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  • 1.
    Adam, Jonathan
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Analyzing Function and Potential in Cuba's El Paquete: A Postcolonial Approach2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The dire state of Cuban internet connectivity has inspired local informal innovations. One such innovation is El Paquete, a weekly distribution of downloaded content spread through an informal network. Taking a postcolonial approach, I investigate through user experiences how this network operates in a resource-poor environment. This investigation articulates a model of El Paquete centered on social interactions, which inform the system’s function but also shape El Paquete’s design and role in society. Based on this model, a set of speculative design exercises probe possibilities to streamline El Paquete’s compilation, involve consumer preferences in its design directions, or act as a disruption tolerant network. In uncovering the technical possibilities of El Paquete, these designs illuminate how its current design serves Cuban communities by embodying realities and limitations of Cuban society. El Paquete’s embodiment of informal innovation serves as a call to designers to continuously rethink development design processes, centering communities and their knowledge and technical practices.

  • 2.
    Al Moubayed, Samer
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    Heylen, D.
    Bohus, D.
    Koutsombogera, Maria
    Papageorgiou, H.
    Esposito, A.
    Skantze, Gabriel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    UM3I 2014: International workshop on understanding and modeling multiparty, multimodal interactions2014In: ICMI 2014 - Proceedings of the 2014 International Conference on Multimodal Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, p. 537-538Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present a brief summary of the international workshop on Modeling Multiparty, Multimodal Interactions. The UM3I 2014 workshop is held in conjunction with the ICMI 2014 conference. The workshop will highlight recent developments and adopted methodologies in the analysis and modeling of multiparty and multimodal interactions, the design and implementation principles of related human-machine interfaces, as well as the identification of potential limitations and ways of overcoming them.

  • 3.
    ANDERSSON, ALEXANDER
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    ESSUNGER, KARL
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Physical or Digital Payments: Towards a Dominant Design?2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid digitalisation development has been stampeding widely across today’s societies, and not least in the payment industry. Though, the digitalisation in the payment industry has been very deviating, even between similar well-developed countries, and while there are positive and negative effects with both digital- and physical payment means, there is little knowledge that highlights the influencing factors and accompanied problems. This study therefore explore swhich, and how, different factors influence a country’s degree of digital payments, and creates further understanding of where the payment markets are heading in the future. It is done through a case study of four different industrialised countries, Sweden, Italy, Canada, and Switzerland which involves mapping the countries’ payment markets, as well as potential factors influencing a population’s payment habits, through a perspective of innovation theory in terms of dominant designs and technological discontinuities. Theory of network externalities and two-sided platforms are further used to explain and discuss how a two-sided market, likethe payment market, is affected by changes and other circumstances in different ways.Conclusions are then drawn from the used theories together with a comparison of the findings,and identifies certain influencers to a country’s distribution of payments, as well as provides indications of where the different payments markets are heading in the future. Data is mainly gathered through written material and credible databases, but also from semi-structured interviews.

  • 4. Arkenson, Caroline
    et al.
    Chou, Y. -Y
    Huang, C. -Y
    Lee, Y. -C
    Tag and seek a location-based game in tainan city2014In: CHI PLAY 2014 - Proceedings of the 2014 Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, p. 315-318Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tag and Seek is a location-based game which leads a traveler through Tainan City in Taiwan. The traveler's task is to find Harry's friends who are hiding at different sites in the city. Once at the site, the traveler has to scan a Near Field Communication (NFC) tag placed on a board looking like Harry's friend. When the NFC tag is scanned the lost friend is found, information about the site is presented and instructions to the next site will be available. The game lets the traveler experience culture, gain knowledge about sites in the city and meet local citizens - without the traveler having to plan the trip ahead. By implementing NFC technology as check points the interaction with the game differs from regular tourist guides and the threat of privacy which comes with location-based services is greatly lowered as the traveler is not being tracked by GPS. From our user evaluation we found that both the interface and interaction with the boards could use some improvements to increase the usability.

  • 5.
    Artman, Henrik
    et al.
    Totalförsvarets forskningsinstitut (FOI).
    Brynielsson, Joel
    Totalförsvarets forskningsinstitut (FOI).
    Johansson, Björn JE
    Totalförsvarets forskningsinstitut (FOI).
    Trnka, Jiri
    Totalförsvarets forskningsinstitut (FOI).
    Dialogical Emergency Management and StrategicAwareness in Emergency Communication2011In: Proceedings of the 8th International ISCRAM Conference, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper introduces two concepts—dialogical emergency management and strategic awareness—as means touse and understand the content of social media for the purpose of emergency communication. Dialogicalemergency management denotes that the emergency management organizations follow what people publish invarious social media on emergencies and ongoing emergency response, and then adjust their informationstrategies in a way that matches the expectations and needs for emergency information of the public. Theconcept of strategic awareness suggests that it is essential to have an understanding of the receiver (public) ofemergency information but also to have an understanding of the receivers’ idea about the emergency andemergency response. Hence, the notion of strategic awareness incorporates structured awareness of how peopleinterpret, value, and reacts on communication based on what they think about the sender’s (emergencymanagement organization’s) actual intentions and motives.

  • 6.
    Artman, Henrik
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Tholander, Jakob
    Klas, Karlgren
    Rollen hos representationer och agerande inom interaktionsdesign2014In: Resultatdialog, Vetenskapsrådet , 2014, , p. 8p. 156-163Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Asplund, Simon
    et al.
    KTH.
    Jonsson, M.
    SWAY - designing for balance and posture awareness2018In: TEI 2018 - Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, Vol. 2018, p. 470-475Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents the SWAY prototype that encourages people to explore aspects around balance and posture in a playful way. The prototype senses small movements and shifts in posture using a Kinect sensor, and translates these movements to the tilting of a platform holding a set of marbles, and to haptic feedback in the form of vibrations. The prototype provides an interactive experience focusing on building body awareness with a particular focus on balance and posture. The design inquiry provided new insights with respect to reinforcement of bodily experiences and how different modalities affect the guiding of attention.

  • 8.
    Avramova, Vanya
    et al.
    KTH.
    Yang, Fangkai
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Li, Chengjie
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Peters, Christopher
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Science and Technology (CST).
    Skantze, Gabriel
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    A virtual poster presenter using mixed reality2017In: 17th International Conference on Intelligent Virtual Agents, IVA 2017, Springer, 2017, Vol. 10498, p. 25-28Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this demo, we will showcase a platform we are currently developing for experimenting with situated interaction using mixed reality. The user will wear a Microsoft HoloLens and be able to interact with a virtual character presenting a poster. We argue that a poster presentation scenario is a good test bed for studying phenomena such as multi-party interaction, speaker role, engagement and disengagement, information delivery, and user attention monitoring.

  • 9.
    Baalsrud Hauge, J. M.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Engström, Alexander
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Stefan, I. A.
    Strömgren, Johanna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM).
    Bridging educational and working environments through pervasive approaches2017In: 3rd International Joint Conference on Serious Games, JCSG 2017, Springer Verlag , 2017, p. 296-307Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the education of mechanical engineers alternative learning methods like serious games, simulations etc. have been used in past decades to better the learning outcomes. However, a main concern is still the amount of resources used on adapting and modding games as well as the challenges related to the implementation in the class room setting. Typically a positive learning experience does not only rely on the game as such, but how good the facilitator or teacher is to change game mechanics and the narratives so that players with different learning curves, past experience and cognitive abilities all stay in flow and feel immersed. Physical simulation games played in a workshop setting often have this ability, whereas this still seems to be a challenge in digitalized games. The main purpose of this article is to identify mechanics that need to be adapted differently for different user groups in order to keep them in flow, motivated and engaged in order to have a high learning experience and how we can take advantage of technologies like VR to reduce the costs and the resources.

  • 10. Back, J.
    et al.
    Vidal, L. T.
    Waern, A.
    Paget, S.
    Pysander, Eva-Lotta Sallnäs
    KTH.
    Playing close to home: Interaction and emerging play in outdoor play installations2018In: CHI '18 Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Outdoor play is becoming an increasingly marginalised activity in the urban landscape. Even in HCI, research on interactive solutions for outdoor play has largely been limited to special areas and in particular playgrounds. But children play everywhere, and especially play close to home is central in children's play activities. In this article we draw upon knowledge about designing for children's play in interaction design as well as in landscape architecture, to study how interactive play installations can be integrated in outdoor environments of a residential area. We present a field study in which digitally enhanced play installations were installed, in dialogue with the landscape, in between the buildings of a residential area. We focus on how emerging play activities made use of the installations as well as of the surrounding landscape in expected as well as unexpected ways. Based on the observations, we discuss how residential play is special, and how this affects how to design for it.

  • 11. Bajones, Markus
    et al.
    Fischinger, David
    Weiss, Astrid
    Wolf, Daniel
    Vincze, Markus
    Puente, Paloma de la
    Körtner, Tobias
    Weninger, Markus
    Papoutsakis, Konstantinos
    Michel, Damien
    Qammaz, Ammar
    Panteleris, Paschalis
    Foukarakis, Michalis
    Adami, Ilia
    Ioannidi, Danai
    Leonidis, Asterios
    Antona, Margherita
    Argyros, Antonis
    Mayer, Peter
    Panek, Paul
    Eftring, Håkan
    Frennert, Susanne
    Hobbit: Providing Fall Detection and Prevention for the Elderly in the Real World2018In: Journal of Robotics, Vol. 2018, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Balamurugan, Kanagasabai
    et al.
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Natarajan Arul, Murugan
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Theoretical Chemistry (closed 20110512). KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Ågren, Hans
    KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Theoretical Chemistry and Biology.
    Multistep Modeling Strategy To Improve the Binding Affinity Prediction of PET Tracers to A beta(42): Case Study with Styrylbenzoxazole Derivatives2016In: ACS CHEMICAL NEUROSCIENCE, ISSN 1948-7193, Vol. 7, no 12, p. 1698-1705Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Positron emission tomography (PET) tracers play an important role in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, a condition that leads to progressive dementia and memory loss. A high binding affinity and specificity of the PET tracers to amyloid oligomers and fibrils are crucial for their successful application as diagnostic agents. In this sense, it is essential to design PET tracers with enhanced binding affinities, which can lead to more precise and earlier detection of Alzheimer's disease conditions. The application of in silico methodology for the design and development of efficient PET tracers may serve as an important route to improved Alzheimer's disease diagnosis. In this work, the performance of widely used computational methods is explored for predicting experimental binding affinities of styrylbenzoxazole (SB) derivatives against a common amyloid protofibril. By performing docking, molecular dynamics, and quantum chemistry calculations in sequence their combined predictive performance is explored. The present work emphasizes the merits as well as limitations of these simulation strategies in the realm of designing PET tracers for Alzheimer's disease diagnosis.

  • 13. Barahona, Adrián
    et al.
    Pauletto, Sandra
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Perceptual Evaluation of Modal Synthesis for Impact-Based Sounds2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    BIRGERSSON, KRISTOFFER
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    GRANATH, PHILIP
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Industrial Economics and Management (Dept.).
    Improving Software-as-a-Service Sales by Managing the Knowledge of Change Agents: A Case Study of an IT-company in a Servitization Transition2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Servitization describes the trend amongst companies of supplementing tangible product offerings with services. A case in point is the cloud computing which represents a paradigm shift of servitization in the IT industry as it allows physical products to be delivered entirely remotely as a service. Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) constitutes a delivery business model of cloud computing which allows customers to access a supplier's application through a cloud infrastructure and is seen as a disruptive innovation. Despite the growing market for cloud computing services, the concept is claimed not to be very understood by many businesses. When transitioning from product-oriented to service-oriented value propositions, successful companies have for instance put efforts on the education of their sales personnel. Such employees could be seen as change agents whose goal is to influence the adoption decision making processes of the organization’s clients. Furthermore, as economies have become more knowledge-intensive, Knowledge management has become more critical. Previous research has put little attention to how Knowledge management relates to the diffusion rate of innovations. This study, therefore, explores how management of change agents' knowledge can facilitate the mediation of innovations. A case study was conducted of an IT company experiencing a servitization transition towards SaaS offerings to achieve the purpose of this study. The study is delimited to the diffusion of SaaS as an innovation within the financial industry in Sweden. 12 employees within the Case Company and six clients were interviewed regarding the subjects previously mentioned. The results suggest that the mediation of SaaS is done through personal communication, presentations, and distribution of sales material. The study has found that change agents need to be clear in their mediation efforts of SaaS solutions as the understanding of what SaaS includes sometimes differs between clients and suppliers. Furthermore, customers considered SaaS solutions for systems that they view as not being directly value-adding and for those systems they prefer standardization as it allows cost-efficiency. SaaS allows multi-tenant environments and is therefore suitable for standardized offerings, as standardization corresponds well to the business logic appropriate for a codification Knowledge Management strategy. The Case Company already conducts a codification strategy. However, the finding of this study suggests that they should strengthen it since a focused KM strategy is preferable to attain more of its benefits and to increase the organizational knowledge creation capabilities. Conducting a codification strategy is something they have good capabilities of pursuing and is suggested to facilitate the change agents' mediation of innovations. Sales material at the Case Company is identified as dependent on personal performance and standardizing the material would thereby ensure an even quality. Making a variety of standardized material easily accessible would further allow the change agents to select material with appropriate messages aimed at specific types of customers, which is important since the customers are found to have different preferences

  • 15.
    Bogdan, Cristian
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Human - Computer Interaction, MDI (closed 20111231).
    Göller, M.
    Towards a framework for design and evaluation of mixed initiative systems: Considering movement as a modality2009In: IHRCMICA-2009 Improving Human-Robot Communication with Mixed-Initiative and Context-Awareness: Proceedings of the Workshop on Improving Human-Robot Communication with Mixed-Initiative and Context-Awareness co-located with Ro-Man 2009, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a framework for design and evaluation of mixed initiative robotic systems, focusing mostly on the robot initiative in the case of a robotic shopping trolley. Throughout, we consider the implications of the movement modality in the robot initiative and the communication that follows it. We illustrate our considerations with our experience in designing and evaluating mixed-initiative human-robot communication with a mock-up robot and subsequently an actual robot platform.

  • 16.
    Bogdan, Cristian M
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Declarative interaction towards evolutionary user interface prototyping2018In: 16th IFIP TC13 International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, INTERACT 2017, Springer, 2018, Vol. 10774, p. 83-90Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the potential of describing interactive systems in a declarative manner with concepts familiar to both developers and designers. Such declarative interaction descriptions will enable evolutionary prototyping processes. This new type of design and development processes that can emerge with declarative interaction is described along with benefits for human-centred system design. A few challenges are raised for future research in this area.

  • 17. Boman, Magnus
    Artificial Intelligence in Cities of the Future: Viable Cities Report 2019:12019Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Borg, Johan
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lantz, Ann
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Kognitiv tillgänglighet till elektronisk kommunikation: En sammanfattning av vetenskapligt utvärderade tillgänglighetsåtgärder2013Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Författarna har under perioden januari till augusti 2013 genomfört en systematisk kunskapsöversikt av vetenskapligt utvärderade och rapporterade empiriska studier av tillgänglighet till elektronisk kommunikation för personer med kognitiva funktionshinder. Resultaten av denna studie presenteras på ett förenklat sätt i denna rapport.

  • 19.
    Bout, Martijn
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Integrated Transport Research Lab, ITRL.
    A Head-Mounted Display to Support Remote Operators of Shared Automated Vehicles2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Automated driving systems will be severely challenged under the unpredictable conditions of mixed traffic. Consequently, some form of human support remains essential in the foreseeable future. This challenge is particularly true for Shared Automated Vehicles, as these vehicles will likely not include any human driver onboard. When a Shared Automated Vehicle encounters a situation it cannot handle, a remote human operator will be needed to intervene. The remote operator can help the passengers to continue their journey by resuming vehicle operations. This thesis has investigated whether using a Head-MountedDisplay in comparison to a computer display improves Situation Knowledge for remote operators of Shared Automated Vehicles. This research adopted a user-centered design approach to develop a Head-Mounted Display and computer display prototype. In one of the first studies on a Shared Automated Vehicle remote control interface, this thesis considered implicit measurements of Situation Knowledge and did not focus on performance indicators. In a userstudy, twelve participants were given the task to determine the reason why theShared Automated Vehicle had stopped based on pre-recorded driving scenarios.Strong qualitative evidence indicates that a Head-Mounted Display canprovide remote operators with improved Situation Knowledge in comparisonto computer displays. To deepen the understanding of the performance andSituation Knowledge for remote operators of Shared Automated Vehicles undervarious conditions further research is necessary. Future studies can extendknowledge by assessing different scenarios and tasks in a live remote controlsituation, and develop and evaluate additional interface elements.

  • 20.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.
    Real-time visualization of musical expression2004In: Proceedings of Network of Excellence HUMAINE Workshop "From Signals to Signs of Emotion and Vice Versa", Santorini, Greece, Institute of Communication and Computer Systems, National Technical University of Athens, 2004, p. 19-23Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A system for real-time feedback of expressive music performance is presented.The feedback is provided by using a graphical interface where acoustic cues arepresented in an intuitive fashion. The graphical interface presents on the computerscreen a three-dimensional object with continuously changing shape, size,position, and colour. Some of the acoustic cues were associated with the shape ofthe object, others with its position. For instance, articulation was associated withshape, staccato corresponded to an angular shape and legato to a rounded shape.The emotional expression resulting from the combination of cues was mapped interms of the colour of the object (e.g., sadness/blue). To determine which colourswere most suitable for respective emotion, a test was run. Subjects rated how welleach of 8 colours corresponds to each of 12 music performances expressingdifferent emotions.

  • 21.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH.
    What is the color of that music performance?2005In: Proceedings of the International Computer Music Conference - ICMC 2005, Barcelona, 2005, p. 367-370Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The representation of expressivity in music is still a fairlyunexplored field. Alternative ways of representing musicalinformation are necessary when providing feedback onemotion expression in music such as in real-time tools formusic education, or in the display of large music databases.One possible solution could be a graphical non-verbal representationof expressivity in music performance using coloras index of emotion. To determine which colors aremost suitable for an emotional expression, a test was run.Subjects rated how well each of 8 colors and their 3 nuancescorresponds to each of 12 music performances expressingdifferent emotions. Performances were playedby professional musicians with 3 instruments, saxophone,guitar, and piano. Results show that subjects associateddifferent hues to different emotions. Also, dark colorswere associated to music in minor tonality and light colorsto music in major tonality. Correspondence betweenspectrum energy and color hue are preliminary discussed.

  • 22.
    Bresin, Roberto
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Elblaus, Ludvig
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Frid, Emma
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Favero, Federico
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE).
    Annersten, Lars
    Musikverket.
    Berner, David
    Musikverket.
    Morreale, Fabio
    Queen Mary University of London.
    SOUND FOREST/LJUDSKOGEN: A LARGE-SCALE STRING-BASED INTERACTIVE MUSICAL INSTRUMENT2016In: Sound and Music Computing 2016, SMC Sound&Music Computing NETWORK , 2016, p. 79-84Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     In this paper we present a string-based, interactive, largescale installation for a new museum dedicated to performing arts, Scenkonstmuseet, which will be inaugurated in 2017 in Stockholm, Sweden. The installation will occupy an entire room that measures 10x5 meters. We aim to create a digital musical instrument (DMI) that facilitates intuitive musical interaction, thereby enabling visitors to quickly start creating music either alone or together. The interface should be able to serve as a pedagogical tool; visitors should be able to learn about concepts related to music and music making by interacting with the DMI. Since the lifespan of the installation will be approximately five years, one main concern is to create an experience that will encourage visitors to return to the museum for continued instrument exploration. In other words, the DMI should be designed to facilitate long-term engagement. Finally, an important aspect in the design of the installation is that the DMI should be accessible and provide a rich experience for all museum visitors, regardless of age or abilities.

  • 23.
    Burger, Birgitta
    et al.
    University of Cologne, Dept. of Systematic Musicology, Germany.
    Bresin, Roberto
    KTH, Superseded Departments, Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Displaying expression in musical performance by means of a mobile robot2007In: Affective Computing And Intelligent Interaction, Proceedings, 2007, Vol. 4738, p. 753-754Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Böckle, Marc-Philipp
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Integrated Transport Research Lab, ITRL.
    Pernestål Brenden, Anna
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Integrated Transport Research Lab, ITRL.
    Klingegård, Maria
    RISE Viktoria.
    Habibovic, Azra
    RISE Viktoria.
    Bout, Martijn
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Centres, Integrated Transport Research Lab, ITRL.
    SAV2P – Exploring the Impact of an Interface for Shared Automated Vehicles on Pedestrians’ Experience2017In: AutomotiveUI 2017 - 9th International ACM Conference on Automotive User Interfaces and Interactive Vehicular Applications, Adjunct Proceedings, New York, USA: ACM Digital Library, 2017, p. 136-140Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To study future communication needs between pedestrians and shared automated vehicles (SAVs), an interface that communicates the intentions of SAVs to pedestrians was designed and implemented in a virtual reality (VR) environment. This enabled the exploration of behaviors and experiences of 34 pedestrians when encountering SAVs, both with and without the interface, in several street crossing situations. All pedestrians assessed the level of perceived safety and comfort directly after each encounter with the SAV. The results show that the pedestrians’ level of perceived safety and comfort is higher in encounters with the interface than in encounters without the interface. This may have a positive influence on the acceptance of SAVs, and implies that future SAVs may gain from this, or similar interface.

  • 25.
    Cano-Viktorsson, Carlos
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
    From Maps to Apps: Tracing the Organizational Responsiveness of an Early Multi-Modal Travel Planning Service2015In: The Journal of urban technology, ISSN 1063-0732, E-ISSN 1466-1853, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 87-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An Internet-based system for informing on multimodal travel planning (several modes of transportation) was introduced in Stockholm, Sweden in October 2000 in the form of a web page called trafiken.nu. The web page has a historical value of being one of the first attempts in Europe, and possibly the world, at providing an ICT-based travel planning service geared towards facilitating sustainable travel to the general public. The aim of this article is to investigate the historical development of trafiken.nu in order to draw lessons on how to better provide for a public information service with a potential for facilitating sustainable travel planning. Findings from the study of trafiken.nu suggest that the organizations behind the service have been slow in adapting to shifting media technology practices on how to provide for information which has affected the uptake of the service. Lessons from the case study provide a basis for arguing that organizations attempting to implement public information services would benefit from finding a means of harnessing collective intelligence in order to provide for a more customizable and responsive service to the general public.

  • 26. Cerinšek, G.
    et al.
    Oliveira, M.
    Duin, H.
    Hauge, Jannicke
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM). BIBA-Bremer Institut für Produktion und Logistik GmbH, Germany.
    Margoudi, M.
    Perini, S.
    Taisch, M.
    Recommendations to leverage game-based learning to attract young talent to manufacturing education2017In: 3rd International Joint Conference on Serious Games, JCSG 2017, Springer, 2017, Vol. 10622, p. 187-202Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the problem of under-representation of young people in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) education in general, and manufacturing education in particular, as European and global phenomenon. The main objective is to analyse characteristics and different limitations of so called conventional initiatives to attract young talents to STEM and manufacturing and to furthermore propose how ICT and game-based learning approaches can address respective challenges. The paper presents an online serious game EcoFactory aimed at raising the awareness of sustainable manufacturing targeting young children in late primary and middle school. It furthermore provides lessons learnt from the evaluation of the EcoFactory and proposes recommendations for designing game-based initiatives in order to attract young talent to STEM and manufacturing education. They are aligned to the requirements of four target groups, i.e. game designers, STEM initiative designers, decision makers and teachers. In summary, game design should be based on pedagogical scenarios and co-creation processes; should focus on particular STEM subjects without causing major changes to school curricula and content; and should create and/or involve wider community with feedback and experience sharing mechanisms.

  • 27.
    de Greef, Tjerk
    et al.
    TU Delft.
    Gullström, Charlie
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Architecture.
    Handberg, Leif
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Nefs, H.T.
    TU Delft.
    Parnes, Peter
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    Shared mediated workspaces2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Shared mediated spaces provide viable alternatives for meetings and interactions. The development of collaborative mediated workspaces and shared negotiation spaces will have a fundamental impact on all human practices. Previous design-led research, has identified spatial design concepts, such as mediated gaze, and spatial montage, which, if unaddressed, may be said to impose friction, and thus impact negatively on the experience of mediated presence. The current paper discusses a set of conceptual tools for presence design, in relation to a prototype that is currently being developed by an interdisciplinary academic work group: The Mediated Sketching Table. The prototype combines analogue and digital interaction tools and technologies including HTML5 and WebRTC. Here, we present our initial observations when using the prototype and discuss possible ways to overcome design friction in the prototype. We acknowledge that mediated presence cannot be ensured by design or technology alone. However, by monitoring various design features, presence designers can seek to reduce the friction that otherwise inhibits mediated presence, mutual trust, knowledge-sharing, and teamwork efficiency.

  • 28.
    de Haan, Sophie
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Application Design for the Quantified Pet Domain from a User Centered Design Perspective2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Quantifying personal information is a rapidly emerging lifestyle that has now extended to tracking non-personal information as well. The Quantified Pet (QP) domain enablespet owners to gain insights in their pet’s behavior and wellbeing. This study investigates how to design a QP application using the User Centered Design Method. To gain understanding in the inner drivers that form the human-pet relationship, five dog owners are interviewed. Three inner drivers that trigger interaction are revealed: habits, love and guilt. By surveying 104 users of existing QP applications, this study examined what motivates users to use a pet activity tracker and what sustains this usage. After performing a thematic analysis on this data, it was found that Activities,interest in activity data, and Health, improving and ensuringthe dog’s health, are dominantly portraited in the results. These themes provide the foundation for the establishment of two personas, of which the Health persona is chosen to be the primary design target. Next to user requirements following from the persona design, a heuristic evaluation is performed on one QP application (FitBark) to provide an additional set of design requirements. From these requirements, a design solution is proposed and evaluated amongst ten participants by means of a task list, semi- structured interview and a questionnaire. This revealed high usability for navigation and successful implementation of most requirements. However, design flaws, in specific of data visualization, and some misunderstanding of informational components remain. Future work proposes an improved design and provides additional suggestions for implementation and examination.

  • 29.
    Dermentzis, Georgios
    et al.
    University of Innsbruck.
    Gustafsson, Marcus
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Fluid and Climate Technology. Högskolan Dalarna.
    Ochs, Fabian
    University of Innsbruck.
    Holmberg, Sture
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Fluid and Climate Technology.
    Feist, Wolfgang
    Passivhaus Institut.
    Calabrese, Toni
    University of Innsbruck.
    Oberrauch, Philipp
    University of Innsbruck.
    Evaluation of a versatile energy auditing tool2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Energy auditing can be an important contribution for identification and assessment of energy conservation measures (ECMs) in buildings. Numerous tools and software have been developed, with varying degree of precision and complexity and different areas of use.

     

    This paper evaluates PHPP as a versatile, easy-to-use energy auditing tool and gives examples of how it has been compared to a dynamic simulation tool, within the EU-project iNSPiRe. PHPP is a monthly balance energy calculation tool based on EN13790. It is intended for assisting the design of Passive Houses and energy renovation projects and as guidance in the choice of appropriate ECMs.

     

    PHPP was compared against the transient simulation software TRNSYS for a single family house and a multi-family house. It should be mentioned that dynamic building simulations might strongly depend on the model assumptions and simplifications compared to reality, such as ideal heating or real heat emission system. Setting common boundary conditions for both PHPP and TRNSYS, the ideal heating and cooling loads and demands were compared on monthly and annual basis for seven European locations and buildings with different floor area, S/V ratio, U-values and glazed area of the external walls.

     

    The results show that PHPP can be used to assess the heating demand of single-zone buildings and the reduction of heating demand with ECMs with good precision. The estimation of cooling demand is also acceptable if an appropriate shading factor is applied in PHPP. In general, PHPP intentionally overestimates heating and cooling loads, to be on the safe side for system sizing. Overall, the agreement with TRNSYS is better in cases with higher quality of the envelope as in cold climates and for good energy standards. As an energy auditing tool intended for pre-design it is a good, versatile and easy-to-use alternative to more complex simulation tools.

  • 30. Edmonds, E A
    et al.
    Candy, Linda
    Fell, Mark
    Knott, Roger
    Pauletto, Sandra
    Weakley, Alastair
    Developing interactive art using visual programming2003In: Proceedings of Human-Computer Interaction, p. 1183-1187Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31. Eftring, H.
    et al.
    Frennert, Susanne
    Designing a social and assistive robot for seniors2016In: Zeitschrift fÌr Gerontologie und Geriatrie, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 274-281Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32. Eilers, S.
    et al.
    Mårtensson, Jonas
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Applied Physics, Biomedical and X-ray Physics.
    Pettersson, H.
    Pillado, M.
    Gallegos, D.
    Tobar, M.
    Johansson, Karl Henrik
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control.
    Ma, Xiaoliang
    KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Transport Science, Transport Planning, Economics and Engineering.
    Friedrichs, T.
    Borojeni, S. S.
    Adolfson, M.
    COMPANION-Towards Co-operative Platoon Management of Heavy-Duty Vehicles2015In: IEEE Conference on Intelligent Transportation Systems, Proceedings, ITSC, IEEE , 2015, p. 1267-1273Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the EU project COMPANION is to develop co-operative mobility technologies for supervised vehicle platooning, in order to improve fuel efficiency and safety for goods transport. The potential social and environmental benefits inducted by heavy-duty vehicle platoons have been largely proven. However, until now, the creation, coordination, and operation of such platoons have been mostly neglected. In addition, the regulation and standardization of coordinated platooning, together with its acceptance by the end-users and the society need further attention and research. In this paper we give an overview over the project and present the architecture of the off-board and onboard platforms of the COMPANION cooperative platoon management system. Furthermore, the consortium reports on the first results of the human factors for platooning, legislative analysis of platooning aspects, clustering and optimization of platooning plans and prediction of congestion due to planned special events. Finally, we present the method of validation of the system via simulation and trials.

  • 33.
    Eklund, Frida
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), Centres, Visualisation - Interaction - Collaboration, VIC.
    Make people move: Utilizing smartphone motion sensors to capture physical activity within audiences during lectures2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    It takes only about 10-30 minutes into a sedentary lecture before audience attention is decreasing. There are different ways to avoid this. One is to use a web-based audience response systems (ARS), where the audience interact with the lecturer through their smartphones, and another is to take short breaks, including physical movements, to re-energize both the body and the brain.

    In this study, these two methods have been combined and explored. By utilizing the motion sensors that are integrated in almost every smartphone, a physical activity for a lecture audience was created and implemented in the ARS platform Mentimeter. The proof of concept was evaluated in two lectures, based on O’Brien and Toms' model of engagement. The aim was to explore the prerequisites, both in terms of design and implementation, for creating an engaging physical activity within a lecture audience, using smartphone motion sensors to capture movements and a web-based ARS to present the data.

    The results showed that the proof of concept was perceived as fun and engaging, where important factors for creating engagement were found to be competition and a balanced level of task difficulty. The study showed that feedback is complicated when it comes to motion gesture interactions, and that there are limitations as to what can be done with smartphone motion sensors using web technologies. There is great potential for further research in how to design an energizing lecture activity using smartphones, as well as in exploring the area of feedback in motion gesture interaction.

  • 34.
    Eklund, Rikard
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Ergonomics.
    Presentation av taktisk information på bildskärm: Head-Up Display som stöd för tidsstyrd taxning med flygplan2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 35.
    Ekne, Samuel
    KTH, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS).
    Teaching climate change: Creating and testing an interactive visualization of carbon emissions in order to increase awareness2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A gap of knowledge exists between the latest climate change research and the general public. The goal of this thesis is to bridge that gap by making the information more accessible and easier to understand. A proof-of-concept model is created with the goal to visualize carbon emission data, namely size relations between countries, source of emissions per country and the current state of carbon emissions compared to a stated goal (the Paris Agreement), and give the user options to reach said goal by manipulating percentages of renewable energy, electric vehicles, and industry, on a global or local scale.User studies are then performed with members of the target group (students age 13-15) to test whether these visualizations are intuitive and accurately communicates the visualized data. The studies are effective and the goal of the visualization is reached.

  • 36.
    Elevant, Katarina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    COLLABORATIVE OBSERVATIONS OF WEATHER A Weather Information Sharers' Community of Practice2010In: WEBIST 2010: PROCEEDINGS OF THE 6TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON WEB INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGY, VOL 2 / [ed] Filipe, J Cordeiro, J, INSTICC-INST SYST TECHNOLOGIES INFORMATION CONTROL & COMMUNICATION , 2010, p. 392-399Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Beside occasional disastrous impacts of weather, weather also affects daily life. Societal and environmental challenges of the future include both providing customized weather information in-time due to users' needs, and detecting climate change and its impacts on land and ecosystems. The accuracy of weather and climatic information is, however, limited by spatial and temporal borders that need to be overriden. Also, weather information services cannot be fully customized, a problem arising from the spatial inaccuracy of weather forecasts and observations. Here, the role of social media, collective and civic intelligence and crowd sourcing should be investigated. This paper envisions a community of weather-interested users that provide usable observations of weather and environmental change, and presents a web-based interface for this community as a new method to collect weather and climatic information. User-generated weather observations can be processed based on principles of collective intelligence and co-creation, in order to improve, customize and personalize weather information.

  • 37.
    Elevant, Katarina
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    "Share weather": Design and evaluation of a new concept for sharing weather information2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Already centuries ago, humans had observed the weather in their everyday lives, seeking ways to understand, comprehend, and predict it. Until the present day, weather has had tremendous impacts on our lives and with climate change human civilizations as well. With new media technologies weather constitutes a part of the information services used by many residents of modern cities, people and businesses worldwide.

    The rise of Web 2.0, a cyberspace where individuals may connect and interact under new premises, bridging the size of weather systems, creates new opportunities to share, and potentially improve, weather information. This thesis develops a concept “share weather”, based on individuals who share local weather information using interactive media technologies. The concept is empirically tested in eight papers, and, finally, evaluated in the summary of the compilation thesis. Since it explores a new research field, the thesis develops a framework for studying “share weather” based on several theories on motivation and participation in networks. Key issues are associated with accuracy of user-generated observations of weather, methods and design used to employ them, and estimating the potential levels of user contributions. The focus of this thesis lies on motivation theory and design of a “share weather” artifact.

    Drawing on prior research on online networks, a model for studying “share weather” is constructed by merging several theories, with the aim of studying the problem from both the individual perspective, and the relationships and structures created by ties and interactions. In addition, the thesis attempts to thoroughly investigate the context of “share weather”, in order to contribute new knowledge to research on online networks, whereas a sustainability perspective is added and associated with the information domain. In order to test the feasibility of the “share weather” concept, several empirical studies based on a mixture of qualitative and quantitative analysis and design research science methodology were conducted during 2008-2011. The studies included six surveys and 17 interviews, involving four different user groups: over 440 traffic-interested individuals who received a weather service, 60 schoolchildren, 20 patients at a dental clinic, and 50 students. A separate study on African farmers was also analyzed.

    The findings of this thesis confirmed that, in online networks, individuals are often driven by intrinsic rewards, but this thesis highlights the strong effects of interactions and reciprocity of receiving useful information (weather forecasts) as rewards. In order to capture the range of drives of different instrumentality that might occur, in particular in networks for knowledge creation, a holistic approach can be recommended, where a larger scale of instrumentality is applied when studying online networks for knowledge creation.

    Other results, acquired by studying accuracy of user-generated observations, pointed at the powerful abilities possessed by all humans when they perceive weather through their senses. Sharing weather information can be realized using simple methods based on the human eye and perception. Collection methods, based on pictures and predefined text messages inspired by methods used previously in history, can easily be integrated with different interactive media technologies: web, mobile technology, and SMS.

    Based on the empirical results and design research methodology, the thesis concludes that “share weather” can contribute to improved weather information. Moreover, it is also suggested that “share weather” might serve some additional goals. The environmental challenges of the future imply that weather will become even more important and that active participation and information sharing is requested at all levels. Based on learning and social processes that can be activated in online networks, “share weather” might potentially contribute to increased public participation in environmental issues.

  • 38.
    Engquist, Malin
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Learning.
    Kommunikation i storskaliga internetbaserade kurser: En kvalitativ studie om karaktären av den sociala interaktionen i diskussionsforum i xMOOCar2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) were introduced in 2008 by George Siemens and Stephen Downes and their popularity has increased ever since. Advocates of MOOCs claim that they have the potential to enable lifelong learning for people all over the world. Since the first MOOC, two kinds of MOOCs have developed, cMOOCs that developed from the theory of learning, connectivism, and xMOOCs, which are relatively similar to usual online courses, with the difference that the number of participants is more or less unlimited. In 2016, the MOOC initiative from the Royal Institute of Technology (KTHx) joined edX, a teaching platform for xMOOCs. Opportunity for social interaction with other course participants and teachers is offered on edX in the form of asynchronous discussion forums. Research on the characterof the social interaction in the discussion forums and its potential for promoting learning in xMOOCs is currently limited. The purpose of this master thesis is to investigate the nature of social interaction in two different xMOOCs, one self-paced and one instructor-paced. An increased understanding of the current social interaction that is taking place in the discussion forums can be helpful to teachers in the design of teaching in xMOOCs. In this master thesis two discussion forums from courses of the respective categories of xMOOCs have been studied. Both a conventional content analysis and a directed contentanalysis based on the learning theory Community of Inquiry (CoI) have been conducted to highlight different aspects of the nature of the social interaction and how one may promote learning in the discussion forums. The result of the analysis shows that the social interaction in the discussion forums is impersonal and that the participants initiate the interaction by asking questions that are mainly answered by the teachers, by either instructing or informing. No community is formed and the discussion forums show lower levels of cognitive presence. In order to promote learning, discussion forums may be used to engage the active participants in discussions and it might be benificial if the teachers focused on establishing a safe environment for interaction, as opposed to focusing on instruction and informing.

  • 39.
    Eriksson, Magnus G.
    KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.
    Haptic Milling Simulation in Six Degrees-of-Freedom: With Application to Surgery in Stiff Tissue2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The research presented in this thesis describes a substantial part of the design of a prototypical surgical training simulator. The results are intended to be applied in future simulators used to educate and train surgeons for bone milling operations. In earlier work we have developed a haptic bone milling surgery simulator prototype based on three degrees-of-freedom force feedback. The contributions presented here constitute an extension to that work by further developing the haptic algorithms to enable six degrees-of-freedom (6-DOF) haptic feedback. Such feedback is crucial for a realistic haptic experience when interacting in a more complex virtual environment, particularly in milling applications.The main contributions of this thesis are:The developed 6-DOF haptic algorithm is based on the work done by Barbic and James, but differs in that the algorithm is modified and optimized for milling applications. The new algorithm handles the challenging problem of real-time rendering of volume data changes due to material removal, while fulfilling the requirements on stability and smoothness of the kind of haptic applications that we approach. The material removal algorithm and the graphic rendering presented here are based on the earlier research. The new 6-DOF haptic milling algorithm is characterized by voxel-based collision detection, penalty-based and constraint-based haptic feedback, and by using a virtual coupling for stable interaction.Milling a hole in an object in the virtual environment or dragging the virtual tool along the surface of a virtual object shall generate realistic contact force and torque in the correct directions. These are important requirements for a bone milling simulator to be used as a future training tool in the curriculum of surgeons. The goal of this thesis is to present and state the quality of a newly developed 6-DOF haptic milling algorithm. The quality of the algorithm is confirmed through a verification test and a face validity study performed in collaboration with the Division of Orthopedics at the Karolinska University Hospital. In a simulator prototype, the haptic algorithm is implemented together with a new 6-DOF haptic device based on parallel kinematics. This device is developed with workspace, transparency and stiffness characteristics specifically adapted to the particular procedure. This thesis is focuses on the 6-DOF haptic algorithm.

  • 40. Eriksson, Magnus G.
    Three 6-DOF Haptic Algorithms Compared for Use in a Milling Surgery Simulator Prototype2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Three different six degrees of freedom haptic algorithms are presented in this paper. Two of them are developed by the author, and the third is a modified Barbic’ algorithm. Algorithm #1 is a constraint-based proxy-method, Algorithm #2 is a penalty-based method, and Algorithm #3 uses a virtual coupling. They are implemented and compared in a haptic milling surgery simulator. We produce new angles of perspective when having three different solutions to the same problem. All of the algorithms fulfill the real-time requirements and give realistic force- and torque feedback. The choice of algorithm is a question about stability and the requirement of the virtual environment to realistically mimic real world scenarios. The work presented here is an extension to earlier research dealing with three degrees of freedom haptic feedback for milling applications.

  • 41.
    Eriksson, Magnus G.
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Flemmer, Henrik
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Wikander, Jan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    A Haptic and Virtual Reality Skull Bone Surgery Simulator2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The work presented in this paper gives an introduction to the development of a simulator system based on a virtual reality representation of the human skull, from which both haptic and visual feedback is generated to simulate and animate the milling process in skull bone surgery. The system will be used to educate and train surgeons to do complicated skull bone operations, such as removal of cancer tumors. The skull bone data is taken from a CT-scan and visualized using a modified Marching cubes algorithm. Different haptic rendering algorithms of the bone milling process are discussed for implementation. An energy-based approach is used for modeling of material removed during the milling process. The topic is still young and unexplored; hence this paper discusses the different parts a bone milling VRsystem consists of and gives an insight into problems occurring in a VR bone milling process and presents solutions for some of these problems.

  • 42.
    Eriksson, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Khan, Suleman
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Wikander, Jan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Face Validity Tests of a Haptic Bone Milling Surgery Simulator Prototype2012In: Journal of Medical Devices, ISSN 1932-619XArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Eriksson, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Wikander, Jan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    A 6 degrees-of-freedom haptic milling simulator for surgical training of vertebral operations2012In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, ISSN 0926-9630, E-ISSN 1879-8365, Vol. 173, p. 126-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the research presented here, the aim has been to develop a haptic milling simulator for surgical training of vertebral operations. One central goal has been to create a simulator that gives the user a realistic impression of contacts with, and milling of, a virtually represented bone tissue model. A new 6 degrees-of-freedom haptic algorithm for milling is implemented together with new 6 degrees-of-freedom haptic device.

  • 44.
    Eriksson, Magnus
    et al.
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    Wikander, Jan
    KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Mechatronics.
    A Face Validated Six Degrees-of-Freedom Haptic Bone Milling AlgorithmIn: IEEE Transactions on Haptics, ISSN 1939-1412, E-ISSN 2329-4051Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Lundström, Anders
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Intention-Centred Design Education: Beyond Methods and Techniques2014In: Proceedings of DRS 2014: Design's Big Debates / [ed] Lim, Y.-K., Niedderer, K., Redström, J., Stolterman, E., & Valtonen, A., Umeå Institute of Design , 2014, p. 1157-1167Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design work can be driven from a variety of intentions, e.g. to serve users, to generate profit, to explore a new concept, or to trigger reflection and debate. However, it is not always clear how such intentions can be addressed concretely in education, and in specific design domains, such as interaction design, they might easily get lost among course content related to specific methods and technologies. In this paper, we discuss how we have addressed design intentions in our advanced course in interaction design, and also what we see as its main qualities in relation to more conventional course structure in this area.

  • 46.
    Fernaeus, Ylva
    et al.
    KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.
    Vallgårda, Anna
    ITU Copenhagen.
    Ajna: negotiating forms in the making of a musical cabinet2014In: DIS '14 Proceedings of the 2014 conference on Designing interactive systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, p. 915-924Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ajna is a musical cabinet made from a rich composition of acoustic materials and designed to perform digitally composed music. In this paper, we aim to unpack the design as well as key aspects of the design process that lead up to this unique artwork. We base our analysis on interviews with its two creators as well as on observations of Ajna performing in different contexts. From the perspective of interaction design, we first analyse the process of its making through the negotiations between physical form, temporal from, and the interactive gestalts. Lastly, we place these negotiations in a larger picture of bricolage as a design approach. Based on this we then discuss the qualities of bricolage in interaction design.

  • 47. Frennert, Susanne
    Domestication of a telehealthcare system2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Frennert, Susanne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    Narrative Review: Technologies in Eldercare2018In: Journal of Science and TechnologyArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 49. Frennert, Susanne
    Older People and the Adoption of Innovations: A study of the expectations on the use of social assistive robots and telehealthcare systems2014Other (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Frennert, Susanne
    KTH, School of Engineering Sciences in Chemistry, Biotechnology and Health (CBH), Biomedical Engineering and Health Systems, Technology in Health Care.
    Social companion robots in eldercare – who gains and who loses?2013In: Proceeding at ICSR2013 at the workshop on social companion robots, Bristol, UK, October 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
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