu, Andrei
    Söderberg, Daniel
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Fibre- and Polymer Technology, Fiberprocesser.
    Hsiao, Benjamin S.
    Exploring nanofibrous networks with x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy through a digital twin2023In: Physical review. E, ISSN 2470-0045, E-ISSN 2470-0053, Vol. 108, no 1, article id 014607Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate a framework of interpreting data from x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy experiments with the aid of numerical simulations to describe nanoscale dynamics in soft matter. This is exemplified with the transport of passive tracer gold nanoparticles in networks of charge-stabilized cellulose nanofibers. The main structure of dynamic modes in reciprocal space could be replicated with a simulated system of confined Brownian motion, a digital twin, allowing for a direct measurement of important effective material properties describing the local environment of the tracers. 

123 1 - 10 of 27
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf